Date   

Re: Add-on Updater 19.03 #addonrelease

Abbie Taylor <abbietaylor945@...>
 

I recently started using Outlook. Where would I find the Outlook extended add-on.
--
Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author
http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com
http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
abbietaylor945@...


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 06:05 PM, Richard Bartholomew wrote:
the need to press the escape key when using Control+F to find a string was mentioned very early in the conversation
10th post, but it was mentioned by Travis on his first entry.  So, I apologize to Travis.   Somehow I missed this and retract my earlier statement as mistaken and baseless.  I expect others to read carefully and I expect nothing less of myself.  I failed in this case.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Richard Bartholomew
 

Given the incredible amount of verbiage on this topic (to which I’m contributing!), I can see that it would be easy to miss something but, just for completeness, the need to press the escape key when using Control+F to find a string was mentioned very early in the conversation and, from memory, multiple times thereafter!

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 26 February 2019 18:41
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:37 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

I don't mind the silene as I am yelled at if nothingn on that page is found in regard to the string I typed.

Which is fine if you know exactly what to expect.   For anyone who already uses the technique, is comfortable with it, and may be teaching someone else - in which case they'll be teaching the technique completely and noting its pitfalls - more power to you.

This isn't saying that no one can or should use a technique they prefer.   But, you have to be complete about what that technique is.  I would have discovered the NVDA speaks part after hitting Escape ages ago had that been included.   Even though it works, it's also completely counterintuitive as Escape (just as Control) alone will typically shut a screen reader up.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Golden Cursor question

Curtis Delzer
 

Hi I got this reply from the Becky! mail list from the gentleman who
writes a help file for Becky.
Yes, Becky opens URL in browser. If not happening, it may be a problem in default browser setup. good luck,

-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA


Re: Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

Gene
 

Any time I have been in a program where browse mode is available, JAWS and NVDA automatically place me in browse mode.  I should add that Microsoft Word, which may have browse mode available is an exception to what I said for understandable reasons.  Often, when you run Word, you want to edit and write.  You can't in browse mode.  I can instantly tell if it is available or if I am in it by using the command NVDA key space, which will toggle between browse mode on and off.  In JAWS the same behavior occurs, you are automatically placed in browse mode if the program supports it.  To see if you are in browse mode, or as JAWS calls it, the Virtual PC cursor, pressing numpad plus will announce Virtual PC cursor if it is active.
 
I recall that Window-eyes had a setting that would allow you to have browse mode not automatically come on.  This can be accomplished in JAWS and NVDA with roughly equivalent commands.  But my point is that it is very easy to tell if you are in browse mode with JAWS and NVDA.  When using a different screen-reader, it’s a good idea to ask if there is a feature that is equivalent to what you use in the one you generally work with if you are switching screen-readers or plan to use the other one a lot more. Not asking may cause you to lose access to a useful or important feature. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 3:52 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

I will also point out that Window-eyes had the ability to change and
stay in any given mode, as well as the ability, (not by just changing
cursors) to at least query the system and see if browse mode was
available, and then tell you, for example, "browse mode available,"
which is extremely valuable in cases where you try to go to it in a
control you may not be familiar with but suspect that browse mode may be
available. :)
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA




Re: Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

Curtis Delzer
 

I will also point out that Window-eyes had the ability to change and
stay in any given mode, as well as the ability, (not by just changing
cursors) to at least query the system and see if browse mode was
available, and then tell you, for example, "browse mode available,"
which is extremely valuable in cases where you try to go to it in a
control you may not be familiar with but suspect that browse mode may be
available. :)
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA


Re: Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

 

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 04:05 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:
ChromeVox
This reply is not meant as a "jumping down your throat," but once you get to an ecosystem other than Windows we're talking about an entirely different world.

You are not alone, however, in liking the automatic switching between modes.   I prefer it except in very specific circumstances, and those occur so seldom that I'd never make the default be manual switching.

Some of this comes from when different people began using screen readers, too, as at one time manual switching was the default.  It's all pretty much in what you got used to and comfortable with.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

Steve Nutt
 

Hi Brian,

 

I like the other way personally, where it changes.  The reason I do is because I use ChromeVox and that doesn’t have a forms or browse mode at all, it simply has shortcuts that are not single keys to move by elements.  Of course, if you want single key behaviour in ChromeVox, you can turn on Sticky Keys.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 26 February 2019 15:41
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Staying in Forms for Checkboxes

 

Both NVDA and JAWS can be configured to stay in one mode or the other unless the user changes it by intent using keyboard shortcuts.  Both are also configured by default these days to switch from browse to forms mode when they land on a control during traversal and back to browse mode when they leave that control back to an area of straight text.

Gene has often mentioned that his personal preference is for "the old way" where the default was that you stayed in whatever mode you happen to be in until or unless you change it, no matter what you have landed on as you're making your way through the page.

It is odd that it would automatically switch to browse mode (or not leave browse mode) when landing on a control in the typical default configuration.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Off topic does anyone know of any app for android that makes google maps accessible

erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

Google maps may not actually allow you to explore a map by touch, but it will give you directions and all of the text portions of the app are  accessible.

On February 26, 2019 12:26:56 PM "ADRIAN POCOCK" <ampbeast@...> wrote:

As the subject line says this is off topic but is there any kind souls out there that would know off any android apps capable of accessing google maps to allow talk back to speak them.

 


Adrian Pocock.    Email    ampbeast@...


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Gene
 

It depends on the screen-reader you use.  You can't use control insert f interchangeably with the application search in JAWS if you are not in the Virtual PC cursor.  You may be able to with NVDA but that may not be the case in the future.  NVDA developers are considering adding a screen search, such as JAWS has where you search the current screen only and where there doesn't need to be an application cursor.  I suspect they will use control NVDA key for that search so, there again, if my guess is correct, from that time on, you will have to use the application search and not the NVDA search when you aren't in browse mode to perform a search available in that application.
 
But this isn't complicated.  Most programs don't place you in browse mode and you can easily check to make sure while you are in a program.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Cristóbal
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 2:36 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Be it with Jaws or NVDA, I use  the insert+control+F command. If for nothing else, for the simple fact that this way, it’s only one keystroke command I have to remember using and not worry about there being conflicts if I just use control+F in Adobe for example. Control+F may work in some programs and not in others, so why bother always trying to keep track what screen you’re in or program you’re using when you can just as easily use one command across all windows and aps to accomplish the same task?

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 10:39 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

Using control f with NVDA is by far one of the worst things anyone without sight can possibly do.

I truly do not understand how this benefits you, or anyone else, as a screen reader user.

I might as well not even bother with it. Sometimes my cursor focus doesn't stay on the relevant item, let alone the actual word I'm looking for. Pressing enter gives you 0 indication you've actually reached an item. Pressing escape (about 2 times out of 10) will focus the NVDA cursor on said item. At best, you might get to see the sentence where the word is if it's a long string of text.  Then, pressing control f once again to find next or previous item is just a futile exercise in patience.

 

To each their own. Pressing NVDA plus control plus f is a far cleaner, quicker, more efficient, and smarter way to do things.

On 2019-02-26 12:31 p.m., Brian Vogel wrote:

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:26 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:

I just verified with multiple sighted folks, and each and every one of them uses control-f when they want to find text.

So do I.   What earthly relevance does this have?!!

I can see the highlight move from instance to instance of the string being searched for.   I can know, by sight, exactly where I am on the page.  None of this is relevant to someone using a screen reader.

Dead silence during a search is a horrible, horrible idea as far as I'm concerned.  You clearly differ, and that's fine.  It won't change my position.  I'm not going to encourage a screen reader user to use a technique I know will be problematic from the outset because they can't see.

As I've said a million times:  Tool to task  (which means appropriate tool for the person using it in the circumstance they're using it.  I could use a teaspoon to dig a ditch, but why on earth would I?!)
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Cristóbal
 

Be it with Jaws or NVDA, I use  the insert+control+F command. If for nothing else, for the simple fact that this way, it’s only one keystroke command I have to remember using and not worry about there being conflicts if I just use control+F in Adobe for example. Control+F may work in some programs and not in others, so why bother always trying to keep track what screen you’re in or program you’re using when you can just as easily use one command across all windows and aps to accomplish the same task?

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 10:39 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

Using control f with NVDA is by far one of the worst things anyone without sight can possibly do.

I truly do not understand how this benefits you, or anyone else, as a screen reader user.

I might as well not even bother with it. Sometimes my cursor focus doesn't stay on the relevant item, let alone the actual word I'm looking for. Pressing enter gives you 0 indication you've actually reached an item. Pressing escape (about 2 times out of 10) will focus the NVDA cursor on said item. At best, you might get to see the sentence where the word is if it's a long string of text.  Then, pressing control f once again to find next or previous item is just a futile exercise in patience.

 

To each their own. Pressing NVDA plus control plus f is a far cleaner, quicker, more efficient, and smarter way to do things.

On 2019-02-26 12:31 p.m., Brian Vogel wrote:

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:26 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:

I just verified with multiple sighted folks, and each and every one of them uses control-f when they want to find text.

So do I.   What earthly relevance does this have?!!

I can see the highlight move from instance to instance of the string being searched for.   I can know, by sight, exactly where I am on the page.  None of this is relevant to someone using a screen reader.

Dead silence during a search is a horrible, horrible idea as far as I'm concerned.  You clearly differ, and that's fine.  It won't change my position.  I'm not going to encourage a screen reader user to use a technique I know will be problematic from the outset because they can't see.

As I've said a million times:  Tool to task  (which means appropriate tool for the person using it in the circumstance they're using it.  I could use a teaspoon to dig a ditch, but why on earth would I?!)
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Rui Fontes
 

The problem is that Jaws uses as it own keystrokes some Windows keystrokes...

By instance, some people think that Control+F in a browser is a Jaws command and not a Windows command... Because you perform Control+F and you get the Jaws find dialogue...

Rui


Às 20:27 de 26/02/2019, Sarah k Alawami escreveu:

On 26 Feb 2019, at 10:57, Gene wrote:
Window-eyes had a separate browse mode search, JAWS does and NVDA does.
We know this, but I don't think many of us use it. I was trained to use the windows find when I first got a computer in 2002 and I've used it ever since. so for me over the past almost 20 years it works. IN fact i don't ever recall using a jaws find, it was what ever the browser did when I had jaws in 2009. and to tell you the truth I didn't know about nvda find until this year, I always thought they were synonymous, until a few days ago.
My computer teachers always taught their newly blinded, or students the windows way first, the screen reader way second, and to me that is how it should be in case you use different screen readers, you will always know the windows way first at least.


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Gene
 

The JAWS find is control f.  They made it the same for consistency.  The Window-eyes find is control shift f and you know the NVDA command.
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 2:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage



On 26 Feb 2019, at 10:57, Gene wrote:

Window-eyes had a separate browse mode search, JAWS does and NVDA does.


We know this, but I don't think many of us use it. I was trained to use the windows find when I first got a computer in 2002 and I've used it ever since. so for me over the past almost 20 years it works. IN fact i don't ever recall using a jaws find, it was what ever the browser did when I had jaws in 2009. and to tell you the truth I didn't know about nvda find until this year, I always thought they were synonymous, until a few days ago.

My computer teachers always taught their newly blinded, or students the windows way first, the screen reader way second, and to me that is how it should be in case you use different screen readers, you will always know the windows way first at least.


Re: alt tab quits working at random when nvda is running

Sarah k Alawami
 

Darn. then the next time I turn on my computer it will be lost. I'll have to reproduce the isue, then send the log over. I can wait. and yeah this has happened now two times in the past 2 weeks.

Tc

On 26 Feb 2019, at 11:00, Tyler Spivey wrote:

You can only retrieve the log from one restart ago, at %temp%\nvda-old.log.

This has been an ongoing, annoying problem for NVDA for years. It was considerably worse before some UIA changes went in to 2018.4 (#7345). I don't think I've seen it since it was fixed.

On 2/26/2019 9:29 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

except I did not have explorer open. I had p3d, obs, firefox, project fly, skype, I think my mail program and that was about it. Is there a way retrieve the logs from 2 restarts of nvda ago or am I basically SOL until it happens again. I really do want to submit the log for this if possible.

On 26 Feb 2019, at 9:16, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:

I also get this but put it down to the same issue like open an
Explorer window and nvda will not register its open yet it is open
as cursor down brings it to life. Same goes sometimes in web sites
not auto reading or indeed not showing having focus either unless
you do something like open a menu and close it

I think that there is a kind of slugging effect going on in all
these scenarios that makes nvda not get the event it needs to detect
the changes reliably.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Sarah k Alawami"
<marrie12@...>
To: "Nvda List" <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 5:03 PM
Subject: [nvda] alt tab quits working at random when nvda is running

Summary: when using alt tab to get from program to program, nvda
will
sometimes not an-ounce the program O'm on when holding alt and
hitting
tab

steps:

1. Launch nvda
2. Use nvda as normal and alt tab between many windows. I
sometimes have
between 5 and 10 running..
3. Notice that sometimes alt tab fails to speak the window I'm
on but
when I let go after let's say hitting tab 3 times I will gain
focus on
that window.

Regression: I can regress this to some builds last year, although I
thought it was a windows issue so never actually reported it..

Expected results:

I should be able to see the windows that i'm alt tabbing through
instead of getting silence

Windows version 10 1809 updated last Saturday to the latest.
32 gigs of ram, 4.0 ghz processor and 64 bit architecture.

Work around:
Restarting nvda always works to bring my alt tab behavior back.
I just
shut off my computer last night so no logs will be apparent. Is
there a
way I can retrieve the log from the time before I restarted nvda and
before I shut down the computer?


This is random so I can't really say when this happens or give any
pattern to how to make this happen.




Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Sarah k Alawami
 



On 26 Feb 2019, at 10:57, Gene wrote:

Window-eyes had a separate browse mode search, JAWS does and NVDA does.


We know this, but I don't think many of us use it. I was trained to use the windows find when I first got a computer in 2002 and I've used it ever since. so for me over the past almost 20 years it works. IN fact i don't ever recall using a jaws find, it was what ever the browser did when I had jaws in 2009. and to tell you the truth I didn't know about nvda find until this year, I always thought they were synonymous, until a few days ago.

My computer teachers always taught their newly blinded, or students the windows way first, the screen reader way second, and to me that is how it should be in case you use different screen readers, you will always know the windows way first at least.


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:50 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:
but you can't go around telling people that the screen reader approach is the only approach for screen reader users, because that's just spreading misinformation.
It is the only approach that seems to work reliably for "the uninitiated."  That's all I really need to know.   It also seems to be the only way that's working reliably for quite a few of the very initiated, too.

I'd prefer to err on the side of caution with this one.  And with this, I'm done.  To each his or her own.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

 

I just wanted you to excuse me if I've wrote my last answer on a not common way that I'd write other ones. I'm just tired of hitting shift+delete, you know.
But that's fine, if we agree with each other let's stop here, let who want keep it up. Eventually others will do as well.

Em 26/02/2019 16:08, Travis Siegel escreveu:

Hah, you've clearly not read all the comments in this thread then if you're making that claim.

I was told very specificlaly that the screen reaer find command was the only way to find text ona web page, (multiple times I might add). But, you're right, this thread has definitely outlived it's usefulness.  If folks want to continue spreading misinformation, then that's their business.  I will post no longer on this thread.

On 2/26/2019 1:54 PM, marcio via Groups.Io wrote:
Em 26/02/2019 15:50, Travis Siegel escreveu:

but you can't go around telling people that the screen reader approach is the only approach for screen reader users

Man, no one ever said this, not that I have seen so far!
We were only discussing and one was saying about what's the best in one's opinion, nothing else!
And know what? I'm bored with it all. Tired of the thread that I myself started. I just can't handle it anymore!
I wasn't even going to answer this one, however saying we did anything we didn't isn't the best thing to do, so here I am, for the last time.
Enough is enough, I for one won't contribute in this thread anymore.

Cheers,

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Tyler Wood
 

Just to add here, the search box in question was Telegram's, not the find search box.


Though now that I say that, I just tried it again on a different website (youtube this time) and had to press escape twice to actually exit the find dialogue (which still did not function as expected).

On 2019-02-26 1:09 p.m., Tyler Wood via Groups.Io wrote:

I just tried that method here 5 times. I know the text was actually on the page - for reference, this was a telegram window in chrome. I searched for a person's name with control f. After pressing escape, I was still in the search box. Keep in mind that I was not in focus mode but I decided to arrow down a few times to get out of the search box and try again, just in case.


Still no results. Pressing control f, where the person's name still was, pressing enter, then escape still brought me to the top of the list of names - well above where that person actually was in the list. I then decided to try f3, the find next command. Not only does it put you back in the search box, by the way (NVDA plus f3 simply takes you to the next instance of that text), but it did absolutely nothing, again. My focus was still on the first person in the list.


Pressing NVDA control f and typing in the name actually placed focus on the name and I could press enter to message them without issue.


I'm sorry - This isn't false information. There is a reason why screen reader developers create specific commands for things. This is one of them.

On 2019-02-26 12:57 p.m., Gene wrote:
I have tried escape a number of times.  I'm not sure if it ever worked but it is not consistent.  I think it worked once and failed two or three times.  Besides, what is being discussed in terms of the cursor?  There is no cursor on the actual web page unless you are in an edit field.  So when something is searched for by a sighted person with control f, what happens?  Since there is no cursor, is the text placed in a certain area such as at the top of the document window?  Clearly, whatever is done, it is not reliable when used with browse mode.  I and others have reported that results are not consistent.  NVDA developers didn't go through the trouble of developing a browse mode find command just for enjoyment.  they did so because it is necessary.
 
Window-eyes had a separate browse mode search, JAWS does and NVDA does.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 12:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:13 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:
I open a web page, hit control-F, type in what I'm looking for, press enter, then press escape,
You do realize, Travis, that you omitted that last part about pressing Escape until this very post.  And that's the pivotal trick to getting the method you use to work.

It is also, to me, a very kludgey way to get the same result that every screen reader gives you using its built-in search, and with no more key presses.  Having to press the modifier key as part of the search, rather than Escape after the search, is a heck of a lot more natural to me when working with a screen reader.

But, it's clear now that there is a technique that can be made to work if one chooses to use a straight browser search:  hitting Escape.    I still find the dead silence while I'm looking for something, particularly when that something repeats, particularly unhelpful.  I have been known, on rare occasions, to tell someone something like, "find the fifth occurrence of supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" on the page.  I find that most of them find it much easier when they can hear occurrences one through four as they search through.

To each his or her own.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Hah, you've clearly not read all the comments in this thread then if you're making that claim.

I was told very specificlaly that the screen reaer find command was the only way to find text ona web page, (multiple times I might add). But, you're right, this thread has definitely outlived it's usefulness.  If folks want to continue spreading misinformation, then that's their business.  I will post no longer on this thread.

On 2/26/2019 1:54 PM, marcio via Groups.Io wrote:
Em 26/02/2019 15:50, Travis Siegel escreveu:

but you can't go around telling people that the screen reader approach is the only approach for screen reader users

Man, no one ever said this, not that I have seen so far!
We were only discussing and one was saying about what's the best in one's opinion, nothing else!
And know what? I'm bored with it all. Tired of the thread that I myself started. I just can't handle it anymore!
I wasn't even going to answer this one, however saying we did anything we didn't isn't the best thing to do, so here I am, for the last time.
Enough is enough, I for one won't contribute in this thread anymore.

Cheers,

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

Tyler Wood
 

I just tried that method here 5 times. I know the text was actually on the page - for reference, this was a telegram window in chrome. I searched for a person's name with control f. After pressing escape, I was still in the search box. Keep in mind that I was not in focus mode but I decided to arrow down a few times to get out of the search box and try again, just in case.


Still no results. Pressing control f, where the person's name still was, pressing enter, then escape still brought me to the top of the list of names - well above where that person actually was in the list. I then decided to try f3, the find next command. Not only does it put you back in the search box, by the way (NVDA plus f3 simply takes you to the next instance of that text), but it did absolutely nothing, again. My focus was still on the first person in the list.


Pressing NVDA control f and typing in the name actually placed focus on the name and I could press enter to message them without issue.


I'm sorry - This isn't false information. There is a reason why screen reader developers create specific commands for things. This is one of them.

On 2019-02-26 12:57 p.m., Gene wrote:
I have tried escape a number of times.  I'm not sure if it ever worked but it is not consistent.  I think it worked once and failed two or three times.  Besides, what is being discussed in terms of the cursor?  There is no cursor on the actual web page unless you are in an edit field.  So when something is searched for by a sighted person with control f, what happens?  Since there is no cursor, is the text placed in a certain area such as at the top of the document window?  Clearly, whatever is done, it is not reliable when used with browse mode.  I and others have reported that results are not consistent.  NVDA developers didn't go through the trouble of developing a browse mode find command just for enjoyment.  they did so because it is necessary.
 
Window-eyes had a separate browse mode search, JAWS does and NVDA does.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 12:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Differences between using the NVDA and the browser commands search on a webpage

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 01:13 PM, Travis Siegel wrote:
I open a web page, hit control-F, type in what I'm looking for, press enter, then press escape,
You do realize, Travis, that you omitted that last part about pressing Escape until this very post.  And that's the pivotal trick to getting the method you use to work.

It is also, to me, a very kludgey way to get the same result that every screen reader gives you using its built-in search, and with no more key presses.  Having to press the modifier key as part of the search, rather than Escape after the search, is a heck of a lot more natural to me when working with a screen reader.

But, it's clear now that there is a technique that can be made to work if one chooses to use a straight browser search:  hitting Escape.    I still find the dead silence while I'm looking for something, particularly when that something repeats, particularly unhelpful.  I have been known, on rare occasions, to tell someone something like, "find the fifth occurrence of supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" on the page.  I find that most of them find it much easier when they can hear occurrences one through four as they search through.

To each his or her own.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back