Date   

Re: how do i get my NVDA to read powerpoints

Christo de Klerk
 

Thank you so much. This is really excellent and very helpful.

Kind regards

Christo


On 2019/02/13 10:55 PM, hurrikennyandopo ... wrote:

Hi


A few years back i put together a tutorial on making a basic power point slide show  and what keys etc to use.


it will also depend how they have it set up automatic changing of slides or manual.


the tutorial is below and can also be found off my nvda tutorials for other programs page.


How to create a PowerPoint presentation with NVDA
When you open up PowerPoint it will automatically go to the first slide. This will open in slide view and this will be spoken out by NVDA. In the first slide, if you tab, you will hear the following: Subtitle placeholder and Centre Title placeholder.
If you press the Enter key on either of these options, an editable box will come up. Here, type in your text. When finished, press the Escape key, then tab to the next item and repeat the process (as in the first option given). Make sure after you have typed in your text to press the Escape key. Next, if you use the Tab key you will hear what is written in each section. You may also wish to add other items such as links, pictures or sounds etcetera to your presentation.
Adding extra slides
When you have finished creating your first slide, in most cases you will want to add extra slides to the presentation. To add another slide as you go use the New Slide (Ctrl + M) shortcut. When a new slide is added you will hear NVDA say slide 2 slide view.
This time when you use the Tab key you will hear NVDA say Title placeholder and Object placeholder. Repeat the steps as were done in slide one.
You will notice as you add extra slides NVDA will say the number of the slide.
To go between slides you have created
As you create your presentation the more slides you add you will hear the number of the slides go from number one to the number where you have finished your last slide (for example slide 20).
You can use the page up key to take you back through your presentation until you arrive back at slide one. If you use the page down key, you can go forwards through the presentation back to your last slide (for example slide 20). You might hear NVDA also say slide show complete.
To get quickly to the start of your PowerPoint presentation or to the end of it
To quickly get back to your first slide you can use the Home key. This will take you to the very first slide you created and you should hear the contents of the slide read out.  
To quickly get to the very last slide of your presentation you can use the End key. You should hear the name of the very last slide read out and its contents.
Using the F6 key to go between Windows
If you go back to your very first slide, then start pushing the F6 key, you will hear NVDA say the following: slide one slide view. Press the F6 key again and you will hear NVDA say status bar, ribbon tab home. Press the F6 key again and you will hear NVDA say slide one notes page multiline. Press the F6 key again and you will hear NVDA say thumbnail one of however many slides you have created. Press the F6 key again and you will be back to where you started.
Adding notes to your slides
If you would like to add a note to your presentation (on the slide that you are on), when you hear NVDA say slide notes page - type your note in here.
When you hear NVDA say thumb nails number one of whatever is your last slide, you can use your down and up arrow keys to go between each slide.
Watching the PowerPoint presentation you have created
To start your slide show, press the F5 key. This will start your PowerPoint presentation at the beginning of the PowerPoint you have created.
You can then either use the Enter key or the Spacebar to go to the next slide (from start to finish) of your PowerPoint. NVDA will read the slides from top to bottom. You will hear when your slide show is finished with NVDA saying PowerPoint complete at the end of the slide show.
The PowerPoint presentation can also be automated, so it changes slides at set intervals between slides. You may have to play around with the timing so the slide is not quicker than NVDA reading out the slide. To have a set interval between each slide that is the same use Alt + the letter K, then the letter I. When you hear the following read out this is the time between each slide 00:00.00. You can use the up and down arrow keys to adjust the time between each slide.  These will all be set to the same length of time you specified (for example 10 seconds) before it goes to the next slide.
Inserting a picture into your PowerPoint presentation
Whenever you insert pictures, graphs, etcetera into your PowerPoint presentation, please also add Alt text to the graphics in the slide at the same time. This way, when the screen reader comes to the picture, it will read out the Alt text in the graphic. This helps a blind or visually impaired student know what that picture/graphic is about. Alt text refers to alternate text.
To insert a picture into your slide show (on the current slide), press the Alt key + the letter N. Next, press the letter P, then the Enter key. A dialogue box will come up. You can tab and shift tab around it to locate your photo. In this area it will ask you what type of photo you want to insert (as in the format of the photo) and give you the option to find it on your computer or portable media. When you have located your picture, press the Enter key on it and that picture will be inserted into the slide show.
Next, use the application key and you will be given a selection of menus to arrow through. Arrow to the format picture menu, then press the Enter key. When the next screen comes up, you will be given quite a few options and might hear NVDA say Picture Corrections List. You will need to locate the Alt text menu. This might be a matter of arrowing right or left to get to the tab. You can also tab through the different sections there under the different menus.
Under the Alt text section, when you first tab, it will give you the option to give the picture a title. Enter in whatever you want to in this section (for example Dog playing in the snow). The next time you tab, it will let you put in a description about the photo (for example our house all covered in snow with the dog playing in the snow and children chucking snow balls at each other). Next, tab down to the close button then press the Enter key. Now, the Alt text is inserted into the photo you put into the PowerPoint presentation.
You will hear content placeholder when the alternative text in the picture is read out.
Switching between the slide and its accompanying notes
If you would like to switch between the slide and any accompanying notes (if any) you can use the following shortcut. Press Control + Shift + S to switch back and forth between the slide and its accompanying notes.
You must be watching your slide show to do this on each slide.
Adding notes to your presentation
When you are putting together your slide show presentation, there are a couple of ways you can get to the notes section. One is to use the F6 key until you hear NVDA say notes page. Here, enter in your notes, then use the F6 key to cycle you back to slide view.
The second way is to use a shortcut. The shortcut key to get to this section quickly is Alt + R, then C.  Now, type in your comment, and make sure the comment lines up with the slide.
Editing or reviewing each slide
When you are in slide view you can arrow down and up this section to each slide you have created. Locate the slide you want to edit then tab once until you hear NVDA say Centre Title placeholder. Next press the Enter key then an editable dialogue box will come up with whatever you had written in this section before. Make your changes, and press the Escape key. Now it will be updated with the new information you have edited or replaced.
Tab once more until you hear NVDA say Subtitle placeholder, then press the Enter key. Make your changes then press the Escape key and the new information will be updated.
Inserting a hyperlink into your Power Point presentation
From time to time you might want to put a hyperlink into your PowerPoint presentation (that might point to a resource on the internet).
To add a hyperlink into your presentation, work out where in the text you would like the hyperlink to be. For example, to visit the NVAccess website please go to and put your hyper link in here.
When you have found the right spot for the hyperlink to go on your slide, press the application key on your keyboard. When a context menu comes up, arrow until you hear NVDA say the menu that says hyperlink, then press the Enter key. It will ask you to put in the hyperlink address for example http://www.nvaccess.org Once done, tab to the ok button. Then press the Enter key. Now, your hyperlink will be in the slide where you put it.
The shortcut key to insert a hyperlink is Alt + N, then I. This will give you a whole heap of extra options such as (under the Hyperlink section)... Create a link to a Web page, a picture, an e-mail address, or a program.
It is a matter of tabbing through the sections given and adding the parts that you would like to put into your Power Point presentation.
Inserting a table into your slide
To insert a table into your slide, locate where you want it in your slide to be shown.
Next, press the Alt key + the letter N, then the letter T for table and press the Enter key. This is the shortcut key to insert a table into your slide.
You will now be given some options which you can tab through. There are plenty of options to choose from (going from 1x1 Table onwards). You can also use the Shift/Tab key to go back through the options given. If any of the other options suit you, press the Enter key on it.
Find the size of the table you want to put into the slide show then press the Enter key. Your table will now be inserted into your slide.
Turning on the reporting of tables when editing a table
Make sure you have the report tables check box checked under the document formatting section in NVDA; otherwise, you will have no idea of where you are in the table. To do this, use the NVDA key + the Ctrl key + the letter D to quickly get to the document formatting dialogue section within NVDA.
Putting in a customized sized table
There may be times when you want to put in a certain sized table (for example a 3 column by 2 row table).
To do a customized sized table (when you first go into the screen where it gives you a whole lot of options), you will hear NVDA say 1 times 1 table. Shift/tab a couple of times until you hear NVDA say insert table, then press the Enter key. Here you will be able to enter a custom number for your column and a custom number for your rows. Next, tab down to the ok button then press the Enter key, and your new table will be inserted into the PowerPoint slide.
If for any reason you are unsure where NVDA is focused, you can use the NVDA key + the Tab key so NVDA speaks the focused position.
Entering information into your table
You can now tab through the table you have inserted and enter your information into it.
The applications key can be used while in the table to give you other options. These include options such as: insert rows both above and below or insert columns both to the left or right; delete rows and delete columns; merge cells; split cells and select table.
After you have finished inserting information into your table, press the Escape key. You will need to go back to slide view and then play your PowerPoint presentation. You will now hear stuff read out to you from your table. Make sure you note (when entering information into your table) where each tab will take you.
Creating accessible PowerPoint presentations - Office Support
If you would like to know more about how to create an accessible PowerPoint presentation, you may find the following link from Microsoft useful https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Creating-accessible-PowerPoint-presentations-6f7772b2-2f33-4bd2-8ca7-dae3b2b3ef25
Shortcuts you may find useful
Please go to the following link to get shortcuts for PowerPoint 2010/2013, Office etcetera. https://www.dropbox.com/s/r0hc0ejv9whgsgs/Useful%20shortcuts.zip?dl=0



HOME



On 14/02/2019 9:33 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Hey guys, Molly here again 😀

I need to access somepowerpoints  for school. How do I get NVDA to read them?

Thanks. And sorry if I’m asking a question that has already been answered.

--
Check out my website for NVDA tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net
 
Regardless of where you are in New Zealand if you are near one of the APNK sites you can use a copy of the NVDA screen reader on one of their computers. To find out which location (or locations) are nearest to you please visit http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.org/content/partner-libraries (Aotearoa People's Network Kaharoa).
To find out which software is installed on the APNK network please visit the following link http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.info/faq/software To find out how to use NVDA on APNK computers please visit the following link http://www.aotearoapeoplesnetwork.info/faq/nvda
 

To find out which software is available on the Christchurch City Library network, and how to start the NVDA screen reader, please go to the following links. Software available  https://my.christchurchcitylibraries.com/faq/computers/#faq_5884  How to start the NVDA screen reader on Christchurch City Library computers  https://my.christchurchcitylibraries.com/faqs/what-screen-reader-software-is-available/
 
To find an NVDA certified expert near you, please visit the following link https://certification.nvaccess.org/. The certification page contains the official list of NVDA certified individuals from around the world, who have sat and successfully passed the NVDA expert exam.



Obtaining Outlook2019

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear  Molly & List:

Outlook2019 is a paid-for product from Microsoft. You may purchase it from the Microsoft Store if available as a single program, or purchase Office2019 which includes it, except in the Student/Teacher edition.

The                        main@TechTalk.groups.io list is probably a more appropriate forum to ask about non-NVDA questions.

Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.

 


Re: Some mouse navigation questions

Chris Shook
 

Nymer,
I looked back at the archived messages on this thread. I see that my message was extremely rude to you. I am sorry for the rudeness.
I realize now that you were only trying to help and my response was uncalled for.


Re: NVDA and sounds

Chris Shook
 

JAWS does have an import function that allows you to import the sounds.
In order to compare, the addon would have to have both a list of sounds and a import feature.
As a side note, sorry about the content of the post describing the sound feature in JAWS. I didn't read it before sending.


Re: NVDA and sounds

 

And what if we could choose the sounds direct from our computers?
It was what I was thinking.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 13/02/2019 22:43, Chris Shook escreveu:

Yeah, the addon would probably have to pull the sounds from some sort of website or service.
May be something to suggest to the developers.






Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Michael Munn
 

I still remember back in the old days that Dectalk and KeynoteGold TTS are the choice of Screen' reader users. I know that Dectalk Express  cost like $2,000 I don't know anything about KeynoteGold. My first interaction with KeyNoteGold was in 2014 on a School's Braille Note Apex32. 
Back to Dolfen; The UK Daniel was the common voice that's being used  when they doing Demos of there Screen Reader features.
I has happen to had  Chance to play with the Software for two months. and I love some of it's features.
Thanks 
Best Regards 
Michael Munn 
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 6:48 PM Rui Fontes <rui.fontes@...> wrote:
By the way, complementing the information:
The synts are:
SAM, software
Apollo - hardware
Juno - hardware feaatured for laptops

Rui Fontes


Às 23:37 de 13/02/2019, Ian Westerland escreveu:
>
>
> Just to provide a little more information, Dolphin produced some
> synthesizers that claimed to be very close to a real human voice--Apollo
> and Apollo 2.  The first Apollo was a desk top synthesizer and the
> Apollo 2 is a software model.
>
>  From memory, there was a Dolphin Synthesizer as well but I can't
> remember too many details.
>
> We have come such a long way with speach access and, yes, my Screen
> reader of choice is NVDA latest version.   I wouldn't be without it.
>
> Ian Westerland
>
>
>
> On 2/14/2019 10:10 AM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
>> Hi, Brad,
>>
>> For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the
>> correction.
>>
>> Rosemarie
>>
>> *From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of
>> *Brad Snyder
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
>>
>> Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K.
>> that markets several access technology software products.  Their
>> primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen
>> reader and screen magnification product.
>>
>> Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United
>> States, though they have been around for a while.
>>
>>
>> /- Brad -/
>>
>>
>> On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@...
>> <mailto:michaelrbms@...>> wrote:
>>
>> This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries.
>> they're located in England.
>>
>>
>> Michael Munn
>>
>> Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
>>
>>   National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia www.nfbv.org
>> <http://www.nfbv.org/>
>>
>> Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
>>
>> National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
>> <http://www.nfbmd.org/>
>>
>> Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind
>>
>> www.hadley.edu <http://www.hadley.edu/>
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover
>> <brainardmolly@... <mailto:brainardmolly@...>> wrote:
>>
>>     I've never heard of dolphin before lol.
>>
>>     -----Original Message-----
>>     From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>>     <nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of
>>     Chris Shook
>>     Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
>>     To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>>     Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
>>
>>     Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is
>> usually
>>     ranked as third.
>>     I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as
>> job and
>>     that it is commercial so you have to buy it.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>




Re: NVDA and sounds

Chris Shook
 

Yeah, the addon would probably have to pull the sounds from some sort of website or service.
May be something to suggest to the developers.


Re: NVDA and sounds

 

LOL it really would be sooo funny to have something like that in NVDA!

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 13/02/2019 22:34, Chris Shook escreveu:

Here's how it works with JAWS.
1. Go to dictionary manager.
2. Press Shit control D. THis will open the default dictionary manager.
3. CLick on the add button.

4. Go to the actual world field.
5. Type the word in the actual word field.
6. Tab to the select sound button.
7. Go to the list of sounds that come up.
8 When you find the sound you want, click enter.
9. If you want to test the sound press the play button.
10. If you like the sound, press control S to save the changes.
11. Exit the dictionary.

The sounds are various. My personal favorite one was starter pistol.






Re: NVDA and sounds

Chris Shook
 

Here's how it works with JAWS.
1. Go to dictionary manager.
2. Press Shit control D. THis will open the default dictionary manager.
3. CLick on the add button.

4. Go to the actual world field.
5. Type the word in the actual word field.
6. Tab to the select sound button.
7. Go to the list of sounds that come up.
8 When you find the sound you want, click enter.
9. If you want to test the sound press the play button.
10. If you like the sound, press control S to save the changes.
11. Exit the dictionary.

The sounds are various. My personal favorite one was starter pistol.


Re: Upgrading Microsoft Word

molly the blind tech lover
 

Hi. I have word 2016. It's compatible with NVDA. It costs like $40 if I remember correctly to get the suite of apps.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Abbie Taylor
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 7:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Upgrading Microsoft Word

I'm currently using Word 2013 on a 64-bit desktop PC running Windows 10.
I'm considering upgrading. I understand Word 2019 is the latest, but is it compatible with NVDA, or should I go to 2016 instead? Is it possible to buy just Word without the office suite? How much does it cost? Thank you in advance for any answers.

--

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author https://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com abbietaylor945@gmail.com


--
Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author
http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com
http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
abbietaylor945@gmail.com


Re: NVDA and sounds

molly the blind tech lover
 

There is a thing in Jaws for that but I don’t know about NVDA.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 7:20 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and sounds

 

I had never heard about this concept before your message. How is it? An add-on to perform such a thing would be quite interesting.


Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 13/02/2019 21:22, Chris Shook escreveu:

Queck question.
JAWS had a way to link sounds with words using the Dictionary manager.
Is there an addon for NVDA that can do the same thing?



 


Upgrading Microsoft Word

Abbie Taylor <abbietaylor945@...>
 

I'm currently using Word 2013 on a 64-bit desktop PC running Windows 10. I'm considering upgrading. I understand Word 2019 is the latest, but is it compatible with NVDA, or should I go to 2016 instead? Is it possible to buy just Word without the office suite? How much does it cost? Thank you in advance for any answers.

--

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author https://abbiescorner.wordpress.com http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com abbietaylor945@gmail.com


--
Abbie Johnson Taylor, Author
http://www.abbiejohnsontaylor.com
http://abbiescorner.wordpress.com
abbietaylor945@gmail.com


Re: NVDA and sounds

 

I had never heard about this concept before your message. How is it? An add-on to perform such a thing would be quite interesting.

Cheers,
Marcio
Follow me on Twitter

Em 13/02/2019 21:22, Chris Shook escreveu:

Queck question.
JAWS had a way to link sounds with words using the Dictionary manager.
Is there an addon for NVDA that can do the same thing?






Re: row and column titles

Quentin Christensen
 

Normally you place the focus in the leftmost column you want row titles and press NVDA+control+c to set column headers (or topmost row with headers and press NVDA+control+r).

NVDA automatically treats any column to the right of that as having headers.  Doing it this way makes it a little tricker to understand but more flexible - if you have a table with several sets of column headers in different places in different rows for instance. (Or row headers in different columns etc).

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 1:59 AM Robert Doc Wright godfearer <godfearer@...> wrote:

NVDA+shift+r or c works fine if I only need a single column title. It does not work if I choose multiple columns. When I press that key command after selecting two or more columns it types the letter  r or c.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Rui Fontes
 

By the way, complementing the information:
The synts are:
SAM, software
Apollo - hardware
Juno - hardware feaatured for laptops

Rui Fontes


Às 23:37 de 13/02/2019, Ian Westerland escreveu:

Just to provide a little more information, Dolphin produced some synthesizers that claimed to be very close to a real human voice--Apollo and Apollo 2.  The first Apollo was a desk top synthesizer and the Apollo 2 is a software model.
From memory, there was a Dolphin Synthesizer as well but I can't remember too many details.
We have come such a long way with speach access and, yes, my Screen reader of choice is NVDA latest version.   I wouldn't be without it.
Ian Westerland
On 2/14/2019 10:10 AM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Brad,

For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the correction.

Rosemarie

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Brad Snyder
*Sent:* Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K. that markets several access technology software products.  Their primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen reader and screen magnification product.

Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United States, though they have been around for a while.


/- Brad -/


On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@gmail.com <mailto:michaelrbms@gmail.com>> wrote:

This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries. they're located in England.


Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

  National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia www.nfbv.org <http://www.nfbv.org/>

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org <http://www.nfbmd.org/>

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

www.hadley.edu <http://www.hadley.edu/>

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover <brainardmolly@gmail.com <mailto:brainardmolly@gmail.com>> wrote:

    I've never heard of dolphin before lol.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
    <nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of
    Chris Shook
    Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
    To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
    Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

    Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is usually
    ranked as third.
    I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as job and
    that it is commercial so you have to buy it.







Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Ian Westerland
 

Just to provide a little more information, Dolphin produced some synthesizers that claimed to be very close to a real human voice--Apollo and Apollo 2. The first Apollo was a desk top synthesizer and the Apollo 2 is a software model.

From memory, there was a Dolphin Synthesizer as well but I can't remember too many details.

We have come such a long way with speach access and, yes, my Screen reader of choice is NVDA latest version. I wouldn't be without it.

Ian Westerland

On 2/14/2019 10:10 AM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Brad,
For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the correction.
Rosemarie
*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Brad Snyder
*Sent:* Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K. that markets several access technology software products.  Their primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen reader and screen magnification product.
Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United States, though they have been around for a while.
/- Brad -/
On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@gmail.com <mailto:michaelrbms@gmail.com>> wrote:
This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries. they're located in England.
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia www.nfbv.org <http://www.nfbv.org/>
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org <http://www.nfbmd.org/>
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind
www.hadley.edu <http://www.hadley.edu/>
On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover <brainardmolly@gmail.com <mailto:brainardmolly@gmail.com>> wrote:
I've never heard of dolphin before lol.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of
Chris Shook
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is usually
ranked as third.
I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as job and
that it is commercial so you have to buy it.


Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Brad Snyder
 

True.
Hal got its name from the talking diabolical robot in the movie 2001: A Space Oddity.
The accompanying screen magnification product was called Lunar.  It was similar to ZoomText, in that it was available in both magnification only and magnification with speech.
The original SuperNova product was Hal bundled with the Lunar screen magnification product.  This is similar to Vispero’s current Fusion product.

- Brad -




On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:18, Richard Bartholomew <rlbart53@...> wrote:

Just for info even though non-NVDA related…Dolphin were founded in the mid-80’s to further the development of the HAL screenreader primarily – the forerunner of Supernova.  HAL was very popular in those early days when there were very few packages around but it started to lose influence once the likes of Vocal-Eyes and JAWS for DOS gained market share.  When Supernova eventually came along, although it was very good at what it did with certain software, it did not have the flexibility of other packages.
 
Cheers
Richard Bartholomew
 
 
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: 13 February 2019 23:11
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
 
Hi, Brad,
 
For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the correction.
 
Rosemarie
 
 
 
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
 
Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K. that markets several access technology software products.  Their primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen reader and screen magnification product.
Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United States, though they have been around for a while.
 


- Brad -

 
On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@...> wrote:
 
This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries. they're located in England. 

 
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 
 
On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover <brainardmolly@...> wrote:

I've never heard of dolphin before lol. 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is usually
ranked as third.
I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as job and
that it is commercial so you have to buy it.





 



Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Chris Shook
 

We might want to take this one to the chat list.


Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

molly the blind tech lover
 

That’s an awesome name for a project.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 6:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

 

SuperNova is an interesting product.  I’ve attended a few training seminars presented by Dolphin over the years, but have never really spent much time using it to get the hang of it.  It is really very different from either NVDA or JAWS in both concepts and functionality.

 

You can learn more about SuperNova here:

 

HTH 


- Brad -


 

On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:10, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:

 

Hi, Brad,

 

For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the correction.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

 

Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K. that markets several access technology software products.  Their primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen reader and screen magnification product.

Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United States, though they have been around for a while.

 


- Brad -



 

On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@...> wrote:

 

This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries. they're located in England. 


 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover <brainardmolly@...> wrote:

I've never heard of dolphin before lol. 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is usually
ranked as third.
I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as job and
that it is commercial so you have to buy it.







 

 


Re: ie unsafe dolphin users

Brad Snyder
 

SuperNova is an interesting product.  I’ve attended a few training seminars presented by Dolphin over the years, but have never really spent much time using it to get the hang of it.  It is really very different from either NVDA or JAWS in both concepts and functionality.

You can learn more about SuperNova here:

HTH 

- Brad -




On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:10, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:

Hi, Brad,
 
For years now I thought Dolphin was a screen reader. Thanks for the correction.
 
Rosemarie
 
 
 
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brad Snyder
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users
 
Dolphin is not a screen reader, rather it is a company in the U.K. that markets several access technology software products.  Their primary product is the SuperNova Access Suite, which includes a screen reader and screen magnification product.
Dolphin is pretty big in Europe, but not so widely used in the United States, though they have been around for a while.
 


- Brad -


 
On Feb 13, 2019, at 17:04, Michael Munn <michaelrbms@...> wrote:
 
This piece of screen reading package is common in European countries. they're located in England. 

 
Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 
 
On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 9:45 AM molly the blind tech lover <brainardmolly@...> wrote:

I've never heard of dolphin before lol. 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Shook
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:21 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] ie unsafe dolphin users

Dolpin is a screen reader. If your ranking screen readers it is usually
ranked as third.
I don't know mch about it besides it's supposedly not as good as job and
that it is commercial so you have to buy it.