Date   

Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Hope Williamson <ladyhope@...>
 

Yeah just use uBlock origin. There's an addon for Firefox, and an extension for crhome as well. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/ublock-origin/cjpalhdlnbpafiamejdnhcphjbkeiagm also https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

I would think so. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
Thanks for this. Really a good tip.
In adition, I guess we also can, instead of bookmark the settings page, make a shortcut of it. That is, create a shortcut on our desktop that will put us exactly on this page when we hit enter in it.
Am I right about it?

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 23/01/2019 00:21, Gene escreveu:
This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal




Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
Thanks for this. Really a good tip.
In adition, I guess we also can, instead of bookmark the settings page, make a shortcut of it. That is, create a shortcut on our desktop that will put us exactly on this page when we hit enter in it.
Am I right about it?

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 23/01/2019 00:21, Gene escreveu:

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal




Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

I disagree that you can pretty much install it and forget it.  Yes, you can do that if you only use pages that require JAVA script to run that are on the white list, but with increasing numbers of pages requiring JAVA scripts to be allowed, you will very likely have to allow scripts on specific sites as you go.  and in the New York Times Example I gave, it may be easier to do what I described, even if you use Noscript and you allow scripts on the Times site, than to keep allowing and not allowing scripts using noscript.  You can allow scripts on the Times site using noscript, then switch using the method I described in a previous message.  That would give the best protection because Noscript provides certain additional protections that are active even if you allow scripts on a site. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

You can use it and it is still good but it isn't as good as it used to be before Firefox Quantum came out.  it isn't as easy to understand as to the interface and it doesn't have as many features in the redesigned version for the brave new Firefox.  Will Firefox ever stop requiring its add-on developers to modify them every few years?  I wonder how many add-ons have been abandoned by their developers after having the modify them at least two times in the last number of years.
 
 
I'm not recommending the method I gave over the add-on and the add-on provides good protections.  But those interested may compare the two if they wish.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

I do use UBlock Origin, but never knew that it also would block scripts. I thought it could only block ads. Good to know it.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 22:57, Brian Vogel escreveu:

Marcio,

         If you want a softer approach, then please just start out with uBlock Origin, which blocks ads and selectively blocks "annoying" scripts (my term, not theirs).  If you find you want something more aggressive afterward, then try NoScript.

          Both of these programs run in "install it and forget it" mode, but both are also wildly customizable if one so chooses.  I have not so chosen, except to suspend uBlock Origin on a couple of sites where I stream commercial TV content and cannot get it to work if uBlock is active.  What's funny is that adding the Privacy Badger extension brought back blocking of TV ads when streaming (or at least it did 2 days ago) which is something that used to work with both uBlock and Adblock Plus until ABC.com blocked all content if you had either activated.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Marcio,

         If you want a softer approach, then please just start out with uBlock Origin, which blocks ads and selectively blocks "annoying" scripts (my term, not theirs).  If you find you want something more aggressive afterward, then try NoScript.

          Both of these programs run in "install it and forget it" mode, but both are also wildly customizable if one so chooses.  I have not so chosen, except to suspend uBlock Origin on a couple of sites where I stream commercial TV content and cannot get it to work if uBlock is active.  What's funny is that adding the Privacy Badger extension brought back blocking of TV ads when streaming (or at least it did 2 days ago) which is something that used to work with both uBlock and Adblock Plus until ABC.com blocked all content if you had either activated.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Before I fill out the survey

Quentin Christensen
 

I was also going to say that there is also value in knowing what users are having trouble with - if it's a matter of something which has a keystroke / setting / existing way to fix it, that's great and makes it easy to help the individual, but us learning that people are getting stuck with something is useful as well.  There's no point in us thinking we've solved a problem by adding a keystroke or setting if no-one is aware it is exists :)


On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 9:00 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
I would also argue that regardless of whether there is a "way around" the issues you're encountering, there is great value in a development team for any product to know about issues that require "ways around" that irritate users to no end.

Sometimes highly skilled users of certain software, not just NVDA, lose all perspective of what the experience is like for the unsophisticated user (and that term is not an insult, personal or otherwise, we were all unsophisticated users of everything we've ever touched at one point in time).   Having that input can result in improvements that would not otherwise have been contemplated because there was no awareness of need or desire.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: Urgent Help With Accessing Google Drive and Docs

Ann Byrne
 

The book is excellent. I spent the morning curled up with it. At $12, it's a steal!

At 05:55 PM 1/22/2019, you wrote:
it just so happens that in an email message I received from Mystic Access, they mention a book they've just produced on how to use the Google suite of products with your PC. They also have an audio tutorial. You can visit them at http://www.mysticaccess.com to learn more about all their products. I just completed their Wordpress course, and I've used some of their other tutorials and products, and they're all great, so I highly recommend them. Good luck.
--
Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author
<http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com>http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com
http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
abbietaylor945@gmail.com


Re: Urgent Help With Accessing Google Drive and Docs

Abbie Taylor <abbietaylor945@...>
 

it just so happens that in an email message I received from Mystic Access, they mention a book they've just produced on how to use the Google suite of products with your PC. They also have an audio tutorial. You can visit them at http://www.mysticaccess.com to learn more about all their products. I just completed their Wordpress course, and I've used some of their other tutorials and products, and they're all great, so I highly recommend them. Good luck.
--
Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author
http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com
http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
abbietaylor945@...


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

On  Breitbart.com, when you click on an article to read and scroll down to read it, they all have embedded several links which are ads.  I use the page every day and there is no exception.

I just installed UBlock Origin, and my visit to Breitbart was much smoother.  I was able to read the first article without running into links for ads.

Thanks again

Blessings

Pascal    

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

It appears that on Breitbart.com, some of the ads being referred to are between links for articles.  The message wasn't descriptive of what pages on the site the adds being complained of occur.  If some of the ads appear between the links on the home page, then the NVDA add-on being discussed won't help.  That add-on is to allow you to skip ads in articles.  The reading feature I discussed won't help because that is specifically for reading articles.  It appears that of the options being discussed, ad blockers are the only ones that will solve the problem of ads appearing on pages like the Breitbart.com home page, where there appear to be a lot of them interspersed between article links.  the other remedies for ads, such as the add-on and paragraph reading may be useful.  They may also be used to skip intrusive material that often is placed between paragraphs in articles.  But I'm saying that there are different common interruptions to reading text and mentioning these may be helpful in different contexts.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 3:49 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 02:19 PM, Lino Morales wrote:

Brian does it weed out most of the ads on news sites etc. You’ve talked about this extension before

Simple answer:  yes.    It essentially wipes out all online ads anywhere they occur.   As new ones pop up the set of definitions gets updated very quickly and most of us never see them.  

I can't imagine browsing without an ad blocker.  They drove me mad with the visual distraction (not to mention auditory, for some) well over a decade ago and I cannot imagine that things have gotten any better, probably they've gotten worse.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Brian,
If I install this add-on, I'll automatically block all scripts, right? That is, I'll actually don't have any control about what to block and what to don't, isn't it?
A softer way to do it would be what I'm looking for. I don't want to block all these things all the time, only in certain websites. Any idea?

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:35, Brian Vogel escreveu:

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Yes please, do!

thanks

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 

 

As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 

 

Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Lino Morales
 

I’m aware of this setting. FF has it and so does Edge. That was introduced last year for Edge during the Insider test builds for 1709 if memory serves. C Net is bad about this. I just want to read the article not hear the vid along with it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Gene <gsasner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:16:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker
 
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 06:10 PM, marcio wrote:
Does it apply to Firefox as well?  (the need to grant an add-on permission to run in private mode)
It does not appear so.  I actually checked what was going on in Firefox when I was posting that last message, presuming I'd find an analogous setting.   I did not.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Lino Morales
 

Gene it’s a way to get to the pertant INFO say in an article. It’s a bear to find the beginning of a news article a lot of the time. Like I said before pages content are always changing so I feel this not effective. Adds are everywhere. We just got to find a happy medium to filter out all the clutter. The more I visit sites like:

www.wnd.com etc. the worse it gets.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Gene <gsasner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:06:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker
 
I doubt that ads are consistent on web sites.  They may be of different sizes, and I wouldn't assume they will remain on the same exact part of the page.  I don't ever recall Flexible Web described as a way to skip ads. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:54 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I don’t know if the Jaws Flexible Web main purpose is to work as an add blocker.

I use it to filter out/block elements like in forums (Reddit for example) and other sites/domains where things are pretty constant and just the simple structure of the site is a bit too cluttered for me.

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lino Morales
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Way worse Bryan. I can attest to this. This is a far better solution than JAW’s Flexible Web. I mean pages regardless of being a news site or not are constantly changing so to me this type of thing they are doing is ineffective IMHO. So don’t get any bright ideas NVDA add-on devs on here. Said add-on should do it no matter what screen reader you use.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:49:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 02:19 PM, Lino Morales wrote:

Brian does it weed out most of the adds on news sites etc. You’ve talked about this extention before

Simple answer:  yes.    It essentially wipes out all online ads anywhere they occur.   As new ones pop up the set of definitions gets updated very quickly and most of us never see them.  

I can't imagine browsing without an ad blocker.  They drove me mad with the visual distraction (not to mention auditory, for some) well over a decade ago and I cannot imagine that things have gotten any better, probably they've gotten worse.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back