Date   

Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

Chris Mullins
 

Hi

It’s definitely a feature of Windows 10 and I believe it was in Windows 7 as well.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Monte Single
Sent: 16 May 2021 19:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop

 

Had a friend install it for me.

He found it on the web,,  not as part of windows any version.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Greg Epley

Sent: May 16, 2021 8:12 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop

 

Others correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe "ReadyBoost" is a Microsoft Windows feature, so it's just part of Windows. As far as the trick working, however, I've tried it on two laptops, but am told they are each already running as fast as they can. Basically that "ReadyBoost" won't help performance. So, using ReadyBoost is NOT a given performance booster available to anyone and everyone. Also, sorry that all my posts have been "echoing", but for whatever strange reason, Mozilla Thunderbird has "Reply to List" ghosted, and I couldn't even get the "Reply to Group" send mail link to do a darned thing when I clicked it, so I am hoping this makes it to the list, though it's doing so without quoting the original message given the crazy way I had to trigger any reply whatsoever.

 

-Greg Epley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

I've had a number of techs look at my laptop over the last couple
months. They've all recommended I get some combination of a new
machine with a faster processor, more ram, or an SSD, but I've had
very little to complain about with this machine as currently
configured. Sometimes, there are instances where I open a large number
of windows in my web browser, and the number of windows I can open was
significantly smaller on this machine with Windows 10, 4 GB of ram and
an Intel I3 than on my previous laptop with an Intel I5 and Windows 7
with the same specs. The number of windows I can open at a time has
decreased even more since I switched from IE to Firefox.

On 5/16/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Sun, May 16, 2021 at 02:21 AM, Jeff Samco wrote:


to be confident the laptop won't frustrate me.
-
And right there is the key point. One can definitely use a "less finely
specced" machine than one's home workhorse when all it's meant for is light
duty emailing, web browsing, word processing, and even streaming, but even
when something with really minimum spec works (and I have an ancient Gateway
with 4GB and old Intel processor that does), "works" is often not enough to
make one feel OK while using it.

You still want the speed and responsiveness you're used to on your regular
machine, but just for lighter loads. With Windows 10, it's almost certain
that you will not have that experience with under 8GB of RAM, and you
absolutely won't if you've got less than that with a really old processor
and a conventional HDD. SSDs can and do gain you a lot of zippy-ness when
it comes to tasks that are disk I/O intensive. Boot times shrink
incredibly. But for stuff that's not disk I/O intensive, and the intended
uses aren't, your throttling point is typically from the combination of
processing power and RAM, which are intimately related in that a poor
processor with lots of RAM could, in theory, work better than a mediocre (or
good) processor with insufficient RAM.

Windows 10, and all modern OSes, are now built to absolutely maximize their
exploitation of available RAM to make faster performance (from the user
perspective, anyway) happen.

I've never owned anything near to a "flagship machine" myself, because I
don't have the need for that kind of processing power or speed. I have, at
times past, had to get "the cheapest thing possible" so I've lived with
these long term, and it wasn't fun.

Often even small increases in price on the lower end of the market get you
some pretty substantial performance boosts.

In the end, I'm really not telling anyone what they should buy, because I
can't know that. Only the individual making the choice knows what is
"minimally acceptable" to them. But I am trying to identify factors to
consider. You have to make the choice in the end, and what's right for me,
or any random someone else, may not be right for you.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless
you hate them. And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon






Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

Gene
 

Here is an interesting article about Ready Boost.  I don’t know what you had installed but it is a part of Windows.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 1:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop
 
Had a friend install it for me.
He found it on the web,,  not as part of windows any version.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Greg Epley
Sent: May 16, 2021 8:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop

Others correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe "ReadyBoost" is a Microsoft Windows feature, so it's just part of Windows. As far as the trick working, however, I've tried it on two laptops, but am told they are each already running as fast as they can. Basically that "ReadyBoost" won't help performance. So, using ReadyBoost is NOT a given performance booster available to anyone and everyone. Also, sorry that all my posts have been "echoing", but for whatever strange reason, Mozilla Thunderbird has "Reply to List" ghosted, and I couldn't even get the "Reply to Group" send mail link to do a darned thing when I clicked it, so I am hoping this makes it to the list, though it's doing so without quoting the original message given the crazy way I had to trigger any reply whatsoever.

-Greg Epley












Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

Monte Single
 

Had a friend install it for me.
He found it on the web,, not as part of windows any version.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Greg Epley
Sent: May 16, 2021 8:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop

Others correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe "ReadyBoost" is a Microsoft Windows feature, so it's just part of Windows. As far as the trick working, however, I've tried it on two laptops, but am told they are each already running as fast as they can. Basically that "ReadyBoost" won't help performance. So, using ReadyBoost is NOT a given performance booster available to anyone and everyone. Also, sorry that all my posts have been "echoing", but for whatever strange reason, Mozilla Thunderbird has "Reply to List" ghosted, and I couldn't even get the "Reply to Group" send mail link to do a darned thing when I clicked it, so I am hoping this makes it to the list, though it's doing so without quoting the original message given the crazy way I had to trigger any reply whatsoever.

-Greg Epley


Re: Windows 10 ocr & nvda

Chris
 

I dont think you really need the add-on in win10, as NVDA + R should work, then use the arrow up/down keys to read the result

 

 

 

> Às 15:51 de 16/05/2021, Michael Maslo escreveu:

>> Hello everyone, I was wondering if someone would be able to explain on how to use the windows 10 ocr add on? I installed it and hit the insert plus r. It said it was performing the o c r. And then it said it was done when I tried to read the results, I couldn't. Can someone explain in how to use this please?

>>

>> Sincerely,

>>

>> Michael maslo

>>

>> Sincerely,

>>

>> Michael maslo

>>

>>

>>

>

>

>

>

>

 

 

 

 

 


Re: NVDA and APA Style

Gene
 

I don’t use the citation system being discussed but would it be useful to move with the arrow keys and hear such information character by character?
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: tim
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 12:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style
 

Trying slowing down your speech output.

On 5/16/2021 10:28 AM, Kelly, Kathleen wrote:
Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information.


Re: [Solved] office 2019 and outlook

Gene
 

I seem to recall reading something about that some time ago.  But in this case, it sounds as though an Office Update is causing the problem since the person has been using autocomplete until recently.  From the way the question is written, the same program is evidently being used.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 11:53 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] office 2019 and outlook
 
Gene,

           This has been coming up again and again on several groups as people are getting new machines or setting up completely fresh copies of Office.

            Outlook does not use your Contacts for autocomplete, but a list it compiles as you send e-mail messages out.  Autocomplete often contains addresses not in your Contacts.  I talked about this briefly (as do the articles referenced) on the JAWS Group here: https://jfw.groups.io/g/main/message/88876 

             When you have a brand-spankin' new installation of Outlook there is no existing autocomplete list unless you've taken the time to have exported it prior to the new install, and going through the steps to import that data into the new install.  This is also talked about in the articles I reference in the message above.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: NVDA and APA Style

Sandra Pilz
 

What kind of overload are you trying to minimise?  Is it when you read and reread your paper to edit the text, or is it when you edit the bibliography?


I think using reference software could help with both. I like to use a citation style that creates less verbeage when the text is read back to me. When I am done writing, I can simply change the citation style to whatever I need, for example APA. The Software will then change the in-line citations to the required format. Finally, I have it insert my bibliography at the end of my document. Of course, I still have to check the bibliography and at this point, you might feel there is overload again. I am not sure how you could minimise it at this point.


Also, if your paper is nearly done, it is not really feasible to start using reference software now. But maybe you might try it for your next paper.


Regards


Sandra

Am 16.05.2021 um 16:28 schrieb Kelly, Kathleen:

Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 


Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

tim
 

Ben running computers for over 30 years and never heard of genI5/r5?

Now the 8gb of ram is best to stop slugishness, I 3 or 5 with no less then 128emc drive will keep you running a long time with no problem.

here is one to stay away from any notebook with less then 128gb emc drive. I have worked on a bunch with 32 and 64 and windows really don't like these small drives. I either put linux or chrome os on them for max power.

You can get a real good referb for under $300 and under with good specs.





On 5/16/2021 8:20 AM, enes sarıbaş wrote:

I would do a minimum of 8gb of ram, and a current gen i5/r5. That is as low as you should go. Even with those specs, NVDA is heavy on CPU usage.

On 5/15/2021 7:36 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Personally, I would not even consider running Windows 10 with less than 8 GB of RAM.  Nor would I consider a Celeron processor, for anything, these days.

I'd invest a bit more for additional memory and a better processor.  You might also consider a refurbished business-class laptop, which can be had at very reasonable prices (or at least could prior to the pandemic - everything's getting more expensive as supply is constrained).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: NVDA and APA Style

tim
 

Trying slowing down your speech output.

On 5/16/2021 10:28 AM, Kelly, Kathleen wrote:
Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 


Re: [Solved] office 2019 and outlook

Jackie
 

& if I'm not mistaken (& I could well be, it happens w/some degree of
regularity), some of the privacy settings can also affect whether
addresses are auto-completed.

On 5/16/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Gene,

This has been coming up again and again on several groups as people are
getting new machines or setting up completely fresh copies of Office.

Outlook does not use your Contacts for autocomplete, but a list it compiles
as you send e-mail messages out.  Autocomplete often contains addresses not
in your Contacts.  I talked about this briefly (as do the articles
referenced) on the JAWS Group here:
https://jfw.groups.io/g/main/message/88876

When you have a brand-spankin' new installation of Outlook there is no
existing autocomplete list unless you've taken the time to have exported it
prior to the new install, and going through the steps to import that data
into the new install.  This is also talked about in the articles I reference
in the message above.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless
you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon





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Re: [Solved] office 2019 and outlook

 

Gene,

           This has been coming up again and again on several groups as people are getting new machines or setting up completely fresh copies of Office.

            Outlook does not use your Contacts for autocomplete, but a list it compiles as you send e-mail messages out.  Autocomplete often contains addresses not in your Contacts.  I talked about this briefly (as do the articles referenced) on the JAWS Group here: https://jfw.groups.io/g/main/message/88876 

             When you have a brand-spankin' new installation of Outlook there is no existing autocomplete list unless you've taken the time to have exported it prior to the new install, and going through the steps to import that data into the new install.  This is also talked about in the articles I reference in the message above.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

Gene
 

Nothing I’ve seen convinces me that NVDA itself uses a lot of computing power.  nor have I seen this with screen-readers in general to the small extent I’ve checked.  Its using the newer synthesizers that uses a lot of computing ;power.  If you want to use the newer voices, I can’t comment on the minimum specifications to get good performance but in the old days, I had machines that today would be laughably underpowered, running Windows 95 and Windows 3.1 and Via Voice, very similar to Eloquence, ran well.  This was in a 166MHZ, not GHZ, Pentium machine and in an even older and less powerful machine running Windows 3.1. 
 
As for NVDA using a lot of computing power, if I monitor use when I’m typing text with carachter echo on in the Windows Task manager, I get low numbers.  I just checked and while moving up and down the list in task manager, then pressing f5 to refresh the screen, I get a 6 percent CPU reading.  When typing in this e-mail message, alt tabbing immediately to the task manager and refreshing the screen, I get a 10 percent usage reading.
 
I’m not saying there won’t be variations, but those figures are close to what I generally get when I test doing these things.
 
And I haven’t seen complaints about the performance of NVDA from people using tablets. 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 7:20 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA running on a budget laptop
 

I would do a minimum of 8gb of ram, and a current gen i5/r5. That is as low as you should go. Even with those specs, NVDA is heavy on CPU usage.

On 5/15/2021 7:36 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Personally, I would not even consider running Windows 10 with less than 8 GB of RAM.  Nor would I consider a Celeron processor, for anything, these days.

I'd invest a bit more for additional memory and a better processor.  You might also consider a refurbished business-class laptop, which can be had at very reasonable prices (or at least could prior to the pandemic - everything's getting more expensive as supply is constrained).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: [Solved] office 2019 and outlook

Gene
 

I’m not sure what may be causing the problem.  Someone else may have suggestions.  I may be wrong, but I vaguely seem to remember this being asked about on a list I follow.  If you can’t resolve the problem, there may be a work around that works as well or almost as well. 
 
Windows Live Mail has a search contacts function.  While it may not be the case, if Windows Live Mail has it, Outlook likely does.  this might solve your problem. 
I generally type the first name of the contact I’m looking for and I usually find it efficiently that way.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 6:34 AM
Subject: [nvda] office 2019 and outlook
 

Hi

Using the latest nvda and windows 10 pro

Lately if I create a new email.

I type in the email address.  Nvda tells me use your up and down keys to get  contact sugestions, but it gives me no emails addresses.

GBut it is there.  Any help will be greatful.

Thanks

Timothy

 

 


Re: Windows 10 ocr & nvda

Michael Maslo
 

Hello, so if I use Windows 10 OCR, it should read everything on the screen or just on the element which I am focused? Regarding to getting the numeric keypad, is that so I can read the results of the screen or what? I’m trying to find the best solution for skimming a screen when there is unreadable text on it.

Sincerely,

Michael maslo

On May 16, 2021, at 10:48, Rui Fontes <rui.fontes@tiflotecnia.com> wrote:

The OCR is applied to the navegation object focused.

So, if yo tab to a button and perform the OCR, it will be applied only to that button...


Normally you should go up some levels in the object hierarchy untill you reach the window object...


Rui


Às 15:51 de 16/05/2021, Michael Maslo escreveu:
Hello everyone, I was wondering if someone would be able to explain on how to use the windows 10 ocr add on? I installed it and hit the insert plus r. It said it was performing the o c r. And then it said it was done when I tried to read the results, I couldn't. Can someone explain in how to use this please?

Sincerely,

Michael maslo

Sincerely,

Michael maslo






Re: Windows 10 ocr & nvda

Rui Fontes
 

The OCR is applied to the navegation object focused.

So, if yo tab to a button and perform the OCR, it will be applied only to that button...


Normally you should go up some levels in the object hierarchy untill you reach the window object...


Rui


Às 15:51 de 16/05/2021, Michael Maslo escreveu:

Hello everyone, I was wondering if someone would be able to explain on how to use the windows 10 ocr add on? I installed it and hit the insert plus r. It said it was performing the o c r. And then it said it was done when I tried to read the results, I couldn't. Can someone explain in how to use this please?

Sincerely,

Michael maslo

Sincerely,

Michael maslo



Re: NVDA running on a budget laptop

 

On Sun, May 16, 2021 at 02:21 AM, Jeff Samco wrote:
to be  confident the laptop won't frustrate me.
-
And right there is the key point.  One can definitely use a "less finely specced" machine than one's home workhorse when all it's meant for is light duty emailing, web browsing, word processing, and even streaming, but even when something with really minimum spec works (and I have an ancient Gateway with 4GB and old Intel processor that does), "works" is often not enough to make one feel OK while using it.

You still want the speed and responsiveness you're used to on your regular machine, but just for lighter loads.  With Windows 10, it's almost certain that you will not have that experience with under 8GB of RAM, and you absolutely won't if you've got less than that with a really old processor and a conventional HDD.   SSDs can and do gain you a lot of zippy-ness when it comes to tasks that are disk I/O intensive.  Boot times shrink incredibly.  But for stuff that's not disk I/O intensive, and the intended uses aren't, your throttling point is typically from the combination of processing power and RAM, which are intimately related in that a poor processor with lots of RAM could, in theory, work better than a mediocre (or good) processor with insufficient RAM.  

Windows 10, and all modern OSes, are now built to absolutely maximize their exploitation of available RAM to make faster performance (from the user perspective, anyway) happen.

I've never owned anything near to a "flagship machine" myself, because I don't have the need for that kind of processing power or speed.  I have, at times past, had to get "the cheapest thing possible" so I've lived with these long term, and it wasn't fun.

Often even small increases in price on the lower end of the market get you some pretty substantial performance boosts.

In the end, I'm really not telling anyone what they should buy, because I can't know that.  Only the individual making the choice knows what is "minimally acceptable" to them.  But I am trying to identify factors to consider.  You have to make the choice in the end, and what's right for me, or any random someone else, may not be right for you.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Re: Windows 10 ocr & nvda

P. Otter
 

hello there, you have to use the numberic block.
if you use a laptop, use the functionkey to activate the numberic block keys!
cheers
paul otter


Op 16-5-2021 om 16:51 schreef Michael Maslo:

Hello everyone, I was wondering if someone would be able to explain on how to use the windows 10 ocr add on? I installed it and hit the insert plus r. It said it was performing the o c r. And then it said it was done when I tried to read the results, I couldn't. Can someone explain in how to use this please?

Sincerely,

Michael maslo

Sincerely,

Michael maslo



Windows 10 ocr & nvda

Michael Maslo
 

Hello everyone, I was wondering if someone would be able to explain on how to use the windows 10 ocr add on? I installed it and hit the insert plus r. It said it was performing the o c r. And then it said it was done when I tried to read the results, I couldn't. Can someone explain in how to use this please?

Sincerely,

Michael maslo

Sincerely,

Michael maslo


Re: NVDA and APA Style

Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 

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