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Re: accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

That means then that there is obviously a way to turn it off. Is this a simple key like f2 to edit in Access for example?
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:33 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"


Mary,

Have a read through:

* Adjusting Protected View Settings in MS-Office Programs ( https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&;id=0B98uELZbPFnOSHIyWXUzRnFkdmc )

I have hated Protected View as default since its introduction. I never open an MS-Office document from any source that I don't trust, so it's just a PITA for me. The sighted folks can see what's there, so they don't need to have something read it, and it's visible when Protected View is on. If they want to manipulate it in any way, though, they've got to turn it off, too, either for that document alone or as noted above.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Getting this thread back on topic though. If we only consider the Writer from Open Office, if it could be made to behave in say all and maybe have the browse and edit modes etc, added it would be a very creditable replacement. I find the Libra version works best thus far.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 9:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


[Edited Message Follows]
[Reason: Correction of misattributed quote. The archive needs to be correct. I apologize that this involves the message being resent.]

On Wed, January 23, 2019, 2:17 PM, Travis Siegel ( tsiegel@softcon.com ) wrote:


I'd rather put up with some access issues than pay for a product that must
be paid for each and every year, or you loose the ability to use the
program, that's just silly, and companies really be shot for introducing
such nonsense.
There are so many products that use this service model, and have for many, many years now, that this comment is nonsense.

You can use Office up through 2016 (and I think even 2019) as an installed program if you wish and there will be support for same for some years to come.

You certainly must never have been a JAWS user, either, as their model is very much "as a service" if you wish to have a version of JAWS that's keeping up with "what's happening now."

I strongly prefer installed programs that I am not paying for over time, but there's nothing wrong with selling service in that way. Buying a high-end version of Office outright is a multi-hundred dollar proposition. It will take quite a while to equal what you'd have paid for the installed version via "as a service" delivery model and you keep getting updates as well.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Hmm, well yes I think though that Jaws will still carry on working on the machine its been installed on as long as you do not need a newer version. If the poster is correct this is not what Microsoft does with the subscription model. With Word, I can still use old versions as long as they will still run and screenreaders support them. I find it intensely annoying for example that Microsoft decide which email client I can use. If I load up Outlook Express on windows ten with the support files it needs from xp, it will run fine. However when Windows updates in a major way, it removes it.

However most of the free replacements of that software are worse. Security may be a little better, but to date its not been an issue.
They reinvent the wheel worse then won't allow people to use the old wheels even if they fit and go around, so to speak.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 9:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 03:40 PM, Gene wrote:


I'd rather put up with some access issues than pay for a product that must
be paid for each and every year, or you loose the ability to use the
program, that's just silly, and companies really be shot for introducing
such nonsense.
There are so many products that use this service model, and have for many, many years now, that this comment is nonsense.

You can use Office up through 2016 (and I think even 2019) as an installed program if you wish and there will be support for same for some years to come.

You certainly must never have been a JAWS user, either, as their model is very much "as a service" if you wish to have a version of JAWS that's keeping up with "what's happening now."

I strongly prefer installed programs that I am not paying for over time, but there's nothing wrong with selling service in that way. Buying a high-end version of Office outright is a multi-hundred dollar proposition. It will take quite a while to equal what you'd have paid for the installed version via "as a service" delivery model and you keep getting updates as well.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I have to say I do agree and I'm also the person who still buys music on physical media for similar reasons.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Travis Siegel" <tsiegel@softcon.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 8:17 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


I know I'm in the minority here, but I'll *never* use office 365. I'd
rather put up with some access issues than pay for a product that must
be paid for each and every year, or you loose the ability to use the
program, that's just silly, and companies really be shot for introducing
such nonsense. I know you can still access your documents you already
created if you don't pay, but creating new content is off the table at
that point, and to me, that's just criminal. Charge me for updates,
that's fine, because then I can choose not to upgrade, but charge for
basic use of the program, and hold capabilities back if I don't pay?
How's that any different than some of those hackers who hold your files
for ransom?

No thanks, no office 365 for me *ever*.

On 1/23/2019 2:41 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
I have not touched Office 365, but certain things are very, very, very
unlikely to change, ever.

ALT+F, S still does a save as it always has for an existing file
that's been saved.

Alt+F,A still does a Save As, though if you want to go straight to the
browse dialog add an O after that A, as that forces it to go directly
to the browse dialog (and the same is true for the straight save the
first time you're saving a file).

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the
need for illusion is deep./*

~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Really? I thought at least that part was pretty straightforward. Here speaks a person who still prefers the long unsupported office XP version of Word!
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Doc Wright godfearer" <godfearer@comcast.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 5:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


i am running 2007. I peeked at office 365 but I did not like what hoops i had to jump through just to save a file.
***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****
----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Vogel
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 8:15 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


And the question, "Upgrading from what?/What existing version of Office are you using?," comes to mind.

I just recently upgraded from 2010, which is getting rickety but is still supported, to Office 2016. Office 2016 will still be supported for some years to come, and with the availability of recycled licenses out of the EU one can upgrade to the top version, Pro Plus, for very little money.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I think in terms of the word processor, the main differences I see is not browse or edit mode as in word, and an inability to reliably do a read all on anything but a paragraph at a time.
The rest of the suite seem to need one to play about with Java runtimes and hence have no interest for me as they are too flaky.
I do wish somebody would make a very easy to configure and use, database that runs in a screenreader with all options accessible without either being a concert pianist or having to work around things that seldom work.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 2:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice


OO, Open Office, is a more accessible program than LO is, but it is also a far worse program with missing basic features, such as working with Docx files. LO is a far better program, but if you need something complex for a huge project, neither works well. LiBreOffice is the best open source alternative but is less accessible than OO.


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

If quantum runs well on your machine, the current version.  If it doesn't run well, you would have to run a version of either 52X or older and that, of course isn't recommended because of security reasons.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:15 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Dear of Gene & List:

 

What is the presently recommended version of Firefox for Windows 10 screenreader users to run?

Have a 64-bit PC.

 

Brian K. Lingard

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: January 22, 2019 9:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

You can use it and it is still good but it is not as good as it used to be before Firefox Quantum came out.  It is not as easy to understand as to the interface and it does not have as many features in the redesigned version for the brave new Firefox.  Will Firefox ever stop requiring its add-on developers to modify them every few years?  I wonder how many add-ons have been abandoned by their developers after having the modify them at least two times in the last number of years.

 

 

I am not recommending the method I gave over the add-on and the add-on provides good protections.  However, those interested may compare the two if they wish.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables many functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear of Gene & List:

 

What is the presently recommended version of Firefox for Windows 10 screenreader users to run?

Have a 64-bit PC.

 

Brian K. Lingard

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: January 22, 2019 9:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

You can use it and it is still good but it is not as good as it used to be before Firefox Quantum came out.  It is not as easy to understand as to the interface and it does not have as many features in the redesigned version for the brave new Firefox.  Will Firefox ever stop requiring its add-on developers to modify them every few years?  I wonder how many add-ons have been abandoned by their developers after having the modify them at least two times in the last number of years.

 

 

I am not recommending the method I gave over the add-on and the add-on provides good protections.  However, those interested may compare the two if they wish.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables many functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Sarah k Alawami
 

Yeah. Won't work on the site I gave. I just tried it. And it's on. I love it for safari, it is seeming to work well, except on that site.

Take care

On 22 Jan 2019, at 16:57, Brian Vogel wrote:

Marcio,

         If you want a softer approach, then please just start out with uBlock Origin, which blocks ads and selectively blocks "annoying" scripts (my term, not theirs).  If you find you want something more aggressive afterward, then try NoScript.

          Both of these programs run in "install it and forget it" mode, but both are also wildly customizable if one so chooses.  I have not so chosen, except to suspend uBlock Origin on a couple of sites where I stream commercial TV content and cannot get it to work if uBlock is active.  What's funny is that adding the Privacy Badger extension brought back blocking of TV ads when streaming (or at least it did 2 days ago) which is something that used to work with both uBlock and Adblock Plus until ABC.com blocked all content if you had either activated.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Sarah k Alawami
 

Agreed. The site I visit platinum airways is chock full of adds. I can't even get to the history of my DOTW, even though my bf can and we are both running the same browser, on the mac anyway. I get stuck in a pacture. There are other ways to get there but still I was going to read the history of sitka this week. Oh well.

Take care

On 22 Jan 2019, at 15:12, Lino Morales wrote:

Gene it’s a way to get to the pertant INFO say in an article. It’s a bear to find the beginning of a news article a lot of the time. Like I said before pages content are always changing so I feel this not effective. Adds are everywhere. We just got to find a happy medium to filter out all the clutter. The more I visit sites like:

www.wnd.com etc. the worse it gets.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Gene <gsasner@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:06:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker
 
I doubt that ads are consistent on web sites.  They may be of different sizes, and I wouldn't assume they will remain on the same exact part of the page.  I don't ever recall Flexible Web described as a way to skip ads. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:54 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I don’t know if the Jaws Flexible Web main purpose is to work as an add blocker.

I use it to filter out/block elements like in forums (Reddit for example) and other sites/domains where things are pretty constant and just the simple structure of the site is a bit too cluttered for me.

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lino Morales
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Way worse Bryan. I can attest to this. This is a far better solution than JAW’s Flexible Web. I mean pages regardless of being a news site or not are constantly changing so to me this type of thing they are doing is ineffective IMHO. So don’t get any bright ideas NVDA add-on devs on here. Said add-on should do it no matter what screen reader you use.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:49:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 02:19 PM, Lino Morales wrote:

Brian does it weed out most of the adds on news sites etc. You’ve talked about this extention before

Simple answer:  yes.    It essentially wipes out all online ads anywhere they occur.   As new ones pop up the set of definitions gets updated very quickly and most of us never see them.  

I can't imagine browsing without an ad blocker.  They drove me mad with the visual distraction (not to mention auditory, for some) well over a decade ago and I cannot imagine that things have gotten any better, probably they've gotten worse.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

 

hi. libreoffice and openoffice are usable with nvda, but for example:
we cant use SayAll, footnotes, endnotes, comments and also tables have
some issues that i dont know, because i am not very familiar with
office programs and never used table until now.

On 1/23/19, Robert Doc Wright godfearer <godfearer@comcast.net> wrote:
How are these programs in the realm of accessibility with NVDA? I'm trying
to decide if I should switch or uprade to Ofice 365.
***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you
get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****



--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

In Chrome, do the following:
Open the settings in Chrome and tab a good way to advanced.  It's a button.  Press the space bar. 
Tab to content settings.  It's a button.  Press the space bar.
Now, bookmark the page so you can open it efficiently in future.
Use your screen-reader's search to search for JAVA.  It’s a button.  Press the space bar.
Tab once and you will find another button that tells you whether JAVA is blocked or allowed.  Press the space bar to toggle between the settings.
When you have it set as you wish, Shift tab once and you will be on a back button.  Press the back button. 
You will be back on the original JAVA button again.  Leave the window opened so you can press that button and follow the procedure again if you want to change it during your session.
Also, I told you a way I know works.  You may just be able to not use the back button and stay on the blocked/allowed button and press it when you want to change the setting.  You can experiment. I haven't checked. 
 
What I said about using shift enter or control enter applies in Chrome as well as firefox.  they are standard commands in at least Chrome, firefox, and Internet Explorer.  I would think they are available in many other browsers.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 8:32 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Yes please.

Many thanks.

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 10:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Do you want the instructions for Chrome as well? 

 

its not a question of novices.  Most people wouldn't know or wouldn't have thought of applying these various tasks in one related manner.

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:05 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Thank you Gene for taking the time to write down the instructions for us novices.

Blessings

Pascal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.

 

In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.

Here is how you get to the setting:

In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.

Press enter.

A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.

you are now in a search field.

The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.

 

In the search field, type the following exactly as written:

pt.en

Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 

It is now off. 

Leave that Window opened.

Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 

 

If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.

As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.

Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:

Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.

Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 

Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 

Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 

 

As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)


Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 

 

As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 

 

Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal

 


Re: accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"

Maria Reyes <blindteky@...>
 

Also you can press alt f then hit i e for enable editing. At least that's what I do and I save it then it won't be in protected view anymore.




On Jan 23, 2019, at 7:09 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:34 PM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra wrote:
Be careful before suspending protected view.
I have no argument with the advice you've given, as everyone has their own tolerance for risk.

I will note, however, that what you propose doing would unleash exactly the same macros as my method does once the file is open.  That's why I don't find Protected View useful for myself.   I have never opened anything I have no intention of interacting with, and the moment you unprotect a given file it's unprotected.  For myself, I just see no advantage in doing this on a case by case basis since I'm strict about what I'll open.

If one has to deal with a lot of Office file throughput, though, and you don't have the need to interact with many of them, Protected View can come in handy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Richard Wells
 

Gene: Thanks for your help. You stimulated me to go find the answer and it is actually quite easy. Just open the file menu with alt followed with f. Then press t for options and down-arrow to the save category. Tab through until you find the back stage and deselect it. Tab to okay and that pesky back stage thingy is gone. You guys and gals are great! I love all of you all almost as much as I love NVDA.

On 1/23/2019 5:35 PM, Gene wrote:
I don't use Office and I expect others will explain how to do this.  Until then, I believe that pressing escape will take you out of it but I'm not sure of that.  That is my not necessarily correct recollection of discussions I've seen on a list perhaps a year ago. 
 
Gene
----- Original message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 4:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice

Gene: Would you tell us how to turn off back stage?

On 1/23/2019 12:09 PM, Gene wrote:
You probably could have saved the file as you do now if you turned back stage view off.  I don't use Word and I'll let those who do discuss that but from discussions I've seen on lists, turning it off removes such annoyances.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 11:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice

i am running 2007. I peeked at office 365 but I did not like what hoops i had to jump through just to save a file.
***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 8:15 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice

And the question, "Upgrading from what?/What existing version of Office are you using?," comes to mind.

I just recently upgraded from 2010, which is getting rickety but is still supported, to Office 2016.   Office 2016 will still be supported for some years to come, and with the availability of recycled licenses out of the EU one can upgrade to the top version, Pro Plus, for very little money.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Yes please.

Many thanks.

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 10:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Do you want the instructions for Chrome as well? 

 

its not a question of novices.  Most people wouldn't know or wouldn't have thought of applying these various tasks in one related manner.

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:05 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Thank you Gene for taking the time to write down the instructions for us novices.

Blessings

Pascal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.

 

In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.

Here is how you get to the setting:

In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.

Press enter.

A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.

you are now in a search field.

The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.

 

In the search field, type the following exactly as written:

pt.en

Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 

It is now off. 

Leave that Window opened.

Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 

 

If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.

As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.

Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:

Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.

Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 

Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 

Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 

 

As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)


Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 

 

As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 

 

Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal

 


Re: Corrupted NVDA

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi John,

NVDA 2018.4.1 is the latest stable build of NVDA.  Possible confusion because it did, in fact, come out in 2019, but it is a point release for 2018.4 (as in, identical to 2018.4 with just a minor update to address a specific bug).

It sounds like the machine might be going into sleep mode or at least screensaver and starting to power down some things.  In the advanced power options you can set options such as sleeping USB ports for instance.  If your Braille display is connected via USB, then if it goes to sleep, when you wake up the laptop by pressing something, it may then need to take a few moments to reconnect.

On Thu, Jan 24, 2019 at 12:41 PM John J. Boyer <john.boyer@...> wrote:
Hello,

I have Windows 10 Home on an Acer Swift notebook with a Focus 40 Braille display. NVDA is 2018.4.1 with BrailleExtender.
Somehow it seems to have gotten corrupted. If I leave the machine idle for a while it doesn't respond to the advance
button on the display. If I keep poking around for a few minutes it comes back to normal. I tried to update to 2019.1.
It seemed to work, but it is still running the old version and now it says that no update is availablle. I guess I
should reinstall NVDA, but that would require sighted help. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks,
John

gotten corrupted.
gotten corrupted. It b
--
John J. Boyer
Email: john.boyer@...
website: http://www.abilitiessoft.org
Status: Company dissolved but website and email addresses  live.
Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Mission: developing assistive technology software and providing STEM services
        that are available at no cost







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Corrupted NVDA

John J. Boyer
 

Hello,

I have Windows 10 Home on an Acer Swift notebook with a Focus 40 Braille display. NVDA is 2018.4.1 with BrailleExtender.
Somehow it seems to have gotten corrupted. If I leave the machine idle for a while it doesn't respond to the advance
button on the display. If I keep poking around for a few minutes it comes back to normal. I tried to update to 2019.1.
It seemed to work, but it is still running the old version and now it says that no update is availablle. I guess I
should reinstall NVDA, but that would require sighted help. Any suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks,
John

gotten corrupted.
gotten corrupted. It b
--
John J. Boyer
Email: john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org
website: http://www.abilitiessoft.org
Status: Company dissolved but website and email addresses live.
Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Mission: developing assistive technology software and providing STEM services
that are available at no cost


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

Gene
 

Brian and all
 
I'm really getting tired of your harassment.  I never start these arguments.  You go out of your way to argue with me.  Every such discussion is started by you.  You made a charge.  let's have some examples.  Give specifics about when I have been negatively critical, not positively critical, of list members. 
At times, I comment on how a list member does something related to using Windows or a Windows program but that is constructive criticism and I assume you aren't referring to such occasions.
 
If other list members want to comment and present examples, I'll be happy to hear them.  If I am doing something I am unaware of or that strikes people the wrong way, I'll be happy to consider comments.  But please write me off list at this address:
so as not to clutter the list with administrative and offtopic discussion.  Also, if you want the list owner to see our discussions, please use the owner's address.  I'll see your messages along with the owner. 
 
Since I am a moderator, if I am, even inadvertently and without realizing it, creating or contributing to an unpleasant list environment, then the owner should be aware of it.  People need not be intimidated about writing to me.  I don’t hold grudges and I hope that, if people have constructively critical comments, that they will let me know. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 5:54 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:51 PM, Gene wrote:
But getting caught up in a discussion and replying without reading the thread, while it would be better to do otherwise, really doesn't deserve a scolding comment of this type.  I don't see why it deserves one at all.
What a surprise, Gene.   You are free to scold all you want, and heaven knows you do.  Every once in a while turnabout is absolutely fair play.  And this is coming immediately upon the heels of my having edited the original post to correct it.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: Open Office/libreOffice

JM Casey
 

OO will open .dox files, but not save them, I think. You can save in the older style .doc files, which Microsoft Office can work with to this day.

 

There are definite accessibility quirks with both Libre and Open Office, depending on which screen-reader you use. I thought OO worked slightly better with JAWS whereas Libre seemed to work slightly better with nVDA, and even seem to remember someone in an earlier discussion on this list explaining why that was so.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Kingett
Sent: January 23, 2019 9:04 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Open Office/libreOffice

 

OO, Open Office, is a more accessible program than LO is, but it is also a far worse program with missing basic features, such as working with Docx files. LO is a far better program, but if you need something complex for a huge project, neither works well. LiBreOffice is the best open source alternative but is less accessible than OO.


Re: accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"

 

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:34 PM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra wrote:
Be careful before suspending protected view.
I have no argument with the advice you've given, as everyone has their own tolerance for risk.

I will note, however, that what you propose doing would unleash exactly the same macros as my method does once the file is open.  That's why I don't find Protected View useful for myself.   I have never opened anything I have no intention of interacting with, and the moment you unprotect a given file it's unprotected.  For myself, I just see no advantage in doing this on a case by case basis since I'm strict about what I'll open.

If one has to deal with a lot of Office file throughput, though, and you don't have the need to interact with many of them, Protected View can come in handy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back