Date   

locked First question

Harry Spencer
 

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM, 8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry


Re: Using NVDA remote via an iPhone?

Jonathan Milam
 

This is very true, but RIM previously mentioned on this list can actually do that now, in addition to allowing copy/paste of files and folders between the controller and the target.

Jonathan


On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 11:08 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 10:42 AM, zhu bonie wrote:
Therefore, I can only control one of the two devices. Is it right?
-
As a general observation, this is true of remote software of all types that I've ever worked with.  One side is "in control" while the other is "being controlled" and those roles cannot be switched once they have been established for a session.
 
If I'm the person giving assistance/controlling from one end, the person being assisted on the other cannot flip-flop the roles to become the assistant/controller, nor can I as the controlling side hand that off to them.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Facebook and Twitter shortcut keys compattibility with NVDA?

Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, and many others are examples of web apps. Modal and non-modal screen readers work a bit differently, but they all have some sort of functionality for allowing you to pass keys to the web app, or to have keys perform screen reading functionality. in the case of NVDA, it seems that you already know your options. Use focus mode, or turn off virtual navigation keys. With some web apps, NVDA automatically goes into focus mode anyway.

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 8:42 AM Akash Kakkar <akash.diverse@...> wrote:
All,

Is there any way to use the facebook/Twitter shortcut keys for example
"J/K" to scroll with NVDA without turning off the browse mode or single
key shortcuts?

Any best practices to use Facebook and Twitter with NVDA?








--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

Check out and subscribe to BlindTechAdventures in podcast audio form on YouTube for the latest happenings in tech.

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

Thank you, and have a great day!


Re: Mcaffee DLP endpoint security software causes NVDA to stop working correctly

Thomas N. Chan
 

There's only a few things I can think of.
the keyboard protection or banking protection which other security call them. that will protect keylogger from logging keyboard input. 
that will usually affect screen readers as we talk directly to certain windows components which by chance, hackers also use.

The other thing the IT guys can check is to check on the log.
whatever the security software does, block, remove or do whatever changes in client or workstation, there's always a log for them to review.


Regards,
Thomas N. Chan


On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 4:29 PM Khalid Anwar <anwarkhalid850@...> wrote:
Hi there,
I was wondering if you might know what setting it would be that stops the keyboard command from being recognised by the screen reader and stops the screen reader from reading out the screen,
Unfortunately, my IT department doesn’t know much about screen readers and I don’t know much about them either.
from what I know about data loss prevention tools, they modify which kinds of information I sent to the webpage and what kind of files the websites can read and accept


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Thomas N. Chan
 

There's another guy call Michael D. Lawler which does the programming and support.
I still got some old emails from them.

the good old days




Regards,
Thomas N. Chan


On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 5:30 AM Sky Mundell <skyt@...> wrote:
Hello David. Window-Eyes was developed by a sighted guy, named Doug Geoffray, and Dan W. They they did have Clarance Wally, who was a blind man, and who was their blind sales man, and they also had blind tech support specialists, as well, remember Raul A. Gallegos, Steve Klower, and Jeremy Curry?

On Jul 24, 2022, at 2:21 PM, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...> wrote:

It’s possible that Window-eyes wasn’t mentioned in the article for two reasons.
First, the article’s focus was on blind programmers who were solving the accessibility barriers from Windows.I’m not sure if the WE developers were blind. Also, Window-Eyes isn’t available anymore and so cannot be considered as a modern solution. 
 
David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2022
 
Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.
 
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf OfGene
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2022 7:29 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)
 

the article is interesting and it has good information about JAWS and NVDA.  But it has problems.  It should have said something about Window-eyes because a lot of people used it and it was a good screen-reader.  It helped in development of screen-reader innovations in ways that should have been noted.

But a serious problem in the article is that it gives the reader the impression that there shouldn't need to be independently developed screen-readers if developers of software built accessibility into them.  This is erroneous for two reasons.

First, yes, accessibility should be built into programs and operating systems but we have been better served by screen-readers being developed outside of operating system programmers.  We are much better off having choices when it  comes  to Windows screen-readers.  It is a constantly stated truism that some screen-readers work better with some programs than others.  If Microsoft had developed a good screen-reader from the outset, we would probably only have one screen-reader and even if we would benefit from having more, we wouldn't.  

The article doesn't discuss this at all and the author is evidently completely unaware of the arguments about which is better, one screen-reader developed by the developers of an operating system or what exists regarding Windows.

I think we are much better off as things are.  

Gene

On 7/14/2022 10:06 PM, Laurie Mehta via groups.io wrote:
Hi,
I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name…)
-Laurie
 

The hidden history of screen readers

 
 
 
 
 



Re: Facebook and Twitter shortcut keys compattibility with NVDA?

Sascha Cowley
 

This should be on the chat subgroup, but...
You could also use "pass next key through" before every keypress (NVDA+F2). Honestly though the simplest solutions are either to use focus mode or turn off single letter navigation for that document (applies until refresh, I believe) (NVDA+Shift+Space).


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Rui Fontes
 

Hello!


Vocalizer Expressive from Tiflotecnia switch automatically the language based in the character set used...

So, in any application, whenever a japanese character is found, the synth will change automatically to japanese... When finding a latin character will go back to english...

Note that this is only possible between languages using different character sets... It will not switch between english and portuguese or between japanese and chinese...


Best regards,

Rui Fontes
Tiflotecnia, Lda.
 


Às 22:03 de 24/07/2022, Sharni-Lee Ward escreveu:

I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese, be it a single line or a passage in the midst of English instructions. It does not currently do this and this could pose problems when learning. The ProTalker addon used to do it but alas...

On 25/07/2022 4:13 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Also, if we’re talking about a Web page the developer(s) of the page need to be using the language attribute correctly. Just having the page being written or displayed in the Japanese language won’t switch the synth language to Japanese if English is still being used as the default or primary language.

Of course, if the synth has been set to Japanese and if it’s still not speaking correctly then this is a bit outside of my wheelhouse.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 2:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

Do you have automatic language switching turned on in Speech settings?

Also, and this is not meant as snarky, are you certain you are using Espeak as your synth?  I'd also suggest, once you're certain that automatic language switching is turned on in NVDA, that you give the Microsoft OneCore Japanese a try, if for no other reason than testing.  It does support text to speech.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Chris Tromborg
 

Window-Eyes?  Telnet?  The very mention of these warms the cockles of me heart.

 

Chris Tromborg, Ph.D.

Mountain Lion Foundation

Feline Conservation Foundation

Behavioral Enrichment for Captive Animals

Animal Communication, Behavior, & Cognition

Feline Conservation & Biology

1-530-753-2763 Home

1-530-902-2763 Cell

cattromborg@...

www.christromborg.com

 

  

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ken Perry
Sent: Monday, July 25, 2022 7:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

 

I don’t know that they have advanced so much.  The best combination of Word processor and screen reader still is ASAP and word 5.1 (I still have a laptop that runs both and use a DecTalk Express s with it) There are a lot of combinations like that that far out strip using things like NVDA and Word and or Jaws and word.  I would almost call it a twostep.  In many cases we take two steps forward and one step back.  In some cases it’s the opposite we take 1 step forward and two back.    Using command line shells like telnet was much better than it currently is with Jaws and NVDA only because the MsDos screen readers let you configure the command line apps like Pine much better.  Now days it is harder to use things like pine and  editors in the shell unless you just switch to Linux and use speakup for the command line.   Oh well I am sure I am showing my age in this post I just wanted to say I don’t think Screen readers actually have advanced that much.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 3:15 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

On Sun, Jul 24, 2022 at 05:20 AM, Gene wrote:

I'm not sure this is the place to go into at length how much screen-readers have advanced since they first came out but they have advanced enormously.

-
I have allowed this topic to go on well past any direct involvement with NVDA, and that's because it is of clear interest to a large number among the readership and this "walk down memory lane" has blessedly remained constrained to this single topic.  I see no point in shutting it down now, nor of trying to steer it back to NVDA, either.  We're so deep into thread drift territory that there's no turning back.  I can't recall the last topic that made it to over 110 posts and counting.

If anyone has tired of this topic, and would rather not see one more post from it, that's what the "Mute this Topic" link at the end of every message that gets sent was put there for.  Activate it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: NVDA 2022.2 and Vocalizer Driver Version 5

Rui Fontes
 

Hello!


You can go to:

https://www.tiflotecnia.net/en/downloads.htm


and download the driver from there...


Any other question you can contact us directly through:

rui.fontes@...


Best regards,

Rui Fontes
Tiflotecnia, Lda.
 


Às 18:22 de 24/07/2022, Daniel Sommerfeld escreveu:

Hi Abbie and all.


Sorry if i wasn't very clear. I will copy the list entry here so you know what i mean.


Nuance Vocalizer 5.5 driver; Status: Incompatible; Version: 2.1.2; Autor: Tiflotecnia, LDA.


So i am really talking about the version 2. You can activate your license with a key file. I am using this old driver also, because there is a german voice, wich is not available on version 3.

What confuses me is, that at the beginning of the list entry it sais version 5. Sorry for confusing you. :-)


Regards

Daniel

Am 23.07.2022 um 23:25 schrieb Abbie Taylor:
Hello. I use Code Factory's Vocalizer. When I upgraded to the latest version of NVDA, there was no problem. It still works. I hope that helps.


Re: Using NVDA remote via an iPhone?

Shawn
 

Hi, I never tried the TTS, just Voiceover, so I can't tell you that one, but as soon as you press the home button on your phone you'll be out of the NVDA remote app and can do other things on your phone with the keyboard I would think. I actually haven't tried that either, I usually just use gestures directly on the phone to disconnect the NVDA remote app when I'm done. I really haven't actually tried to use it for any length of time, so never really needed to switch from using it to doing something on my phone, but if I did, I would just use the phone's screen and the home button to navigate away from it as I would if I weren't using the keyboard at all.

Shawn Klein

On 7/25/2022 9:42 AM, zhu bonie wrote:

Hi Shawn 
Thanks so much for your kind help! It's really detailed.
Now I want to switch the control of my iPhone and computer freely. After I controlled my computer, I want to control my iPhone again. What should I do?
I also find that if I close the screen of my iPhone, the remote will stop. Is it right?
Finally, now I have to turn off my voice-over to use the TTS speech engine. When I turn on voice-over again, the remote will also stop. Therefore, I can only control one of the two devices. Is it right?
Thanks!


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Josh Kennedy
 

did anyone on here ever use the infovox230 software tts by Telia Promotor, for windows 95 through xp? It was a formant tts, only one for its time to support all the scandinavaian languages such as Icelandic and Finnish. I played with the demo back in the mid to late 90s. It was interesting. 


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Josh Kennedy
 

I think you can still get window eyes from the internet archive wayback machine but it may not work well at all on modern windows. Lots of interesting stuff old assistive tech websites on the wayback machine that you can explore.


Facebook and Twitter shortcut keys compattibility with NVDA?

Akash Kakkar
 

All,

Is there any way to use the facebook/Twitter shortcut keys for example "J/K" to scroll with NVDA without turning off the browse mode or single key shortcuts?

Any best practices to use Facebook and Twitter with NVDA?


Re: Using NVDA remote via an iPhone?

 

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 10:42 AM, zhu bonie wrote:
Therefore, I can only control one of the two devices. Is it right?
-
As a general observation, this is true of remote software of all types that I've ever worked with.  One side is "in control" while the other is "being controlled" and those roles cannot be switched once they have been established for a session.
 
If I'm the person giving assistance/controlling from one end, the person being assisted on the other cannot flip-flop the roles to become the assistant/controller, nor can I as the controlling side hand that off to them.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 
Edited

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 10:46 AM, Gene wrote:
I remember those "good" old days and what you are saying is just not the case in terms of general accessibility. 
-
 As do I, but my time starts around 2010.

The overarching direction of accessibility has been nothing but forward and better.  That is not to say that there have not been plenty of isolated or limited "two steps forward, one step back" type incidents, and even fewer "one step back" for specific things incidents, but those are all exceptions to a rule that points toward constantly increasing accessibility.  [NB: Increasing does not mean either universal or perfect. Nor does it mean that all developments will meet your personal preference for approach.]

There is an awful lot of, "What's too painful to remember, we simply choose to forget!," in nostalgia, tech or otherwise.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Gene
 

It may be that not everything I say in this message is completely correct because of limitations in my technical knowledge.  I think that what I am saying is generally true and I'd be happy to have errors or misunderstandings discussed. 

I remember those "good" old days and what you are saying is just not the case in terms of general accessibility. 

I remember when, time after time, a new version of Pine came out and users of shell accounts would have to alter the Vocal-ize set file for Pine so the program would work properly. 

And that is not to say anything negative against Vocal-ize, it is to point out how much accessibility has advanced and how much Windows screen-readers now can work with all sorts of programs without having to be especially caused to work with them.

I can't comment on your specific examples of command line programs.  I can say that if you used JAWS with Pine, as I used to with a shell account, you wouldn't have to make any adjustments or modifications in JAWS.

All I had to do was set the screen echo in JAWS to all, open a message in pine, and use the right shift to skip information I didn't want to read.  Every time I would press right shift, I would move down a line.  Thus, I could skip any header information I didn't want to hear and move to the message body efficiently. 

I can use program after program with NVDA or JAWS and those screen-readers aren't scripted or tailored to work specifically with those programs in any way. 

and there is a lot more uniform structure in Windows programs.  Dialogs are generally dialogs, menus are generally menus, etc.  In a lot of programs, I can work with these structures without any adaptation of the screen-reader. 

Screen-readers have become much more capable but also, Windows and Windows programs are often structurally much more similar than DOS programs were. 

Gene

On 7/25/2022 9:11 AM, Ken Perry wrote:

 

I don’t know that they have advanced so much.  The best combination of Word processor and screen reader still is ASAP and word 5.1 (I still have a laptop that runs both and use a DecTalk Express s with it) There are a lot of combinations like that that far out strip using things like NVDA and Word and or Jaws and word.  I would almost call it a twostep.  In many cases we take two steps forward and one step back.  In some cases it’s the opposite we take 1 step forward and two back.    Using command line shells like telnet was much better than it currently is with Jaws and NVDA only because the MsDos screen readers let you configure the command line apps like Pine much better.  Now days it is harder to use things like pine and  editors in the shell unless you just switch to Linux and use speakup for the command line.   Oh well I am sure I am showing my age in this post I just wanted to say I don’t think Screen readers actually have advanced that much.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 3:15 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

On Sun, Jul 24, 2022 at 05:20 AM, Gene wrote:

I'm not sure this is the place to go into at length how much screen-readers have advanced since they first came out but they have advanced enormously.

-
I have allowed this topic to go on well past any direct involvement with NVDA, and that's because it is of clear interest to a large number among the readership and this "walk down memory lane" has blessedly remained constrained to this single topic.  I see no point in shutting it down now, nor of trying to steer it back to NVDA, either.  We're so deep into thread drift territory that there's no turning back.  I can't recall the last topic that made it to over 110 posts and counting.

If anyone has tired of this topic, and would rather not see one more post from it, that's what the "Mute this Topic" link at the end of every message that gets sent was put there for.  Activate it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard



Re: Using NVDA remote via an iPhone?

zhu bonie
 

Hi Shawn 
Thanks so much for your kind help! It's really detailed.
Now I want to switch the control of my iPhone and computer freely. After I controlled my computer, I want to control my iPhone again. What should I do?
I also find that if I close the screen of my iPhone, the remote will stop. Is it right?
Finally, now I have to turn off my voice-over to use the TTS speech engine. When I turn on voice-over again, the remote will also stop. Therefore, I can only control one of the two devices. Is it right?
Thanks!


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

On Sun, Jul 24, 2022 at 08:28 PM, Gene wrote:
But is the language attribute supposed to change if a page is mostly in one language and parts of a page are in another language? 
-
Although it is not visible, the best way to think about the language attribute is the same way you think about a font attribute.

They appear in their "on form" immediately ahead of any segment not in the main document language and their "off form" after the last character of that content.

Think of something like government forms where precisely the same phrase is repeated in multiple languages one after the other.  If the language attribute is appropriately applied, and the user has a text-to-speech version of a given language, the screen reader should just keep reading in the language that the specific line is written in, switching as it goes along.

It's essentially a way to make the screen reader do what a multi-lingual human reader does "automatically."
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Ken Perry
 

I remember when you could play the windows solitare and hearts games with window-eyes.  Can’t do that now.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shawn via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2022 11:45 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

I used Window Eyes for 9 years, I still miss the way you could move around the mouse area.

Shawn Klein

On 7/19/2022 6:26 AM, Michael Munn wrote:

I was a user of Window-eyes for several years before they sentenced that screen reader to death. Window-eyes is one the only screen reader is far I know of ever made a deal with Microsoft so this way it’s user can use Office for free. Heck, that was the screen reader my school taught me to use when I was in seventh grade because they have the latest version of Office. Right now I’m a heavy user of Jaws in Windows, and I just recently getting in to Voice Over on the Mac. I do use NVDA but I’m not a full time user of it.  It is good for an operating system to be open sourced so this way the end user with vision problem can have multiple choice to what screen reader they choose to install on their machine.

Best regards

Michael H> Munn

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shawn via groups.io
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2022 9:57 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

Yeah, I couldn't get that because you have to have a Brazilian bank account in a certain bank to get it. I thought it would be cool to try it. I did have DosVox though for a while and played around with it some years ago. There were some cool games, I especially liked the one where you have to try to land on the moon. But I had to use a different voice, the native voice was incomprehensible to me as it was just made up of a bunch of syllables in wav files. Sounded like an alien robot. For native speakers it wasn't a problem, but for me I hated it. Luckily you could use a Sapi voice with it. It was basically a screen reader for people who didn't want to have to learn windows. It had loads of parts like a word processor, dictionaries, a telnet type client, and a file manager and I forget what else. Lots of people say it makes its users lazy for that reason, and they don't bother learning how to do things with windows and other programs.

Shawn Klein

On 7/18/2022 6:35 PM, Rui Fontes wrote:

And everybody have forgoten a screen reader developed in Brasil, named Virtual Vision...

 

Rui Fontes

 

Às 00:28 de 19/07/2022, Gene escreveu:

the article is interesting and it has good information about JAWS and NVDA.  But it has problems.  It should have said something about Window-eyes because a lot of people used it and it was a good screen-reader.  It helped in development of screen-reader innovations in ways that should have been noted.

But a serious problem in the article is that it gives the reader the impression that there shouldn't need to be independently developed screen-readers if developers of software built accessibility into them.  This is erroneous for two reasons.

First, yes, accessibility should be built into programs and operating systems but we have been better served by screen-readers being developed outside of operating system programmers.  We are much better off having choices when it  comes  to Windows screen-readers.  It is a constantly stated truism that some screen-readers work better with some programs than others.  If Microsoft had developed a good screen-reader from the outset, we would probably only have one screen-reader and even if we would benefit from having more, we wouldn't. 

The article doesn't discuss this at all and the author is evidently completely unaware of the arguments about which is better, one screen-reader developed by the developers of an operating system or what exists regarding Windows.

I think we are much better off as things are. 

Gene

On 7/14/2022 10:06 PM, Laurie Mehta via groups.io wrote:

Hi,

I came across this today and am sharing it here because I think that many here will find it interesting. (Link below my name…)

-Laurie

 

The hidden history of screen readers

 

 

https://www.theverge.com/23203911/screen-readers-history-blind-henter-curran-teh-nvda

 

 

 


Re: Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

Ken Perry
 

I think the difference comes down to the people who  want a fast tool synth to those who want their computers to sound more human.  I am much more into having speed than a human speaker.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, July 22, 2022 11:05 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Article on Screen Reader History (including NVDA)

 

In this case, we have had synthesizers of the more natural voice type competing with Eloquence since the early 2000's as I recall.  I understand that different people prefer different synthesizers but fifteen or more years is too long a time for the initial advantage to be maintained to the extent that the preference for Eloquence evidently exists.

Gene
On 7/22/2022 9:57 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Jul 22, 2022 at 10:53 AM, Gene wrote:

That may account for its initial popularity but it doesn't account for its continued popularity when so many other synthesizers are available. 

-
You don't account for the fact that "whatever got there first" often tends to have real staying power even when superior alternatives appear later.  "It's what I'm used to," is a very powerful deterrent to change in many instances.

And the above is not meant to ignore the rest of what you've said.  But it is often the case that what came first, or very early on, that became very widely accepted remains so even after something demonstrably better has come along.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill

 

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