Date   

Re: Open Office/libreOffice

 

And the question, "Upgrading from what?/What existing version of Office are you using?," comes to mind.

I just recently upgraded from 2010, which is getting rickety but is still supported, to Office 2016.   Office 2016 will still be supported for some years to come, and with the availability of recycled licenses out of the EU one can upgrade to the top version, Pro Plus, for very little money.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

It doesn't matter if the ads are accessible.  They shouldn't interfere with a blind person using the site.  But good luck with that quixotic battle.  Ads come from all sorts of companies and are usually third party ads.  If they're are only a small number of ad designers, there might be some hope.  But I suspect the number is large.
 
You say there are an increasing number of sites that don't allow you to use them if an ad blocker is on.  They may be usable using my method. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 3:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I'm encountering not so much ads, but long links mainly used to track. By
which I mean, say you subscribe to an rss or mail list feed from a council.
they will send an html email in which these long links are not just the
direct address of a page, but are designed to click through some kind of
click measuring or tracking system so, one assumes they can find out where
you got to the information from ie, from another web site, or the email list
etc. I know of no add blocker which can sort this mess out, as strictly
speaking they are still links on the page much like the long javascript ones
you see a lot that mean nothing, but are often hidden from the sighted in
some way.
 If they are actual adverts, then I've a pet peeve to  say, and I do not see
how nvda can be adapted to fix it. Many sites will not let you in if they
see an ad blocker but it matters not how accessible the underlying site is
if the advertisers make their adverts disruptive to access software with
scrolling messages moving graphics or all sorts of other effects. Surely if
a site is accessible they should be able to stipulate that any ads sent via
it are accessible as well.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Pascal Lambert " <coccinelle86@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:22 PM
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker


> Hi All,
>
> Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of
> which
> are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying
> and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com. they are
> becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we
> may need to look into and report.
>
> Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that
> works well with NVDA?
>
> Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
>
> Many thanks
>
> Blessings
>
> Pascal
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Open Office/libreOffice

 

OO, Open Office, is a more accessible program than LO is, but it is also a far worse program with missing basic features, such as working with Docx files. LO is a far better program, but if you need something complex for a huge project, neither works well. LiBreOffice is the best open source alternative but is less accessible than OO.


Re: editing in Word

Chris Mullins
 

Hi

Based on the cursor being at the beginning of the word to be selected, Notepad does select the word and the full-stop, so only uses space or end-of-line to delimit the text selection.  In Word 2007, it selects only the word, so it looks like Word over-rides the Windows Ctrl+shift+arrow command and uses the punctuation mark as a text delimiter.  The only way I can see you getting the results you have is that you only selected the full-stop character or have somehow de-selected the word, then selected the full-stop..        

 

Cheers

Chris

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: 23 January 2019 10:15
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] editing in Word

 

Hi all,

I generally just use Notepad for writing anything down, pasting it into Word when I need to send it to anybody else. Due to time pressures with my univeristy deadlines, I'm writing a 40-page film script directly into Word.

I keep geting caught out when selecting words if a punctuation symbol folows the word. For example, if I wanted to select, 'end.', in Notepad I'd pres CTRL+SHIFT+left arrow and I'd get the word 'end' and the full stop / period. In Word I just get the full stop / period,not the word 'end' as well.

It's caught me out a few times. If I wanted to change end to finish, for example, in Notepad I'd CTRL+SHIFT+Left Arrow and just type finish. In Word I do that on autopilot and end up with endfinish.

This seems to be happening only in Word. Is there a reason why? Is it a feature of Word or is NVDA behaving differently in Word compared to other programs? I'm guessing it's Word. If it is does anybody know of a setting to select word and punctuation symbol rather than just the symbol?

Thanks for any thoughts,

Giles


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Thank you Gene for taking the time to write down the instructions for us novices.

Blessings

Pascal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.

 

In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.

Here is how you get to the setting:

In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.

Press enter.

A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.

you are now in a search field.

The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.

 

In the search field, type the following exactly as written:

pt.en

Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 

It is now off. 

Leave that Window opened.

Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 

 

If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.

As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.

Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:

Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.

Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 

Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 

Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 

 

As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)


Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:

This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 

 

As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 

 

Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal

 


Re: Emoji in Office 365

Ralf Kefferpuetz
 

This is also in Outlook 2013, just type a smiley like ": )", ": - )" or "; - )" (without the spaces)
They all will be reported as 12.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Christo de Klerk
Sent: Mittwoch, 23. Januar 2019 10:49
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Emoji in Office 365

Hello Quentin

Thank you for responding and for showing an interest to try and assist.

My friend provided the following steps to duplicate the problem:

Begin quote:

Steps to reproduce


1. Use Office 365 with latest updates and latest official NVDA release. The
issue was present with previous Office 365 updates and NVDA versions too though.
2. Open a blank MS Word document or new message in Outlook.
3. Use the normal method to insert an emoji using the keyboard.


Outcome when using NVDA


1. Instead of producing the chosen emoji, NVDA inserts the digits "12".
2. There is no way to ascertain if the correct emoji was inserted.
3. When saving the document or draft, it is saved with the name 12, explained
above.


Outcome when using JAWS 2019


* The emoji is correctly reported with no unexpected behaviour.


The bug has previously been reported to Joseph Lee, who blamed the
shortcoming
on Microsoft Office. This clearly is not the case, as outlined above.

End quote

Kind regards

Christo


On 2019/01/22 01:01 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Hi Christo,

Can you please advise the steps to reproduce this?

Which Office program? Which emoji character? If it's a document you have
been sent, if you are able to forward it to info@nvaccess.org, I can have a
look at the same file, otherwise, if it's one (or several) emojis, please
advise how to select the appropriate one(s).

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Mon, Jan 21, 2019 at 8:24 PM Christo de Klerk <christodeklerk@gmail.com>
wrote:

Hello NVDA developers


A friend who is not on this list asked me to report that when using NVDA
with Office 365 emoji are not shown; instead the number 12 appears in
the text. This only happens in Office 365 and not in older versions of
Office. He says that the opposition Shark handles emoji perfectly in
365. Is this a know issue?


Kind regards


Christo






Open Office/libreOffice

Robert Doc Wright godfearer
 

How are these programs in the realm of accessibility with NVDA? I'm trying to decide if I should switch or uprade to Ofice 365.
***
Jesus says, follow me and I'll help you through the rough spots.
the world says, hey come with me. My way is broad and easy. So what if you get crap on your shoes. You can always wash it off, can't you!
****


editing in Word

Giles Turnbull
 

Hi all,

I generally just use Notepad for writing anything down, pasting it into Word when I need to send it to anybody else. Due to time pressures with my univeristy deadlines, I'm writing a 40-page film script directly into Word.

I keep geting caught out when selecting words if a punctuation symbol folows the word. For example, if I wanted to select, 'end.', in Notepad I'd pres CTRL+SHIFT+left arrow and I'd get the word 'end' and the full stop / period. In Word I just get the full stop / period,not the word 'end' as well.

It's caught me out a few times. If I wanted to change end to finish, for example, in Notepad I'd CTRL+SHIFT+Left Arrow and just type finish. In Word I do that on autopilot and end up with endfinish.

This seems to be happening only in Word. Is there a reason why? Is it a feature of Word or is NVDA behaving differently in Word compared to other programs? I'm guessing it's Word. If it is does anybody know of a setting to select word and punctuation symbol rather than just the symbol?

Thanks for any thoughts,

Giles


Re: Before I fill out the survey

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

That is very true and of course, one also needs to set reasonable defaults as its compounded if an issue is actually du to a setting that people would not expect to affect a certain thing, but does. The one I'm thinking of is the onees regarding the switching between focus and browse mode on edit areas. Sometimes it better one way sometimes another and its hard to see how you can tell in advance which way around a given site might work best with.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Quentin Christensen" <quentin@nvaccess.org>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 12:53 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Before I fill out the survey


I was also going to say that there is also value in knowing what users are
having trouble with - if it's a matter of something which has a keystroke /
setting / existing way to fix it, that's great and makes it easy to help
the individual, but us learning that people are getting stuck with
something is useful as well. There's no point in us thinking we've solved
a problem by adding a keystroke or setting if no-one is aware it is exists
:)

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 9:00 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:

I would also argue that regardless of whether there is a "way around" the
issues you're encountering, there is great value in a development team for
any product to know about issues that require "ways around" that irritate
users to no end.

Sometimes highly skilled users of certain software, not just NVDA, lose
all perspective of what the experience is like for the unsophisticated user
(and that term is not an insult, personal or otherwise, we were all
unsophisticated users of everything we've ever touched at one point in
time). Having that input can result in improvements that would not
otherwise have been contemplated because there was no awareness of need or
desire.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need
for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, *To Jerusalem and Back*






--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I'm encountering not so much ads, but long links mainly used to track. By which I mean, say you subscribe to an rss or mail list feed from a council. they will send an html email in which these long links are not just the direct address of a page, but are designed to click through some kind of click measuring or tracking system so, one assumes they can find out where you got to the information from ie, from another web site, or the email list etc. I know of no add blocker which can sort this mess out, as strictly speaking they are still links on the page much like the long javascript ones you see a lot that mean nothing, but are often hidden from the sighted in some way.
If they are actual adverts, then I've a pet peeve to say, and I do not see how nvda can be adapted to fix it. Many sites will not let you in if they see an ad blocker but it matters not how accessible the underlying site is if the advertisers make their adverts disruptive to access software with scrolling messages moving graphics or all sorts of other effects. Surely if a site is accessible they should be able to stipulate that any ads sent via it are accessible as well.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pascal Lambert " <coccinelle86@comcast.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:22 PM
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker


Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which
are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying
and difficult. Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com. they are
becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we
may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads? Is there a freeware ads blocker that
works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal




Re: Emoji in Office 365

Christo de Klerk
 

Hello Quentin

Thank you for responding and for showing an interest to try and assist.

My friend provided the following steps to duplicate the problem:

Begin quote:

    Steps to reproduce


 1. Use Office 365 with latest updates and latest official NVDA release. The
    issue was present with previous Office 365 updates and NVDA versions too though.
 2. Open a blank MS Word document or new message in Outlook.
 3. Use the normal method to insert an emoji using the keyboard.


    Outcome when using NVDA


 1. Instead of producing the chosen emoji, NVDA inserts the digits "12".
 2. There is no way to ascertain if the correct emoji was inserted.
 3. When saving the document or draft, it is saved with the name 12, explained
    above.


    Outcome when using JAWS 2019


  * The emoji is correctly reported with no unexpected behaviour.


The bug has previously been reported to Joseph Lee, who blamed the shortcoming
on Microsoft Office. This clearly is not the case, as outlined above.

End quote

Kind regards

Christo

On 2019/01/22 01:01 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Hi Christo,

Can you please advise the steps to reproduce this?

Which Office program? Which emoji character? If it's a document you have
been sent, if you are able to forward it to info@nvaccess.org, I can have a
look at the same file, otherwise, if it's one (or several) emojis, please
advise how to select the appropriate one(s).

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Mon, Jan 21, 2019 at 8:24 PM Christo de Klerk <christodeklerk@gmail.com>
wrote:

Hello NVDA developers


A friend who is not on this list asked me to report that when using NVDA
with Office 365 emoji are not shown; instead the number 12 appears in
the text. This only happens in Office 365 and not in older versions of
Office. He says that the opposition Shark handles emoji perfectly in
365. Is this a know issue?


Kind regards


Christo






Re: Windows Defender Adequate?

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Ralph, Gene & List:

 

I purchased WEB Root Internet Security Everywhere from my Tech person who is a member of Nerds on Site.

 

Has a subscription, believe I bought the three-year one. He swears by it. Has updates sometimes hourly.

 

He used to receive crisis calls from clients using their PC for business who found they had a virus. After he started installing Web Root on their systems, the crisis calls have almost all stopped. He still drops by their offices every few months to do a scan using his anti-virus scanners; just to be sure, nothing has sneaked in. Says he seldom finds anything.

 

To make the program configurable or stoppable with speech or Braille, remove the Captcha it has to stop or configure it. I had help from one of his or her techs with this; however, anyone sighted can do it for you.

Their web site is HTTP://www.webroot.com;  

I wonder why this is being asked on the NVDA list. There are other forums available, such as blindtech.

Brian K. Lingard

 

Web site is: -year one. Same firm has versions for IOS, Android, and Mac. Worth its subscription.

Firm is in the suburbs of Denver, Colorado, on Mountain Standard Time, 7 hours behind GMT.

Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: January 21, 2019 10:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Windows Defender Adequate?

 

Windows Live Mail has good ratings.  It is not the best program but I do not know how many accessible antivirus programs there are now.  I’m not anywhere near an authority enough to say if it is adequate but my impression is that it is unless someone takes recklessly dangerous risks. 

   

Regarding Malware Bytes Are you using the version with real-time protection or are you just scanning your computer with it on a schedule?  I am not recommending that you buy the program and thus get real-time protection or that you do not.  I am just pointing out that if you use the free version, this is a question worth discussing.

 

Gene

Sent: M

 

 

On day, January 21, 2019 9:21 AM

Subject: [nvda] Windows Defender Adequate?

 

For more than two years, I have relied only on Windows Defender plus Malware Bytes. Now I am purchasing a new Dell Inspiron. Any thoughts about whether Windows Defender provides adequate protection.

 

Ralph

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Hope Williamson <ladyhope@...>
 

Yeah just use uBlock origin. There's an addon for Firefox, and an extension for crhome as well. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/ublock-origin/cjpalhdlnbpafiamejdnhcphjbkeiagm also https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/ublock-origin/


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

I would think so. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 9:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
Thanks for this. Really a good tip.
In adition, I guess we also can, instead of bookmark the settings page, make a shortcut of it. That is, create a shortcut on our desktop that will put us exactly on this page when we hit enter in it.
Am I right about it?

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 23/01/2019 00:21, Gene escreveu:
This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal




Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Gene,
Thanks for this. Really a good tip.
In adition, I guess we also can, instead of bookmark the settings page, make a shortcut of it. That is, create a shortcut on our desktop that will put us exactly on this page when we hit enter in it.
Am I right about it?

Cheers,
Marcio
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Em 23/01/2019 00:21, Gene escreveu:

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal




Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

I disagree that you can pretty much install it and forget it.  Yes, you can do that if you only use pages that require JAVA script to run that are on the white list, but with increasing numbers of pages requiring JAVA scripts to be allowed, you will very likely have to allow scripts on specific sites as you go.  and in the New York Times Example I gave, it may be easier to do what I described, even if you use Noscript and you allow scripts on the Times site, than to keep allowing and not allowing scripts using noscript.  You can allow scripts on the Times site using noscript, then switch using the method I described in a previous message.  That would give the best protection because Noscript provides certain additional protections that are active even if you allow scripts on a site. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

You can use it and it is still good but it isn't as good as it used to be before Firefox Quantum came out.  it isn't as easy to understand as to the interface and it doesn't have as many features in the redesigned version for the brave new Firefox.  Will Firefox ever stop requiring its add-on developers to modify them every few years?  I wonder how many add-ons have been abandoned by their developers after having the modify them at least two times in the last number of years.
 
 
I'm not recommending the method I gave over the add-on and the add-on provides good protections.  But those interested may compare the two if they wish.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Marcio,

            If you want to block scripts, Java and several other kinds, in Firefox then use the Add-On NoScript.  It is available from https://noscript.net/ , has been around for a very long time, and is pretty much "install it and forget it.  For myself, full script blocking is overkill, as it disables a lot of functions I actually want to keep.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Re: NVDA and ads blocker

Gene
 

This explanation is long.  It explains how to do this and gives an example of an efficient way to use this setting and how it may benefit you.
 
In firefox, it is a few steps to get to the place where you change the setting.  But once there, if you leave a window or tab opened, you can change it between on and off by just pressing enter in that window or tab.
Here is how you get to the setting:
In the browser address bar, type about:config.  Look at what I wrote character by character to see exactly how to type it.
Press enter.
A warning will come up.  Press the space bar.
you are now in a search field.
The first time you do this, once you are in the search field, you may want to bookmark the page for the fastest use in the future.  If you follow the bookmark, you will be on the warning message so press the space bar.
 
In the search field, type the following exactly as written:
pt.en
Tab once.  I think there is only one item in the results.  But if not, there will be very few.  The item you want says JAVA script default enabled or something very similar.  Select it if you are on it with the space bar or down arrow and up arrow.  Press enter.  it will then say
JAVA script user set bullian false or something similar. 
It is now off. 
Leave that Window opened.
Open a new window for your browsing with control n.  Or open a new tab with control t.  if you know how to move from tab to tab and from window to window, open whatever you want. 
 
If you go to a page that requires JAVA script, move to the settings window, press enter, go back to the page and reload it with f5.  If you know in advance that the page requires JAVA script, you can change the setting and then load the page as usual in the other window or tab.
As I said in another message, many pages now require scripts to function properly.  but when you are dealing with a site where certain pages do and certain ones don't like The New York Times Site, if you do the following, you will have easier to navigate article pages.
Open the home page or another page that requires scripts.  I don't know which do and don't in general.  the home page does as does the New York Times in print page.  You can tell by experimentation and what you know about sites you have visited if the pages display as they should when scripts are off.  The Times home page doesn't show all content if JAVA is off.  It shows some and for just a quick look at some important articles, that's fine.  But perhaps thirty to forty percent of the articles can't be seen if scripts are off.  So if you want to see all the articles and read them conveniently with scripts off, do the following:
Open The times home page, for example with Scripts enabled.
Then switch to the settings window and press enter to turn scripts off. 
Now go back to the other page.  Scripts will still be running on that page because it was opened before you changed the setting.  Find an article you want to read.  Use Shift enter instead of just enter.  The article will open in a new window and scripts won't be runnning.  The page may load noticeably faster and there will be considerably less interruptions on the page for things like advertising. 
Once finished, close the window with alt f4.  You will be back in the home page window, just where you left off. 
 
As I said, it's somewhat or rather geeky, but you may see benefits well worth having if you experiment and try seeing how things differ when scripts are allowed and not.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

Gene,
I would to know how to do it in Firefox. Please, may you explain it to us? :)

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 21:16, Gene escreveu:
This would probably be considered a somewhat geeky solution but it is effective and something some people might want to know about.  I avoid a lot of problems on pages that don't require JAVA script by having it off on such pages..  Alot of what you are describing, intrusive ads, refreshing pages, videos or audio that plays, are often displayed or played by use of JAVA scripts. 
 
As one possible solution to the audio problem when JAVA scripts are on, I saw in one browser, it may have been Chrome, a setting that allows you to tell the browser not to play audio on web pages.  I don't recall the exact wording and it might be different such as referring to audio and videos or a variation.  Others may know about that setting.  I saw it in passing recently but I didn't try to remember anything about it. 
 
Increasingly, pages require JAVA scripts to work properly but on a page with an article, you usually don't need to have it on.  I can explain more how I do this reasonably efficiently in Chrome and Firefox if people want to know. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:56 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

I was just wandering as the web is getting more and more difficult for us visually impaired and blind person.  It is not only the ads but also videos that suddenly are launched when you are trying to read something and pages that refreshed and you are no longer where you were as what you were reading has moved.  All these annoyances make the web, at times, difficult to navigate.  My first option is coming to this fortunate list and various members have kindly provided various solutions.  Thanks for your suggestions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 1:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

The ADA says things should be accessible.  I don't know if inconvenience ever rises to a level of a violation of accessibility laws, but it often doesn't.  I would suggest, when problems of formatting or such as you are describing now are found, that you ask if people know of ways to reduce or eliminate the problem instead of first resorting to a legal remedy which you will likely not get support for by institutions or those who bring accessibility actions and which may take a long time to be ejudicated in the court system. 

 

In this case, while I don't know what browser you are using , try another browser.  Also, if you do or don't want to try another browser first, Some browsers have a reading view.  If they don't, you can use an add-on.  This removes a lot of extraneous material from web pages and it may remove these long links. 

 

also, there is an NVDA add-on I saw discussed about a month ago that may deal with a problem like yours but I don't recall the name and it may do other things you don't like.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:22 PM

Subject: [nvda] NVDA and ads blocker

 

Hi All,

Today some pages are so riddled with long links that are ads, some of which are several lines long, making reading with a screen reader very annoying and difficult.  Example of pages are Breitbart.com, wnd.com… they are becoming very common which, in my view, is a violation of the ADA that we may need to look into and report.

Is there any way to skip the ads?  Is there a freeware ads blocker that works well with NVDA?

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Blessings

Pascal



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

I do use UBlock Origin, but never knew that it also would block scripts. I thought it could only block ads. Good to know it.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 22/01/2019 22:57, Brian Vogel escreveu:

Marcio,

         If you want a softer approach, then please just start out with uBlock Origin, which blocks ads and selectively blocks "annoying" scripts (my term, not theirs).  If you find you want something more aggressive afterward, then try NoScript.

          Both of these programs run in "install it and forget it" mode, but both are also wildly customizable if one so chooses.  I have not so chosen, except to suspend uBlock Origin on a couple of sites where I stream commercial TV content and cannot get it to work if uBlock is active.  What's funny is that adding the Privacy Badger extension brought back blocking of TV ads when streaming (or at least it did 2 days ago) which is something that used to work with both uBlock and Adblock Plus until ABC.com blocked all content if you had either activated.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 



Re: NVDA and ads blocker

 

Marcio,

         If you want a softer approach, then please just start out with uBlock Origin, which blocks ads and selectively blocks "annoying" scripts (my term, not theirs).  If you find you want something more aggressive afterward, then try NoScript.

          Both of these programs run in "install it and forget it" mode, but both are also wildly customizable if one so chooses.  I have not so chosen, except to suspend uBlock Origin on a couple of sites where I stream commercial TV content and cannot get it to work if uBlock is active.  What's funny is that adding the Privacy Badger extension brought back blocking of TV ads when streaming (or at least it did 2 days ago) which is something that used to work with both uBlock and Adblock Plus until ABC.com blocked all content if you had either activated.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back