Date   

Re: Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

Richard B. McDonald
 

Your work here is commendable.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 2:48 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

 

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list (it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation, founding an international gathering of a community, releasing countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors (summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective September 1, 2021. This means:

·         I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as 2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing outstanding pull requests.

·         I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.

·         For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.

·         For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons list).

 

Several thank you’s:

·         Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006 signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.

·         NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching me about life, programming, and group work.

·         Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in 2013.

·         Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.

·         Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when I was a novice translator in 2012.

·         Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.

·         Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many collaborations and helpful advice.

·         For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain private information), and so many other things that made add-ons useful to this day.

·         NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm and support.

·         Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many opportunities to connect and learn from.

·         Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting new friends and colleagues.

 

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when talking to people online.

 

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and what not.

 

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

 

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

 

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March 2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)


Re: Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

Gary Metzler
 

Hi Joseph,

 

I wish you all the best in all your future endeavors.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 5:48 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

 

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list (it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation, founding an international gathering of a community, releasing countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors (summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective September 1, 2021. This means:

  • I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as 2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing outstanding pull requests.
  • I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.
  • For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.
  • For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons list).

 

Several thank you’s:

  • Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006 signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.
  • NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching me about life, programming, and group work.
  • Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in 2013.
  • Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.
  • Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when I was a novice translator in 2012.
  • Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.
  • Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many collaborations and helpful advice.
  • For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain private information), and so many other things that made add-ons useful to this day.
  • NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm and support.
  • Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many opportunities to connect and learn from.
  • Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting new friends and colleagues.

 

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when talking to people online.

 

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and what not.

 

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

 

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

 

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March 2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)


Re: Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

Blaster
 

Thank you for all of your contributions and love of this great community!

Take care,
Blaster

On 5/10/21, Mallard <mallard@kimabe.eu> wrote:
Hello Joseph,


Congratx on your new assignment! I have learned to know and appreciate
your work over all these nine years, and I take the liberty to say here,
publicly, that I believe you deserve that "golden opportunity" that has
been offered to you.


We'll miss you, but you deserve it all.


Blessings, stay safe!

Ollie



On 10/05/2021 11:48, Joseph Lee wrote:

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list
(it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum
platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an
adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation,
founding an international gathering of a community, releasing
countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and
learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in
the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently
hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden
opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of
arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California
State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors
(summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking
about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate
teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take
highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than
undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding
responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in
collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love
programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my
immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective
September 1, 2021. This means:

* I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as
2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing
outstanding pull requests.
* I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community
for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and
Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA
comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed
to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to
keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.
* For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I
really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.
* For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin
and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons
list).

Several thank you’s:

* Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006
signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.
* NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching
me about life, programming, and group work.
* Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and
making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in
2013.
* Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an
updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating
strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.
* Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when
I was a novice translator in 2012.
* Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum
discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.
* Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many
collaborations and helpful advice.
* For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug
logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain
private information), and so many other things that made add-ons
useful to this day.
* NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm
and support.
* Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many
opportunities to connect and learn from.
* Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting
new friends and colleagues.

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write
effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what
others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a
conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when
talking to people online.

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping
the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is
calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on
accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and
what not.

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high
school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you
want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and
ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point
in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate
skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college
speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy
skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided
opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked
about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital
ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial
intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high
school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade
people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there
aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech
and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the
big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the
message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a
nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice
coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on
NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over
the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a
difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student
and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and
healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA
screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March
2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)






Re: Bluetooth speakers with Windows

Kevin Cussick
 

Hi, thanks no I will just stay with wired head phones they work with thanks.

On 09/05/2021 22:48, Gene wrote:
I can propose two possibilities.
I don’t particularly like this possible workaround but you may want to try it. I also have no idea if it will work since other expected solutions didn’t. Perhaps having something playing at so low a volume that you can hardly hear it will work and what is playing could be a looping file of white noise. I can prepare a file that you can have a player loop for continuous play. You can set the volume of the player as you wish.
You might have to get used to the white noise, even if it is very soft, it may be distracting until you get used to it.
Or there may be a much better work around. After a ;period of disuse, get in the habit of issuing a command that does nothing but generate speech. Then issue whatever command or commands you were going to do. NVDA key t, for example, before issuing other commands would solve the problem since that command generates speech and never does anything. I think I would prefer that work around to the white noise one but I’m offering both so you have choices.
Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Cussick via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Bluetooth speakers with Windows
Yes correct. OK then now what.
On 09/05/2021 22:21, Gene wrote:
Since neither add-on solves the problem, I am suspicious that the problem isn’t the usual one. Anything that keeps the sound card active, such as Silenzio, as I understand it, should solve the problem and I would expect the Add-on Brian referenced to solve it as well.

We need more information. does the problem occur when and only when there has been no audio for a time or does it occur at other times? We assumed the problem occurred after a period of no audio but since the expected solutions don’t work, we have to see if our assumptions are correct.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Cussick via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Bluetooth speakers with Windows

that did not work for me either.

On 09/05/2021 11:31, Steve Nutt wrote:
No, but I think Silenzio will. That add-on is not great, I tested it.

All the best

Steve

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-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Cussick via groups.io
Sent: 08 May 2021 23:01
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Bluetooth speakers with Windows

well for me this addon did not fix the blue tooth audio cutting off words.

On 08/05/2021 15:14, Brian Vogel wrote:
Because of how Windows handles power management (and sleeping) for
Bluetooth. There's actually an add-on to address this issue:


BluetoothAudio
<https://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/BluetoothAudio.en.html>

--

Brian -Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

/Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win
unless you hate them. And then you destroy yourself./

~ Richard M. Nixon




















Invoice Software options that are accessible with NVDA

Nicholas Stevens
 

Morning all,

Are there any invoice programs which work well with NVDA?

Kind Regards

Nicholas Stevens

Administration Assistant


Two Oceans Aquarium, Dock Road, V&A Waterfront  

Tel: +27 (0)21 418 3823 | Direct:  +27 (0)21 814 4560

Email: nicholas.stevens@... | Website: www.aquarium.co.za

 



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Re: Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

Mallard
 

Hello Joseph,


Congratx on your new assignment! I have learned to know and appreciate your work over all these nine years, and I take the liberty to say here, publicly, that I believe you deserve that "golden opportunity" that has been offered to you.


We'll miss you, but you deserve it all.


Blessings, stay safe!

Ollie

On 10/05/2021 11:48, Joseph Lee wrote:

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list (it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation, founding an international gathering of a community, releasing countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors (summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective September 1, 2021. This means:

* I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as
2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing
outstanding pull requests.
* I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community
for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and
Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA
comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed
to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to
keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.
* For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I
really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.
* For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin
and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons
list).

Several thank you’s:

* Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006
signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.
* NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching
me about life, programming, and group work.
* Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and
making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in 2013.
* Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an
updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating
strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.
* Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when
I was a novice translator in 2012.
* Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum
discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.
* Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many
collaborations and helpful advice.
* For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug
logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain
private information), and so many other things that made add-ons
useful to this day.
* NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm
and support.
* Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many
opportunities to connect and learn from.
* Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting
new friends and colleagues.

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when talking to people online.

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and what not.

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March 2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Gene
 

I don’t know how many laptops have line-in jacks.  Some have jacks you can set either to use as line-in or microphone jacks.  I’m not talking about USB cables.  Others can talk with you about how to connect your laptop to whatever your friend has.  I haven’t looked into it.  You may be able to use a US B cable or perhaps an old style patch chord with plugs, probably 1/8th inch diameter plugs, on each end.  but I can discuss recording programs.  To record from your friend’s laptop, I can tell you how to work with MP3 Direct Cut or, what might be better, I can send you a tutorial I did on the subject.  It is a simple program and you can easily edit what you record. 
 
So I’ll continue to discuss recording programs but I’ll let others discuss the connection, and what they say will depend on what you find out from your friend.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2021 1:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software
 

I can partly answer your question. Yes, this laptop does have a hook up where I can hook it to the television. As for my friend’s apple tv. I’ll have to ask if she has the hook up that you are asking if the tv has that.  My sound card is a realtec. I haven’t looked at its settings. In my old windows 7 box I had total recorder I used it as a free trial but had to pay for it 30 days later.  This computer did not come with it.  As for getting another sound card, that’s kind of what I thought. You have to have a double sound card. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 8:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

I’ll let those who know about the Apple TV answer the question.  But if you can hook up the television to the computer,, you can do so without recording the screen-reader.  If you are recording something like a stream that your computer is playing, then you may have to use a second soundd card or get a program like Total Recorder.  But you are talking about connecting something to the computer and recording it so the problem of recording the screen-reader can be avoided with the right sound card settings. 

 

Does your computer have a line-in jack?  Does the apple television have a line-out or headphone jack or both? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Yes she does have apple tv. Can I hook up a cable to record let’s say 48 hours from the apple tv to the PC Computer? I know you can do it with the cable tv.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

You should be able to record with Goldwave from the computer even if the soundcard doesn’t support it.  That is my understanding from discussions I’ve seen on lists.  But are you talking about recording something from another appliance?  You said your friend has Apple TV, but what will you be recording from?

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

 

 


Re: Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

dennis huckle
 

I hope all goes well for you in the future.

As a new member on this list I have already learned a lot especially in respect of using nvda with a braille focus display.

Kind regards,

Dennis huckle.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: 10 May 2021 10:48
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

 

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list (it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation, founding an international gathering of a community, releasing countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors (summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective September 1, 2021. This means:

  • I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as 2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing outstanding pull requests.
  • I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.
  • For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.
  • For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons list).

 

Several thank you’s:

  • Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006 signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.
  • NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching me about life, programming, and group work.
  • Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in 2013.
  • Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.
  • Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when I was a novice translator in 2012.
  • Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.
  • Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many collaborations and helpful advice.
  • For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain private information), and so many other things that made add-ons useful to this day.
  • NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm and support.
  • Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many opportunities to connect and learn from.
  • Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting new friends and colleagues.

 

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when talking to people online.

 

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and what not.

 

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

 

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

 

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March 2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)


Farewell, NVDA community: retiring from NVDA contributions, effective September 1, 2021

 

I received permission from Nimer regarding the following letter:

Hello NVDA community,

First, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

One day in early 2012, I came across a question posed on an NVDA list (it could have been this list which was hosted on a different forum platform then): can NVDA read Korean? That question led to an adventure that span nine years: translations, writing documentation, founding an international gathering of a community, releasing countless add-ons, moderating several NVDA lists and communities, and learning to incorporate lessons I have learned from the community in the next chapter of my life. In the midst of contributions, I recently hinted that I plan to retire from the community, and that golden opportunity has come:

On May 10, 2021, I was offered and accepted admission to master of arts (graduate school) program in communication studies at California State University, Los Angeles after graduating with highest honors (summa cum laude) from the same university.

After observing discussions between graduate students and thinking about balancing between graduate seminars, coaching speech and debate teams, and NVDA code contributions, I decided that school should take highest of highest of priorities. Graduate school is harder than undergraduate (college) education, especially when adding responsibility of teaching and coaching students competing in collegiate speech and debate tournaments. As much as I love programming and contributing to NVDA community, I cannot forget my immediate responsibilities of being a student and public speaking coach.

Therefore, I’m retiring from NVDA community contributions, effective September 1, 2021. This means:

  • I do have work to finish which might end up in NVDA as early as 2021.2, and I plan to dedicate this summer to completing outstanding pull requests.
  • I’m handing over most of my add-ons to the NVDA add-ons community for further maintenance. I do plan to maintain Add-on Updater and Windows 10 App Essentials – Add-on Updater is needed until NVDA comes with add-ons store, and Windows 10 App Essentials is needed to respond to ever-changing nature of Windows 10 ecosystem and to keep up with changes in NVDA development from time to time.
  • For NVDACon attendees and organizers, I will not be able to (and I really cannot) participate in NVDACon for a while.
  • For add-ons community, I will be stepping down as your chief admin and add-on reviewer this summer (details will be sent to add-ons list).

 

Several thank you’s:

  • Mick and Jamie: for starting it all fifteen years ago – April 2006 signaled the birth of a movement, which endures today.
  • NV Access staff, past and present: so many discussions, teaching me about life, programming, and group work.
  • Mesar Hameed: for teaching me about NVDA translation process and making sure community add-ons website was ready for the world in 2013.
  • Many NvDA users and enthusiasts in South Korea: for giving me an updated picture on Korean blindness community and help formulating strategies on translations and outreach nine years ago.
  • Many translators: for helping me adjust to the NVDA community when I was a novice translator in 2012.
  • Thousands of users: for teaching me many things – forum discussions, direct feedback, and countless other venues.
  • Nimer and NVDA Users list moderators, past and present: many collaborations and helpful advice.
  • For users of my add-ons: countless feedback, megabytes of debug logs (all were destroyed after analyses because they contain private information), and so many other things that made add-ons useful to this day.
  • NVDA supporters outside this forum: for your continued enthusiasm and support.
  • Microsoft engineers and fellow Windows Insiders: many opportunities to connect and learn from.
  • Folks from Mozilla, Google, and other organizations: for meeting new friends and colleagues.

 

One advice for future NVDA contributors: listen a lot. You can’t write effective add-ons and NVDA pull requests without listening to what others have to say. Before writing Python, sit down and have a conversation with users. Collaboration is the key, especially when talking to people online.

 

Although I’m retiring as a code contributor, I look forward to helping the NVDA community in other ways. Until then, graduate school is calling me – feel free to reach out if you seek advice on accessibility advocacy, programming in general, public speaking, and what not.

 

Before I close, I would like to take this time to invite resident high school and college students to invest in public speaking, or if you want, compete in speech and debate tournaments. You can’t just sit and ask others to advocate for you – you must do it yourself at some point in your life. One way to do so is learning public speaking and debate skills, and one venue is through competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments. What strengthened my own advocacy skills was competing in speech tournaments, which also provided opportunities to tell the world about NVDA project – I even talked about NVDA and accessibility advocacy at a national speech tournament.

 

Advocacy will be important, especially as the world moves onto digital ways to accomplish more tasks: virtual reality, artificial intelligence, biometrics, web-based workplace, and telehealth. As high school and college students, you are in a place to inform and persuade people about baking accessibility into products. Right now, there aren’t many blind students competing in high school or college speech and debate tournaments, and I want to sincerely ask you to change the big picture. I’m willing to coach public speaking events (see the message header for contact email); this speech coaching offer from a nationally recognized former speech competitor and now an apprentice coach extends to any blind high school or college student (not only on NVDA Users list, but also in other communities).

 

Farewell, NVDA community. Thank you for teaching me many lessons over the last nine years, and for giving me opportunities to make a difference in the lives of many as an undergraduate college student and a volunteer code contributor. Love you all, and stay safe and healthy.

Sincerely,

Joseph S. Lee

NVDA Certified Expert, 2019

Volunteer translator, code contributor, and add-ons reviewer, NVDA screen reader project (June 2012 to September 2021)

Founding chair, NVDA Users and developers Conference (NVDACon) (March 2014 to April 2016)

Member, NVDA Council

Former moderator, NVDA Users list (2013 to 2016)


Re: Uppercase pitch change is not clearly indicated with "Windows OneCore Microsoft Richard"

Quentin Christensen
 

Giles,

There is an issue requesting reporting of capitals during say all: https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues/3286  I think part of the complication is when reading more than a single letter, how best to differentiate between reporting one capital letter and a whole sentence in capitals.  If you have any thoughts on that please do add a comment to that issue (you can comment here too, but it won't necessarily get captured and seen by anyone who happens to work on the issue).

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Sat, May 8, 2021 at 12:28 AM Giles Turnbull <giles.turnbull@...> wrote:
I've always found the pitch change to be barely audible even when the level is ramped up! The problem with the "Say Cap" and "Beep for Caps" is that it doesn't do it when you are using Read All, only when you are navigating letter-by-letter. It also doesn't work if you are typing something and your settings are to read words rather than letters.

I discussed this on here back in September 2019 when, for my Masters dissertation, I badly needed to be able to spot if I had accidentally turned Caps Lock on and had been typing in uppercase letters where I didn't want to be! Ricardo Leonarczyk helpfully gave me a link to an NVDA dictionary file which contained a regular expression that would, as Ricardo described it, "when NVDA finds individual upper case letters, it will first say "cap" and after will speak the letter, without breaking the word (inserting a space). When it finds a sequence of uppercase characters it'll say "All cap" and the sequence of letters as a whole word."

That worked perfectly for what I needed at the time. I opened the dictionary file in Notepad and then copied and pasted the search field and replacement field text into an entry in my default.dic file, and then removed it once I was finished doing such detailed editing.

If you want to find that thread, it dates from September 2019 and has the subject of Identifying Capital Letters.

I don't know if this will be any help or interest, but I thought I'd mention it :)

Giles



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Jacob Kruger
 

Charlie, might be a dumb question, but, do you have a new version of reaper installed?


And, don't use it myself at all - my audio activities are limited to audacity, but, just a thought.


Stay well


Jacob Kruger
Blind Biker
Skype: BlindZA
"...resistance is futile...but, acceptance is versatile..."

On 2021-05-09 12:16 AM, Charlie Dyasi wrote:
Hi Chris, thank you so much for this, but Reaper, I have it installed on my laptop, but my laptop is so old, it takes for ever just open up reaper at least in half an hour. 
and as a result, I have never been able to learn how to use reaper. I’m still saving to buy a new computer, that maybe I can take me  about what ,for months  but eventually I’ll get there.
With been laid off from work as well, it has made things just much harder because of Covid, I hope everyone who  still has got a job to wake up to, is enjoying it.
Charlie 

      





Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Arlene
 

I can partly answer your question. Yes, this laptop does have a hook up where I can hook it to the television. As for my friend’s apple tv. I’ll have to ask if she has the hook up that you are asking if the tv has that.  My sound card is a realtec. I haven’t looked at its settings. In my old windows 7 box I had total recorder I used it as a free trial but had to pay for it 30 days later.  This computer did not come with it.  As for getting another sound card, that’s kind of what I thought. You have to have a double sound card. 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 8:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

I’ll let those who know about the Apple TV answer the question.  But if you can hook up the television to the computer,, you can do so without recording the screen-reader.  If you are recording something like a stream that your computer is playing, then you may have to use a second soundd card or get a program like Total Recorder.  But you are talking about connecting something to the computer and recording it so the problem of recording the screen-reader can be avoided with the right sound card settings. 

 

Does your computer have a line-in jack?  Does the apple television have a line-out or headphone jack or both? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Yes she does have apple tv. Can I hook up a cable to record let’s say 48 hours from the apple tv to the PC Computer? I know you can do it with the cable tv.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

You should be able to record with Goldwave from the computer even if the soundcard doesn’t support it.  That is my understanding from discussions I’ve seen on lists.  But are you talking about recording something from another appliance?  You said your friend has Apple TV, but what will you be recording from?

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Gene
 

I’ll let those who know about the Apple TV answer the question.  But if you can hook up the television to the computer,, you can do so without recording the screen-reader.  If you are recording something like a stream that your computer is playing, then you may have to use a second soundd card or get a program like Total Recorder.  But you are talking about connecting something to the computer and recording it so the problem of recording the screen-reader can be avoided with the right sound card settings. 
 
Does your computer have a line-in jack?  Does the apple television have a line-out or headphone jack or both? 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 10:15 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software
 

Yes she does have apple tv. Can I hook up a cable to record let’s say 48 hours from the apple tv to the PC Computer? I know you can do it with the cable tv.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

You should be able to record with Goldwave from the computer even if the soundcard doesn’t support it.  That is my understanding from discussions I’ve seen on lists.  But are you talking about recording something from another appliance?  You said your friend has Apple TV, but what will you be recording from?

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Arlene
 

Yes she does have apple tv. Can I hook up a cable to record let’s say 48 hours from the apple tv to the PC Computer? I know you can do it with the cable tv.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

You should be able to record with Goldwave from the computer even if the soundcard doesn’t support it.  That is my understanding from discussions I’ve seen on lists.  But are you talking about recording something from another appliance?  You said your friend has Apple TV, but what will you be recording from?

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: Arlene

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Blaster
 

Charlie, You may want to check out the new AVID ProTools cloud based
solutions. I have no idea how screen reader friendly this program is,
but if it's web-based it would be worth checking out. It looks like
there's a free version, so you can try before you buy.

https://www.avid.com/pro-tools/comparison

HTH,
Blaster

On 5/9/21, Roger Stewart <paganus2@gmail.com> wrote:
Not for me but I use 2 sound cards--one cheapy USB card that is set as
default so it plays all Windows sounds as well as all speech from NVDA
and the better one for sound recording.
Roger






On 5/9/2021 6:02 PM, Arlene wrote:

If I use that, does NVDA get onto the recording as you record from the
web?

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows 10

*From: *Roger Stewart <mailto:paganus2@gmail.com>
*Sent: *May 9, 2021 2:37 PM
*To: *nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject: *Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious
editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job
nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and
the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has
an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well. Best of all, it's
FREE! :)

Roger

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from
this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if
you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather
you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the
screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>
for Windows 10

*From: *Chris Smart <mailto:ve3rwj@winsystem.org>
*Sent: *May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
*To: *nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject: *Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production
Software

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows?

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through,
how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple
like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper?

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots
of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording
a single thing onto one track, no.

.


.







Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Roger Stewart
 

Not for me but I use 2 sound cards--one cheapy USB card that is set as default so it plays all Windows sounds as well as all speech from NVDA and the better one for sound recording.
Roger






On 5/9/2021 6:02 PM, Arlene wrote:

If I use that, does NVDA get onto the recording as you record from the web?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Roger Stewart
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

.



Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Gene
 

With most recording programs, the only way to record what your computer is playing, such as an Internet stream without recording your screen-reader is to have two sound cards. 
 
One exception I know of which allows you to have your screen-reader speak while recording a stream is Total Recorder.  I don’t know if it will record what you want in that way.  If it can, you can use your computer for other things while you are recording.  But you may have to get a second sound card.  I’m not sure just what you want to record from.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:02 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software
 

If I use that, does NVDA get onto the recording as you record from the web?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Roger Stewart
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Gene
 

Virtual Reccorder is free but I don’t have an opinion about whether you use it or Goldwave.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software
 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Gene
 

You should be able to record with Goldwave from the computer even if the soundcard doesn’t support it.  That is my understanding from discussions I’ve seen on lists.  But are you talking about recording something from another appliance?  You said your friend has Apple TV, but what will you be recording from?
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 6:00 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software
 

Hi, do you have to pay for virtual recorder? If so, can you record with Goldwave? I have it on this computer. Someone gave it to me as a gift. I heard you can do it but never learned how to do it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Gene
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

But if you are recording material the PC is actually playing, the most simple solution may well be virtual recorder.  then you can use MP3 Direct Cut for editing.  MP3 Direct cut can’t record from your computer itself unless you have a soundcard that supports Stereo Mix, also known by other names including What You Hear.  On board sound, which a typical computer has when sold, usually doesn’t support that option.  An external USB sound card that does is the usual solution.  But Virtual Recorder solves the problem.  It can record what your computer plays even if the onboard sound or sound card you are using doesn’t.

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2021 4:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 


Re: Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

Arlene
 

If I use that, does NVDA get onto the recording as you record from the web?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Roger Stewart
Sent: May 9, 2021 2:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

If you are just wanting to record programs and not do any serious editing, then all you'll need is mp3 Direct Cut. This will do the job nicely and will also let you edit out commercials or the beginning and the end of the show if you get a few minutes you don't need. NVDA has an add on for mp3 Direct Cut and works very well.  Best of all, it's FREE! :)

 

Roger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 5/9/2021 1:47 PM, Arlene wrote:

I am interested in learning how to record shows like 48 hours from this computer. I thought I had to use Reaper. Someone told me if you record from the PC it does pick up the screen reader weather you use JAWS, NVDA etc. but with a Mac you don’t pick up the screen reader when using Audio High Jack that the Mac uses.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Smart
Sent: May 9, 2021 10:54 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Enquiry about add-ons for Audio Production Software

 

 

On 2021-05-09 1:49 p.m., Arlene wrote:

Hi, Does Reaper pick up NVDA while using it to record shows? 

 

That all depends on which audio device you are recording through, how you have things routed etc. If you want to do something simple like record a show, you probably don't need Reaper.

 

 

Does it matter how fast your prosessor works while using Reaper? 

Again, for doing what? Playing back a 100+ track project with lots of virtual instruments and effects processing? Yes. For recording a single thing onto one track, no.

 

 

.

 

 

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