Date   

Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

<LOL> -- very interesting. I fully understand your perspective but if you work as a journalist and operate in a newsroom, you have to be able to receive timely updates for everything including speeches, election results, explosions, pandemic updates, resolutions, etc. That's why my work-related RSS feeds are updated every 15 minutes in Internet Explorer (the minimum value allowed), and many times I also refresh a couple of them in 5 to 10-minute intervals.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Object Navigation - Where and How Do You Use It?

 

Jackie (and many others, since I last posted),

Thank you very much for concrete examples of where, and how, you are using Object Navigation.  It's so much easier to formulate an educated guess of where it might be helpful/appropriate when you encounter a situation if you've seen other situations where it was.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 02:44 PM, Amir wrote:
That's why they're not suitable for me especially for work-related tasks.
-
I have no idea what you do, and the following is not aimed at you, personally, but if "within the hour" is not fast enough, then that's a business I don't want to be in.

As a former software developer I learned to despise artificial deadlines, and also learned that 99 times out of 100, "It will still be there tomorrow, possible for multiple tomorrows," applied to so-called time critical tasks.

I got out, among other reasons, because there was never time to do it right to begin with, but always plenty of time to do it over just so long as something, anything, was presented by someone's designated deadline that was completely disconnected from actual need.

One of my favorite quotations, whether you liked the source or not:

     I reject get-it-done, make-it-happen thinking. I want to slow things down so I understand them better.

             ~ Gov. Jerry Brown

Most times, you can slow them way down, and get a far better solution/result.

Sorry for getting all meta on everyone.  It's a hot and lazy Sunday afternoon.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

That's the case with stand-alone RSS feed readers -- you can even set the refresh rate to "1 minute" with many of them, and, of course, you can refresh manually whenever desired. However, web-based readers such as The Old Reader and Feedly don't give you such a fine-tuning especially with their free tiers. The Old Reader clearly mentions that the Premium tier allows for faster refresh rates although I don't know how fast it might be. That's why they're not suitable for me especially for work-related tasks. Even with Lire on my iPhone I tend to use it in Stand-alone mode so as to get faster refresh rates without having to be limited by the dictates of its supported web-based services.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Cristóbal
 

So, now I had to look it up. It looks like I was indeed grandfathered in at the $2 a month.

What will you get with The Old Reader Premium?
- Full-text search
- Faster feed refresh times
- Up to 500 Subscriptions
- 6 months of post storage
- Instapaper and Readability integration
- Early access to new features

What will it cost?
The Old Reader Premium will cost $3/month or $30/year. However, for the next 2 weeks (or up to 5,000 accounts) we’ll be offering the service for $2/month or $20/year and we will lock you into that price for a minimum of the next 2 years. This is our way of saying thanks to our existing users and hopefully getting the Premium service off to a great start.

This post was back in 2014 so I guess I’ve been saving that extra buck for the past four years or so… Yea me.

Again though, you don’t have to pay.

Do I have to upgrade?
No! 90% of our users can continue on for free just as they are today. However, users with more than 100 feeds will need to upgrade to premium. Otherwise, all functionality will remain available to free accounts. We also offer a 2 week trial period for the premium service and will even allow that trial period to get extended for those still interested in moving to Premium.

https://blog.theoldreader.com/post/76417559063/the-old-reader-premium

I’m sure there are other services out there that offer similar features with paid and free tears, so it’s not like these guys have some sort of special sauce or anything. This is simply the service I’ve found to cover most of my needs. I am a heavy RSS user with multiple devices that I may use throughout the day to keep up on the news.

The Old Reader’s even got keyboard commands similar to how Twitter.com and Reddit.com an a lot of other web based programs have. I don’t particularly make use of them, but they’re there if that’s your thing as well.

 

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:59 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 01:41 PM, Amir wrote:

I feel I shouldn't have to pay $2 or more per month for a service

Is this for the premium service, or basic?   I'll admit the website isn't good about discussing this, but when I attempt the "Sign Up" process it mentions a 14-day trial of premium.  On a lot of these "premium versus basic" situations the cost is only if you want the premium features.

That would be good info to have.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Object Navigation - Where and How Do You Use It?

Jackie
 

Hey Brian, I just came across this & thought it might help illustrate
the usefulness of object nav.

Right now, I'm struggling w/integrating Amazon S3 storage w/WordPress.
I found a book I thought might be able to help at:
https://www.manning.com/books/amazon-web-services-in-action-second-edition?a_bid=387245ad&a_aid=mwittig#toc

After the link that says "Click the table of contents to start
reading." you'll notice that there are links that do not announce
their contents. Now, I realize that you can see, so all you'd need to
do is to look, but, since most of us don't have that luxury, & since
NVDA isn't reading these by default, I use the Move to first contained
object key (NVDA+numpad2 or NVDA shift down arrow) to read the link's
url, which tells me the links represent the authors' social media
channels. Those are relatively unimportant, but this can help a great
deal as well w/other links that aren't announced. Hopefully w/this
concrete example, you can see how object nav is useful for NVDA users.

Please note that this posting in no way represents that I am endorsing
this or any other product, or that I have any financial interests in
same (which I don't).

On 8/7/20, Chris Mullins <cjmullins29@...> wrote:
Hi Brian
I understand you are using Object navigation in this case to gain knowledge
of how to use it but I thought I would make you aware of the Virtual Review
add-on. With Virtual Review installed, pressing NVDA+Ctrl+w when the About
window is in focus, will open a temporary textual window containing the
information from the About window you can’t access in situe using the
keyboard. You can arrow around the virtual review window to read the info
then press escape to dismiss it and return focus back to the About window
itself.

Cheers
Chris


from the In

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: 06 August 2020 23:41
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Object Navigation - Where and How Do You Use It?

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 06:35 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
You can’t use keyboard commands to look at various system information
displayed on that screen – you must use object navigation to read them.
-
Thank you for this specific example.   Again, this is very handy for me to
have as I now have a specific location where playing with object navigation
gets me a result I cannot get otherwise, and I've been told what that result
would be.  I just went through the list of items near the top of the About
pane and got "status green" for each after it was read, and had no idea of
exactly how I was supposed to (or even if I could) get to that information
via NVDA.

--
Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363
A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.
          ~ Oscar Wilde






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Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 02:19 PM, Amir wrote:
updates don't come as fast or spontaneous as stand-alone readers which do the fetching of headlines and articles on their own.
-
My guess is that this is directly dependent on the default sync intervals each is using.  For many pieces of software like these, it's configurable so you can make the checks either more or less frequent.

Given that I do not use any of the things mentioned, this is based on experience with pretty much anything that has sync intervals, including e-mail clients.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

The Old Reader is free for up to 100 feeds and offers a Premium version with full-text search and up to 500 subscriptions and 6 months of post storage. The free tier also includes sponsored posts from time to time. It's also worth mentioning that with web-based feed services such as The Old Reader and Feedly which I've tried, updates don't come as fast or spontaneous as stand-alone readers which do the fetching of headlines and articles on their own. So if speed is a factor for you, web-based services are at least several minutes and at most an hour behind.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Cristóbal
 

Don’t know what to tell you, but at least for me, it’s not all that complicated. I’ve got my feeds sorted nicely into folders that are all displayed on one page. First it’s the folder then the individual feeds below it. I can view all feed entries by folder or feed. Oldest to newest and vice versa. Have them shown as a list view or full article. Share an article to Facebook or Twitter (in my case, I don’t have these services connected for this option), Save to Instapaper or Pocket or share  via email. Again, you don’t “have to pay). There is a free option. Paying the nominal amount is to unlock bonus features, be able to retrieve a larger number of feeds  and again, to support the service. I recall a few months ago a new RSS service based out of Germany being talked about. Like a lot of other services, they touted their privacy-centric approach, but again, they were web based and also had free and paid options. Who’s to say their assurances aren’t any better or worse about data privacy than any other random add-on or extension…

I did try using Outlook’s built in RSS feed for like five minutes and that  was a no go for sure. No structure or easy way to navigate by topic etc.

I’ve had my share of hopefully so far unsuccessful  attempts to get into my accounts too. A password manager, 2FA wherever possible, etc is a good idea regardless of what service you may or may not use.  

 

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Amir
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:42 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

Cristóbal, it's mostly a matter of taste although I feel I shouldn't have to pay $2 or more per month for a service when stand-alone extensions can do the job and Internet Explorer has been propelling it for many years. Moreover, with email I also tend to use Thunderbird rather than the web interface. Unlike you I feel finding information, or even a single feed hidden in a folder when you have more than 100 feeds, via the web interface is much more cumbersome and time-consuming than utilizing a stand-alone app. Finally -- and as someone who has been the target of hopefully unsuccessful Apple and Gmail hacking attacks, I guess it's much more important than you portray. At any event and as you rightly said, to each their own.

 

Best,

Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

David Griffith
 

 

I think the question was for somebody else who also had problems with Thunderbird but I agree that if I had the same problems you had Thunderbird would be unusable.

So far thankfully I have not replicated these issues but I have only just started using it.

The version I am using is

Thunderbird Version 68.11.0

So I don’t know if it has become less buggy since you used it.

David G.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Amir
Sent: 09 August 2020 18:48
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

Yes, my folders got created, but the feeds, or rather the feed names, inside each folder are missing. In other words, I do get all articles belonging to each folder, but I can't tell which article belongs to which RSS feed as articles for each feed inside folders aren't populated under that feed, meaning I can't separately monitor feeds which reside inside folders. Also I went to Tools for the import.

 

Best,

Amir

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 01:41 PM, Amir wrote:
I feel I shouldn't have to pay $2 or more per month for a service
Is this for the premium service, or basic?   I'll admit the website isn't good about discussing this, but when I attempt the "Sign Up" process it mentions a 14-day trial of premium.  On a lot of these "premium versus basic" situations the cost is only if you want the premium features.

That would be good info to have.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

Yes, my folders got created, but the feeds, or rather the feed names, inside each folder are missing. In other words, I do get all articles belonging to each folder, but I can't tell which article belongs to which RSS feed as articles for each feed inside folders aren't populated under that feed, meaning I can't separately monitor feeds which reside inside folders. Also I went to Tools for the import.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

Cristóbal, it's mostly a matter of taste although I feel I shouldn't have to pay $2 or more per month for a service when stand-alone extensions can do the job and Internet Explorer has been propelling it for many years. Moreover, with email I also tend to use Thunderbird rather than the web interface. Unlike you I feel finding information, or even a single feed hidden in a folder when you have more than 100 feeds, via the web interface is much more cumbersome and time-consuming than utilizing a stand-alone app. Finally -- and as someone who has been the target of hopefully unsuccessful Apple and Gmail hacking attacks, I guess it's much more important than you portray. At any event and as you rightly said, to each their own.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 01:31 PM, Cristóbal wrote:
theoldreader.com
Certainly seems to be the perfect "tool to task" solution to me. Cristóbal, your link didn't linkify for easy click-through, so I've forced it this time.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: What is the NVDA key combination for pop up dialogues in Firefox or Crome

 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 03:09 AM, Matt Wadsworth wrote:
Yes, FF and Croam automatically download files to a specified folder.
-
Or can be set to ask you where you want to save each file you download, when you kick off the download.  This is how I configure all my browsers, because if the thing I'm downloading is something I intend to keep I want it filed in the correct location.

Dealing with a Downloads folder that becomes a trash heap (which happens in far too many instances) is not my idea of fun.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

David Griffith
 

That is odd that we are getting such different experiences. My OPML file imported straight away without any issue.

Did your folders get created at all?

Presumably you went to Tools and imported from there?

David Griffith

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Akash Kakkar
Sent: 09 August 2020 17:12
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

I've tried thunderbird many times but it doesn't import my OPML

correctly. after importing, it doesn't fetch anything at all.

 

On 8/9/20, Akash Kakkar via groups.io <akash.misc07@...> wrote:

> Hi Amir, I've cloned the source, will take a look at it

> On 8/9/20, Amir <mobilespace08@...> wrote:

>> Akash, Smart RSS is open-source. So I'd appreciate it if you could also

>> take

>> a look at it.

>> 

>> Best,

>> Amir

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>

 

 

 


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Cristóbal
 

www.theoldreader.com

 

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Akash Kakkar
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 11:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

the URL for old reader please?
I want to give it a try.
Will try to contribute for smart reader too by fixing the accessibility issues on github if it is open source
On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 07:10 PM, Cristóbal wrote:

Whenever this topic comes up, I always recommend The Old Reader
I first discovered it after Google Reader shut down and a lot of us became RSS refugees. It’s web based so you can log in from any device and browser. Completely accessible too. In fact, in my case, I have the “all posts” of the site with all my feeds set as my homepage. A bonus is that it’s compatible with iOS devices, so you can have synchronicity across multiple platforms.
There’s a free as well as paid options. I chose to pay for the extra features as well as to support the developers. It’s something like $2.00 a month, but it could be that I’m grandfathered in at that price since I’ve been subscribed for a while.
There are of course other options out there, but I prefer something web based so I don’t’ have to worry about not having things synchronize like pop3 or having a machine crash and take all my feeds with it or a funky add-on/extension etc.
Currently, I’ve got around 160 RSS feeds. You can create folders, rename feeds, search for feeds while on the site and all that good stuff.
Anyway, my two cents.

Cristóbal

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Amir
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 12:01 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Greetings,


If you are into RSS feeds and feed subscriptions, you most likely know that Windows suffers from a paucity of accessible RSS readers. Internet Explorer offers an accessible RSS reader, but accessing articles in IE is quite problematic these days given the age of the browser itself.
Thunderbird offers a good one, but it doesn't work the way a standard reader should operate in many ways. So I decided to see if I can find a good and stand-alone, I mean service/subscription-independent, RSS extension for MS Edge Chromium/Google Chrome as they have become quite popular. I tested a few readers but landed upon Smart RSS which, despite its accessibility shortcomings, sounds more promising:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smart-rss/eggggihfcaabljfpjiiaohloefmgejic?hl=en
<https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smart-rss/eggggihfcaabljfpjiiaohloefmgejic?hl=en>

Fortunately the developer is quite responsive and really wants to help make Smart RSS more accessible on Github. So if you are interested, please visit the following page and chip in with your perspectives and
suggestions: https://github.com/SmartRSS/Smart-RSS/issues/132
<https://github.com/SmartRSS/Smart-RSS/issues/132>

Hope together we can find an accessible RSS solution for Windows 10/MS Edge Chromium/Google Chrome in order to get rid of Internet Explorer 11, once and for all!


Best,

Amir


 On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 07:10 PM, Cristóbal wrote:

Whenever this topic comes up, I always recommend The Old Reader
I first discovered it after Google Reader shut down and a lot of us became RSS refugees. It’s web based so you can log in from any device and browser. Completely accessible too. In fact, in my case, I have the “all posts” of the site with all my feeds set as my homepage. A bonus is that it’s compatible with iOS devices, so you can have synchronicity across multiple platforms.
There’s a free as well as paid options. I chose to pay for the extra features as well as to support the developers. It’s something like $2.00 a month, but it could be that I’m grandfathered in at that price since I’ve been subscribed for a while.
There are of course other options out there, but I prefer something web based so I don’t’ have to worry about not having things synchronize like pop3 or having a machine crash and take all my feeds with it or a funky add-on/extension etc.
Currently, I’ve got around 160 RSS feeds. You can create folders, rename feeds, search for feeds while on the site and all that good stuff.
Anyway, my two cents.

Cristóbal

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Amir
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 12:01 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Greetings,


If you are into RSS feeds and feed subscriptions, you most likely know that Windows suffers from a paucity of accessible RSS readers. Internet Explorer offers an accessible RSS reader, but accessing articles in IE is quite problematic these days given the age of the browser itself.
Thunderbird offers a good one, but it doesn't work the way a standard reader should operate in many ways. So I decided to see if I can find a good and stand-alone, I mean service/subscription-independent, RSS extension for MS Edge Chromium/Google Chrome as they have become quite popular. I tested a few readers but landed upon Smart RSS which, despite its accessibility shortcomings, sounds more promising:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smart-rss/eggggihfcaabljfpjiiaohloefmgejic?hl=en
<https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smart-rss/eggggihfcaabljfpjiiaohloefmgejic?hl=en>

Fortunately the developer is quite responsive and really wants to help make Smart RSS more accessible on Github. So if you are interested, please visit the following page and chip in with your perspectives and
suggestions: https://github.com/SmartRSS/Smart-RSS/issues/132
<https://github.com/SmartRSS/Smart-RSS/issues/132>

Hope together we can find an accessible RSS solution for Windows 10/MS Edge Chromium/Google Chrome in order to get rid of Internet Explorer 11, once and for all!


Best,

Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Amir
 

Good question. I don't need to keep track of all of them on a daily basis. First, some of them are weekly podcasts (The Pulse, The Moth, This American Life, Innovation Hub, Ken Rudin's Political Junkie, Planet Money, etc.), and since the mechanism is quite similar to fetching RSS feeds, I use the RSS approach on Windows to keep track of podcasts. Second, many of them are work-related RSS feeds such as the ones provided by Reuters, Associated Press, CNN, BBC, etc., so I closely monitor them for work. Third, I tend to read the titles not the full articles. So, for instance, with CNET, Wired, MacRumors, Android Police, and so forth, I check their headlines and read just a couple of their articles. The same is true about various NPR/PRI/APM feeds and programs -- I peruse the headlines -- even without having to open the articles, but open or download a few of them. Finally, I keep track of some of them via my iPhone (Lire to be specific) on the go.
 
Best,
Amir


Re: Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

Cristóbal
 

I mean… to each their own, but you know… web based email, online banking, online shopping, social media, a smartphone in one’s pocket with Bluetooth tracking  and on and on and on. Worrying about my RSS feed service wouldn’t exactly be my first concern as far as security and data sharing.

Besides, how often does one use a third party device that they need to log into and out of all the time? Personally, I think those particular concerns are overblown. It’s not like I’m going to be visiting a cousin and have to check my RSS feeds so urgently that I’d ask to borrow their PC real quick.

I don’t know what could be more simple or reachable than opening a webpage? Internet explorer is after all just another browser that you’d have to launch first anyway.

 I don’t know the exact details as far as the tear between free and paid since I choose to pay to support the service. It’s not like two bucks a month is going to break the bank. That and honestly, I’m as much on my phone as I am on my PCs so having the cross platform option with instant synchronicity is a major plus.  I believe The Old Reader has an even higher tear for 500 feeds plus, but I’m not even that hardcore of an RSS person.

Not saying a standalone program or solution isn’t an option, but again, being tied to just one machine and all the possibilities for something going wrong on that one device or program is something I’d not be inclined to choosing.

But again, personal preference and all that.

I do recall trying out other services like Feedly and Inoreader and while iOS access worked perfectly fine, the websites were horrible as far as screen reader accessibility. Things could have changed since then, but this is my recollection when trying them out.

 

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Amir
Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2020 6:13 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Helping to make an Edge/Chrome RSS reader accessible

 

Cristóbal, I don't like web-based RSS readers and services at all. The  hassles of logging into and out of them aside, I don't want to share my data with any of them. I want something as simple yet accessible and reachable as Internet Explorer. In fact, had I wanted a web-based RSS service, I could have gone with other services which are more feature-rich. I've also heard that The Old Reader doesn't accept more than 100 feeds in its free version -- it started in 2018.

Best,
Amir


Re: Honey - Browser Extension that finds Promo Codes on Websites

 

Amended the title to make it clear what this is about.  Also, for those interested, see:

Automatic Coupons, Promo Codes, and Deals | Honey

Honey - Chrome Web Store

Get Honey - Microsoft Store

Honey - Get this Extension for 🦊 Firefox (en-US)

as well as Honey App Review: Is It a Scam or Legit? (2020 Update)
and Honey - A Quality Service To Save Money, or a Scam?

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

A gentleman is one who never hurts anyone's feelings unintentionally.

          ~ Oscar Wilde