Date   

locked NVDA Remote

Robert Doc Wright godfearer
 

A friend was just given a desktop PC and when we tried downloading the remote his pc kept deleting it saying that it had a virus. This happened when we downloaded from the web site.

 

                                                                                                                                If all I have left in this world is God, I have everything!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Nimer Jaber
 

Okay, I think it is time to allow this thread to die. Going to lock it now. i think this topic has gone far enough, and its usefulness to NVDA community has been exhausted.

Thanks.

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 12:23 PM Lenron <lenron93@...> wrote:
no no and no Microsoft will not just start charging more because
narrator is better.

On 5/23/19, Arlene <nedster66@...> wrote:
> Hello if Microsoft is making Narrator the main Screen reader like Apple with
> Voiceover built in. Then if you purchase a windows system with Narrator
> built in. Then you should pay extra.  Also if that is the case, then
> Microsoft should include a word processor with your computer.  Or, give a
> free trial for 30 days and if you have an outlook key then use it.  Or if
> you purchase outlook you should be able to buy it out right.  Because you
> pay for it and other things to run your computer.  I hope this is not off
> topic.
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Gene
> Sent: May 23, 2019 11:00 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS
>
> The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose
> Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.  I
> doubt Narrator is intended to be so good that it might threaten them but I
> don't know what the long range plans are.  but you know the saying, be
> careful what you wish for.  How long was Microsoft criticized for being a
> monopoly and yet, there appear to be a lot of blind people who want Narrator
> to be a good enough screen-reader that other designers would leave the
> field.  That isn't in blind computer users' interests.
>
> As far as the touch cursor is concerned, I was stating what I've seen on
> list from one or two good sources.  But I'm not saying that you are wrong,
> Nimber, I'm just explaining that I have never compared the two and I don't
> use Windows 10 so I'll withdraw my statement and let others address the
> question.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Devin Prater
> Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 11:29 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS
>
> This is a great point, and one I've never really thought of. With other
> platforms, again, you don't really get that choice, and with Windows you
> do.
>
> On May 23, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Karl Smith <karl@...> wrote:
> I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many
> people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works
> better than the other in different situations?
>
> Karl
>
>
> __________
>
> Karl Smith
> Access Technology Consultant
> Axis
> 4304 South El Camino St.
> Taylorsville, Utah 84129
>
> Phone: 866-824-7885
> Fax:     866-824-7885
> E-mail: karl@...
> Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@...
>
> Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech
>
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
> Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS
>
> I debunk this.
> The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken
> accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where
> multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable
> access?
> The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't
> comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access
> into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will
> invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues
> caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party
> scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of
> service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get
> a quagmire.
> I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are
> all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things
> will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or
> feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of
> development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows,
> we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the
> mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money,
> demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass
> ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used
> to.
> Best,
> Erik
> On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:
>
> Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.
> Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will
> work.
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Bianka Brankovic
> Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS
>
> Hello Aine, hello list,
>
> I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.
>
> Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job
> with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe
> and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest
> version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will
> encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws.
> Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than
> one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as
> you would like it.
>
> As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be
> using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to
> survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.
>
> Hope that helps …
>
> Thanks and kind regards,
>
> Bianka
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762





--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Lenron
 

no no and no Microsoft will not just start charging more because
narrator is better.

On 5/23/19, Arlene <nedster66@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello if Microsoft is making Narrator the main Screen reader like Apple with
Voiceover built in. Then if you purchase a windows system with Narrator
built in. Then you should pay extra. Also if that is the case, then
Microsoft should include a word processor with your computer. Or, give a
free trial for 30 days and if you have an outlook key then use it. Or if
you purchase outlook you should be able to buy it out right. Because you
pay for it and other things to run your computer. I hope this is not off
topic.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Gene
Sent: May 23, 2019 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose
Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.  I
doubt Narrator is intended to be so good that it might threaten them but I
don't know what the long range plans are.  but you know the saying, be
careful what you wish for.  How long was Microsoft criticized for being a
monopoly and yet, there appear to be a lot of blind people who want Narrator
to be a good enough screen-reader that other designers would leave the
field.  That isn't in blind computer users' interests.

As far as the touch cursor is concerned, I was stating what I've seen on
list from one or two good sources.  But I'm not saying that you are wrong,
Nimber, I'm just explaining that I have never compared the two and I don't
use Windows 10 so I'll withdraw my statement and let others address the
question.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Devin Prater
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 11:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

This is a great point, and one I've never really thought of. With other
platforms, again, you don't really get that choice, and with Windows you
do.

On May 23, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Karl Smith <karl@axistech.net> wrote:
I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many
people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works
better than the other in different situations?

Karl


__________

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant
Axis
4304 South El Camino St.
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Phone: 866-824-7885
Fax:     866-824-7885
E-mail: karl@axistech.net
Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@gmail.com

Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

I debunk this.
The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken
accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where
multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable
access?
The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't
comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access
into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will
invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues
caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party
scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of
service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get
a quagmire.
I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are
all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things
will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or
feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of
development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows,
we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the
mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money,
demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass
ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used
to.
Best,
Erik
On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.
Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will
work.
Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Hello Aine, hello list,

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job
with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe
and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest
version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will
encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws.
Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than
one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as
you would like it.

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be
using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to
survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

Hope that helps …

Thanks and kind regards,

Bianka







--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Arlene
 

Hello if Microsoft is making Narrator the main Screen reader like Apple with Voiceover built in. Then if you purchase a windows system with Narrator built in. Then you should pay extra.  Also if that is the case, then Microsoft should include a word processor with your computer.  Or, give a free trial for 30 days and if you have an outlook key then use it.  Or if you purchase outlook you should be able to buy it out right.  Because you pay for it and other things to run your computer.  I hope this is not off topic. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 23, 2019 11:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.  I doubt Narrator is intended to be so good that it might threaten them but I don't know what the long range plans are.  but you know the saying, be careful what you wish for.  How long was Microsoft criticized for being a monopoly and yet, there appear to be a lot of blind people who want Narrator to be a good enough screen-reader that other designers would leave the field.  That isn't in blind computer users' interests.

 

As far as the touch cursor is concerned, I was stating what I've seen on list from one or two good sources.  But I'm not saying that you are wrong, Nimber, I'm just explaining that I have never compared the two and I don't use Windows 10 so I'll withdraw my statement and let others address the question.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 11:29 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

This is a great point, and one I've never really thought of. With other platforms, again, you don't really get that choice, and with Windows you do.


On May 23, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Karl Smith <karl@...> wrote:

I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?

 

Karl

 

 

__________

 

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant

Axis

4304 South El Camino St.

Taylorsville, Utah 84129

 

Phone: 866-824-7885

Fax:     866-824-7885

E-mail: karl@...

Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@...

 

Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

 

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 02:25 PM, Gene wrote:
How can a paying product compete or one where people donate money, time, and solicit grants?
See Microsoft Office, PhotoShop, Dreamweaver, and the list goes on and on.   This is all the more so once you have an embedded base, which JAWS has in spades, and when most government entities "insist" on a specific product (JAWS, in this case) the probability of your demise is very, very slim.   

The idea that competition in the marketplace is or ever will be fair in any meaningful sense should be easily dismissed by anyone who's observed business history in any capitalist system.   Competition is ruthless for the most part, and it's generally government regulation that's required to get something that's even vaguely fair.

'Well-regulated free markets' is not an oxymoron, but a necessity for good economic outcomes.

     ~ Peter Diamond, winner of the 2010 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences
 
But since this isn't in any meaningful way about JAWS versus NVDA from a "what can it do for the user, and how" perspective I'm dropping it now.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

Puritanism:  The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

        ~ H.L. Mencken

 

 


Re: not able to start NVDA using shortcut Ctrl + alt + space

Arlene
 

Hi there: Arlene here. I seen a message on this list 2 or 3 weeks ago. It had steps to have Nvda start if you are on a web page. I accidently deleted the message when I was going to braille it out.  Whoever sent these steps. Can they be resent again?  Thanks. I do want to write them down!  It was to do with either NBDA not starting or crashes.  Thanks and have a good day.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Ed Marquette
Sent: May 2, 2019 6:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] not able to start NVDA using shortcut Ctrl + alt + space

 

 

This procedure is a bit odd.  NVDA installs a shortcut on the desktop, and usually control+Alt+ the letter N starts NVDA.  That stopped working.  I tried refreshing the shortcut, but it still didn’t work.  Actually nothing happens.

My plan is to delete the shortcut, identify (in Explorer) the path to the exe file, send to the desktop, and assign the letter N.  Windows should supply the control and the Alt.

That’s what Ive historically done.  Does anyone know of a reason why that shouldn’t work?

 


On May 2, 2019, at 2:01 PM, Arlene <nedster66@...> wrote:

Hello, What I do is this, I do alt enter. Then tab until you hear something like create short cut. You check it by doing  alt control N while in the NVDA program or whatever screen reader you are working with.  Or, you can do it when you instal it.  If that doesn’t work, In my case this happened to me.   I did create the short cut. But when I shut down NVDA I restarted it again. But nothing happened.  I just went in there and redid it. Then finally it worked.  Sometimes with fresh new computers you have to make sure it took. Sometimes it will do the short cut but when you shut down NVDA or whatever you have on your new system if it doesn’t work and you know it did. You may have to go back into that program and do it again. But make sure it works. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Mohd. Ahtesham Shaikh
Sent: May 1, 2019 11:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] not able to start NVDA using shortcut Ctrl + alt + space

 

This is a new computer
While installatioon, I unchecked the option to show shortcut on the desktop. But how can it affect the hot key function. However, now how can I make the hot key work?

--
Mohd. Ahtesham
From India
Using Windows 8.1 at home and windows 10 pro in office

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Gene
 

If I owned a store and gave everything away, that wouldn't be competition.  How can a paying product compete or one where people donate money, time, and solicit grants?
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 1:10 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 02:00 PM, Gene wrote:
The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.
Why?   Stiff competition is what has driven along the development trajectory of all the existing screen readers, as well as lead to the death of several.  'Twas ever thus.

I'd far rather see a fully competent screen reader ship with any given OS, as well as there being third-party alternatives.   Even if there were to be no third party alternatives, which I find highly unlikely to occur, it would be a major step forward were really good accessibility be built-in, and be expected to be built-in, to any modern OS.

At this point I believe that both NVDA and Narrator have Vispero quaking in their boots for the first time.   There is very serious market competition occurring now that hadn't really occurred in the past. 
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

Puritanism:  The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

        ~ H.L. Mencken

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

 

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 02:00 PM, Gene wrote:
The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.
Why?   Stiff competition is what has driven along the development trajectory of all the existing screen readers, as well as lead to the death of several.  'Twas ever thus.

I'd far rather see a fully competent screen reader ship with any given OS, as well as there being third-party alternatives.   Even if there were to be no third party alternatives, which I find highly unlikely to occur, it would be a major step forward were really good accessibility be built-in, and be expected to be built-in, to any modern OS.

At this point I believe that both NVDA and Narrator have Vispero quaking in their boots for the first time.   There is very serious market competition occurring now that hadn't really occurred in the past. 
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

Puritanism:  The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

        ~ H.L. Mencken

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Gene
 

The advantages of having more than one screen-reader is why I oppose Narrator becoming so good that it might threaten other screen-readers.  I doubt Narrator is intended to be so good that it might threaten them but I don't know what the long range plans are.  but you know the saying, be careful what you wish for.  How long was Microsoft criticized for being a monopoly and yet, there appear to be a lot of blind people who want Narrator to be a good enough screen-reader that other designers would leave the field.  That isn't in blind computer users' interests.
 
As far as the touch cursor is concerned, I was stating what I've seen on list from one or two good sources.  But I'm not saying that you are wrong, Nimber, I'm just explaining that I have never compared the two and I don't use Windows 10 so I'll withdraw my statement and let others address the question.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 11:29 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

This is a great point, and one I've never really thought of. With other platforms, again, you don't really get that choice, and with Windows you do.


On May 23, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Karl Smith <karl@...> wrote:

I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?

 

Karl

 

 

__________

 

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant

Axis

4304 South El Camino St.

Taylorsville, Utah 84129

 

Phone: 866-824-7885

Fax:     866-824-7885

E-mail: karl@...

Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@...

 

Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 


Re: braille edge

Rui Fontes
 

Hello!

I have tested in a machine I have configured to a customer, and in spite of do not appear in the devices list, it worked beautifully via USB or Bluetooth...

Rui Fontes


Às 18:51 de 23/05/2019, Nevzat Adil escreveu:

Cecilia, if you are addressing me, I said HIMS is no longer there.
On 5/23/19, Cecelia Rodriguez <cessbraille@gmail.com> wrote:
Why do you say I noticed that it is still there because I use a braille edge
with NVDA.
On May 23, 2019, at 8:47 AM, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:

No... Hims is no longer there... But thanks for the automatic option. I'll
pass it on.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 14:33, Nevzat Adil ha scritto:
While checking the NVDA braille display list I noticed that HIMS is no
longer there. But if one chooses automatic NVDA sees Braille edge.


On 5/23/19, Nevzat Adil via Groups.Io <nevzatadil=gmail.com@groups.io>
wrote:
She should press NVDA+n, down arow to preferences, right arrow to
settings enter on settings, down arro to braille, tap to braille
properties and choose the braille display and tap to okay and press
enter. One also may choose automatic instead of a particular braille
display.

On 5/23/19, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:
Talking about Braille Edge, a friend of mine pointed out to me that in
the latest version of NVDA there are no more drivers for Hims devices.


She has a BrailleSense, and doesn't know how to connect it to her pc
after NVDA updated.


Could anyone help, please?


Thanks in advance.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 01:06, Grant Metcalf ha scritto:
I had a Braille Edge and now have a QBraille XL. I also notice that
from time to time there seems to be a blank line while reading. This
always seems to be at the end of a paragraph or a hard return. When I
up arrow it often goes away. However, I haven't used this with NVDA
so
far.
Grant


-----Original Message----- From: Nevzat Adil
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 12:01 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I am a literary braille proofreader and use Braille Edge for my work.
The main drawback I encountered so far is that occasionally it shows
an empty line where it's not supposed to be.
I have already let the HIMS no about this and hopefully it will be
fixed soon.
It can also be used as a standalone notetaker, but limitted to text
and brf files.
Nevzat


On 5/22/19, Fernando Apan <ferapan@utexas.edu> wrote:
Hello. For me, working with my braille edge and NVDA has been a very
good
experience, however, the arrow keys doesn???t seem to work with NVDA
as they
do in other screen readers. Does anybody know if they have fixed
this
problem so far?
Fernando Apan

Enviado desde mi iPhone

El 22 may 2019, a las 8:39, Cecelia Rodriguez
<cessbraille@gmail.com>
escribi??:


I love my braille edge with NVDA.
rent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Robert Doc Wright godfearer
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 6:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I have been using mine now for a year this month. Before this my
last
braille display was the Braille Light 40 back in 99. I gave it back
because I was taking programming classes and it would not have
helped me
in that effort as far as being able to run the program I wrote. The
BrailleEdge40 I am enjoying for both reading and writing. Be aware
that if
you are also wanting to go on-line then you will either have to
Bluetooth
it to your phone or connect it to your pc. It does not have these
capabilities on its own. Its memory is based on the size of the SD
card
you install. Let me know if I can help in any other way.


If all I have
left in
this world is God, I have everything!




Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Ashley Wayne
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:20 PM
To: Nvda
Subject: [nvda] braille edge

Hi all,
Could anyone tell me of their experiences using NVDA with the
Braille Edge
from HIMS? I???m considering purchasing one but would just love
some
personal feedback. Does it work well specifically for editing
documents?
Thanks so much.
Ashley


Sent from Mail for Windows 10



Virus-free. www.avg.com




--
Nevzat Adil
Library of Congress Certified Braille Proofreader
C: 512 502 4403
e-mail: nevzatadil@gmail.com
Facebook: m.facebook.com/LiteraryBrailleProofreader







Re: braille edge

 

Cecilia, if you are addressing me, I said HIMS is no longer there.

On 5/23/19, Cecelia Rodriguez <cessbraille@gmail.com> wrote:
Why do you say I noticed that it is still there because I use a braille edge
with NVDA.
On May 23, 2019, at 8:47 AM, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:

No... Hims is no longer there... But thanks for the automatic option. I'll
pass it on.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 14:33, Nevzat Adil ha scritto:
While checking the NVDA braille display list I noticed that HIMS is no
longer there. But if one chooses automatic NVDA sees Braille edge.


On 5/23/19, Nevzat Adil via Groups.Io <nevzatadil=gmail.com@groups.io>
wrote:
She should press NVDA+n, down arow to preferences, right arrow to
settings enter on settings, down arro to braille, tap to braille
properties and choose the braille display and tap to okay and press
enter. One also may choose automatic instead of a particular braille
display.

On 5/23/19, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:
Talking about Braille Edge, a friend of mine pointed out to me that in
the latest version of NVDA there are no more drivers for Hims devices.


She has a BrailleSense, and doesn't know how to connect it to her pc
after NVDA updated.


Could anyone help, please?


Thanks in advance.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 01:06, Grant Metcalf ha scritto:
I had a Braille Edge and now have a QBraille XL. I also notice that
from time to time there seems to be a blank line while reading. This
always seems to be at the end of a paragraph or a hard return. When I
up arrow it often goes away. However, I haven't used this with NVDA
so
far.
Grant


-----Original Message----- From: Nevzat Adil
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 12:01 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I am a literary braille proofreader and use Braille Edge for my work.
The main drawback I encountered so far is that occasionally it shows
an empty line where it's not supposed to be.
I have already let the HIMS no about this and hopefully it will be
fixed soon.
It can also be used as a standalone notetaker, but limitted to text
and brf files.
Nevzat


On 5/22/19, Fernando Apan <ferapan@utexas.edu> wrote:
Hello. For me, working with my braille edge and NVDA has been a very
good
experience, however, the arrow keys doesn???t seem to work with NVDA
as they
do in other screen readers. Does anybody know if they have fixed
this
problem so far?
Fernando Apan

Enviado desde mi iPhone

El 22 may 2019, a las 8:39, Cecelia Rodriguez
<cessbraille@gmail.com>
escribi??:


I love my braille edge with NVDA.
rent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Robert Doc Wright godfearer
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 6:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I have been using mine now for a year this month. Before this my
last
braille display was the Braille Light 40 back in 99. I gave it back
because I was taking programming classes and it would not have
helped me
in that effort as far as being able to run the program I wrote. The
BrailleEdge40 I am enjoying for both reading and writing. Be aware
that if
you are also wanting to go on-line then you will either have to
Bluetooth
it to your phone or connect it to your pc. It does not have these
capabilities on its own. Its memory is based on the size of the SD
card
you install. Let me know if I can help in any other way.


If all I have
left in
this world is God, I have everything!




Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Ashley Wayne
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:20 PM
To: Nvda
Subject: [nvda] braille edge

Hi all,
Could anyone tell me of their experiences using NVDA with the
Braille Edge
from HIMS? I???m considering purchasing one but would just love
some
personal feedback. Does it work well specifically for editing
documents?
Thanks so much.
Ashley


Sent from Mail for Windows 10



Virus-free. www.avg.com




--
Nevzat Adil
Library of Congress Certified Braille Proofreader
C: 512 502 4403
e-mail: nevzatadil@gmail.com
Facebook: m.facebook.com/LiteraryBrailleProofreader






--
Nevzat Adil
Library of Congress Certified Braille Proofreader
C: 512 502 4403
e-mail: nevzatadil@gmail.com
Facebook: m.facebook.com/LiteraryBrailleProofreader


Re: braille edge

Cecelia Rodriguez <cessbraille@...>
 

Why do you say I noticed that it is still there because I use a braille edge with NVDA.

On May 23, 2019, at 8:47 AM, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:

No... Hims is no longer there... But thanks for the automatic option. I'll pass it on.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 14:33, Nevzat Adil ha scritto:
While checking the NVDA braille display list I noticed that HIMS is no
longer there. But if one chooses automatic NVDA sees Braille edge.


On 5/23/19, Nevzat Adil via Groups.Io <nevzatadil=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
She should press NVDA+n, down arow to preferences, right arrow to
settings enter on settings, down arro to braille, tap to braille
properties and choose the braille display and tap to okay and press
enter. One also may choose automatic instead of a particular braille
display.

On 5/23/19, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:
Talking about Braille Edge, a friend of mine pointed out to me that in
the latest version of NVDA there are no more drivers for Hims devices.


She has a BrailleSense, and doesn't know how to connect it to her pc
after NVDA updated.


Could anyone help, please?


Thanks in advance.

Ciao,

Ollie




Il 23/05/2019 01:06, Grant Metcalf ha scritto:
I had a Braille Edge and now have a QBraille XL. I also notice that
from time to time there seems to be a blank line while reading. This
always seems to be at the end of a paragraph or a hard return. When I
up arrow it often goes away. However, I haven't used this with NVDA so
far.
Grant


-----Original Message----- From: Nevzat Adil
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 12:01 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I am a literary braille proofreader and use Braille Edge for my work.
The main drawback I encountered so far is that occasionally it shows
an empty line where it's not supposed to be.
I have already let the HIMS no about this and hopefully it will be
fixed soon.
It can also be used as a standalone notetaker, but limitted to text
and brf files.
Nevzat


On 5/22/19, Fernando Apan <ferapan@utexas.edu> wrote:
Hello. For me, working with my braille edge and NVDA has been a very
good
experience, however, the arrow keys doesn???t seem to work with NVDA
as they
do in other screen readers. Does anybody know if they have fixed this
problem so far?
Fernando Apan

Enviado desde mi iPhone

El 22 may 2019, a las 8:39, Cecelia Rodriguez <cessbraille@gmail.com>
escribi??:


I love my braille edge with NVDA.
rent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Robert Doc Wright godfearer
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 6:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] braille edge

I have been using mine now for a year this month. Before this my last
braille display was the Braille Light 40 back in 99. I gave it back
because I was taking programming classes and it would not have
helped me
in that effort as far as being able to run the program I wrote. The
BrailleEdge40 I am enjoying for both reading and writing. Be aware
that if
you are also wanting to go on-line then you will either have to
Bluetooth
it to your phone or connect it to your pc. It does not have these
capabilities on its own. Its memory is based on the size of the SD
card
you install. Let me know if I can help in any other way.


If all I have
left in
this world is God, I have everything!




Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Ashley Wayne
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:20 PM
To: Nvda
Subject: [nvda] braille edge

Hi all,
Could anyone tell me of their experiences using NVDA with the
Braille Edge
from HIMS? I???m considering purchasing one but would just love some
personal feedback. Does it work well specifically for editing
documents?
Thanks so much.
Ashley


Sent from Mail for Windows 10



Virus-free. www.avg.com




--
Nevzat Adil
Library of Congress Certified Braille Proofreader
C: 512 502 4403
e-mail: nevzatadil@gmail.com
Facebook: m.facebook.com/LiteraryBrailleProofreader





locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,


I use different browsers for different situations. For instance, if I want to download something from sendspace, I use internet explorer. I agree that it's good to be able to use more than one browser in any given situation.


Rosemarie



On 5/23/2019 9:36 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 12:25 PM, Karl Smith wrote:
How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?
As the odd sighted guy, and someone who's been involved in tech support and tutoring/teaching technology for several decades now, I'd say about 99.999%.

It is a general truism, regardless of the specific tool, that one had ought to be prepared to try a different one at the drop of a hat, even if it's for a single purpose/situation, when one's chosen favorite is cranky, for whatever reason.

If you're not ready or willing to do this, then you will invariably end up beating your head against cement walls on way more than one occasion.  This is one of the reasons I try to impress upon my students when I'm tutoring them with a screen reader that they absolutely need to familiarize themselves with another, if just for really basic functions, because there are times when a given screen reader just doesn't "play well" with something (and I don't care if it's the something that's at fault, the point is that going with another alternative lets you find out whether it's likely the screen reader or that other something).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

Puritanism:  The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

        ~ H.L. Mencken

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

 

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 12:25 PM, Karl Smith wrote:
How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?
As the odd sighted guy, and someone who's been involved in tech support and tutoring/teaching technology for several decades now, I'd say about 99.999%.

It is a general truism, regardless of the specific tool, that one had ought to be prepared to try a different one at the drop of a hat, even if it's for a single purpose/situation, when one's chosen favorite is cranky, for whatever reason.

If you're not ready or willing to do this, then you will invariably end up beating your head against cement walls on way more than one occasion.  This is one of the reasons I try to impress upon my students when I'm tutoring them with a screen reader that they absolutely need to familiarize themselves with another, if just for really basic functions, because there are times when a given screen reader just doesn't "play well" with something (and I don't care if it's the something that's at fault, the point is that going with another alternative lets you find out whether it's likely the screen reader or that other something).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

Puritanism:  The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

        ~ H.L. Mencken

 

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Devin Prater
 

This is a great point, and one I've never really thought of. With other platforms, again, you don't really get that choice, and with Windows you do.


On May 23, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Karl Smith <karl@...> wrote:

I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?

 

Karl

 

 

__________

 

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant

Axis

4304 South El Camino St.

Taylorsville, Utah 84129

 

Phone: 866-824-7885

Fax:     866-824-7885

E-mail: karl@...

Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@...

 

Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 


Re: no braille output from input help

Brian Tew
 

Hurray Felix,
that was it.
Thanks.


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Karl Smith
 

I don’t think blind people are the only ones who have this issue. How many people, sighted and blind,  use more than one browser because one works better than the other in different situations?

 

Karl

 

 

__________

 

Karl Smith
Access Technology Consultant

Axis

4304 South El Camino St.

Taylorsville, Utah 84129

 

Phone: 866-824-7885

Fax:     866-824-7885

E-mail: karl@...

Alternate E-mail: karl.axistech@...

 

Twitter http://twitter.com/axistech

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 9:18 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Nimer Jaber
 

Thanks Gene, but it isn't that simplified. As I have pointed out in two other messages in just this thread alone, I run into issues where the touch cursor can access content, yet object navigation can't. i am pretty certain that I am competent in the use of object navigation, having been an NVDA user since I believe 0.5 and having either moderated or owned this list since around that time.

Thanks.

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 9:20 AM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Object navigation is the NVDA equivalent of the Touch Cursor.  Those who want touch cursor functionality in NVDA need to learn it.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

One thing Jaws has implemented that is helpful is the touch cursor.
This emulates a touch screen with the cursors, whether you have a touch screen installed or not.
Does NVDA have touch screen support?
If so, I may resource this in NVDA.
I too still switch to Jaws when I feel like I need a "jaws cursor".
Glenn
 

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 2:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.



--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Devin Prater
 

About other platforms, I think that we think accessibility is great because there aren't other options on Mac and iOS, and Android...

On Windows, though, we do have the option of using other screen readers, thus working around what accessibility problems there are, to an extent. On Linux, things aren't much better than they were 5 years ago, and indeed, are worse for lack of more accessibility-focused distributions since Vinux and Sonar merged together, and fell together. There is only one GUI screen reader on Linux, and it hacks around inaccessibility just like NVDA has to sometimes.

The difference is that with Microsoft being a learn-it-all company, they continually improve, whereas Linux, being more of a "every man for himself," type OS, there is no guarantee besides the message of possible utopia, that accessibility will be fixed in anything by its communities.


On May 23, 2019, at 11:09 AM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

I think part of it may have to do with bad accessibility API implementations from affected apps (we have countless issues regarding this, including Registry Editor). It might be possible to get around this (at least temporarily) by assigning commands to “flattened view” commands (already done for touchscreens, but not for keyboard yet).

As for someone’s question about touchscreen support and NVDA: yes, it does.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nimer Jaber
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 8:55 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io Group Moderators <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello,

 

Respectfully, I find that touch cursor is able to access more than object navigation. While I like object nav, the ability to use the keyboard to essentially swipe is helpful. I have been able to access parts of inaccessible programs using the touch cursor whereas object nav did not work for me.

 

thanks.

 

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 8:53 AM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Touch cursor, as far as mechanics is concerned, is object navigation.
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 8:52 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

One thing Jaws has implemented that is helpful is the touch cursor.

This emulates a touch screen with the cursors, whether you have a touch screen installed or not.

Does NVDA have touch screen support?

If so, I may resource this in NVDA.

I too still switch to Jaws when I feel like I need a "jaws cursor".

Glenn

 

 

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 2:36 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.


 

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locked Re: NVDA versus JAWS

Gene
 

Object navigation is the NVDA equivalent of the Touch Cursor.  Those who want touch cursor functionality in NVDA need to learn it.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

One thing Jaws has implemented that is helpful is the touch cursor.
This emulates a touch screen with the cursors, whether you have a touch screen installed or not.
Does NVDA have touch screen support?
If so, I may resource this in NVDA.
I too still switch to Jaws when I feel like I need a "jaws cursor".
Glenn
 

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 2:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.