Date   

Re: weather plus question

Adriano Barbieri
 

Hi Andrea and Michael,
 
These lists are created by each user of Weather Plus, and then are customized.
The list increases as by adding every time the city of your interest...
I don't think that interests you my italian cities list, but if you want I can send it in private :)
You can then import the city from the button "Import new cities..." and selecting the file with the extension*.zipcodes.
Regards
Adriano
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 9:14 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] weather plus question

I would also appreciate a copy of this weather.zipcodes please.

Andrea


On 12/10/2016 5:55 PM, Adriano Barbieri via Groups.io wrote:
Hi Gary and every body,
 
In addition to what I have already said to Ron:
You can import the file Weather.zipcodes from another Weather Plus user; these can export and then send us their list of cities.
 
Regards
Adriano
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 1:33 AM
Subject: [nvda] weather plus question

Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad



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Re: Keystroke issues Portable version

jordy deweer <webmaster_deweer@...>
 

Hi Brian,

Ik is a Windows 7 workstation that's be linked with a Windows Server 2012R2.
That's the own where I have problems.

It is not possible to install a copy of NVDA. The IT Manager here don't want to install anything, he just want to use Portable software, if possible.


I am talking about all NVDA Keystrokes. I have access to the keyboard and all works, only the NVDA Keystrokes (shortcuts) don't work.
Vriendelijke groeten, Kind Regards,
Jordy Deweer.

Tel.: +32 (0)497/40.70.01
Email: webmaster_deweer@hotmail.be

-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] Namens Brian's Mail list account
Verzonden: woensdag 12 oktober 2016 10:22
Aan: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Onderwerp: Re: [nvda] Keystroke issues Portable version

Are you saying this does not work on all machines or is there something special about this one?
I have occasionally come across keys pressed at once limits on some older laptop keyboards, but not in normal use with portable versions, though of course there are some admin screens it will not read. Does an installed copy work?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Webmaster Deweer" <webmaster_deweer@hotmail.be>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 8:32 AM
Subject: [nvda] Keystroke issues Portable version


Hi all,

I have a problem with my NVDA Key Strokes. I put a portable version of NVDA
2016.3 on a Windows 7 Desktop with full access on this directory, and linked
with a Windows 2012R2 Server. Everything is okay, but I can't use NVDA
Keystrokes with Insert or the CapsLock.

Is there any solution for this issue?

Thanks in advance!

Vriendelijke groeten, Kind Regards,
Jordy Deweer.

Tel.: +32 (0)497/40.70.01
Email: webmaster_deweer@hotmail.be


Re: Keystroke issues Portable version

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Are you saying this does not work on all machines or is there something special about this one?
I have occasionally come across keys pressed at once limits on some older laptop keyboards, but not in normal use with portable versions, though of course there are some admin screens it will not read. Does an installed copy work?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Webmaster Deweer" <webmaster_deweer@hotmail.be>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 8:32 AM
Subject: [nvda] Keystroke issues Portable version


Hi all,

I have a problem with my NVDA Key Strokes. I put a portable version of NVDA 2016.3 on a Windows 7 Desktop with full access on this directory, and linked with a Windows 2012R2 Server. Everything is okay, but I can't use NVDA Keystrokes with Insert or the CapsLock.

Is there any solution for this issue?

Thanks in advance!

Vriendelijke groeten, Kind Regards,
Jordy Deweer.

Tel.: +32 (0)497/40.70.01
Email: webmaster_deweer@hotmail.be


Keystroke issues Portable version

jordy deweer <webmaster_deweer@...>
 

Hi all,

 

I have a problem with my NVDA Key Strokes. I put a portable version of NVDA 2016.3 on a Windows 7 Desktop with full access on this directory, and linked with a Windows 2012R2 Server. Everything is okay, but I can’t use NVDA Keystrokes with Insert or the CapsLock.

 

Is there any solution for this issue?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Vriendelijke groeten, Kind Regards,

Jordy Deweer.

 

Tel.: +32 (0)497/40.70.01

Email: webmaster_deweer@...

 


Re: weather plus question

Michael Capelle <mcapelle@...>
 

same here.
 

Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 2:14 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] weather plus question
 

I would also appreciate a copy of this weather.zipcodes please.

Andrea


On 12/10/2016 5:55 PM, Adriano Barbieri via Groups.io wrote:
Hi Gary and every body,
 
In addition to what I have already said to Ron:
You can import the file Weather.zipcodes from another Weather Plus user; these can export and then send us their list of cities.
 
Regards
Adriano
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 1:33 AM
Subject: [nvda] weather plus question
 
Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad



Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: weather plus question

Andrea Sherry
 

I would also appreciate a copy of this weather.zipcodes please.

Andrea


On 12/10/2016 5:55 PM, Adriano Barbieri via Groups.io wrote:
Hi Gary and every body,
 
In addition to what I have already said to Ron:
You can import the file Weather.zipcodes from another Weather Plus user; these can export and then send us their list of cities.
 
Regards
Adriano
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 1:33 AM
Subject: [nvda] weather plus question

Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad



Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: weather plus question

Adriano Barbieri
 

Hi Gary and every body,
 
In addition to what I have already said to Ron:
You can import the file Weather.zipcodes from another Weather Plus user; these can export and then send us their list of cities.
 
Regards
Adriano
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 1:33 AM
Subject: [nvda] weather plus question

Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox


Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Hush I tried to be diplomatic in the way I put it, now see what you have done, you have called them idiots, that is not the case, you know the old phrase that if something is idiot proof, somebody produces a better idiot don't you.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Felix G." <constantlyvariable@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 12, 2016 6:52 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities


Hello,
now please correct me if I'm oversimplifying, but isn't this entire thing
analogous to someone giving out their Teamviewer password to the entire web
and then complaining how insecure Teamviewer is because someone went and
trashed their system?
I strongly trust this community is mature enough not to be damaged by this.
Kind regards,
Felix

Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> schrieb am Di., 11. Okt. 2016 um
22:26 Uhr:

Yeah I agree.
I had a laptop with a bios that didn't update and a fan that didn't work
and packed it away and it was dead.
Due to heat in summer especially with the humidity in new zealand though
other countries and places can get hotter, I have had to put a coolant
fan desk under my computer at all times.
In fact during summer especially if my laptop is on my lap which it can
be from time to time I have got vary burned legs from just putting it
there so yeah.
A friend who has his system in an well ventelated atic room still says
that even with his fans full up on his gaming wrig he needs to stick 1
or 2 fans into his case just to cool it down.
He probably needs several heat pumps or something on the other hand the
solar panels are in his rough so yeah who knows.
Things can get quite hot.
For myself I have a room with 2 computers, 1 workstation and a small
desk server.
It does have 2 sides to open windows but even then well.



On 12/10/2016 9:05 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
Lol, that was really too bad, as I really liked the note line of
devices. Figured it was Samsung's attempt at contributing to some sort
of a bang poppy celebration, but no one seems to appreciate their
version of fireworks.

In all seriousness though, It's not only the note that I've seen that
can get really hot, if put in certain situations. I've seen IPhones that
have gotten hot enough that you could barely touch the glass on the face
of them.
Then again, I've also seen people forget to set their laptops to sleep
or hibernate and then slip it into a case, leading to a pretty decent
smoke out.

Shaun Everiss wrote:
I agree, I reported this in my blog last week.
So many are doing stupid things all the time.
If we need to be worried about anything it is if we have a shiny new
galaxy note bomb or not.
Samsung recalled all gn7s and has canciled production, some sources
say thats the end of the note.
However a expert says as we get better and faster phones they become
more like our computer units, and more powerfull and the energy needs
to go somewhere, they don't have fans, fans would drain battery faster
but the fact is even with flash chips we will need to get our phones
cool somehow.
And since our phones live in cases, etc and we havn't really had the
need to cool them as such that will only become more an issue as it
comes up.



On 12/10/2016 7:41 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone
jack
on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom
of
their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you
can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for
this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just
because
they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall
for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus,
and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your
machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any
secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be
made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that
passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a
file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes
into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that
its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you
remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox,
so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely
validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is
without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss"
<sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are
important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly,
developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root
of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a
public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as
"unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website.
Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph














Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

It happens because people want to believe it. I also think many of us feel there is a conspiracy about, and we don't want to lose access to something we had before. It has been my experience that life often takes several steps back in access for us and its mostly to do with the bottom line and bean counters. However the Iphone thing is solved by a tiny adaptor made by Belkin if you want to charge and run phones together on the 7. I did chuckle at the demo of dunking it in a bucket of water though.
However back on topic now.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy" <icu8it2@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 7:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities


It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus, and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox, so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments, several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative, I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph





Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

Felix G.
 

Hello,
now please correct me if I'm oversimplifying, but isn't this entire thing analogous to someone giving out their Teamviewer password to the entire web and then complaining how insecure Teamviewer is because someone went and trashed their system?
I strongly trust this community is mature enough not to be damaged by this.
Kind regards,
Felix

Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@...> schrieb am Di., 11. Okt. 2016 um 22:26 Uhr:

Yeah I agree.
I had a laptop with a bios that didn't update and a fan that didn't work
and packed it away and it was dead.
Due to heat in summer especially with the humidity in new zealand though
other countries and places can get hotter, I have had to put a coolant
fan desk under my computer at all times.
In fact during summer especially if my laptop is on my lap which it can
be from time to time I have got vary burned legs from just putting it
there so yeah.
A friend who has his system in an well ventelated atic room still says
that even with his fans full up on his gaming wrig he needs to stick 1
or 2 fans into his case just to cool it down.
He probably needs several heat pumps or something on the other hand the
solar panels are in his rough so yeah who knows.
Things can get quite hot.
For myself I have a room with 2 computers, 1 workstation and a small
desk server.
It does have 2 sides to open windows but even then well.



On 12/10/2016 9:05 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
> Lol, that was really too bad, as I really liked the note line of
> devices. Figured it was Samsung's attempt at contributing to some sort
> of a bang poppy celebration, but no one seems to appreciate their
> version of fireworks.
>
> In all seriousness though, It's not only the note that I've seen that
> can get really hot, if put in certain situations. I've seen IPhones that
> have gotten hot enough that you could barely touch the glass on the face
> of them.
> Then again, I've also seen people forget to set their laptops to sleep
> or hibernate and then slip it into a case, leading to a pretty decent
> smoke out.
>
> Shaun Everiss wrote:
>> I agree, I reported this in my blog last week.
>> So many are doing stupid things all the time.
>> If we need to be worried about anything it is if we have a shiny new
>> galaxy note bomb or not.
>> Samsung recalled all gn7s and has canciled production, some sources
>> say thats the end of the note.
>> However a expert says as we get better and faster phones they become
>> more like our computer units, and more powerfull and the energy needs
>> to go somewhere, they don't have fans, fans would drain battery faster
>> but the fact is even with flash chips we will need to get our phones
>> cool somehow.
>> And since our phones live in cases, etc and we havn't really had the
>> need to cool them as such that will only become more an issue as it
>> comes up.
>>
>>
>>
>> On 12/10/2016 7:41 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
>>> It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack
>>> on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of
>>> their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you
>>> can reveal a hidden jack.
>>>
>>> I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for
>>> this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because
>>> they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall
>>> for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
>>> Take care.
>>>
>>> Brian's Mail list account wrote:
>>>> Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus,
>>>> and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your
>>>> machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any
>>>> secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
>>>> I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be
>>>> made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that
>>>> passwords were created for a reason.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a
>>>> file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes
>>>> into details of how to remove it.
>>>> Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that
>>>> its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you
>>>> remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox,
>>>> so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely
>>>> validated by a reputable organisation.
>>>> There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is
>>>> without spreading paranoia about other software.
>>>> Brian
>>>>
>>>> bglists@...
>>>> Sent via blueyonder.
>>>> Please address personal email to:-
>>>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
>>>> in the display name field.
>>>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss"
>>>> <sm.everiss@...>
>>>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
>>>> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are
>>>> important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly,
>>>> developer responsibilities
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I read this to joseph.
>>>>> 1.  yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
>>>>> userid and password.
>>>>> The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
>>>>> stupid reason he hadn't even save.
>>>>> It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
>>>>> Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
>>>>> not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
>>>>> He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
>>>>> in general not being secure.
>>>>> This same user has done this drama before.
>>>>> He got what he deserved is all I am saying.
>>>>>
>>>>> You shouldn't give out your security info.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
>>>>>> Dear NVDA community:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
>>>>>> members:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
>>>>>> nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root
>>>>>> of the
>>>>>> problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
>>>>>> strings
>>>>>> passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a
>>>>>> public
>>>>>> forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
>>>>>> "invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
>>>>>> several
>>>>>> people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
>>>>>> disconnected. A
>>>>>> few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
>>>>>> password,
>>>>>> changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
>>>>>> long
>>>>>> strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
>>>>>> published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
>>>>>> social
>>>>>> media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as
>>>>>> "unsecure".
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
>>>>>> I'd like
>>>>>> to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1.      Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 2.      The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
>>>>>> done
>>>>>> privately.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 3.      The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
>>>>>> do so
>>>>>> the host can be aware of what's going on.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 4.      The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
>>>>>> disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
>>>>>> action plan
>>>>>> in the future:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 1.      Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
>>>>>> conclusion
>>>>>> that things are insecure.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 2.      Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
>>>>>> evidence becomes available.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website.
>>>>>> Although
>>>>>> there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
>>>>>> incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
>>>>>> actions.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thank you.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Cheers,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Joseph
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: weather plus question

Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Gary,


If you want access to a lot of cities, what you do is to select each one of them individually--either by name or zip code and then add them to your list.  Then choose one as your default.  I have over a hundred cities nationally (USA) and worldwide and if I want to see what the weather is in Tokyo or Brasilia or North Pole Alaska, I simply switch to it under the select cities--create a temporary city (control + shift + insert + W keystroke) and I can find out the information in a few seconds.



On 10/11/2016 7:33 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:
Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox

--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


weather plus question

Gary Metzler <gmtravel@...>
 

Hi All,
 
I just started using nvda and downloaded the weather plus app.  Does anyone know where I can get the file of zip codes?  Thanks for any help. Regards, Gary kn4ox


Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

 

Yeah I agree.
I had a laptop with a bios that didn't update and a fan that didn't work and packed it away and it was dead.
Due to heat in summer especially with the humidity in new zealand though other countries and places can get hotter, I have had to put a coolant fan desk under my computer at all times.
In fact during summer especially if my laptop is on my lap which it can be from time to time I have got vary burned legs from just putting it there so yeah.
A friend who has his system in an well ventelated atic room still says that even with his fans full up on his gaming wrig he needs to stick 1 or 2 fans into his case just to cool it down.
He probably needs several heat pumps or something on the other hand the solar panels are in his rough so yeah who knows.
Things can get quite hot.
For myself I have a room with 2 computers, 1 workstation and a small desk server.
It does have 2 sides to open windows but even then well.

On 12/10/2016 9:05 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
Lol, that was really too bad, as I really liked the note line of
devices. Figured it was Samsung's attempt at contributing to some sort
of a bang poppy celebration, but no one seems to appreciate their
version of fireworks.

In all seriousness though, It's not only the note that I've seen that
can get really hot, if put in certain situations. I've seen IPhones that
have gotten hot enough that you could barely touch the glass on the face
of them.
Then again, I've also seen people forget to set their laptops to sleep
or hibernate and then slip it into a case, leading to a pretty decent
smoke out.

Shaun Everiss wrote:
I agree, I reported this in my blog last week.
So many are doing stupid things all the time.
If we need to be worried about anything it is if we have a shiny new
galaxy note bomb or not.
Samsung recalled all gn7s and has canciled production, some sources
say thats the end of the note.
However a expert says as we get better and faster phones they become
more like our computer units, and more powerfull and the energy needs
to go somewhere, they don't have fans, fans would drain battery faster
but the fact is even with flash chips we will need to get our phones
cool somehow.
And since our phones live in cases, etc and we havn't really had the
need to cool them as such that will only become more an issue as it
comes up.



On 12/10/2016 7:41 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack
on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of
their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you
can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for
this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because
they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall
for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus,
and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your
machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any
secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be
made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that
passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a
file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes
into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that
its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you
remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox,
so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely
validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is
without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss"
<sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are
important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly,
developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root
of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a
public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as
"unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website.
Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph











Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Lol, that was really too bad, as I really liked the note line of devices. Figured it was Samsung's attempt at contributing to some sort of a bang poppy celebration, but no one seems to appreciate their version of fireworks.

In all seriousness though, It's not only the note that I've seen that can get really hot, if put in certain situations. I've seen IPhones that have gotten hot enough that you could barely touch the glass on the face of them.
Then again, I've also seen people forget to set their laptops to sleep or hibernate and then slip it into a case, leading to a pretty decent smoke out.

Shaun Everiss wrote:

I agree, I reported this in my blog last week.
So many are doing stupid things all the time.
If we need to be worried about anything it is if we have a shiny new galaxy note bomb or not.
Samsung recalled all gn7s and has canciled production, some sources say thats the end of the note.
However a expert says as we get better and faster phones they become more like our computer units, and more powerfull and the energy needs to go somewhere, they don't have fans, fans would drain battery faster but the fact is even with flash chips we will need to get our phones cool somehow.
And since our phones live in cases, etc and we havn't really had the need to cool them as such that will only become more an issue as it comes up.



On 12/10/2016 7:41 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack
on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of
their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you
can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for
this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because
they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall
for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus,
and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your
machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any
secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be
made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that
passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a
file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes
into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that
its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you
remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox,
so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely
validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is
without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are
important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly,
developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph








Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

 

I agree, I reported this in my blog last week.
So many are doing stupid things all the time.
If we need to be worried about anything it is if we have a shiny new galaxy note bomb or not.
Samsung recalled all gn7s and has canciled production, some sources say thats the end of the note.
However a expert says as we get better and faster phones they become more like our computer units, and more powerfull and the energy needs to go somewhere, they don't have fans, fans would drain battery faster but the fact is even with flash chips we will need to get our phones cool somehow.
And since our phones live in cases, etc and we havn't really had the need to cool them as such that will only become more an issue as it comes up.

On 12/10/2016 7:41 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack
on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of
their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you
can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for
this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because
they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall
for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus,
and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your
machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any
secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be
made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that
passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a
file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes
into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that
its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you
remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox,
so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely
validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is
without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are
important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly,
developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph







Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

 

Well it was all for fun.
Sadly, on some forums there is a group that cries over security in remote.
No data was lost just stuff in ram, and stuff in ram is destroyed all the time.
They didn't save, someone crashed nvda and they had to restart.
Maybe someone should find this group and put criptolocker on their systems with instructions that they need to apologise to the rest of us for being idiots, not do it again, and say if they do they will be removed from lists and blacklisted for ever.
Nothing to bad, but this group pops up every so often, they lay low then pop up.
They will probably do that right now.

On 12/10/2016 2:46 a.m., Jeremy wrote:
As I understand it, the individuals who had their remote sessions
tinkered with had basically invited someone to screw with them. Once it
became clear who the group was who had their sessions played with, or at
least some of those in the group were, the whole thing became kind of
entertaining. While the person who sent the playful strings of text
could maybe have made slightly better choices, those individuals who
received said playful strings were apparently trying to figure out how
it was done, so they could use it on others.

had those individuals being messed with not had their own malicious
intent, as I strongly suspect, I don't think it would have ever come to
this. Either way, you try and screw with someone and every now and then,
someone much more intelligent than you comes along and plays with you a
little. That's the way of things on the internet.


Shaun Everiss wrote:
I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative, I'd
like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph




.


Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

 

Well I am not sure what to think.
True a lot of people are taking it like it wasn't anything.
This particular guy and guys like him there are a couple have bitched about nvda remote being unsecure.
Its only a problem if.
1. you give out your key.
2. you autoconnect to things all the time there is no need, this excludes say if you admin something say on a network and you need access, even then, I guess you turn off your access as needed at any rate if you are doing adminning nvda needs to be active to do so so you can still autoconnect when you are running nvda and as long as nvda does not run thats fine, I guess you can turn it off and on as you wish I was planning to set several units with unique keys which ofcause I will not share for those purposes.
3. since the file for the key the .ini is not hidden or encripted anyone can get it, this assumes you give it out in the first place or your friend who is helping you is a total idiot and shares/uses the key for something.
As an added thingy, you can generate your own keys, every time you exit a session if you wish and don't save, those keys are destroyed there is a key generator.
The thing is opensource meaning even if the key was encripted, well you can't protect it as such because of the nature people would find out how.
4.
As far as I understand it, someone says, looky at me I will make a key called 123 and just have people foul my computer.
Now on several hack forums and stuff I visit a lot of people have just done this, like hay, here is a key, see how much you can stuff up my vm and see how good the os is.
Now thats a vm, you can create and destroy that if it gets to dammaged and as long as you don't stupidly externally link it to an entire drive or something, set a folder say for its access then the worse you can do is mangle that and if you are smart you damn sure will make sure its not even important.
A lot of us geeks dammage vms all the time, thats what those are for, testing and seing, otherwise what would we use vms for.
Its a bit stupid to allow your live machine for this treatment, a vm hack fest is fine, if it gets clobbered, make another.
And if you don't want another, make a backup of the image files before we come in and trash it.
5. its not our fault if someone doesn't save data, and all that happened was someone made nvda crash with a lengthy string of junk.
This was all it was.
The reciever had to reboot and his data in memmory which he had not saved was gone.
Nothing was dammaged.
Yet he cries wolf.
Having known tyler from before when he did stupid things I know full well, me being a fellow pirate laughed it off, others didn't think it was funny.
But still, he is now doing good which is fine.
Any bit of software will dammage you if you are stupid.
Ie who posts a key of 123, in fact who posts a password of 123 these days.
I admit on a public service I posted a number of 12345 on a private service becuase I couldn't be bothered with security, but later on when it was upgraded I changed it to another number.
From time to time this guy appears and says something.

On 12/10/2016 3:05 a.m., Mallard wrote:
From the incident description, in my humble opinon, it looks as if the
whole thing had been carefully planned, with the purpose of deliberately
damaging the community and NVDA's reputation.


Unfortunately I've been seeing disruptive behavours on other lists
lately, where some "clever" person(s) faked a group member's account and
started trolling the list.

As Einstein once said, there are only two infinitethings: the Universe
and human stupidity... And there are still doubts about the first one...
(lol).

I'd say both these incidents, the NVDA Remote and the other one I was
referring to, fall into this category.
Ciao,
Ollie




Il 11/10/2016 15:46, Jeremy ha scritto:
As I understand it, the individuals who had their remote sessions
tinkered with had basically invited someone to screw with them. Once
it became clear who the group was who had their sessions played with,
or at least some of those in the group were, the whole thing became
kind of entertaining. While the person who sent the playful strings of
text could maybe have made slightly better choices, those individuals
who received said playful strings were apparently trying to figure out
how it was done, so they could use it on others.

had those individuals being messed with not had their own malicious
intent, as I strongly suspect, I don't think it would have ever come
to this. Either way, you try and screw with someone and every now and
then, someone much more intelligent than you comes along and plays
with you a little. That's the way of things on the internet.


Shaun Everiss wrote:
I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his
userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some
stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is
not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote
in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community
members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long
strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments,
several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host
disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published
password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read
long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on
social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative,
I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be
done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to
do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following
action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the
conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user
actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph







.


Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

It kind of reminds me of the thing going around about the headphone jack on the newer IPhone 7s. Apparently one can take a drill to the bottom of their pretty new device and if you've got the placement just right, you can reveal a hidden jack.

I find it absolutely crazy how many people apparently have fallen for this crap and caused serious problems to brand new IPhones, just because they seen it on youtube or facebook. While I feel bad that people fall for things like this, it still makes me scratch my noggin in amazement.
Take care.

Brian's Mail list account wrote:

Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus, and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox, so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments, several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative, I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph




Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

jeremy <icu8it2@...>
 

Yeah, that's kind of how it appeared to me too. Main thing I think is important to keep in mind, as has already been said here, don't give out personal information or participate in things that may sound shady, unless you fully know what you're dealing with. It's also worth pointing out, in as much as I understand how it took place, it was mainly the remote server that allowed this to occur, so understand that in most cases, when you make a connection to a server, the admin of that server may be able to do things you may not necessary wish them to.

I personally don't see any issues using nvdaremote.com and for the few times I've used it, it's worked wonderfully, but then I'm not participating in this crap that got all this started either. I do however think that it would be a good idea for better documentation on the installation of the remote server to be placed somewhere, so that people have easier access to run their own, if they wish too.

I think that NVDA remote was an amazing contribution to the community and that Tyler and Tauth did a wonderful job, but I do kind of wish that we could see some updates in it's development. That's for another topic though, me thinks. :)
Take care.

Mallard wrote:

From the incident description, in my humble opinon, it looks as if the whole thing had been carefully planned, with the purpose of deliberately damaging the community and NVDA's reputation.


Unfortunately I've been seeing disruptive behavours on other lists lately, where some "clever" person(s) faked a group member's account and started trolling the list.

As Einstein once said, there are only two infinitethings: the Universe and human stupidity... And there are still doubts about the first one... (lol).

I'd say both these incidents, the NVDA Remote and the other one I was referring to, fall into this category.
Ciao,
Ollie




Il 11/10/2016 15:46, Jeremy ha scritto:
As I understand it, the individuals who had their remote sessions tinkered with had basically invited someone to screw with them. Once it became clear who the group was who had their sessions played with, or at least some of those in the group were, the whole thing became kind of entertaining. While the person who sent the playful strings of text could maybe have made slightly better choices, those individuals who received said playful strings were apparently trying to figure out how it was done, so they could use it on others.

had those individuals being messed with not had their own malicious intent, as I strongly suspect, I don't think it would have ever come to this. Either way, you try and screw with someone and every now and then, someone much more intelligent than you comes along and plays with you a little. That's the way of things on the internet.


Shaun Everiss wrote:
I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments, several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative, I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph







Re: NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Yes its like when these folk ring you up pretending you have a virus, and asking you to do a remote desktop or some other control your machine from afar program. You just do not do it or give them any secret key you have to get into it on your machine.
I think one can only go so far with protection, some people need to be made aware that its perfectly possible to invite trouble and that passwords were created for a reason.


As an aside there is also a rumour going on on sighted forums that a file associated with dropbox is some kind of malware and even goes into details of how to remove it.
Dbxcon or some such name. the only evidence people are using is that its not actually signed by dropbox but another name. However If you remove all copies it will completely screw up your access to dropbox, so don't take any notice of such things unless they can be absolutely validated by a reputable organisation.
There is far too much misinformation and nasty people about as it is without spreading paranoia about other software.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2016 11:34 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA Remote crash incident: trust and ethics are important just as technology is, never give out passwords publicly, developer responsibilities


I read this to joseph.
1. yeah someone gave his public key which is basically giving his userid and password.
The user got his nvda crashed and lost data in ram, which for some stupid reason he hadn't even save.
It was all mindless fun and just users mucking round.
Sadly the same user has gone over the fact that the main dev criss is not responding to feadback and not hiding the public key, etc, etc.
He then decided to post on a public forum complaining about nv remote in general not being secure.
This same user has done this drama before.
He got what he deserved is all I am saying.

You shouldn't give out your security info.



On 11/10/2016 8:40 a.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Dear NVDA community:



I give you permission to pass out the following to other community members:



Dear users of NVDA Remote Support add-on:



On the morning of October 10, 2016, a group of users connected via
nvdaremote.com experienced a general client crash, with the root of the
problem being a series of events that led to NVDA crashing with long strings
passed to a particular synthesizer. The event unfolded as follows:



In the evening of October 9, 2016, someone posted a message to a public
forum which included giving out his remote client password, with an
"invitation" for anyone to connect to his computer. Within moments, several
people connected to the poster's computer, but then the host disconnected. A
few moments later, the server admin came in using the published password,
changed some configurations and crashed NVDA by letting clients read long
strings and making their keyboards unusable. An audio recording was
published that provides some live evidence, with people posting on social
media advising others to stop using this, labeling this as "unsecure".



In light of this incident, as a community add-ons representative, I'd like
to request that add-on users follow these guidelines:



1. Never give out NVDA remote session password publicly.

2. The Remote host must provide the password and this should be done
privately.

3. The Remote client must tell host what he or she is going to do so
the host can be aware of what's going on.

4. The host should try to inform clients that he or she is
disconnecting so clients can disconnect properly.



Also, as an add-on developer, I'd like to propose the following action plan
in the future:



1. Please examine evidence you can find before coming to the conclusion
that things are insecure.

2. Developers should provide responses as soon as possible when
evidence becomes available.



The add-on can be found in our NVDA Community Add-ons website. Although
there is some things about this add-on that have contributed to this
incident, the ultimate root cause has to do with irresponsible user actions.



Thank you.

Cheers,

Joseph