Date   

Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Shawn
 

More likely the web designer thought of including it for edit boxes for Spanish, but not for other places on the page. People are funny that way. You'd think they'd be consistent, but they're not.

Shawn Klein

On 7/26/2022 10:29 AM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:

Weirdly, when I had to type in something in Spanish manually, probably because I used the acute E but possibly because it detected this field would only have Spanish in it, NVDA did do the switch.

On 25/07/2022 8:54 am, Shawn via groups.io wrote:

With Spanish you'll just have to switch back and forth, or you could practice listening to English with  a Spanish voice for parts of the page where both languages are heavily mixed. It's not so hard once you get used to it.

Shawn Klein

On 7/24/2022 4:53 PM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:

I was responding to each message as I read it, so I didn't see yours until after I wrote that.


I don't think the Duolingo site does this, sadly. I started in on Spanish this morning, and NVDA didn't change language for the Spanish words, meaning the pronunciation was botched 80% of the time by the screen-reader. They have little voice clips whenever you press a button corresponding with a non-English word though, so at least I won't be botching pronunciations.


This will not help me with Japanese if I can't hear the symbols being properly identified, of course.

On 25/07/2022 7:30 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Sharni-Lee wrote:

> I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese,

 

As I wrote this can only happen if the Web site uses a specific language attribute in their code when switching to a new language. The code is normally hidden but it tells the Web site, “Hey, this next block of text that I’m about to write is actually Japanese.” When writing English text a similar code needs to be entered which tells the Web site, “the following text is in English.” Of course, NVDA needs to have language switching enabled in the Voices dialog, as well.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sharni-Lee Ward
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 5:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese, be it a single line or a passage in the midst of English instructions. It does not currently do this and this could pose problems when learning. The ProTalker addon used to do it but alas...

On 25/07/2022 4:13 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Also, if we’re talking about a Web page the developer(s) of the page need to be using the language attribute correctly. Just having the page being written or displayed in the Japanese language won’t switch the synth language to Japanese if English is still being used as the default or primary language.

Of course, if the synth has been set to Japanese and if it’s still not speaking correctly then this is a bit outside of my wheelhouse.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 2:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

Do you have automatic language switching turned on in Speech settings?

Also, and this is not meant as snarky, are you certain you are using Espeak as your synth?  I'd also suggest, once you're certain that automatic language switching is turned on in NVDA, that you give the Microsoft OneCore Japanese a try, if for no other reason than testing.  It does support text to speech.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Gene
 

I would suggest getting the SAPI5 Eloquence version, not the add-on.  You can use the SAPI5 version with any screen-reader that supports SAPI5 and you  don't have to worry about which version of NVDA you use it with.  NVDA supports SAPI5 regardless of version.

You can try a demo to see if it does what you want.  If no one gives information soon about where to get a demo, I'll check. 

Gene

On 7/26/2022 10:33 AM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:

Actually, while I'm thinking about it, how much is the Eloquence addon? And is it a one-time payment? I know Jaws is subscription-based now (at least, I think that's what the deal is, and last I heard you had to pay for new updates, which I always thought was a d*ck move), but is the Eloquence addon by itself a one-time payment? If so, I may consider investing in it for circumstances such as this.

On 25/07/2022 7:10 am, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:
Since Eloquence is paid and I don't like it anyways, that's not an option for me. I dunno how, if at all, those packs would help, and I don't want to change synths. Anything without inflection settings (including most paid synths) sounds woeful to my discerning ears.

On 25/07/2022 6:30 am, Shawn via groups.io wrote:
The question is did you switch ESpeak's language to Japanese. With some synths, they just won't work with Japanese or some other foreign alphabets at all unless you add language packs in Windows. I just opened a Japanese Wikipedia page with the following results. Japanese Eloquence read it in Japanese. ESpeak Japanese read Japanese letter this, Chinese letter that. You may want to check out this page about installing language packs in Windows, or find a synth that will work without them.

https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fsupport.microsoft.com%2Fen-us%2Fwindows%2Flanguage-packs-for-windows-a5094319-a92d-18de-5b53-1cfc697cfca8&amp;data=05%7C01%7C%7Ce594a98c5f5649b9b50908da6db8ff1a%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637942938588515646%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=wI22F3s6GmKeUfXsNNEB9S%2FA9AB83M%2BZLcgwV3FZtuQ%3D&amp;reserved=0

Shawn Klein

On 7/24/2022 12:58 PM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:
The New Releases page said that Japanese was added to Espeak as well as the packaged Braille Tables. I want to learn Japanese (I started learning in school, then left school, and that was a good fifteen years ago now), and just found out the browser version of Duolingo is accessible with NVDA.


However, I've checked with a couple things (I'm a part of a number of anime fandoms), and NVDA doesn't switch to Japanese when reading passages, instead continuing to say "Japanese-letter" several times, or if I'm scrolling over it, "Japanese-letter" plus several numbers that I suppose are it's unicode designation? But anyways, it is not reflecting the addition of the language bank in Espeak NG. And I know the ProTalker addon has not been compatible for years, though even if it were, there were some weird pronunciation issues with even that.


Is there something I am missing here?


















Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

Actually, while I'm thinking about it, how much is the Eloquence addon? And is it a one-time payment? I know Jaws is subscription-based now (at least, I think that's what the deal is, and last I heard you had to pay for new updates, which I always thought was a d*ck move), but is the Eloquence addon by itself a one-time payment? If so, I may consider investing in it for circumstances such as this.

On 25/07/2022 7:10 am, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:

Since Eloquence is paid and I don't like it anyways, that's not an option for me. I dunno how, if at all, those packs would help, and I don't want to change synths. Anything without inflection settings (including most paid synths) sounds woeful to my discerning ears.

On 25/07/2022 6:30 am, Shawn via groups.io wrote:
The question is did you switch ESpeak's language to Japanese. With some synths, they just won't work with Japanese or some other foreign alphabets at all unless you add language packs in Windows. I just opened a Japanese Wikipedia page with the following results. Japanese Eloquence read it in Japanese. ESpeak Japanese read Japanese letter this, Chinese letter that. You may want to check out this page about installing language packs in Windows, or find a synth that will work without them.

https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fsupport.microsoft.com%2Fen-us%2Fwindows%2Flanguage-packs-for-windows-a5094319-a92d-18de-5b53-1cfc697cfca8&amp;data=05%7C01%7C%7Ce594a98c5f5649b9b50908da6db8ff1a%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637942938588515646%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=wI22F3s6GmKeUfXsNNEB9S%2FA9AB83M%2BZLcgwV3FZtuQ%3D&amp;reserved=0

Shawn Klein

On 7/24/2022 12:58 PM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:
The New Releases page said that Japanese was added to Espeak as well as the packaged Braille Tables. I want to learn Japanese (I started learning in school, then left school, and that was a good fifteen years ago now), and just found out the browser version of Duolingo is accessible with NVDA.


However, I've checked with a couple things (I'm a part of a number of anime fandoms), and NVDA doesn't switch to Japanese when reading passages, instead continuing to say "Japanese-letter" several times, or if I'm scrolling over it, "Japanese-letter" plus several numbers that I suppose are it's unicode designation? But anyways, it is not reflecting the addition of the language bank in Espeak NG. And I know the ProTalker addon has not been compatible for years, though even if it were, there were some weird pronunciation issues with even that.


Is there something I am missing here?

















Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

Weirdly, when I had to type in something in Spanish manually, probably because I used the acute E but possibly because it detected this field would only have Spanish in it, NVDA did do the switch.

On 25/07/2022 8:54 am, Shawn via groups.io wrote:

With Spanish you'll just have to switch back and forth, or you could practice listening to English with  a Spanish voice for parts of the page where both languages are heavily mixed. It's not so hard once you get used to it.

Shawn Klein

On 7/24/2022 4:53 PM, Sharni-Lee Ward wrote:

I was responding to each message as I read it, so I didn't see yours until after I wrote that.


I don't think the Duolingo site does this, sadly. I started in on Spanish this morning, and NVDA didn't change language for the Spanish words, meaning the pronunciation was botched 80% of the time by the screen-reader. They have little voice clips whenever you press a button corresponding with a non-English word though, so at least I won't be botching pronunciations.


This will not help me with Japanese if I can't hear the symbols being properly identified, of course.

On 25/07/2022 7:30 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Sharni-Lee wrote:

> I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese,

 

As I wrote this can only happen if the Web site uses a specific language attribute in their code when switching to a new language. The code is normally hidden but it tells the Web site, “Hey, this next block of text that I’m about to write is actually Japanese.” When writing English text a similar code needs to be entered which tells the Web site, “the following text is in English.” Of course, NVDA needs to have language switching enabled in the Voices dialog, as well.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sharni-Lee Ward
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 5:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese, be it a single line or a passage in the midst of English instructions. It does not currently do this and this could pose problems when learning. The ProTalker addon used to do it but alas...

On 25/07/2022 4:13 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Also, if we’re talking about a Web page the developer(s) of the page need to be using the language attribute correctly. Just having the page being written or displayed in the Japanese language won’t switch the synth language to Japanese if English is still being used as the default or primary language.

Of course, if the synth has been set to Japanese and if it’s still not speaking correctly then this is a bit outside of my wheelhouse.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 2:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

Do you have automatic language switching turned on in Speech settings?

Also, and this is not meant as snarky, are you certain you are using Espeak as your synth?  I'd also suggest, once you're certain that automatic language switching is turned on in NVDA, that you give the Microsoft OneCore Japanese a try, if for no other reason than testing.  It does support text to speech.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


locked Re: First question

 

This topic is locked after this post, as speccing out a computer is not NVDA specific.  If further conversation is desired a new topic, with a descriptive title, should be created on the Chat Subgroup.

Gene is correct that many people spend way more money than they need to based on what they intend to use a computer for.

As someone who is an IT support professional, I will always say the two most important things you can spend money on as far as any computer goes is RAM capacity and an SSD, and the less RAM you have the more important an SSD becomes in supporting responsiveness.

Minimum specs are not now, and have never been, optimum specs for "happy campers."  The minimum RAM I would consider for Windows 10 or 11 is 8GB.  Since Windows 10 only has 3 more years of support, I would verify that the processor in any machine you're considering can support Windows 11 even if it doesn't happen to come with it.  For all Intel i-series processors, that means 8th generation or newer, which is indicated by a number higher than 8000 after the hyphen, e.g., i5-8790.

Very few users indeed, particularly casual users doing web browsing, emailing, and using office suites as their primary activities have ever even come close to exploiting all the processing power of modern processors.

If you're trying to economize, it is always worth looking at manufacturer refurbished business class machines.  They're of higher build quality and generally have specifications that are more than adequate for most home users.

Now lets move this to the Chat Subgroup if anyone wishes to discuss this further.

NVDA Chat Subgroup Archive:  https://nvda.groups.io/g/chat/topics

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--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


locked Re: First question

Sarah k Alawami
 

My machine is 5 years old, or rather was, I’ll say this much. It got so slow that even a reinstall didn’t fix the issue. So yes, parts do ware out. Be aware of this.  I would go with 3.4ghz and 8 gigs of ram if all you will do is check email; future proof yourself though as what if one day that program you use to check email becomes more processer intensive as I’ve seen over the years. You will feel it as time goes by. Even nvda will over time due to what ever we do with it will become more processer intensive. That’s just my take on things.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 12:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Depending on how you use a computer, you may just be wasting money if you buy a faster processor.  Also, machines don't tend to slow down just because they do.  It may be that over time, if you do certain things, your Windows may slow down and you may want to put on a clean copy or revert to a backup, but that is not inevitable.  I use machines for years and they don't slow down.

Many people spend more money, sometimes quite a bit more than they need to and get little or no benefit.

Gene

On 7/26/2022 2:27 AM, Ravindran V.S. wrote:

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question
 
8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16  gig of ram is a waste of money  unless you are doing audio/video editing.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question
 
Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.
 
 
I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.
 
 
In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?
 
 
Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.
 
 
Thanks. Harry
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


Braille Voyager

Ilja und Dani
 

Hi,

At the weekend I tried again to get the Voyager to run.
Until NVDA 2019.2 I always had the native driver from
https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues/1586
used. This worked fine. Here is a link to the archive:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/rrm455s86rojj2s/bram-nvda-voyager-89ddbb3a3bf2.zip?dl=1

Is there anyone here who can port this code to Python 3?
In fact, it's a kind of interface that NVDA uses with the
Voyager software connects. For example, the connection port must be
select in the
original software.

Another option would be to use Brltty, I'm on that
however, did not progress satisfactorily.
The only version I've gotten the line to work with is
4.4-1. At least brltty finds the line and nvda brltty. So far so good.

At the beginning of the line, the first 2 modules are empty, which is a line
with 70 digits is not a big problem. But the problem is that
when scrolling to the right, for example, these 2 characters are then
missing.

Another problem is the scrolling or better display errors. if
I read e.g. on a website with several links down
the first link lnk and the second then lnk lnk ... That's how it is in
a list with the same initial letters. Is the current row
longer than the next one, there is always a remnant of that at the back
previous line on the braille display.
When writing, the line also only shows scrap.
What am I doing wrong?

LG and thank you
Ilja


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

1. This addon/those voices are paid. I did have a cracked version once but I do not wish to do that again.

2. I hate vocalliser. The voices sound bored and flat, I can't get any of them to pronounce things properly, and they honestly all put me to sleep unless they're reading something technical like a recipe book or a list of new additions to the Vision Australia library. Beyond that, for reportedly humanlike voices, they sound even more inhuman than Espeak NG does, and I can max inflection on that!

On 26/07/2022 6:04 am, Rui Fontes wrote:

Hello!


Vocalizer Expressive from Tiflotecnia switch automatically the language based in the character set used...

So, in any application, whenever a japanese character is found, the synth will change automatically to japanese... When finding a latin character will go back to english...

Note that this is only possible between languages using different character sets... It will not switch between english and portuguese or between japanese and chinese...


Best regards,

Rui Fontes
Tiflotecnia, Lda.
 


Às 22:03 de 24/07/2022, Sharni-Lee Ward escreveu:

I need it to read the English text as normal and the Japanese text as Japanese, be it a single line or a passage in the midst of English instructions. It does not currently do this and this could pose problems when learning. The ProTalker addon used to do it but alas...

On 25/07/2022 4:13 am, David Goldfield wrote:

Also, if we’re talking about a Web page the developer(s) of the page need to be using the language attribute correctly. Just having the page being written or displayed in the Japanese language won’t switch the synth language to Japanese if English is still being used as the default or primary language.

Of course, if the synth has been set to Japanese and if it’s still not speaking correctly then this is a bit outside of my wheelhouse.

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2022 2:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

 

Do you have automatic language switching turned on in Speech settings?

Also, and this is not meant as snarky, are you certain you are using Espeak as your synth?  I'd also suggest, once you're certain that automatic language switching is turned on in NVDA, that you give the Microsoft OneCore Japanese a try, if for no other reason than testing.  It does support text to speech.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Sharni-Lee Ward
 

Okay, I will definitely look into that. But I don't think I can set up things in that synth so I can get two languages simultaneously either. I need to know what I'm doing as I learn.

On 26/07/2022 8:52 pm, Josh Kennedy wrote:

one core voices do have japanese. go into settings, windows+i. accessibility in windows11, or ease of access in windows10. down to narrator, tab to add voices, tab to add more voices under language packs, go select japanese and it will be downloaded and installed. restart NVDA and then you get one core japanese voices. 


Re: Reading Japanese with NVDA 2022.2

Josh Kennedy
 

one core voices do have japanese. go into settings, windows+i. accessibility in windows11, or ease of access in windows10. down to narrator, tab to add voices, tab to add more voices under language packs, go select japanese and it will be downloaded and installed. restart NVDA and then you get one core japanese voices. 


locked Re: First question

Monte Single
 

If you buy a new windows pc today, it will likely have windows 11 installed and the processor will likely be running at 3.0 ghz or higher.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ravindran V.S.
Sent: July 26, 2022 1:28 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16 gig of ram is a waste of money unless you are doing audio/video editing.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry


NVDA with Android emulators.

Ravindran V.S.
 

Hi Experts!

Greetings!

How accessible are the Android emulators with NVDA?

If I install BlueStacks in my windows 10 PC, will NVDA support accessing it easily as usual like the other programs?

And is there anything to setup or consider before starting?

Any Add-on available for this?

 

Appreciate your ideas please.

Thank you, have a pleasant day!

Ravi.  

V.S.Ravindran.

Excuses leads to failure!””

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 1:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Depending on how you use a computer, you may just be wasting money if you buy a faster processor.  Also, machines don't tend to slow down just because they do.  It may be that over time, if you do certain things, your Windows may slow down and you may want to put on a clean copy or revert to a backup, but that is not inevitable.  I use machines for years and they don't slow down.

Many people spend more money, sometimes quite a bit more than they need to and get little or no benefit.

Gene

On 7/26/2022 2:27 AM, Ravindran V.S. wrote:

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question
 
8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16  gig of ram is a waste of money  unless you are doing audio/video editing.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question
 
Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.
 
 
I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.
 
 
In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?
 
 
Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.
 
 
Thanks. Harry
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


locked Re: First question

Michael Munn
 

This is again based on your needs.

I currently use an HP ENVY Laptop to do all my works including Audio editing, and that machine had served me quite well for almost three years. Is far I know, only Jaws need massive amounts of storage because they came with so many drivers once you install the screen reader.  NVDA is a lightweight screen reader, and you can download all the add-ins if you want to better enhance your user experience.

That is all I have to say, and I hope what I said is valid. .

Thanks

Best regards

Michael H. Munn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 3:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Depending on how you use a computer, you may just be wasting money if you buy a faster processor.  Also, machines don't tend to slow down just because they do.  It may be that over time, if you do certain things, your Windows may slow down and you may want to put on a clean copy or revert to a backup, but that is not inevitable.  I use machines for years and they don't slow down.

Many people spend more money, sometimes quite a bit more than they need to and get little or no benefit.

Gene

On 7/26/2022 2:27 AM, Ravindran V.S. wrote:

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question
 
8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16  gig of ram is a waste of money  unless you are doing audio/video editing.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question
 
Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.
 
 
I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.
 
 
In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?
 
 
Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.
 
 
Thanks. Harry
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


locked Re: First question

Gene
 

Depending on how you use a computer, you may just be wasting money if you buy a faster processor.  Also, machines don't tend to slow down just because they do.  It may be that over time, if you do certain things, your Windows may slow down and you may want to put on a clean copy or revert to a backup, but that is not inevitable.  I use machines for years and they don't slow down.

Many people spend more money, sometimes quite a bit more than they need to and get little or no benefit.

Gene

On 7/26/2022 2:27 AM, Ravindran V.S. wrote:

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16  gig of ram is a waste of money  unless you are doing audio/video editing.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry





















locked Re: First question

Ravindran V.S.
 

Isn't it worth also looking about the processor?
If a 2.4Ghz would do a lot rather than anything like a 1.5Ghz.
But I'm afraid about the cost of it.
Still, it is always better to look for the best option near to our budget, and if there is anything better to lift it for little more considering the long time use.
Because machines tent to slow down when time passes. And it will be a real pain at that time.
Cheers,
V.S.Ravindran.
Excuses leads to failure!””

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: Tuesday, July 26, 2022 9:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16 gig of ram is a waste of money unless you are doing audio/video editing.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry


Re: NVDA 2022.2 Losing Focus

Dzhovani
 

Just to close the topic, a full reinstall of nvda solved the issue. As far as it was a work machine, I haven't bothered trying the solutions one by one to check which one would've been enough.


locked Re: First question

Monte Single
 

8 gig will work fine, 16 is good.
Anything more than 16 gig of ram is a waste of money unless you are doing audio/video editing.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Harry Spencer
Sent: July 25, 2022 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] First question

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry


locked Re: First question

Gene
 

I said I wouldn't comment further but I'll make one more comment.

If you are going to use the laptop in such a way that you don't care if you use the internal keyboard or not, you don't have to worry about it.  I use my Windows 10 laptop with an external keyboard and I never intend to use it with its internal keyboard.

Gene

On 7/25/2022 10:52 PM, Quentin Christensen wrote:

We often get asked about computers, and like everyone has said here, more RAM helps, but NVDA should run on basically anything you can get your hands on - except Windows 10 S, stay away from that.

What I normally recommend looking at is what keyboard layout do you want?  Do you want a number pad, or do you prefer a smaller form factor without one?   What will you use as your NVDA key, and if Insert, check where it is on that keyboard.  Also, see if you can check the quality of the inbuilt speaker - even if you plan to use headphones or external speakers mostly, it's still handy and sometimes unavoidable using the build in speakers occasionally (and if they're that good, you might not need external speakers - but the last thing you want is to count on using the inbuilt speaker and then discover that it's unbearable to you).

The other personal comment I'd make is, both in general and in regards to a specific model line - don't buy the very cheapest available, but at the same time, don't pay heaps extra to buy the very newest processor.  Work out what your budget is and try to get something good quality in that range.  Models and brands vary - just because someone you know had a bad experience with Lenovo, doesn't make them all bad - similarly, just because your last Acer was brilliant, judge the next one on its own merits - companies change a lot in five years (and that isn't a comment for or against, Acer, Lenovo or any other brand).

On Tue, Jul 26, 2022 at 1:37 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
The original question said the person wants to use the computer as a backup for a desktop and he discussed using programs where the extra speed offered by an SSD doesn't matter.  If you are going to be working on a Word document, if it takes one or two more seconds to load the document and an extra second to save the document once you have finished working on it, that amount of time saving doesn't justify getting an SSD. 

Having said that, computers from Computers For the Blind come with SSDs. 

This is my last message in the thread on the main NVDA list.  Since the first question asks about the amount of RAM NVDA uses, I'm not sure if it was appropriate for the main list, but further discussion on the main list isn't since, aside from the RAM question, the discussion has nothing to do with NVDA.

Gene

On 7/25/2022 9:42 PM, Harry Spencer wrote:

Yup, love the SSD. Made the old desktop PC jump like a pup. Harry


On 7/25/2022 7:34 PM, Chris Smart wrote:

Make sure if you get something used, that it has a solidstate drive. I’m saying that mostly for the increased speed over a physical hard disc.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: July 25, 2022 10:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Hello,

 

Thanks for reaching out. 4 GB will work, but you ideally want at least 8, and adding an extra 4 GB really isn't all that costly.

 

As for different computer brands, as this is subjective and begins to stray from the topic of NVDA, I suggest you ask on a list dedicated to discussing such things, or on the chat subgroup.

 

Thanks.

 

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 7:29 PM Harry Spencer <hespencer55@...> wrote:

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have
learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba
laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing
fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest
NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word
processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is
that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA
will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry







 

--

Best,

Nimer Jaber

Check out and subscribe to BlindTechAdventures in podcast audio form on YouTube for the latest happenings in tech.

 

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

Thank you, and have a great day!




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager



locked Re: First question

Quentin Christensen
 

We often get asked about computers, and like everyone has said here, more RAM helps, but NVDA should run on basically anything you can get your hands on - except Windows 10 S, stay away from that.

What I normally recommend looking at is what keyboard layout do you want?  Do you want a number pad, or do you prefer a smaller form factor without one?   What will you use as your NVDA key, and if Insert, check where it is on that keyboard.  Also, see if you can check the quality of the inbuilt speaker - even if you plan to use headphones or external speakers mostly, it's still handy and sometimes unavoidable using the build in speakers occasionally (and if they're that good, you might not need external speakers - but the last thing you want is to count on using the inbuilt speaker and then discover that it's unbearable to you).

The other personal comment I'd make is, both in general and in regards to a specific model line - don't buy the very cheapest available, but at the same time, don't pay heaps extra to buy the very newest processor.  Work out what your budget is and try to get something good quality in that range.  Models and brands vary - just because someone you know had a bad experience with Lenovo, doesn't make them all bad - similarly, just because your last Acer was brilliant, judge the next one on its own merits - companies change a lot in five years (and that isn't a comment for or against, Acer, Lenovo or any other brand).

On Tue, Jul 26, 2022 at 1:37 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
The original question said the person wants to use the computer as a backup for a desktop and he discussed using programs where the extra speed offered by an SSD doesn't matter.  If you are going to be working on a Word document, if it takes one or two more seconds to load the document and an extra second to save the document once you have finished working on it, that amount of time saving doesn't justify getting an SSD. 

Having said that, computers from Computers For the Blind come with SSDs. 

This is my last message in the thread on the main NVDA list.  Since the first question asks about the amount of RAM NVDA uses, I'm not sure if it was appropriate for the main list, but further discussion on the main list isn't since, aside from the RAM question, the discussion has nothing to do with NVDA.

Gene

On 7/25/2022 9:42 PM, Harry Spencer wrote:

Yup, love the SSD. Made the old desktop PC jump like a pup. Harry


On 7/25/2022 7:34 PM, Chris Smart wrote:

Make sure if you get something used, that it has a solidstate drive. I’m saying that mostly for the increased speed over a physical hard disc.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: July 25, 2022 10:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Hello,

 

Thanks for reaching out. 4 GB will work, but you ideally want at least 8, and adding an extra 4 GB really isn't all that costly.

 

As for different computer brands, as this is subjective and begins to stray from the topic of NVDA, I suggest you ask on a list dedicated to discussing such things, or on the chat subgroup.

 

Thanks.

 

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 7:29 PM Harry Spencer <hespencer55@...> wrote:

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have
learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba
laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing
fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest
NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word
processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is
that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA
will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry







 

--

Best,

Nimer Jaber

Check out and subscribe to BlindTechAdventures in podcast audio form on YouTube for the latest happenings in tech.

 

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

Thank you, and have a great day!




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


locked Re: First question

Gene
 

The original question said the person wants to use the computer as a backup for a desktop and he discussed using programs where the extra speed offered by an SSD doesn't matter.  If you are going to be working on a Word document, if it takes one or two more seconds to load the document and an extra second to save the document once you have finished working on it, that amount of time saving doesn't justify getting an SSD. 

Having said that, computers from Computers For the Blind come with SSDs. 

This is my last message in the thread on the main NVDA list.  Since the first question asks about the amount of RAM NVDA uses, I'm not sure if it was appropriate for the main list, but further discussion on the main list isn't since, aside from the RAM question, the discussion has nothing to do with NVDA.

Gene

On 7/25/2022 9:42 PM, Harry Spencer wrote:

Yup, love the SSD. Made the old desktop PC jump like a pup. Harry


On 7/25/2022 7:34 PM, Chris Smart wrote:

Make sure if you get something used, that it has a solidstate drive. I’m saying that mostly for the increased speed over a physical hard disc.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: July 25, 2022 10:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] First question

 

Hello,

 

Thanks for reaching out. 4 GB will work, but you ideally want at least 8, and adding an extra 4 GB really isn't all that costly.

 

As for different computer brands, as this is subjective and begins to stray from the topic of NVDA, I suggest you ask on a list dedicated to discussing such things, or on the chat subgroup.

 

Thanks.

 

On Mon, Jul 25, 2022 at 7:29 PM Harry Spencer <hespencer55@...> wrote:

Hello. I've been lurking on this list for a couple of months and have
learned a lot. I have an immediate problem. My 10-year-old Toshiba
laptop died a couple of days ago.


I want to buy an inexpensive laptop as an replacement, but nothing
fancy, just Windows 10 or 11 with Thunderbird and MS Word and latest
NVDA. Mostly, I use a laptop for a backup for my desktop PC and word
processing.


In the past, I heard that JAWS and other screenreaders need lots of RAM,
8 GB or more. All the cheap laptops I'm looking at start at 4GB RAM. Is
that enough for NVDA?


Any suggesstions on me buying a cheap backup laptop functional with NVDA
will b very much appreciated.


Thanks. Harry







 

--

Best,

Nimer Jaber

Check out and subscribe to BlindTechAdventures in podcast audio form on YouTube for the latest happenings in tech.

 

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

Thank you, and have a great day!


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