Date   

Re: New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

 

To be honest though that would count for me for every upgrade.

I updated from dos to windows because of hardware and the fact I wanted more than 1 task.

I updated from win95 to win 98 because I could.

I updated from 98 to xp because of better drivers support etc.

I updated from xp to 7 because of security reasons and my computer died.

But I could have continued on xp for ever more.

I will update to 10 because of firstly security and secondly, I can't use anything over 6th generation pluss win7 is about dead anyway.

But if I had the choice I'd still be on stable xp.

On 7/17/2018 9:35 AM, Gene wrote:
Are there features you want or apps you want to run that you can't run now? If you have a reason to upgrade such as that, you may want to. If you are more curious and have no strong reason to do so, I have real reservations about whether its worth upgrading a computer you are satisfied with.

You may find some problem or annoyance you really don't want to deal with and you may not be happy if you upgrade just to upgrade and have one or more annoying problems, even if you solve them. And Windows 10 comes out with a major upgrade every six months, which you must accept. Some people have problems after an upgrade.

You might want to consider getting a tablet to play with Windows 10 if you are just getting it out of curiosity and not because of features or apps you consider important.

Gene


From: Rob DeZonia
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess


Howdy list,

I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.



Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 07:39 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
If they're shutting it down, these versions will no longer work.
And that's the central point I was trying to make.  Those of us who have spent decades in information technology know that "shutting down" is not code for something, but is a direct statement of intent (and, of course, result).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Eleni Vamvakari
 

There are also instances in which using an older version remains
possible, though it is no longer updated. However, you're right. If
they're shutting it down, these versions will no longer work.

On 16/07/2018, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 06:41 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:


Whether there is a way to avoid the updates and whether Classic will
still
work I don't know.
The author of the article gave a direct link to the Skype Blog
article, Upgrade to the latest version of Skype for desktop (
https://blogs.skype.com/news/2018/07/16/upgrade-to-the-latest-version-of-skype-for-desktop/
) , dated today (7/16/2018), that serves as the source material.  He quotes
the following from it, " There comes a time when we must shut down older
services and application versions. "

The phrase "shutting down" is completely unambiguous in the tech world:
older versions will not work, and typically by intention.

I don't care whether your blind, or sighted, or whatever:  Nothing is so
constant as change (and nowhere is it more constant than the world of
computing).  When software vendors are telling you that the time has come to
upgrade that should make you rush out and upgrade while you can have overlap
between the old and new.  Once that shutdown occurs you will be tossed into
the deep end.

Software and hardware both have service lives.  It does no good to cling to
the dying or dead.  And, in the event the "latest  and greatest" isn't for
you, for any you, your energy is far better spent finding a replacement.
This is another reason why early upgrading makes sense, as you can more
accurately determine whether it's time to find a replacement if you simply
cannot work with the latest and greatest.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 06:41 PM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
Whether there is a way to avoid the updates and whether Classic will still work I don't know.
The author of the article gave a direct link to the Skype Blog article, Upgrade to the latest version of Skype for desktop, dated today (7/16/2018), that serves as the source material.  He quotes the following from it, "There comes a time when we must shut down older services and application versions."

The phrase "shutting down" is completely unambiguous in the tech world:  older versions will not work, and typically by intention.

I don't care whether your blind, or sighted, or whatever:  Nothing is so constant as change (and nowhere is it more constant than the world of computing).  When software vendors are telling you that the time has come to upgrade that should make you rush out and upgrade while you can have overlap between the old and new.  Once that shutdown occurs you will be tossed into the deep end.

Software and hardware both have service lives.  It does no good to cling to the dying or dead.  And, in the event the "latest  and greatest" isn't for you, for any you, your energy is far better spent finding a replacement.  This is another reason why early upgrading makes sense, as you can more accurately determine whether it's time to find a replacement if you simply cannot work with the latest and greatest.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Eleni Vamvakari
 

The article in question provided many details. Windows 10 was not
mentioned exclusively either. They are no longer supporting Skype 7,
what they call Classic Skype and will be forcing people to upgrade to
the modern version. Whether there is a way to avoid the updates and
whether Classic will still work I don't know. S Portable may be an
option, but even then, I usually have to tell it not to update.

On 16/07/2018, Robert Mendoza <lowvisiontek@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi, can someone validate this statement are true for the sake of the
welfare of others. For I know it's been almost years been using Skype
for call and video conferencing to my folks. And how this will be going
to be severely impacted some of us using of the Skype. The reason of
this is because here in my area some of the folks and businesses uses
Skype for their jobs, and useful to consider as well. Better to provide
link that could shed details for this matter.Is this concern for the
Windows 10 only or to other platform?

Robert Mendoza


On 7/17/2018 5:56 AM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I'm on a family plan with TMobile. It's unlimited, with no overage
charges. But iy ou use a certain amount of data in one month, they
throttle the connection, making it much slower. I only use it during
the day when in the backyard or when on trips. Otherwise, I use our
home wifi, so it's not an issue. I would never use a pay as you go
plan, because I use the Internet for many hours per day, and my Skype
conversations are a minimum of three hours each.

I don't pay for the home wifi, and other things, which are not mine,
are connected to it. Plus, my parents know very little about
computers, so I'm not going to play with their modem.

On 16/07/2018, Steve Nutt <steve@comproom.co.uk> wrote:
Hi Sean,

I like Chrome, so therefore, I like hangouts. I'd rather have Chrome
than
Edge any day.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun
Everiss
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something
I
have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that
I
may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened
that
way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I
could
have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot
of
family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype
and
others and who knows.

I like my pc though.




On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and
dabbled
with it, but never adopted it for regular use: Why is this such an
issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there
are
many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible. It will also
be
interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with
regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love
for
all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel













--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Robert Mendoza
 

Hi, can someone validate this statement are true for the sake of the welfare of others. For I know it's been almost years been using Skype for call and video conferencing to my folks. And how this will be going to be severely impacted some of us using of the Skype. The reason of this is because here in my area some of the folks and businesses uses Skype for their jobs, and useful to consider as well. Better to provide link that could shed details for this matter.Is this concern for the Windows 10 only or to other platform?

Robert Mendoza

On 7/17/2018 5:56 AM, Eleni Vamvakari wrote:
I'm on a family plan with TMobile. It's unlimited, with no overage
charges. But iy ou use a certain amount of data in one month, they
throttle the connection, making it much slower. I only use it during
the day when in the backyard or when on trips. Otherwise, I use our
home wifi, so it's not an issue. I would never use a pay as you go
plan, because I use the Internet for many hours per day, and my Skype
conversations are a minimum of three hours each.

I don't pay for the home wifi, and other things, which are not mine,
are connected to it. Plus, my parents know very little about
computers, so I'm not going to play with their modem.

On 16/07/2018, Steve Nutt <steve@comproom.co.uk> wrote:
Hi Sean,

I like Chrome, so therefore, I like hangouts. I'd rather have Chrome than
Edge any day.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I
have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I
may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that
way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could
have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of
family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and
others and who knows.

I like my pc though.




On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled
with it, but never adopted it for regular use: Why is this such an
issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are
many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible. It will also be
interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with
regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel











Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Gene
 

That's not surprising.  I just looked it up and it is a cloud-based system.  It's interesting and I'm going to play with the demo.  But in fairness to Eloquence, it's like comparing a calculator to a supercomputer.  Eloquence is remarkably good for its class.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:23 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Actually, Eloquence is beaten now for best pronunciation, by a synth that is not on Windows.  Google TTS beats Eloquence hands down for pronunciation.  I can’t find anything in the dictionary that it pronounces wrong, but I can with Eloquence.  For example, Samhain, a Pagan festival is pronounced Sowan with a hard OW as in Cow, Eloquence completely mangles that and pronounces it Samhain as spelled.

 

Google One, Eloquence definitely Nil.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 16 July 2018 17:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer. 

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Ervin, Glenn

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers
on/

Regards










Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Eleni Vamvakari
 

I'm on a family plan with TMobile. It's unlimited, with no overage
charges. But iy ou use a certain amount of data in one month, they
throttle the connection, making it much slower. I only use it during
the day when in the backyard or when on trips. Otherwise, I use our
home wifi, so it's not an issue. I would never use a pay as you go
plan, because I use the Internet for many hours per day, and my Skype
conversations are a minimum of three hours each.

I don't pay for the home wifi, and other things, which are not mine,
are connected to it. Plus, my parents know very little about
computers, so I'm not going to play with their modem.

On 16/07/2018, Steve Nutt <steve@comproom.co.uk> wrote:
Hi Sean,

I like Chrome, so therefore, I like hangouts. I'd rather have Chrome than
Edge any day.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I
have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I
may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that
way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could
have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of
family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and
others and who knows.

I like my pc though.




On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled
with it, but never adopted it for regular use: Why is this such an
issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are
many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible. It will also be
interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with
regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel











--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com

anyaudio.net: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Sarah k Alawami
 

You cannot tie any account to it. It is like cysco or what ever conferencing services use, except there is a mac and windows and mobile client and the sound is good. The person can call in by phone if they need to as well. I even mute  people upoin joining the meeting to prevent distractions.

On Jul 16, 2018, at 2:07 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@...> wrote:

What is zoom like for home use, is it windows mobile and other things.

Could I use it well enough in a client?

Does it have a pro package with credits like skype, could I tie a skype account to it?

I am now interested in another non microsoft pc solution which is not skype, if it can use skype accounts fine, google to, but with ms anouncement today from thurrot I can't exactly see me using their software any more.




On 7/17/2018 7:23 AM, Tyler Wood wrote:
Lol.

I remember 3.8 had 8 k audio all the time. It has been forever since quality has gone that low on skype for me *since* Microsoft bought it.

Go mobile, even on relatively good LTE, and team talk audio is so bad you can't use it. It takes nothing to make you break up whereas team speak has such a huge buffer you could probably talk in a stereo channel on satellite. Very latent, but doable. I have played around with the transmit interval on team talk to no avail.

I use zoom for work, but have yet to be mobile with it so am curious on how it will handle that. I have a lot of rural areas that get excellent HSPA coverage which should be more than enough for any audio communication, yet team talk struggles like crazy. Frustrating.




On 16-Jul-2018 2:15 PM, Lino Morales wrote:

Well I use Skype and TT on my PC not in a mobile environment due to a Android phone that has 8 GB of memory. I do 99.9 percent of my stuff on said PC with a 200 MBPS download speed on my Spectrum connection. Skype technologies SA should never should have sold their souls to the devil AKA MS. V 4.X had great audio. MS broke it.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

------------------------------------------------------------------------
*From:* nvda@nvda.groups.io<nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Tyler Wood <tcwood12@...>
*Sent:* Monday, July 16, 2018 3:12:13 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -
Maybe it is for you. Not everyone needs high quality audio for voice communication, using tons of mobile internet that they don't have. I have used zoom, and I see absolutely 0 difference in audio quality. Mostly because of internal microphones with noise suppression enabled.



On 16-Jul-2018 1:46 PM, Lino Morales wrote:

If I were a podcaster I’d use Zoom or TT. Sorry, but I standby what I said. The audio is crap.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
*From:* nvda@nvda.groups.io<nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@...>
*Sent:* Monday, July 16, 2018 2:44:27 PM
*To:* Nvda List
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -
The audio quality is fine. It’s not zoom quality but I can understand what’s beeing said, and if I can do my job still Ill take it. I am actually loving skype and I do use it on my vodcasts.

On Jul 16, 2018, at 11:38 AM, Lino Morales <linomorales001@...<mailto:linomorales001@...>> wrote:

The audio quality is crap. TeamTalk is better for what you want to do.

Sent fromMail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>for Windows 10

------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> on behalf of Joshua Hendrickson <louvins@...<mailto:louvins@...>>
*Sent:*Monday, July 16, 2018 2:36:56 PM
*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:*Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -
I'm not exactly a fan of the new version of skype.  If I can figure
out how to invite multiple people to a skype call, that would be
great.  However, I can use this new version of skype ok. Granted, I
don't like it as well as 7.4, but I can use it.

On 7/16/18, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@...<mailto:glenn.ervin@...>> wrote:
> What ever happened to Microsoft Net Meeting?
> I used to use that on days of dial-up and Windows 98.
> Glenn
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Eleni
> Vamvakari
> Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:03 PM
> To:nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -
>
> I used GW Connect for a while, but now, even the patch doesn't seem to work.
>  I installed it on one of my machines a few nights ago, but it wouldn't even
> let me see my contacts.  This is truly sad, as it was great software.  I
> don't know why Microsoft is forcing everyone to use their software,
> especially when it's not even fully accessible!
> Usually, I use S Portable, which is a portable version of regular Skype 7 if
> I remember correctly.  Granted, I don't really like the interface there
> either, especially as I have to use Task Manager to close the program, but
> at least it's better than the one that my friend has on his laptop!  I tried
> it and got a headache!  Here is the link to S Portable.
>
>https://portableapps.com/apps/internet/sportable
>
> Personally, I liked MSN/Windows Live Messenger better than all of the above,
> as it was simple, fast, and in its earlier days, didn't include all sorts of
> unnecessary features!  Now, I must find an accessible alternative to Skype.
> *sigh*
>
> All the best,
> Eleni
>
> On 16/07/2018, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@...<mailto:glenn.ervin@...>> wrote:
>> Does anyone here still use GW Connect?
>> Glenn
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From:nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Sarah k
>> Alawami
>> Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:29 PM
>> To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>>
>> Subject: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -
>>
>>https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/16333 
>> 7/microsoft-killing-skype-classic-september-1
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Facebook:elvam2167@...<mailto:elvam2167@...>
>
>anyaudio.net <http://anyaudio.net/>: elvam2167
>
> Skype: elvam2167
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


-- 
Joshua Hendrickson

Joshua Hendrickson














Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Sarah k Alawami
 

I don’t use the key strokes. I lost the guide someone kindly sent. I just tab to the wend media and files button same as on the mac and whack it.

Take care

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:47 PM, John Isige <gwynn@tds.net> wrote:

Have you gotten sending files to work in Skype on Windows 10? If so, how? I'm fairly sure the keystroke is supposed to be shift-ctrl-f to send a file but I've never gotten it to work, it does something else instead, can't recall what at the moment and I'm not on the machine running it to check.



Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Steve Nutt
 

Hi Sean,

I like Chrome, so therefore, I like hangouts. I'd rather have Chrome than Edge any day.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and others and who knows.

I like my pc though.




On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled with it, but never adopted it for regular use: Why is this such an issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible. It will also be interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel




Re: New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

 

Hi,
Well, we had significant changes on Win10, anyway I still recomend you update it.
Why? Well, the question isn't exactly this but you should wonder "why not?".
When you update something you have the newest version of that thing, what means to say you're supposed to have the best experience with this.
But backing to Win10, despite the changes I mentioned, you can still use it perfectly without much problems, I guess.
It's just a matter of time and a bit of your heffort and it'll be alright.

About Edge, personaly I don't use it, that's not my way browser, you know what I mean?
So, remember that you, like me, always can use a different browser, such as Firefox, Chrome or another you'd like.

Well I guess I wrote more than I should, so I'll stop here.
I hope you consider updating your system, surely it'll be the best you'll do.

P.S.: Let me sorry for my English and if there's something wrong, I'm just a brazilian guy trying to learn and practice it :)

Em 16/07/2018 15:43, Rob DeZonia escreveu:

Howdy list,
 
I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I doubt you  ever will.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claire Potter
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:27
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

Hi Steve, I guess the big question now is when will we be able to access Google TS for NVDA? It would be a brilliant synth!  

Warm regards, Claire Potter,   Check out my brand new website: www.pottersplace.me.uk


On 16 Jul 2018, at 22:23, Steve Nutt <steve@...> wrote:

Actually, Eloquence is beaten now for best pronunciation, by a synth that is not on Windows.  Google TTS beats Eloquence hands down for pronunciation.  I can’t find anything in the dictionary that it pronounces wrong, but I can with Eloquence.  For example, Samhain, a Pagan festival is pronounced Sowan with a hard OW as in Cow, Eloquence completely mangles that and pronounces it Samhain as spelled.

 

Google One, Eloquence definitely Nil.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 16 July 2018 17:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer. 

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers
on/

Regards











Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

Shaun,

           Have you tried hangouts.google.com in the web browser of your choice?  Some seem to "play better" with the Hangouts webpage than others do.

           I most commonly use the Chrome App, but I have used the Hangouts webpage, too.  Of course, you do have to acquire a Google Voice number (which is available at no cost only in the USA and Canada) in order for Hangouts to act like a typical phone line does.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Is NVDA colourblind?

Gene
 

I'll think about your response and I may have comments on it.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:40 PM, Gene wrote:
Pictures representing ideas or objects is not at all the same as symbols representing sounds that are combined to form words.  A picture of a fish representing the ocean is completely different than a symbolic method of writing the sounds in a language that make up the word "ocean."
Only if you're worried about the method, not the concept that is communicated itself.

There are many written (as in with letters) forms of the word, "ocean," but it is not the arbitrary representation of the concept that is the important part.  Even pictographic languages such as hieroglyphics had exact spoken equivalents for the glyphs.

Language is a symbol system to carry human communicative content.   Sign language is every bit as much a language as any other yet has no written component (and, believe me, many have tried to think of one that would work).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

Gene
 

Are there features you want or apps you want to run that you can't run now?  If you have a reason to upgrade such as that, you may want to.  If you are more curious and have no strong reason to do so, I have real reservations about whether its worth upgrading a computer you are satisfied with. 
 
You may find some problem or annoyance you really don't want to deal with and you may not be happy if you upgrade just to upgrade and have one or more annoying problems, even if you solve them.  And Windows 10 comes out with a major upgrade every six months, which you must accept.  Some people have problems after an upgrade.
 
You might want to consider getting a tablet to play with Windows 10 if you are just getting it out of curiosity and not because of features or apps you consider important.
 
Gene

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:43 PM
Subject: [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

Howdy list,
 
I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and others and who knows.

I like my pc though.

On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled with it, but never adopted it for regular use:   Why is this such an issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible.  It will also be interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Steve Nutt
 

I know and I just got the update. It's pretty horrible.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:29
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/163337/micr
osoft-killing-skype-classic-september-1


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Steve Nutt
 

How amusing.  You can listen at 130 percent, and yet you missed the fact that you misspelled Practice as Parctice?

 

I don’t believe blind people listen all that well at high speeds, as proven here.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:18
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I can if I want to listen on my mac at 130 percent, or I used to anyway. That helped me get a lot of things done but it takes parctice. I don’t go 1 percent at a time thoughI try 5 at a time or so if I can handle it.

 

Take care



On Jul 16, 2018, at 9:20 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer.  

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers.  

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <
acsociopath@...>
To: <
nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular 
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial 
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I 
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at 
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in 
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move 
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It 
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you 
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a 
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there 
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers 
on/

Regards










 


Re: Is NVDA colourblind?

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

This is just another case of blind people crying because language doesn’t suit what they want.  We should try to adapt to the real world, rather than complain about language which evolves.

 

So often do I hear on Facebook for example that blind people whinge because sighted people don’t describe images they post on Facebook, and Facebook doesn’t always have alt text for them.

 

Well there are plenty of tools on iOS and Android to tell us roughly what those pictures are.

 

When blind people didn’t know they existed, they didn’t cry about it, now suddenly, because they know an image is there, they complain that all sighted people should write up their images.

 

In this case, my sympathies are with the sighted people, and we come across as a load of moaners.

 

And yes, I am totally blind.

 

Back to Emoji, if you don’t like them, turn them off.

 

End of rant.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

Well, there was a time when using icons/glyphs in an attempt to create a "universal language" for things like road signs was accompanied for quite a few years with a small "label" for lack of a better word beneath it in the local language saying what it meant.  The same thing was true, but to a far lesser extent, on keyboards.  Those attempts have, by and large, met with great success.

On electronic devices, however, the convention of presenting icons and text as the default has really fallen by the wayside.  The first thing I do when setting up a device for myself is to make sure that icons and text, not just icons, are presented.   No one can possibly keep in mind what all the various icons mean, particularly for functions you might touch once every 10 years, if that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel