Date   

NVDA and off topic chats

Chris Shook
 

Martio, have you suggested that messenger thing to keep down the off topic chats yet?


Re: NVDA and sounds

 

Agreed.
However, I saw some interesting points about it. Don't remember who wrote them, but well, my conclusion about it is it may well be something someone consider pretty useful and others consider just for fun.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 14/02/2019 16:40, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io escreveu:

I think here we are talking more about entertainment rather than productivity and utility, so if somebody wants this its better suited to an add on I'd suggest rather than wasting time of the core programmers. Brian

bglists@...
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Please address personal E-mail to:-
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----- Original Message ----- From: "Chris Shook" <chris0309@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and sounds


Yeah, the addon would probably have to pull the sounds from some sort of website or service.
May be something to suggest to the developers.










Re: Accessible dictionaries with NVDA

 

Try WordWeb. It's the best dictionary I've ever used.
Though it has "online" in its name, I'm 99,9% sure it works offline except by 1 or 2 features which I don't use at all, so..
Anyway, give it a try and see what you get.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 14/02/2019 15:07, Robert Geoffroy escreveu:

Hi, everyone,

Do any of you know which language dictionaries are accessible with NVDA, maybe with add-ons? I don’t speak of on-line dictionaries! I’m looking for French-English, English-French dictionaries, English-German and German-English ones too.

I use “Le Robert & Collins” (2.2.0.5) but it isn’t fully accessible.

Well, have you any ideas about that? Thanks!

Robert







Re: Problems With NVDA

molly the blind tech lover
 

Agreed.

I’m only going to reply if I can actually help someone. I deeply regret all the times I have gone off topic. I’m sorry everyone.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 8:06 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io Group Moderators <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

 

Well now,

 

That is an excellent question.

 

This subject has nothing to do with the topic being discussed, and the issues being discussed for sometime now have nothing to do with NVDA that I can tell. There have been a number of posts from Travis stating what is and isn't RAM, so I would think that we might be able to move on now. Thoughts anyone?

 

Thanks.

 

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 5:57 PM Chris Shook <chris0309@...> wrote:

Does anyone remember what this thread was originally about?




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Please take the time to read this signature completely as it contains
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The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
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Re: Problems With NVDA

Nimer Jaber
 

Well now,

That is an excellent question.

This subject has nothing to do with the topic being discussed, and the issues being discussed for sometime now have nothing to do with NVDA that I can tell. There have been a number of posts from Travis stating what is and isn't RAM, so I would think that we might be able to move on now. Thoughts anyone?

Thanks.


On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 5:57 PM Chris Shook <chris0309@...> wrote:
Does anyone remember what this thread was originally about?





--
Cordially,

Nimer Jaber

Please take the time to read this signature completely as it contains
some information about the email you have just read and all
attachments contained within as well as some valuable resources and
methods for contacting me if you have any questions or wish to talk.

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (658-0358) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Re: Problems With NVDA

Chris Shook
 

Does anyone remember what this thread was originally about?


Re: NVDA and sounds

 

Wow, I got curious about this "secure system". What's the name of it, can you tell me so I can look for more info on this matter? Just for fun, curiosity, you know.
Getting back to sounds, I'll just say that I tried everything that I could to get back my Firefox sounds while you seem to don't like yours. Ironic, isn't it? LOL
By the way, is there a way to  really get back the old sounds from the classic versions of Firefox?

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 14/02/2019 18:27, Shaun Everiss escreveu:

You know this brings me right back to university in my os class.

We were talking about security and all the hacking of late and someone asked if there was such a thing as a secure os.

Surprisingly, there was, but every action, needed a password, when you hit enter on anything you needed to varify it was you doing it.

The users didn't like it, it didn't go anywhere.

Back to sounds, I don't think you would like it if everything had a sound.

I had something like this on google chrome once.

In waterfox, nav sounds happen whenever pages move, complete, you type, or do things.

I don't need all those annoying noises download complete, nav start, popups, a few notifications.

Now I guess nav complete and a few others if you were on dialup would be nice but really.

I think you would get really annoyed if every action you pushed resulted in a beep from the pc.

Especially with how some soundcards process stuff.

For example, on my entertainment workstation due to its really mega power, the sound drivers filter the amp.

On headphones you get full power but on speakers its filtered.

Thats fine to play music, or speech, but you start putting more than 1-2 sounds at once you start having issues.

Now I do have some cards without that restriction.

And the reason they have such a restriction on the internals crappy that it may get at times is if you play it raw without some adjustments to the sound or volume, it really doesn't sound good and could damage your ears or the hardware.

Now it can be done, you may be able to run speech like that, but may not other things.

Sounds may have different volumes, some stuff can be louder than speech, I have seen my music be overwealmed by the speech and vice versa.

In fact its more the other way round.

Now if you had different things going through different cards and better still different speakers that would be fine but still.

Point is I wouldn't unnecesarily have sounds playing that could conflict with other sounds.

So for example while I am doing serious work I don't play music, if I do, I turn it down so it doesn't interfier with my sound.

That means I don't usually hear it and with the powerfull box I have now the sound cutouts trip so I need to plug it to a speaker anyway.

If I listen to a podcast or something, the idea is to focus solely on that audio without interuption at least I have always found it better.

Now for a while before sound cards got chipped to boards you were able to get away with a few of these things but I have had users blow their cards, and or speakers as a result of running to many things, I have friends blow their ears etc just by running to many things even though volume wasn't particularly loud.

On the later chipped systems till 2013 when they started tieing it to display cards you could still get away with it.

In fact on win7, you probably could get away with most of this sort of thing.

Win10 isn't going to get you like that.

There are some things it simply won't let you do out of design or safety or something.

Certain things that go against bits of its security or quality rules.

There are vary few things that it outright refuses without a lot of doodling about but well its just not a good idea.

Now in the case of sound if you want to risk it, you can probably get away with well not using your linked drivers and just a ms driver, but as long as you never need headphones or need to use anything bar internal speakers and even then, you may or may not be ok, you take the risk.

Now if you happen to be on a standard non powerfull entertainment workstation that needs enhancements due to crappy sound output you may be fine, you may even get away with it but I wouldn't.




On 14/02/2019 10:15 PM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
At the risk of being too frivolous, the old Victor Borge comedy skit where he proposes that every punctuation mark should have a sound when being read is worth a listen. It will be on Youtube if you have not encountered it before. Its very old, he has been dead for years. Ahead of his time.
Brian

bglists@...
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Please address personal E-mail to:-
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----- Original Message ----- From: "marcio via Groups.Io" <marcinhorj21@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:35 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and sounds


LOL it really would be sooo funny to have something like that in NVDA!

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter <https://twitter.com/firirinfonfon>

Em 13/02/2019 22:34, Chris Shook escreveu:
Here's how it works with JAWS.
1. Go to dictionary manager.
2. Press Shit control D. THis will open the default dictionary manager.
3. CLick on the add button.

4. Go to the actual world field.
5. Type the word in the actual word field.
6. Tab to the select sound button.
7. Go to the list of sounds that come up.
8 When you find the sound you want, click enter.
9. If you want to test the sound press the play button.
10. If you like the sound, press control S to save the changes.
11. Exit the dictionary.

The sounds are various. My personal favorite one was starter pistol.




















Re: Problems With NVDA

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

What you're talking about is called readyboost.  A ramdrive is when you reserve part of your computer's ram as a drive.  It's often used to speed up access to often used programs, or in the case of editing large files, it can be used to increase access times to the data files.  Readyboost is somewhat different. 

What it does is to allow you to use a thumb drive (flash drive) as a cache to store commonly used programs or data files, while you're using your computer, to speed up access to said material.  This was primarily useful when most pcs had slower hard drives.  These days, with pcs having ssd drives, and the like, the readyboost technology isn't going to significantly increase your computer's performance.  If you're still using an older pc, or a slower hard drive, then readyboost can help by allowing you to store things on the thumbdrive that you use regularly, thereby reducing access times, and making your overall access times shorter.  It's not really ram, as it isn't used to run the programs, only to make accessing them faster.  I'm not sure how this differs from just plugging in a thumb drive, and using that for storage, other than it doesn't get a drive letter when using the readyboost.  I guess it was microsoft's way of making a new technology look even cooler when it came out.

On 2/14/2019 6:19 PM, Gene wrote:
However, Windows 10 does have Ram Drive, and I believe 7 and 8 do as well.  it uses a thumb drive and it actually does allow it to function as though it were RAM.  I don't know anything more about this but it might be worth discussing.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:01 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Right, and this is called virtual memory, it's not ram, and it doesn't
matter how many times you call it ram, it *isn't* ram. Virtual memory 
via swap space or similar has been around since windows 3.x, and even
the earliest versions of linux (even before 1.0 versions) had swap
partitions.  That still doesn't make them ram, only virtual memory,
which isn't used for active programs, swap space is only used when a
piece of data (whether it's a program or a chunk of data) hasn't been
accessed in a while, and something that has been accessed more recently
needs the ram to work properly, then that older piece is swapped out to
the virtual memory/swap file.  That doesn't qualify as ram, because of
several factors, the least of which is that that code is no longer
executing in the ram.  Therefore, you can add as much virtual space as
you want, but that doesn't have any affect on the amount of ram you have
in your pc that is available for actually running programs.

On 2/14/2019 3:41 PM, Richard Wells wrote:
> Android and Windows do provide means to boost physical ram. This is
> not storage, it is basically a virtual swap file except on solid state
> media.
>
> On 2/14/2019 11:46 AM, Travis Siegel wrote:
>> It doesn't matter what os you're talking about, sd cards do not
>> provide ram.  Ram is the space where actively executing programs
>> live.  This only happens in RAM.  Sd cards provide storage, this is
>> where saved programs, data for applications, and other downlaoded
>> content such as music files reside.  Too often these days, memory is
>> used interchangeably with storage, and that
>> is missleading at best, and downright dangerous at worst when someone
>> thinks they have more memory than they do, and run a program thinking
>> it will work because they have so much memory, only to find out that
>> the device crashes because it's overtaxed and the memory is full. 
>> Don't make the mistake of confusing memory with storage, they're
>> completely separate items, and the computer industry isn't doing
>> anybody any favors by referring to both as if they were the same thing.
>>
>>  On Thu, 14 Feb 2019, Brian K. Lingard wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Ibrahim Ajayi && List:
>>> Some Android telephones can increase their working RAM with an SD
>>> card, however, if your computer is a laptop, the SD card will
>>> normally only provide storage for files, not increase the working RAM.
>>>
>>> To upgrade the RAM,, you need to first check with the laptop maker
>>> as to the maximum RAM it Can address. Then review your RAM chips,
>>> often in a compartment under the laptop. If all slots are full, you
>>> need to replace the presently installed RAM with larger RAM chips.
>>> You unclip the present Rams, set them aside, and plug in the new
>>> RAM. Upon power-up,, the PC will be using the new RAM which should
>>> make programs run a bit faster ESPECIALLY IF several are running at
>>> once or you are editing huge files, such as audio recordings.
>>> I trust this explains the difference between what an SD card and RAM
>>> chips will do to the laptop.
>>> Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>




Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Problems With NVDA

Gene
 

Usually, when I hear such alerts in Firefox, I hear commands spoken when the alert is read, such as the combinations in the message below.  You have to remember to listen carefully for the command you want because if you don't, it may be inconvenient to have the message read again, in my experience.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: JM Casey
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 5:09 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

You don't really need to "get to" anything though. All you have to do is hit
alt-d or alt-s, depending on whether you want the password saved or not.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: February 14, 2019 6:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Sorry. I'll clarify.
Accessing alerts in GoogleChrome are easier for one thing. IN firefox, if
you get the alert to save a password, it's harder to get to the alert.
I will give firefox this. Firefix at least brings up the entire webage.
I've had instances where GoogleChrome only brings up half the webpage.






Re: Problems With NVDA

David Moore
 

Yes, Gene!

I would love to know more about this, and I am going to look it up.

I never heard of this, but it would really help me right now, until I get a computer with more ram.

I only have four gigs of ram on both of my laptops, and surprisingly, they work pretty good with many programs running except for a little slowness.

David Moore

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 6:20 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

 

However, Windows 10 does have Ram Drive, and I believe 7 and 8 do as well.  it uses a thumb drive and it actually does allow it to function as though it were RAM.  I don't know anything more about this but it might be worth discussing.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:01 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

 

Right, and this is called virtual memory, it's not ram, and it doesn't
matter how many times you call it ram, it *isn't* ram. Virtual memory 
via swap space or similar has been around since windows 3.x, and even
the earliest versions of linux (even before 1.0 versions) had swap
partitions.  That still doesn't make them ram, only virtual memory,
which isn't used for active programs, swap space is only used when a
piece of data (whether it's a program or a chunk of data) hasn't been
accessed in a while, and something that has been accessed more recently
needs the ram to work properly, then that older piece is swapped out to
the virtual memory/swap file.  That doesn't qualify as ram, because of
several factors, the least of which is that that code is no longer
executing in the ram.  Therefore, you can add as much virtual space as
you want, but that doesn't have any affect on the amount of ram you have
in your pc that is available for actually running programs.

On 2/14/2019 3:41 PM, Richard Wells wrote:
> Android and Windows do provide means to boost physical ram. This is
> not storage, it is basically a virtual swap file except on solid state
> media.
>
> On 2/14/2019 11:46 AM, Travis Siegel wrote:
>> It doesn't matter what os you're talking about, sd cards do not
>> provide ram.  Ram is the space where actively executing programs
>> live.  This only happens in RAM.  Sd cards provide storage, this is
>> where saved programs, data for applications, and other downlaoded
>> content such as music files reside.  Too often these days, memory is
>> used interchangeably with storage, and that
>> is missleading at best, and downright dangerous at worst when someone
>> thinks they have more memory than they do, and run a program thinking
>> it will work because they have so much memory, only to find out that
>> the device crashes because it's overtaxed and the memory is full. 
>> Don't make the mistake of confusing memory with storage, they're
>> completely separate items, and the computer industry isn't doing
>> anybody any favors by referring to both as if they were the same thing.
>>
>>  On Thu, 14 Feb 2019, Brian K. Lingard wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Ibrahim Ajayi && List:
>>> Some Android telephones can increase their working RAM with an SD
>>> card, however, if your computer is a laptop, the SD card will
>>> normally only provide storage for files, not increase the working RAM.
>>>
>>> To upgrade the RAM,, you need to first check with the laptop maker
>>> as to the maximum RAM it Can address. Then review your RAM chips,
>>> often in a compartment under the laptop. If all slots are full, you
>>> need to replace the presently installed RAM with larger RAM chips.
>>> You unclip the present Rams, set them aside, and plug in the new
>>> RAM. Upon power-up,, the PC will be using the new RAM which should
>>> make programs run a bit faster ESPECIALLY IF several are running at
>>> once or you are editing huge files, such as audio recordings.
>>> I trust this explains the difference between what an SD card and RAM
>>> chips will do to the laptop.
>>> Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>


 


Re: Problems With NVDA

Chris Shook
 

That's what I always did. I always used to hit alt Y or alt N and it did nothing.


Re: Problems With NVDA

Gene
 

However, Windows 10 does have Ram Drive, and I believe 7 and 8 do as well.  it uses a thumb drive and it actually does allow it to function as though it were RAM.  I don't know anything more about this but it might be worth discussing.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 3:01 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Right, and this is called virtual memory, it's not ram, and it doesn't
matter how many times you call it ram, it *isn't* ram. Virtual memory 
via swap space or similar has been around since windows 3.x, and even
the earliest versions of linux (even before 1.0 versions) had swap
partitions.  That still doesn't make them ram, only virtual memory,
which isn't used for active programs, swap space is only used when a
piece of data (whether it's a program or a chunk of data) hasn't been
accessed in a while, and something that has been accessed more recently
needs the ram to work properly, then that older piece is swapped out to
the virtual memory/swap file.  That doesn't qualify as ram, because of
several factors, the least of which is that that code is no longer
executing in the ram.  Therefore, you can add as much virtual space as
you want, but that doesn't have any affect on the amount of ram you have
in your pc that is available for actually running programs.

On 2/14/2019 3:41 PM, Richard Wells wrote:
> Android and Windows do provide means to boost physical ram. This is
> not storage, it is basically a virtual swap file except on solid state
> media.
>
> On 2/14/2019 11:46 AM, Travis Siegel wrote:
>> It doesn't matter what os you're talking about, sd cards do not
>> provide ram.  Ram is the space where actively executing programs
>> live.  This only happens in RAM.  Sd cards provide storage, this is
>> where saved programs, data for applications, and other downlaoded
>> content such as music files reside.  Too often these days, memory is
>> used interchangeably with storage, and that
>> is missleading at best, and downright dangerous at worst when someone
>> thinks they have more memory than they do, and run a program thinking
>> it will work because they have so much memory, only to find out that
>> the device crashes because it's overtaxed and the memory is full. 
>> Don't make the mistake of confusing memory with storage, they're
>> completely separate items, and the computer industry isn't doing
>> anybody any favors by referring to both as if they were the same thing.
>>
>>  On Thu, 14 Feb 2019, Brian K. Lingard wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Ibrahim Ajayi && List:
>>> Some Android telephones can increase their working RAM with an SD
>>> card, however, if your computer is a laptop, the SD card will
>>> normally only provide storage for files, not increase the working RAM.
>>>
>>> To upgrade the RAM,, you need to first check with the laptop maker
>>> as to the maximum RAM it Can address. Then review your RAM chips,
>>> often in a compartment under the laptop. If all slots are full, you
>>> need to replace the presently installed RAM with larger RAM chips.
>>> You unclip the present Rams, set them aside, and plug in the new
>>> RAM. Upon power-up,, the PC will be using the new RAM which should
>>> make programs run a bit faster ESPECIALLY IF several are running at
>>> once or you are editing huge files, such as audio recordings.
>>> I trust this explains the difference between what an SD card and RAM
>>> chips will do to the laptop.
>>> Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>




Re: Problems With NVDA

JM Casey
 

The alt-d is a bit non-intuitive I guess; I always used to hit alt-n and of
course it didn't make the alert close.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: February 14, 2019 6:13 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Thanks for that information.
I was never able to here the complete alert because the screen reader I was
using would interrupt itself by bringing the webpage up and stopping the
alert.


Re: Problems With NVDA

Chris Shook
 

Thanks for that information.
I was never able to here the complete alert because the screen reader I was using would interrupt itself by bringing the webpage up and stopping the alert.


Re: Problems With NVDA

JM Casey
 

You don't really need to "get to" anything though. All you have to do is hit
alt-d or alt-s, depending on whether you want the password saved or not.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: February 14, 2019 6:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Problems With NVDA

Sorry. I'll clarify.
Accessing alerts in GoogleChrome are easier for one thing. IN firefox, if
you get the alert to save a password, it's harder to get to the alert.
I will give firefox this. Firefix at least brings up the entire webage.
I've had instances where GoogleChrome only brings up half the webpage.


Re: Problems With NVDA

Chris Shook
 

Sorry. I'll clarify.
Accessing alerts in GoogleChrome are easier for one thing. IN firefox, if you get the alert to save a password, it's harder to get to the alert.
I will give firefox this. Firefix at least brings up the entire webage. I've had instances where GoogleChrome only brings up half the webpage.


Re: OCR and pdfs

 

Dan,

            Given what you have stated the material is, I cannot presume it's private in any way.  If you would, please e-mail me a copy so that I can take a look at it.

            I love the OCR capabilities of a piece of free software, and have offered this information in the past, and will again here::

                                                                           Free & Good OCR Software for Image Scanned PDFs

But, the above being said and offered, there are some scans of ancient documents that are just so bad (all sorts of dots and spots, characters looking like they're melting and changing shape, and more) that no OCR software is going to do a decent job with it.   Having the source PDF to look at I can tell you whether this might be the case with it.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and sounds

Gene
 

There are times when a series of words is repeated often and when a certain sound would save a meaningful amount of time.  I really doubt that JAWS developers introduced the feature more for entertainment than for productivity.  I doubt entertainment was a consideration at all. 
 
If you can represent a number of often repeated phrases in a document with sounds, each of which lasts perhaps half a second, you can save enough time that it might amount to something. 
 
Gene
----- Origiginal Message -----

Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and sounds

I think here we are talking more about entertainment rather than
productivity and utility, so if somebody wants this its better suited to an
add on I'd suggest rather than wasting time of the core programmers. Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Shook" <chris0309@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and sounds


> Yeah, the addon would probably have to pull the sounds from some sort of
> website or service.
> May be something to suggest to the developers.
>
>
>




Re: OCR and pdfs

Gene
 

If the document is completely blank, is it possible it is protected in some way and isn't showing anything to the OCR program?  What program are you opening the document in before scanning it?
 
I don't work with PDF documents much but a document where there aren't even garbled attempts at recognition makes me suspicious that nothing is being seen.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Dan Beaver
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:32 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] OCR and pdfs

I do not know since it is a lot of pages that are scanned images instead of text entered directly into the document.


Dan

On 2/14/2019 1:16 PM, JM Casey wrote:

Not all text will oCR.

How is the text printed?

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Beaver
Sent: February 14, 2019 11:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] OCR and pdfs

 

HI,

 

I have a pdf that I really need to ocr.  I am trying to use the Windows ocr via nvda+r.   It says it is running the ocr but it comes back with nothing.  I know the page of the pdf has text so I am confused about why it isn't OCR ing the thing.

 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks.

 

-- 
Dan Beaver (KC4DOY)
-- 
Dan Beaver (KC4DOY)


Re: Need help learning Braille

Giles Turnbull
 

I learned my letters and numbers and grade 2 contractions when I had a whole year of adult vision rehab training in Atlanta. Sadly, through lack of use, I've forgotten all the contractions and I understand it's all Unified English Braille (UEB) now.

As a diabetic doing several finger prick blood tests every day (a minimum of four if I manage to line my test strip up with the drop of blood, as many as 4 per test if I don't) I found my fingertip sensitivity did not easily register the Braile characters. I must say though, the Braille on prescription medications (at least in the UK) is very handy to still be able to decipher ... I used it yesterday to get the right bottle of the two insulins I use.

I am hoping to try an interstitial fouid glucose system once I can upgrade my iPhone so that I won't need to do as many fingertip blood tests. That might improve my fingertip sensitivity and make reading Braille a little easier :)