Date   

Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Michael Micallef at FITA
 

At that time there was also the Slimware Windows Bridge for windows and it wasn’t bad especially with windows 3.1

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 22 July 2022 16:13
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

CAUTION: This email originated from OUTSIDE the Government Email Infrastructure. DO NOT CLICK LINKS or OPEN attachments unless you recognise the sender and know the content is safe.

 

I think the first screen reader for windows was, outspoken, by Berkeley in 1988 or 1989. 


Re: tab in firefox

Bob Cavanaugh
 

Is this on a particular page or throughout Firefox? I've seen this on
certain pages, but not universally in Firefox.

On 7/22/22, Dark Count <darkcount1@...> wrote:
Hello.

Using NVDA 22.2 and 22.1 with Mozilla firefox 102 has lend to the tab
key not moving through links or form fields or if doing so very sluggishly.

List of elements still works as expected, though it does not help when
interacting with form fields swiftly.


I have restarted with add-ons disabled, but this persists.

If somebody else has the same issue and has found a solution, please share.


Thanks,


D C








Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Kim Vaughn
 

I like Eloquence. It is the easiest to understand with my hearing loss.   

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, July 22, 2022 9:53 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available.  It is popular because it does what the most people want it to do the best.  It is responsive, pronounces more words than other synthesizers I've tried correctly out of the box, allows for rapid listening while keeping speech more intelligible than other synthesizers I've tried and it is light on computer resources.

I used DeccTalk before there was an Eloquence and, though it has a more pleasant voice, it is not as easy to listen to speech rapidly and miss as few words as with Eloquence.

Some people may say that other less human and more mechanical sounding synthesizers allow faster listening.  I can't say.  But if that is true, it is also evidently true, that one reason Eloquence is so popular is that it allows a good compromise between the sound of the voice and rapid speech intelligibility.  I suspect a lot of users don't want to use a mechanical sounding synthesizer to get faster reading speed.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 9:43 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:

I also find it interesting that the eloquence voice many people like that is also now on iPhone is now 27 or so years old already. and I think the only reason it became so popular is that Jaws started implementing it and encouraging its use back in early to mid 1996. Jaws 3.2 was the first Jaws for windows version to have eloquence. I got in on cd in the mail in July of 1996 and I thought it was amazing that you just needed a computer with a sound card and no external speech box plugged into the computer. So then eloquence took over, decTalk and Keynote gold software went away because I think eloquence was free with jaws while decTalk software and Keynote were paid products. And eloquence I guess sounded better than both of those. 

 


Re: NVDA 2022.2 and Vocalizer Driver Version 5

Rui Fontes
 

Hello!


NVDA 2022.2 is not a add-on breaking compatibility version...

If you mean Vocalizer-Expressive from Tiflotecnia, the last driver is version 3.1.7 and it is compatible with NVDA 2022.1 and beyond...


The direct link for download is:

https://www.tiflotecnia.net/ftp/vocalizer_expressive_driver-3.1.7.nvda-addon


Best regards,

Rui Fontes
Tiflotecnia, Lda.




Às 20:48 de 22/07/2022, Daniel Sommerfeld escreveu:

Hi all.


I was on vacation the last days and so i don't know, if there are new compatible drivers for the vocalizer drivers for NVDA 2022.2. Does anyone know more about that?


And one more question. Isn't there something like an automatic update feature for those things? I find it really hard to always keep track of these things.


Thanks for help.


Regards

Daniel





Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Shawn
 

Yeah, it sounds like a Brit trying too hard and failing miserably to speak with an American accent. And some of the other Espeak languages are simply awful. Hawaiian is a distorted mess, and I can't understand why. Very disappointing, was really looking forward to that one. There are 3 others just as distorted: Latgalian, Latvian, and Klingon. Oo I didn't know they had Klingon... But it sucks! It's this nasal distorted thing. OK, some of the variants aren't like that with them, but very few, and not ones I like. Cherokee sounds like someone talking with a tube stuck up their nose. I'm not impressed with Vietnamese either, none of the 3, but for other reasons, indistinct consonants, some consonants don't seem to sound like they should at all. I sort of tried to learn it in 2012. I don't speak Arabic, but I've picked up some words watching Youtube videos, I can't stand ESpeak's Arabic voice for reading song titles and Youtube videos, so I use Persian instead. The glottal stops and, I think it's the q, aren't handled well at all IMHO. Aramaic doesn't seem to be very good either, when I listen to the singer say the song title it sounds nothing like what comes out of ESpeak. I use the different ESpeak languages to help me figure out and remember how to pronounce artists and song titles for my Internet radio show in a slew of languages. Most of the voices are reasonable, for my purposes anyway, but some of the voices are just useless.

Shawn Klein

On 7/22/2022 10:13 AM, Devin Prater wrote:

The slightly funny thing is that even today, the American English version of ESpeak sounds a bit British still.
Devin Prater




On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 10:00 AM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I should add that my comments refer to the American English implementation.  I can't comment on Eloquence for other languages. 

I can say that I've heard the British  English implementation of Eloquence and it is significantly inferior to the American implementation.  It sounds as though it is someone trying to imitate a British accent and I suspect that it was developed by American English speakers, which accounts for its imitation quality.

Gene
On 7/22/2022 9:53 AM, Gene wrote:
That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available.  It is popular because it does what the most people want it to do the best.  It is responsive, pronounces more words than other synthesizers I've tried correctly out of the box, allows for rapid listening while keeping speech more intelligible than other synthesizers I've tried and it is light on computer resources.

I used DeccTalk before there was an Eloquence and, though it has a more pleasant voice, it is not as easy to listen to speech rapidly and miss as few words as with Eloquence.

Some people may say that other less human and more mechanical sounding synthesizers allow faster listening.  I can't say.  But if that is true, it is also evidently true, that one reason Eloquence is so popular is that it allows a good compromise between the sound of the voice and rapid speech intelligibility.  I suspect a lot of users don't want to use a mechanical sounding synthesizer to get faster reading speed.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 9:43 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I also find it interesting that the eloquence voice many people like that is also now on iPhone is now 27 or so years old already. and I think the only reason it became so popular is that Jaws started implementing it and encouraging its use back in early to mid 1996. Jaws 3.2 was the first Jaws for windows version to have eloquence. I got in on cd in the mail in July of 1996 and I thought it was amazing that you just needed a computer with a sound card and no external speech box plugged into the computer. So then eloquence took over, decTalk and Keynote gold software went away because I think eloquence was free with jaws while decTalk software and Keynote were paid products. And eloquence I guess sounded better than both of those. 



tab in firefox

Dark Count
 

Hello.

Using NVDA 22.2 and 22.1 with Mozilla firefox 102 has lend to the tab key not moving through links or form fields or if doing so very sluggishly.

List of elements still works as expected, though it does not help when interacting with form fields swiftly.


I have restarted with add-ons disabled, but this persists.

If somebody else has the same issue and has found a solution, please share.


Thanks,


D C


NVDA 2022.2 and Vocalizer Driver Version 5

Daniel Sommerfeld
 

Hi all.


I was on vacation the last days and so i don't know, if there are new compatible drivers for the vocalizer drivers for NVDA 2022.2. Does anyone know more about that?


And one more question. Isn't there something like an automatic update feature for those things? I find it really hard to always keep track of these things.


Thanks for help.


Regards

Daniel


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Shawn
 

Here's my theory on that. Every voice has a bit of a learning curve. If you're used to Eloquence, and then you lose access and have to switch to ESpeak, or Dectalk, or even one of the more natural voices, you'll probably not be able to listen to it as fast at first until you get used to it. I remember when I first started using the Software Automatic Mouth on the c64 on a very small color tv, I thought it was awful! But then I got used to it. It didn't take me as long to get used to Eloquence, but it did take a week or so. And for years I avoided Eloquence's Castillian Spanish voice like the plague, until suddenly I found that it didn't matter which one I used, I got comfortable with both of them equally. I've also had experience with Dectalk. I spent a month at a friend's house listening to his external synth, and eventually I got fast with it as well. That's been my experience. So if your average young person started with one of the concatinative voices, it probably won't matter that they might have had an easier time reading at high speed with Eloquence had they gone with it first, because they're not going to want to put in the time, even if it's just a few days, to get used to Eloquence and start using it as their go-to voice. To really test this, you'd need to convince a young person to try it for a few weeks, and then test their ability to listen at speed against their ability before you ran the test on their previously preferred concatinative voice.

Shawn Klein

On 7/22/2022 10:34 AM, Gene wrote:

I agree that products may have loyalty for long periods of time.  In this case, to test the difference in opinion, it might be useful to know how many younger people, who grew up with immediate and easy access to all sorts of voices, prefer Eloquence in general or for uses that don't involve listening to something like fiction with a synthetic voice. 

I still think that eloquence is better in ways that many people prefer but a study of generations might help settle the question.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 10:13 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 11:05 AM, Gene wrote:
but fifteen or more years is too long a time for the initial advantage to be maintained to the extent that the preference for Eloquence evidently exists.
-
We'll have to disagree regarding that.  There are many things that have retained strong market preference for well over a decade.

For heaven's sake, just look at Windows 7 for an example of that.  And there are still people who wax rhapsodic about Windows XP even though they dropped actually using it long ago.  

Nostalgia is a powerful thing, too.  But there is a significant demographic, regardless of specific product, that just never wants to move on after they've found "their favorite" or "what I know and am comfortable with."  Keeping up-to-date involves constant work, as you well know, and we're constantly seeing assertions about what NVDA and/or JAWS and/or Narrator "can't do" that they've been able to do for some time because the technique(s) used to do them have never been explored or learned.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill



Re: Please update Enhanced Phonetic Reading App

Janet Brandly
 

Thanks Joseph, I’ll wait until next week.

 

Janet

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: July 22, 2022 9:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Please update Enhanced Phonetic Reading App

 

Hi,

If you want, yes, or you can wait until Add-on Updater 22.08 (next week) which will provide an easier way to check for updates for add-ons coming from different repositories.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Please update Enhanced Phonetic Reading App

 

Hi,

If you want, yes, or you can wait until Add-on Updater 22.08 (next week) which will provide an easier way to check for updates for add-ons coming from different repositories.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Please update Enhanced Phonetic Reading App

Janet Brandly
 

Hi Joseph,

 

So can I update this app from the info Brian provided? I’m using Windows 10 with the latest version of NVDA with the MS Richard voice, if that helps.

 

Thanks,

 

Janet

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: July 20, 2022 7:00 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Please update Enhanced Phonetic Reading App

 

Hi,

The criticism and rebuke are warranted - I apologize for making things messier, especially to Janet for not showing professionalism in my answer earlier.

While the add-on was updated on Spanish community add-ons catalog (sometimes called nvda-addons.org), a few weeks ago I did ask community add-ons people to review the latest version of Enhanced Phonetic Reading compatible with NVDA 2022.1. I did update this request, noting that this feature is now part of NVDA, but the add-on author reminded me that there are internal differences between how the add-on does things and the method employed in NVDA. Whereas the add-on uses a timer to measure how long it should delay before announcing character descriptions, NVDA uses a synthesizer command to achieve this. The biggest concern from the add-on author (not me) is speech synthesizer add-on differences - not all speech synthesizers are compatible with recent NVDA releases, or if they are compatible, they do not implement a key piece that NVDA wants to use. As part of delayed character description work, SAPI4 synthesizer code was edited to support the key piece needed to support delayed character descriptions. As NVDA uses synthesizer (more towards speech) commands, one thing you will notice is that some speech synthesizers (notably Microsoft SAPI5) will have a slightly more delay when reading characters phonetically than other speech synthesizers (tested with eSpeak NG, SAPI5, Windows OneCore, Nuance Vocalizer, all of them supporting this feature).

If things went as planned, Enhanced Phonetic Reading compatible with NVDA 2022.1 would have been in your hands by now, but the request I posted about it are awaiting review and approval from community add-ons folks at the moment. The add-on author (again not I) and NVDA folks had a lengthy debate about implementation issues surrounding this feature. I concur with the add-on author on the point about speech synthesizer add-on updates and maintenance, and these add-ons are more sensitive to compatibility breaking changes as some deal with speech internals.

Again my apologies for making things difficult.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Improving accessibility of Spotify for desktop

Tyler Wood
 

Hi,
You'd actually be very surprised at the effort Spotify has been putting into accessibility recently. An email / community forum topic may actually get this sorted a lot easier than you think. As it happens, moving playlists can still be done with NVDA's drag and drop commands but it isn't really a perfectly viable option. With playlists that contain a lot of songs actually scrolling through them can be an incredible pain since focus seems to be dragged down to a random spot unless you've found a way around this I'm not aware of. This is still no excuse for their actions.
That being said, if we're going to mention accessibility or the lack thereof, it wasn't too long ago that discord was almost completely unusable. Deafen, mute, disconnect buttons were all unlabeled for years, most buttons and switches weren't readable and by and large it was a huge mess. A few *years* later, they finally started making improvements and I'm happy about that, but it took a lot of pressure and a lot of people mentioning them on twitter.
But I can reliably say without a doubt spotify is working on accessibility and fixing things, slowly but surely. I'd be more than happy to upvote anything you post in that regard and comment with anything that might help in the community.
thanks

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 9:50 AM Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@...> wrote:

Try contacting them and making that suggestion, I like that idea. I’m a discord user. Salesforce did something similar. You hit space to rearrange the item, move it to where you want it to be then hit space to drop it. It’s quite neat.  Any of those would work re Spotify IMHO.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sharni-Lee Ward
Sent: Friday, July 22, 2022 4:36 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Improving accessibility of Spotify for desktop

 

Discord solved the problem of moving servers and channels around in your list by using ctrl+D to pick up and Enter to put down. I would definitely like a similar feature in Spotify so I could actually make Playlist Folders to sort all my playlists for fanfiction ideas from playlists to listen to while writing and playlists of favourites within a certain genre.

 

I haven't the faintest idea of who to ask about this, but I would like to be able to adjust the order of songs in a playlist (I've messed up said order before to my chagrin), and also to move playlists into folders. Spotify is not exactly the most scrupulous company, so I suppose we'd have to make an addon for that...

On 21/07/2022 5:32 pm, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:

On the other hand much like Team viewer, and dropbox, maybe the authors of these programs and web interfaces need to get their ttesting the accessibility right before they go live with a new version. Ahem. Perhaps we need some kind of list of second line or accessibility support points of contact for an many of these often updated services as possible.
Brian


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gene
 

I agree that products may have loyalty for long periods of time.  In this case, to test the difference in opinion, it might be useful to know how many younger people, who grew up with immediate and easy access to all sorts of voices, prefer Eloquence in general or for uses that don't involve listening to something like fiction with a synthetic voice. 

I still think that eloquence is better in ways that many people prefer but a study of generations might help settle the question.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 10:13 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 11:05 AM, Gene wrote:
but fifteen or more years is too long a time for the initial advantage to be maintained to the extent that the preference for Eloquence evidently exists.
-
We'll have to disagree regarding that.  There are many things that have retained strong market preference for well over a decade.

For heaven's sake, just look at Windows 7 for an example of that.  And there are still people who wax rhapsodic about Windows XP even though they dropped actually using it long ago.  

Nostalgia is a powerful thing, too.  But there is a significant demographic, regardless of specific product, that just never wants to move on after they've found "their favorite" or "what I know and am comfortable with."  Keeping up-to-date involves constant work, as you well know, and we're constantly seeing assertions about what NVDA and/or JAWS and/or Narrator "can't do" that they've been able to do for some time because the technique(s) used to do them have never been explored or learned.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill



Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Devin Prater
 

The slightly funny thing is that even today, the American English version of ESpeak sounds a bit British still.
Devin Prater




On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 10:00 AM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I should add that my comments refer to the American English implementation.  I can't comment on Eloquence for other languages. 

I can say that I've heard the British  English implementation of Eloquence and it is significantly inferior to the American implementation.  It sounds as though it is someone trying to imitate a British accent and I suspect that it was developed by American English speakers, which accounts for its imitation quality.

Gene
On 7/22/2022 9:53 AM, Gene wrote:
That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available.  It is popular because it does what the most people want it to do the best.  It is responsive, pronounces more words than other synthesizers I've tried correctly out of the box, allows for rapid listening while keeping speech more intelligible than other synthesizers I've tried and it is light on computer resources.

I used DeccTalk before there was an Eloquence and, though it has a more pleasant voice, it is not as easy to listen to speech rapidly and miss as few words as with Eloquence.

Some people may say that other less human and more mechanical sounding synthesizers allow faster listening.  I can't say.  But if that is true, it is also evidently true, that one reason Eloquence is so popular is that it allows a good compromise between the sound of the voice and rapid speech intelligibility.  I suspect a lot of users don't want to use a mechanical sounding synthesizer to get faster reading speed.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 9:43 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I also find it interesting that the eloquence voice many people like that is also now on iPhone is now 27 or so years old already. and I think the only reason it became so popular is that Jaws started implementing it and encouraging its use back in early to mid 1996. Jaws 3.2 was the first Jaws for windows version to have eloquence. I got in on cd in the mail in July of 1996 and I thought it was amazing that you just needed a computer with a sound card and no external speech box plugged into the computer. So then eloquence took over, decTalk and Keynote gold software went away because I think eloquence was free with jaws while decTalk software and Keynote were paid products. And eloquence I guess sounded better than both of those. 



Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 11:05 AM, Gene wrote:
but fifteen or more years is too long a time for the initial advantage to be maintained to the extent that the preference for Eloquence evidently exists.
-
We'll have to disagree regarding that.  There are many things that have retained strong market preference for well over a decade.

For heaven's sake, just look at Windows 7 for an example of that.  And there are still people who wax rhapsodic about Windows XP even though they dropped actually using it long ago.  

Nostalgia is a powerful thing, too.  But there is a significant demographic, regardless of specific product, that just never wants to move on after they've found "their favorite" or "what I know and am comfortable with."  Keeping up-to-date involves constant work, as you well know, and we're constantly seeing assertions about what NVDA and/or JAWS and/or Narrator "can't do" that they've been able to do for some time because the technique(s) used to do them have never been explored or learned.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gene
 

In this case, we have had synthesizers of the more natural voice type competing with Eloquence since the early 2000's as I recall.  I understand that different people prefer different synthesizers but fifteen or more years is too long a time for the initial advantage to be maintained to the extent that the preference for Eloquence evidently exists.

Gene
On 7/22/2022 9:57 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 10:53 AM, Gene wrote:
That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available. 
-
You don't account for the fact that "whatever got there first" often tends to have real staying power even when superior alternatives appear later.  "It's what I'm used to," is a very powerful deterrent to change in many instances.

And the above is not meant to ignore the rest of what you've said.  But it is often the case that what came first, or very early on, that became very widely accepted remains so even after something demonstrably better has come along.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill



Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gene
 

I should add that my comments refer to the American English implementation.  I can't comment on Eloquence for other languages. 

I can say that I've heard the British  English implementation of Eloquence and it is significantly inferior to the American implementation.  It sounds as though it is someone trying to imitate a British accent and I suspect that it was developed by American English speakers, which accounts for its imitation quality.

Gene
On 7/22/2022 9:53 AM, Gene wrote:

That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available.  It is popular because it does what the most people want it to do the best.  It is responsive, pronounces more words than other synthesizers I've tried correctly out of the box, allows for rapid listening while keeping speech more intelligible than other synthesizers I've tried and it is light on computer resources.

I used DeccTalk before there was an Eloquence and, though it has a more pleasant voice, it is not as easy to listen to speech rapidly and miss as few words as with Eloquence.

Some people may say that other less human and more mechanical sounding synthesizers allow faster listening.  I can't say.  But if that is true, it is also evidently true, that one reason Eloquence is so popular is that it allows a good compromise between the sound of the voice and rapid speech intelligibility.  I suspect a lot of users don't want to use a mechanical sounding synthesizer to get faster reading speed.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 9:43 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:
I also find it interesting that the eloquence voice many people like that is also now on iPhone is now 27 or so years old already. and I think the only reason it became so popular is that Jaws started implementing it and encouraging its use back in early to mid 1996. Jaws 3.2 was the first Jaws for windows version to have eloquence. I got in on cd in the mail in July of 1996 and I thought it was amazing that you just needed a computer with a sound card and no external speech box plugged into the computer. So then eloquence took over, decTalk and Keynote gold software went away because I think eloquence was free with jaws while decTalk software and Keynote were paid products. And eloquence I guess sounded better than both of those. 



Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 10:53 AM, Gene wrote:
That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available. 
-
You don't account for the fact that "whatever got there first" often tends to have real staying power even when superior alternatives appear later.  "It's what I'm used to," is a very powerful deterrent to change in many instances.

And the above is not meant to ignore the rest of what you've said.  But it is often the case that what came first, or very early on, that became very widely accepted remains so even after something demonstrably better has come along.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gene
 

That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available.  It is popular because it does what the most people want it to do the best.  It is responsive, pronounces more words than other synthesizers I've tried correctly out of the box, allows for rapid listening while keeping speech more intelligible than other synthesizers I've tried and it is light on computer resources.

I used DeccTalk before there was an Eloquence and, though it has a more pleasant voice, it is not as easy to listen to speech rapidly and miss as few words as with Eloquence.

Some people may say that other less human and more mechanical sounding synthesizers allow faster listening.  I can't say.  But if that is true, it is also evidently true, that one reason Eloquence is so popular is that it allows a good compromise between the sound of the voice and rapid speech intelligibility.  I suspect a lot of users don't want to use a mechanical sounding synthesizer to get faster reading speed.

Gene

On 7/22/2022 9:43 AM, Josh Kennedy wrote:

I also find it interesting that the eloquence voice many people like that is also now on iPhone is now 27 or so years old already. and I think the only reason it became so popular is that Jaws started implementing it and encouraging its use back in early to mid 1996. Jaws 3.2 was the first Jaws for windows version to have eloquence. I got in on cd in the mail in July of 1996 and I thought it was amazing that you just needed a computer with a sound card and no external speech box plugged into the computer. So then eloquence took over, decTalk and Keynote gold software went away because I think eloquence was free with jaws while decTalk software and Keynote were paid products. And eloquence I guess sounded better than both of those. 


Re: nvda and numbers announcement

 

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 03:33 AM, Michael Micallef at FITA wrote:
Can someone give me some instructions how I can set nvda to read telephone numbers in terms of digits without effection other applications?
-
This can be handled by a dictionary entry using a regular expression (or, perhaps, several) if you are able to clearly define the format you consider to be "a phone number."   Since this varies somewhat by locale, it's important to know the formats you would want read as chunks of individual digits, and that would include punctuation.

As two examples for the USA:  (540) 571-6820    or 540-571-6820  would be typical phone number formats.

The add-on mentioned does not seem to be specific enough in attending to formatting cues.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill

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