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Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes that was my whole point really. It all a bit late. Who knows how long the security authorities have been using these vulnerabilities. The point I made some time ago is that there is never ever going to be anything that is totally secure, no matter what you do, and its realising this and not getting paranoid that is at issue a lot of the time
The main vulnerability these days is the internet of things, which give entry points to systems that are going to be hard to plug.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <@smeveriss>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 6:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?


Well its for all oses, linux macs maybe even amd cpus, its huge.

We say a 30% slowdown but then no one knows what that means.

Suggestions with games on linux and a few other things running in it suggest that we won't see a problem.

Cloud systems will probably slow down a bit on initial patch.

And every manufacturer is different.

Windows will have a patch next week, mac allready has one about to go, everyone will follow suit from phones to whatnot.

And its not all of a sudden, we are hearing it from the manufacturers now because they are almost ready for this thing to go.

Its complex as hell, but basically the kernal chip has a memmory leak that means people could read data.

Memmory leaks will be fixed going forward but there needs to be a patch reguardless even if the firmwares and such on various chips are patched, most will be if you have a modern pc, I don't though and so for most of us it will be the os alone.

As for slowing nvda down, we can run on slow boxes, I just pitty everything from games to jaws, but then no one knows information is being gleened from articles and such, And we can't do much about it, releases will be done next week and they will be on top of it, theuy have to.

As for it taking 10 years, you do wander, but then let me remind you of the issues with routers, attached storage boxes, and ssl.

Maybe someone saw that coming but maybe they didn't.




On 3/01/2018 11:03 p.m., Antony Stone wrote:
A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do not get
discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm not so
sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and not borne out
by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such a way that it will
have a definite performance penalty. If the 10-year old security flaw were not
much of a problem, Microsoft wouldn't react in a way that unavoidably impacts
the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account via
Groups.Io wrote:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any case. I'm
not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know enough to make such
a comment, but if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade,
I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at any rate I guess all those
out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.
If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel open to
action to give everyone new chips!
Brian

Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Incidentally 57 latest still completely fails in my windows 7, so I'm back on 52 esr. Maybe by the time they get to version 60 ythey might get it torun on windows 7. Ahem.

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Ron Canazzi" <aa2vm@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 6:09 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow


Hi Group,


I have the latest 57 version, I think its 5 or 6 as in 57.005 or 57.006 and I don't see this sluggishness.



On 1/4/2018 12:47 AM, Lino Morales wrote:
Yes. Run the version 52 ESR or simply wait till V 58 comes out. Download 58 beta build 13 also if you'd like. That's what I'm running now. Its not as slow as V577.3.


On 1/4/2018 12:34 AM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards


--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I did read the article, yes. However just as with that network bug a few months ago, it had been known about in security circles and was only patched when it became common knowledge.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 5:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?


The conspiracy theory makes me wonder if you, Brian, read the article before you expressed the conspiracy hypothesis. the facts in the article, such as that this affects Linux as well, and that the problem wasn't discovered by Microsoft and that Linux developers are working on a software fix as well, all demolish the conspiracy idea.

Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Alex Kenny
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 9:26 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?


While this has existed for the past decade, it has only been discovered recently. We have been "living with it", because, as far as we know no one had discover and exploit it. These patches, while slowing performance slightly and only in some use cases, will fix the problem.




Also, jumping immediately to some conspiracy by Microsoft doesn't make sense. First, as Anthony previously stated, Linux is being patched. Mac OS will also be updated.


Second, this issue affects the kernel, which has nothing to do with whether traditional Win32 or Windows Store apps are running on top of it. Deliberately slowing the kernel to induce people to use Windows Store apps is completely nonsensical.


This patch should only significantly affect use cases doing a lot of work in kernel space. NVDA will likely not be affected by this.


On Wed, Jan 3, 2018 at 8:00 AM Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

It just seems odd that we have if you believe all this lived with this for a
decade and I'd have thought there was now a bit of the shutting the stable
door when all the horses have gone about trying to retro patch it I
understand the biggest losers could be the big server companies who might be
using Intel chipped hardware, and hence need things sorting out.
So Maybe I should get my claim for a new processor in tomorrow to be in
time....:-)

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed
for nvda?


>I do not suspect ulterior motives on Microsoft's part in this case, because
> the Linux kernel is being patched in just the same way for just the same
> reason.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 11:17:37, Brian's Mail list account via
> Groups.Io wrote:
>
>> Oh really, well, I'm not so sure. It feeds into the mindset that says
>> Microsofts eventual aim is to lock people in to getting software from its
>> store and nowhere else in the 'interests' of security, when in reality
>> they
>> want to do what Apple is doing, create an ecosystem and make it hard for
>> third parties to just allow their software to run on a system.
>> Whether you suspect ulterior motives or not is your choice.
>>
>> Brian
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
>> To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:03 AM
>> Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact
>> speed
>> for nvda?
>>
>> >A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do not
>> >get discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.
>> >
>> > I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm
>> > not
>> > so sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and not
>> > borne out by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such a way
>> > that it will have a definite performance penalty. If the 10-year old
>> > security flaw were not much of a problem, Microsoft wouldn't react in a
>> > way
>> > that unavoidably impacts the majority of Windows users.
>> >
>> >
>> > Antony.
>> >
>> > On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account via
>> >
>> > Groups.Io wrote:
>> >> https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/
>> >>
>> >> I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any case.
>> >> I'm not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know enough to
>> >> make
>> >> such a comment, but if the security hole has been in the chips for a
>> >> decade, I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at any rate I guess
>> >> all those out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.
>> >>
>> >> If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel open
>> >> to
>> >> action to give everyone new chips!
>> >>
>> >> Brian
>
> --
> When you find yourself arguing with an idiot,
> you should first of all make sure that the other person isn't doing the
> same
> thing.
>
> Please reply to the
> list;
> please *don't* CC
> me.
>
>
>

Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

That is not what I meant. Its more likely that when a new chip is out people will use it as a selling point to drive people into buying a new system... again...
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex Kenny" <alexkenny08@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 3:26 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?


While this has existed for the past decade, it has only been discovered
recently. We have been "living with it", because, as far as we know no one
had discover and exploit it. These patches, while slowing performance
slightly and only in some use cases, will fix the problem.


Also, jumping immediately to some conspiracy by Microsoft doesn't make
sense. First, as Anthony previously stated, Linux is being patched. Mac OS
will also be updated.

Second, this issue affects the kernel, which has nothing to do with whether
traditional Win32 or Windows Store apps are running on top of it.
Deliberately slowing the kernel to induce people to use Windows Store apps
is completely nonsensical.

This patch should only significantly affect use cases doing a lot of work
in kernel space. NVDA will likely not be affected by this.

On Wed, Jan 3, 2018 at 8:00 AM Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

It just seems odd that we have if you believe all this lived with this for
a
decade and I'd have thought there was now a bit of the shutting the stable
door when all the horses have gone about trying to retro patch it I
understand the biggest losers could be the big server companies who might
be
using Intel chipped hardware, and hence need things sorting out.
So Maybe I should get my claim for a new processor in tomorrow to be in
time....:-)

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed
for nvda?


I do not suspect ulterior motives on Microsoft's part in this case,
because
the Linux kernel is being patched in just the same way for just the same
reason.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 11:17:37, Brian's Mail list account via
Groups.Io wrote:

Oh really, well, I'm not so sure. It feeds into the mindset that says
Microsofts eventual aim is to lock people in to getting software from
its
store and nowhere else in the 'interests' of security, when in reality
they
want to do what Apple is doing, create an ecosystem and make it hard for
third parties to just allow their software to run on a system.
Whether you suspect ulterior motives or not is your choice.

Brian

----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact
speed
for nvda?

A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do not
get discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm
not
so sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and not
borne out by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such a
way
that it will have a definite performance penalty. If the 10-year old
security flaw were not much of a problem, Microsoft wouldn't react in
a
way
that unavoidably impacts the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account
via

Groups.Io wrote:
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any
case.
I'm not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know enough to
make
such a comment, but if the security hole has been in the chips for a
decade, I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at any rate I
guess
all those out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.

If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel open
to
action to give everyone new chips!

Brian
--
When you find yourself arguing with an idiot,
you should first of all make sure that the other person isn't doing the
same
thing.

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't* CC
me.





Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Suggest 52 ESR as security update are available for that one, not the others up to 56.

This is one reason why I do not agree with Joseph about using 58 in his tutorials. In real world situations they have not yet fixed the access issues to make it as nippy as the old version was.
Shame they needed to go down this road. They could easily keep the old version and do security fixes for some years if they wanted to.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Edhoari Setiyoso" <edhoari.s@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 04, 2018 6:46 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow


Hi,

Fallback to FF version 53 seems do the trick. Will try update to latest version just before Quantum

Thanks for your help

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 12:49 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
The situation has improved somewhat in Firefox 58 and later, which NVDA 2018.1 will support (you can still use FF58 with NVDA 2017.4).
Cheers,
oseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edhoari Setiyoso
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com






Re: I'm dissappointed

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes indeed this happened to somebody I knew and all credit to the PC world techs, they got the computer sorted and screenreader running in a day. However as was pointed out by the support team, this issue is in fact reaching epedemic proportions and its costing companies who do warranty fixes a lot of money, and they may in the future charge for fixing what they see as operator errors.
You can see their point.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Kevin Huber" <kevin.huber1@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 9:21 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed


Hi Kendell:
I had this happen to me a few months ago. the voice told me that if I
wanted to stop that message from repeating over and over again, I had
to call the number on my screen. Since I could not shut down
properly, I did a forced shutdown. I was scared that somehow, my
computer had been hacked, but I was assured, by a friend of mine, who
is a retired IT person, that if I didn't call the number, nothing
could happen. But, wouldn't you know it, only a couple of weeks
later, a friend of mine had her computer hacked because she called the
number. She couldn't believe she'd been scammed since the message on
her screen said that it was from Microsoft, but I told her that some
of those crooks use the name of Microsoft to fool their victums into
thinking they are legitimate.

Kevin Huber

On 12/28/17, coffeekingms@... <coffeekingms@...> wrote:
Hi

I don’t know a lot about NVDA remote but in my experience, you have to
deliberately connect to a server, unless of course you select the default
which is to forward things through nvdaremove.com, which I would not advise.
Not because t spivey and his other developer are not trustworthy but because
it’s an easy target for people who might try to crack the site or get into
remote sessions. Always set up a dedicated pc or at least a pc that someone
you know and trust owns that you can use for stuff like that. I think it
ultimately depends like someone else said the quality of the person on the
other end. I have had people from other countries try to tell me my computer
has reported to them, them being a fake Microsoft, that it is sick with a
virus and for just $99.99 they can cure it. Clear scam but it can work on
people. I’ve seen it work. I don’t know if these will work anymore with the
advent of windows defender being built in, it might if the person on the
other end says the virus has disabled it. They’ve gotten quite clever. I ran
across a bot that used windows own built in voice to give the standard you
may have a virus prompt. That could lure people into thinking it is
legitimate. I didn’t fall for it because I don’t use narrator’s default
voice and speech settings, but someone who uses the defaults could fall for
it. This in windows 10, it used ms david for the prompt.

Thanks

Kendell Clark





Sent from my Vizio Ultrabook



________________________________
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Jason White via
Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 7:40:15 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed

I would argue that providing technical support is an under-valued
profession. I've encountered technical support staff who clearly don't know
enough to solve my problem, and if they did know, unfortunately they would
be in a "better" (more prestigious, more highly paid, etc.) job elsewhere.

In the commercial hardware and software world, the usual solution is to have
multiple layers of technical support, so that the easy cases can be dealt
with at the lower levels and the harder cases escalated upward. In my
experience, this often doesn't work well if you have one of the harder
cases. I don't know whether anyone has developed a model that works
effectively and which can scale.

Community support (as with free and open-source software projects) can be
very effective in practice, as this and similar mailing lists have shown
over the years. The more that the user knows, of course, the more benefits
tend to be gained.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian's
Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 3:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed

I'm keeping away from this subject in case anyone was wondering. I help out
people local to me. In the main its a voice call or a quick visit in the
main. Nine times out of ten its faulty training or lack of training by
others that are the issue.
Also however I have to give credit where it is due. A much maligned company
here in the UK for simply selling boxes, called PC World have always gone
the extra mile for most people who have encountered problems due to their
naivety or disability. They did a telephone restore of a system for a friend
of mine recently and managed to get the screenreader working as well.
It really depends on the quality of the tech person obviously.

I myself have not used the remote system for nvda in anger and would not
feel happy about doing so without a lot of testing first, mainly due to my
own shortcomings.
Tech support is not easy. Its a bit like solving a criminal case. You often
get bad or no info about what happened and have to somehow deduce the best
way to proceed to preserve data etc.
So when people do say tech support is expensive, yes it is if its any
good.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 2:33 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed


I'm not planning to offer such a service. I was saying that just because
NVDA is free, that that doesn't mean that technical support should be
assumed to be free. Some people may offer free support and some may offer
paid support. But unless this is discussed, people may assume that
everyone
is discussing a free support system because NVDA is free.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Pascal Lambert
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 8:19 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed


Hi All,

Gene’s offer is a sound one. I will be the first one to take advantage of
it. Please let me know when will you start offering your service.

Blessings

Pascal



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 9:09 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed



That's hardly the first suggestion on this list and I doubt on other lists.
At times, this suggestion is made because people don't know the answer or
because some problems are difficult to solve by back and forth messages by
e-mail. Someone remoting into the computer may solve some kinds of
problems
much faster and perhaps problems that wouldn't be solved on lists either
because of lack of knowledge or the difficulty in solving some problems by
exchanging messages.



But since peoples' experiences, as they report them, vary widely when they
call, evidently some techs are competent and some aren't, I would caution
people that it is better to ask about a problem here first and, those who
know enough, when they call the disability line, should have the tech tell
them what is going to be done so that if something doesn't sound correct,
it
can be not approved.



But I was talking about technical support offered by the NVDA community in
some way, in my last message. I enjoy answering questions and solving
things on lists. If I had something like a shift, where I received phone
calls for a certain number of hours a day, that would be more like a job
and
I might want to be paid for it. Because of possible limitations in
finances, I might not ask to be paid nearly what my services would be
worth,
but I might still want to be paid something, five or seven dollars an hour
and that would be a very cheap price, considering how much good technical
support is worth. That's not even minimum wage in the United States.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Lino Morales

Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 6:48 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed



I agree. Trying to trouble shoot things regardless of what screen reader on
any version of WIN is the NO.1 priority. The number one song ahem
suggestion
as of late here and on the WIN 10 year has been call the MS disability help
desk. It seems like that’s the first thing as of late that gets spouted off
the mouth. This is my chief complaint. Its getting old. That’s why their
lists like this. Somebody is bound to know the answers to XYZZ question.
Help desk or taking PC or laptop in to a local shop should be a last
resort.



Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 3:56 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed



Perhaps, but a fundamental question as barely been discussed, if at all.
NVDA is free. Does that mean services related to it should be free and to
what extent? If you are going to expect someone to do something like a
job,
that is, sit around and wait for calls a certain number of hours a day,
some
people might be willing to do that. That doesn't mean that it is
reasonable
to assume that enough people will be willing to do so to build a corps of
enough people around the world. Knowing how to teach and troubleshoot well
are valuable skills and, depending on the problems presented, the solutions
or what is taught may take time and effort. Why would peoples' skills and
knowledge be assumed to be available for free? That devalues both. I
enjoy
writing instructions and helping with problems on an e-mail list where I
control what I write and how often and when I look at list mail when I
want.
Sitting Waiting for a phone to ring, being at the call of anyone who
decides
to call at any time for a number of hours a day, is a lot more like work,
at least to me.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: brian

Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 9:59 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I'm dissappointed



Why don't we use trained volunteers who would have to pass a
certification and let them wait by the phone or skype for tech support.
People who are advanced users of nvda could be people who could do this.
This would give blind people who don't have anything to do somthing to do.

Brian Sackrider


On 12/23/2017 2:36 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Hmmm how would one go about doing this.

Firstly you would need some way to handle this.

I guess if it was all done via skype it could be done but I certainly
do not have time to sit round on a waiting for calls on nvda.

For mail ie email we have this list for global support and the tech
lists at least in new zealand do handle nvda questions and issues if
they get posted there.

There is the blind organisation I am in and they have an accessibility
centre of sorts that covers all support I suspose nvda to but who knows.

Its an organisation so like all of them they want you to use jaws but
who knows a lot of that has changed a lot.




On 24/12/2017 8:22 a.m., Rui Fontes wrote:
I think the better solution is each NVDA country community having
some kind of support center, by phone or by mail...

At least in Portugal we serve as a kind of support center for NVDA...
by phone, Skype or mail...

Regards,

Rui Fontes
Tiflotecnia, Lda.


Às 18:55 de 23/12/2017, Shaun Everiss escreveu:
Well nvda does not use a traditional support line, the email list
is support for most part.

I think there is a toll call service in australia that the devs run
which you can buy, all reader groups have a trained tech support
call centre, we have mike and maybe other devs doing support but its
not a full support group.

Being that this is opensource and not payed for like jaws I am not
sure how we can fix this shortfall.

Technically I guess we can have groups on skype and or whats app for
nvda support but you really need someone to pick up that phone and
dial support.

Here is the thing, a number of devs and a few are payed but most of
us are not.

Having used jaws, and dolphin products while I have needed support
for most of my comercial product use its never been that much and
email has been most of it but if I need a responce the phone is
always the best especially if the computer does not work right.




On 24/12/2017 4:43 a.m., susan@... wrote:
I am a teacher of students with visual impairments. One of my
students is learning to use a screen reader and I decided to adopt
NVDA. Tireless hours training have been spent training myself
through videos, websites, youtubes, etc. I started training my
student and implementing it with his school work. We have found
what works one day does not always work the next day. What has been
frustrating is how difficult it is to get tech support for NVDA on
the spot as we sometimes need in the educational setting. We have
very limited hours in a school day to complete our training and
work with students with visual impairments. Their curriculum
extends beyond the core curriculum as we all know and efficiency
with support is critical. I am starting to use JAWS with my student
and it has been seemless and working well. I really want to adopt
NVDA but it has been very frustrating. We teach our students to
brainstorm and contact tech support when needed but NVDA does not
make it easy for our students to do this. Our students are the
future of NVDA as future screen readers. Thoughts?




.


.















Re: Make NVDA speak certain character

Edhoari Setiyoso
 

Hi Tyler,

That did the trick. Thanks

Best Regards

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 3:33 PM, Tyler Spivey wrote:
Hi.
To fix this, you can press NVDA+p to increase your symbol level. Each
higher level includes more characters. Set it to most and the dash
should speak.
If this speaks too many characters you don't want, you can use the
Punctuation/symbol pronunciation dialog to adjust what gets spoken at
each level.

On 1/4/2018 12:14 AM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
FYI

I'm using latest NVDA 2017.4 on Windows 10 x64 (I doubt OS version has
anything to do with this).

To summarize, I want to know how to make NVDA do not skip certain
character while reading a line.

a = b - c

I only hear "a equals b c" from equation above. While it should be "a
equals b minus c".

Best Regards

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 1:54 PM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
Hi,

It's me again :) I still trying to get used with NVDA and could youe
some help

I review a code with Visual Studio Code and can't get NVDA to spell
the "-" operator when I press numpad 8 or up/down arrow keys.
Therefore I have to traverse per character to hear if thera re any
dash character in certain line. Tried with Notepas++ with same result.

It's a arithmetic operator and important for me to have it read
correctly.

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards

Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

 

Well You can apply the patch manually if you know how.

Any gen4 processer and higher should in theory be impacted less but still.

For me, with things, say a game on first start, there will be some lag, a couple seconds or so, nvda is not effected, obviously as the patch gets adjusted things will continue to evolve.

Servers and low grade processers may be the ones with issues, I have an genuine x86 first gen i3 here and that I admit could have issues.

On one of my win10 systems I have I have noticed that things like transfering files, and other things are more jerky and pronounced, I have not tried with skype but you may just have to wait just that tincy bit longer for things to start, there is a noticable lag when things start.

Ofcause it goes without saying that for the newer systems especially those under support, that bios updates to chip firmwars will probably mitigate this even more.

Aparently they knew as early as december, and one of the hps I have has a system upgrade.

For those on win7 and up search for windows 7 or 8 update history, for those  on win10 hit learn more from windows update then the catalog to get that update after you click on the top article.

If you feel comfortable with this then I would strongly recomend you get this if you can.

Why?

The net is going to struggle with a world wide release I am patching all my systems because I can.

Once you have the patches for everything you need put them on a flash drive and update the systems.

Interestingly, win10 has a full cu, win7 and so on have a security only update.

This does suggest though that this rushed patch will be improved as things come on stream.

On 4/01/2018 8:18 p.m., Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
The slow down has to do with kernel mitigations to work around this problem.
Technical: as I noted on another forum (can get very geeky in the end but please bare with me):
One way to speed up programs is doing things beforehand. On hardware, this is called "speculative execution". Basically, computer programs can perform tasks based on a condition (or a set of them). When a program comes across a fork, it can walk down a path based on the condition it is looking for (usually prefixed with the word "if"). Processors can take advantage of this and say, "oh, let me walk down a random path that can lead me to a jackpot so I don't have to come here again." If the processor gambled right, it leads to huge performance boost, because the program can traverse this path without giving a second thought. But what if the chosen path leads to thorn bushes? The process will then say, "oops, I was wrong, so let me retrace my steps and wait for my guest (program) to show me where to go next."
Under some circumstances, when the processor executes the "wrong" path (although it'll think it was right then), the processor will gather the things needed to travel this path. They include next set of instructions and data needed to carry out what it thinks is the "best" match. The thing is, the only thing the processor can understand is 1's and 0's, so it won't care what it will meet down the road, or the fact that it can leak sensitive information (that's the high-level overview of the vulnerability disclosed by Google). In a nutshell, now the processor will be told by its boss (operating system kernel) that it needs to carry some protective gear when traversing conditional paths in order to make sure the processor won't leak sensitive information again (if possible, but it won't work 100 percent of the time), hence the potential performance degradation in some situations.
As for this affecting NVDA's performance, it could, but we won't know the full extent until next week at the earliest once everyone gets the patch.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 10:44 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

Well its for all oses, linux macs maybe even amd cpus, its huge.

We say a 30% slowdown but then no one knows what that means.

Suggestions with games on linux and a few other things running in it suggest that we won't see a problem.

Cloud systems will probably slow down a bit on initial patch.

And every manufacturer is different.

Windows will have a patch next week, mac allready has one about to go, everyone will follow suit from phones to whatnot.

And its not all of a sudden, we are hearing it from the manufacturers now because they are almost ready for this thing to go.

Its complex as hell, but basically the kernal chip has a memmory leak that means people could read data.

Memmory leaks will be fixed going forward but there needs to be a patch reguardless even if the firmwares and such on various chips are patched, most will be if you have a modern pc, I don't though and so for most of us it will be the os alone.

As for slowing nvda down, we can run on slow boxes, I just pitty everything from games to jaws, but then no one knows information is being gleened from articles and such, And we can't do much about it, releases will be done next week and they will be on top of it, theuy have to.

As for it taking 10 years, you do wander, but then let me remind you of the issues with routers, attached storage boxes, and ssl.

Maybe someone saw that coming but maybe they didn't.




On 3/01/2018 11:03 p.m., Antony Stone wrote:
A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do
not get discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm
not so sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and
not borne out by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such
a way that it will have a definite performance penalty. If the
10-year old security flaw were not much of a problem, Microsoft
wouldn't react in a way that unavoidably impacts the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account
via Groups.Io wrote:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any
case. I'm not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know
enough to make such a comment, but if the security hole has been in
the chips for a decade, I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at
any rate I guess all those out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.
If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel
open to action to give everyone new chips!
Brian




Re: Make NVDA speak certain character

Tyler Spivey
 

Hi.
To fix this, you can press NVDA+p to increase your symbol level. Each
higher level includes more characters. Set it to most and the dash
should speak.
If this speaks too many characters you don't want, you can use the
Punctuation/symbol pronunciation dialog to adjust what gets spoken at
each level.

On 1/4/2018 12:14 AM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
FYI

I'm using latest NVDA 2017.4 on Windows 10 x64 (I doubt OS version has
anything to do with this).

To summarize, I want to know how to make NVDA do not skip certain
character while reading a line.

a = b - c

I only hear "a equals b c" from equation above. While it should be "a
equals b minus c".

Best Regards

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 1:54 PM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
Hi,

It's me again :) I still trying to get used with NVDA and could youe
some help

I review a code with Visual Studio Code and can't get NVDA to spell
the "-" operator when I press numpad 8 or up/down arrow keys.
Therefore I have to traverse per character to hear if thera re any
dash character in certain line. Tried with Notepas++ with same result.

It's a arithmetic operator and important for me to have it read
correctly.

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards


Re: Make NVDA speak certain character

Edhoari Setiyoso
 

FYI

I'm using latest NVDA 2017.4 on Windows 10 x64 (I doubt OS version has anything to do with this).

To summarize, I want to know how to make NVDA do not skip certain character while reading a line.

a = b - c

I only hear "a equals b c" from equation above. While it should be "a equals b minus c".

Best Regards

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 1:54 PM, Edhoari Setiyoso wrote:
Hi,

It's me again :) I still trying to get used with NVDA and could youe some help

I review a code with Visual Studio Code and can't get NVDA to spell the "-" operator when I press numpad 8 or up/down arrow keys. Therefore I have to traverse per character to hear if thera re any dash character in certain line. Tried with Notepas++ with same result.

It's a arithmetic operator and important for me to have it read correctly.

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards

Re: IndentNav dev, BrailleExtender stable #AddonRelease#AddonTesting

Devin Prater
 

I'm very excited about the braille extender, but I'll have to wait until NVDA supports the BrailleNote Touch.




On Wed, Jan 3, 2018 at 4:43 PM -0600, "Jason White via Groups.Io" <jason@...> wrote:

There’s a list of features on the Web page given as a link in the announcement.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lino Morales
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 3:13 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] IndentNav dev, BrailleExtender stable #AddonRelease#AddonTesting

 

So what’s the purpose of Extended Braille add-on?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 3:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] IndentNav dev, BrailleExtender stable #AddonRelease#AddonTesting

 

Hi everyone,

 

On behalf of NVDA add-ons community, I’m delighted to welcome two new add-ons toe community add-ons list:

 

  • BraileExtender adds much needed improvements to NVDA’s braille support (stable).
  • * IndentNav is a handy add-on to navigate around documents with indented text more easily, very useful for programmers and others who needs to work with such text often (development testing).

 

Add-on entries:

 

 

Enjoy.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

test

Dennis L
 

 

Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Lino Morales
 

Later in the 2nd quarter. Stay tuned.

On 1/4/2018 1:19 AM, Dennis L wrote:
When will NVDA 2018.1 be released?

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 12:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi,
The situation has improved somewhat in Firefox 58 and later, which NVDA 2018.1 will support (you can still use FF58 with NVDA 2017.4).
Cheers,
oseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edhoari Setiyoso
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com








Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

 

Hi,
The slow down has to do with kernel mitigations to work around this problem.
Technical: as I noted on another forum (can get very geeky in the end but please bare with me):
One way to speed up programs is doing things beforehand. On hardware, this is called "speculative execution". Basically, computer programs can perform tasks based on a condition (or a set of them). When a program comes across a fork, it can walk down a path based on the condition it is looking for (usually prefixed with the word "if"). Processors can take advantage of this and say, "oh, let me walk down a random path that can lead me to a jackpot so I don't have to come here again." If the processor gambled right, it leads to huge performance boost, because the program can traverse this path without giving a second thought. But what if the chosen path leads to thorn bushes? The process will then say, "oops, I was wrong, so let me retrace my steps and wait for my guest (program) to show me where to go next."
Under some circumstances, when the processor executes the "wrong" path (although it'll think it was right then), the processor will gather the things needed to travel this path. They include next set of instructions and data needed to carry out what it thinks is the "best" match. The thing is, the only thing the processor can understand is 1's and 0's, so it won't care what it will meet down the road, or the fact that it can leak sensitive information (that's the high-level overview of the vulnerability disclosed by Google). In a nutshell, now the processor will be told by its boss (operating system kernel) that it needs to carry some protective gear when traversing conditional paths in order to make sure the processor won't leak sensitive information again (if possible, but it won't work 100 percent of the time), hence the potential performance degradation in some situations.
As for this affecting NVDA's performance, it could, but we won't know the full extent until next week at the earliest once everyone gets the patch.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 10:44 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

Well its for all oses, linux macs maybe even amd cpus, its huge.

We say a 30% slowdown but then no one knows what that means.

Suggestions with games on linux and a few other things running in it suggest that we won't see a problem.

Cloud systems will probably slow down a bit on initial patch.

And every manufacturer is different.

Windows will have a patch next week, mac allready has one about to go, everyone will follow suit from phones to whatnot.

And its not all of a sudden, we are hearing it from the manufacturers now because they are almost ready for this thing to go.

Its complex as hell, but basically the kernal chip has a memmory leak that means people could read data.

Memmory leaks will be fixed going forward but there needs to be a patch reguardless even if the firmwares and such on various chips are patched, most will be if you have a modern pc, I don't though and so for most of us it will be the os alone.

As for slowing nvda down, we can run on slow boxes, I just pitty everything from games to jaws, but then no one knows information is being gleened from articles and such, And we can't do much about it, releases will be done next week and they will be on top of it, theuy have to.

As for it taking 10 years, you do wander, but then let me remind you of the issues with routers, attached storage boxes, and ssl.

Maybe someone saw that coming but maybe they didn't.




On 3/01/2018 11:03 p.m., Antony Stone wrote:
A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do
not get discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm
not so sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and
not borne out by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such
a way that it will have a definite performance penalty. If the
10-year old security flaw were not much of a problem, Microsoft
wouldn't react in a way that unavoidably impacts the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account
via Groups.Io wrote:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any
case. I'm not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know
enough to make such a comment, but if the security hole has been in
the chips for a decade, I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at
any rate I guess all those out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.
If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel
open to action to give everyone new chips!
Brian

Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

probably sometime in February.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis L
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 10:19 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

When will NVDA 2018.1 be released?

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 12:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi,
The situation has improved somewhat in Firefox 58 and later, which NVDA 2018.1 will support (you can still use FF58 with NVDA 2017.4).
Cheers,
oseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edhoari Setiyoso
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

Make NVDA speak certain character

Edhoari Setiyoso
 

Hi,

It's me again :) I still trying to get used with NVDA and could youe some help

I review a code with Visual Studio Code and can't get NVDA to spell the "-" operator when I press numpad 8 or up/down arrow keys. Therefore I have to traverse per character to hear if thera re any dash character in certain line. Tried with Notepas++ with same result.

It's a arithmetic operator and important for me to have it read correctly.

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

 

Who knows, its even hitting the i8 series, they do say anything 4th gen and over may be less effected which means me and a few in my family with 3rd generations will be out of luck.

It does make me wander though they descover this now even on mac, maybe have been incubating a fix, just like y2k for ages before and I have used my system for well everything.

Ofcause the issue is once its out, people will try to exploit it.

On 4/01/2018 4:00 a.m., Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
It just seems odd that we have if you believe all this lived with this for a decade and I'd have thought there was now a bit of the shutting the stable door when all the horses have gone about trying to retro patch it I understand the biggest losers could be the big server companies who might be using Intel chipped hardware, and hence need things sorting out.
So Maybe I should get my claim for a new processor in tomorrow to be in time....:-)

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?


I do not suspect ulterior motives on Microsoft's part in this case, because
the Linux kernel is being patched in just the same way for just the same
reason.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 11:17:37, Brian's Mail list account via
Groups.Io wrote:

Oh really, well, I'm not so sure. It feeds into the mindset that says
Microsofts eventual aim is to lock people in to getting software from its
store and nowhere else in the 'interests' of security, when in reality they
want to do what Apple is doing, create an ecosystem and make it hard for
third parties to just allow their software to run on a system.
 Whether you suspect ulterior motives or not is your  choice.

Brian

----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2018 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed
for nvda?

A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do
not
get discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade,
I'm > not
so sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and not
borne out by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such
a way
that it will have a definite performance penalty.  If the 10-year old
security flaw were not much of a problem, Microsoft wouldn't react
in a > way
that unavoidably impacts the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list
account via

Groups.Io wrote:
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any
case.
I'm not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know enough
to >> make
such a comment, but if the security hole has been in the chips for a
decade, I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at any rate I
guess
all those out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.

  If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel
open >> to
  action to give everyone new chips!

  Brian
--
When you find yourself arguing with an idiot,
you should first of all make sure that the other person isn't doing the same
thing.

                                                  Please reply to the list;
                                                        please *don't* CC me.




.

Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Edhoari Setiyoso
 

Hi,

Fallback to FF version 53 seems do the trick. Will try update to latest version just before Quantum

Thanks for your help

Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com

On 04-Jan-18 12:49 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
Hi,
The situation has improved somewhat in Firefox 58 and later, which NVDA 2018.1 will support (you can still use FF58 with NVDA 2017.4).
Cheers,
oseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edhoari Setiyoso
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com





Re: Will this patch to windows for Intel chips impact speed for nvda?

 

Well its for all oses, linux macs maybe even amd cpus, its huge.

We say a 30% slowdown but then no one knows what that means.

Suggestions with games on linux and a few other things running in it suggest that we won't see a problem.

Cloud systems will probably slow down a bit on initial patch.

And every manufacturer is different.

Windows will have a patch next week, mac allready has one about to go, everyone will follow suit from phones to whatnot.

And its not all of a sudden, we are hearing it from the manufacturers now because they are almost ready for this thing to go.

Its complex as hell, but basically the kernal chip has a memmory leak that means people could read data.

Memmory leaks will be fixed going forward but there needs to be a patch reguardless even if the firmwares and such on various chips are patched, most will be if you have a modern pc, I don't though and so for most of us it will be the os alone.

As for slowing nvda down, we can run on slow boxes, I just pitty everything from games to jaws, but then no one knows information is being gleened from articles and such, And we can't do much about it, releases will be done next week and they will be on top of it, theuy have to.

As for it taking 10 years, you do wander, but then let me remind you of the issues with routers, attached storage boxes, and ssl.

Maybe someone saw that coming but maybe they didn't.

On 3/01/2018 11:03 p.m., Antony Stone wrote:
A large number of security flaws (in both software and hardware) do not get
discovered for a long time after they crept into the design.

I think "if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade, I'm not so
sure its that much of an issue" is a dangerous assumption, and not borne out
by Microsoft's sudden activity to patch Windows in such a way that it will
have a definite performance penalty. If the 10-year old security flaw were not
much of a problem, Microsoft wouldn't react in a way that unavoidably impacts
the majority of Windows users.


Antony.

On Wednesday 03 January 2018 at 10:52:15, Brian's Mail list account via
Groups.Io wrote:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/

I hope that link works, but its easy to find on that site in any case. I'm
not saying this sounds like paranoia, as I do not know enough to make such
a comment, but if the security hole has been in the chips for a decade,
I'm not so sure its that much of an issue. at any rate I guess all those
out there with AMD chips will be chortling loudly.
If its a fault in the chip this seems that it could leave Intel open to
action to give everyone new chips!
Brian

Re: Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Dennis L
 

When will NVDA 2018.1 be released?

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, January 4, 2018 12:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi,
The situation has improved somewhat in Firefox 58 and later, which NVDA 2018.1 will support (you can still use FF58 with NVDA 2017.4).
Cheers,
oseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Edhoari Setiyoso
Sent: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Latest Firefox is extremely slow

Hi All,

I tried Firefox for couple of weeks now and it feels so sluggish. I think it began with Firefox Quantum, Unfortunately the solution that I found in the mozilla forum is to prevent access for accessibility, effectively rendering it useless with NVDA. Does anyone here has another solution?

Best Regards

--
Edhoari Setiyoso
edhoari <dot> s [at] gmail <dot> com