Date   

Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Sarah k Alawami
 

I don’t use the key strokes. I lost the guide someone kindly sent. I just tab to the wend media and files button same as on the mac and whack it.

Take care

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:47 PM, John Isige <gwynn@tds.net> wrote:

Have you gotten sending files to work in Skype on Windows 10? If so, how? I'm fairly sure the keystroke is supposed to be shift-ctrl-f to send a file but I've never gotten it to work, it does something else instead, can't recall what at the moment and I'm not on the machine running it to check.



Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Steve Nutt
 

Hi Sean,

I like Chrome, so therefore, I like hangouts. I'd rather have Chrome than Edge any day.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and others and who knows.

I like my pc though.




On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled with it, but never adopted it for regular use: Why is this such an issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible. It will also be interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel




Re: New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

 

Hi,
Well, we had significant changes on Win10, anyway I still recomend you update it.
Why? Well, the question isn't exactly this but you should wonder "why not?".
When you update something you have the newest version of that thing, what means to say you're supposed to have the best experience with this.
But backing to Win10, despite the changes I mentioned, you can still use it perfectly without much problems, I guess.
It's just a matter of time and a bit of your heffort and it'll be alright.

About Edge, personaly I don't use it, that's not my way browser, you know what I mean?
So, remember that you, like me, always can use a different browser, such as Firefox, Chrome or another you'd like.

Well I guess I wrote more than I should, so I'll stop here.
I hope you consider updating your system, surely it'll be the best you'll do.

P.S.: Let me sorry for my English and if there's something wrong, I'm just a brazilian guy trying to learn and practice it :)

Em 16/07/2018 15:43, Rob DeZonia escreveu:

Howdy list,
 
I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I doubt you  ever will.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claire Potter
Sent: 16 July 2018 22:27
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

Hi Steve, I guess the big question now is when will we be able to access Google TS for NVDA? It would be a brilliant synth!  

Warm regards, Claire Potter,   Check out my brand new website: www.pottersplace.me.uk


On 16 Jul 2018, at 22:23, Steve Nutt <steve@...> wrote:

Actually, Eloquence is beaten now for best pronunciation, by a synth that is not on Windows.  Google TTS beats Eloquence hands down for pronunciation.  I can’t find anything in the dictionary that it pronounces wrong, but I can with Eloquence.  For example, Samhain, a Pagan festival is pronounced Sowan with a hard OW as in Cow, Eloquence completely mangles that and pronounces it Samhain as spelled.

 

Google One, Eloquence definitely Nil.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 16 July 2018 17:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer. 

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers
on/

Regards











Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

Shaun,

           Have you tried hangouts.google.com in the web browser of your choice?  Some seem to "play better" with the Hangouts webpage than others do.

           I most commonly use the Chrome App, but I have used the Hangouts webpage, too.  Of course, you do have to acquire a Google Voice number (which is available at no cost only in the USA and Canada) in order for Hangouts to act like a typical phone line does.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Is NVDA colourblind?

Gene
 

I'll think about your response and I may have comments on it.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:40 PM, Gene wrote:
Pictures representing ideas or objects is not at all the same as symbols representing sounds that are combined to form words.  A picture of a fish representing the ocean is completely different than a symbolic method of writing the sounds in a language that make up the word "ocean."
Only if you're worried about the method, not the concept that is communicated itself.

There are many written (as in with letters) forms of the word, "ocean," but it is not the arbitrary representation of the concept that is the important part.  Even pictographic languages such as hieroglyphics had exact spoken equivalents for the glyphs.

Language is a symbol system to carry human communicative content.   Sign language is every bit as much a language as any other yet has no written component (and, believe me, many have tried to think of one that would work).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

Gene
 

Are there features you want or apps you want to run that you can't run now?  If you have a reason to upgrade such as that, you may want to.  If you are more curious and have no strong reason to do so, I have real reservations about whether its worth upgrading a computer you are satisfied with. 
 
You may find some problem or annoyance you really don't want to deal with and you may not be happy if you upgrade just to upgrade and have one or more annoying problems, even if you solve them.  And Windows 10 comes out with a major upgrade every six months, which you must accept.  Some people have problems after an upgrade.
 
You might want to consider getting a tablet to play with Windows 10 if you are just getting it out of curiosity and not because of features or apps you consider important.
 
Gene

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:43 PM
Subject: [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

Howdy list,
 
I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.


Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

I am not exactly happy with leaving skype, since skype has been something I have had to use on and off, however while there was a potential time that I may have had to use skype, fact is there for business it never happened that way.

Hangouts needs chrome, I would really like a stand alone client if I could have that.

I have not decided but I may try to learn the new skype, however a lot of family use whats app on a newer mobile device and there is also skype and others and who knows.

I like my pc though.

On 7/17/2018 9:25 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled with it, but never adopted it for regular use:   Why is this such an issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible.  It will also be interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

Steve Nutt
 

I know and I just got the update. It's pretty horrible.

All the best

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:29
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/163337/micr
osoft-killing-skype-classic-september-1


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Steve Nutt
 

How amusing.  You can listen at 130 percent, and yet you missed the fact that you misspelled Practice as Parctice?

 

I don’t believe blind people listen all that well at high speeds, as proven here.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:18
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I can if I want to listen on my mac at 130 percent, or I used to anyway. That helped me get a lot of things done but it takes parctice. I don’t go 1 percent at a time thoughI try 5 at a time or so if I can handle it.

 

Take care



On Jul 16, 2018, at 9:20 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer.  

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers.  

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <
acsociopath@...>
To: <
nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular 
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial 
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I 
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at 
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in 
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move 
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It 
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you 
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a 
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there 
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers 
on/

Regards










 


Re: Is NVDA colourblind?

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

This is just another case of blind people crying because language doesn’t suit what they want.  We should try to adapt to the real world, rather than complain about language which evolves.

 

So often do I hear on Facebook for example that blind people whinge because sighted people don’t describe images they post on Facebook, and Facebook doesn’t always have alt text for them.

 

Well there are plenty of tools on iOS and Android to tell us roughly what those pictures are.

 

When blind people didn’t know they existed, they didn’t cry about it, now suddenly, because they know an image is there, they complain that all sighted people should write up their images.

 

In this case, my sympathies are with the sighted people, and we come across as a load of moaners.

 

And yes, I am totally blind.

 

Back to Emoji, if you don’t like them, turn them off.

 

End of rant.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

Well, there was a time when using icons/glyphs in an attempt to create a "universal language" for things like road signs was accompanied for quite a few years with a small "label" for lack of a better word beneath it in the local language saying what it meant.  The same thing was true, but to a far lesser extent, on keyboards.  Those attempts have, by and large, met with great success.

On electronic devices, however, the convention of presenting icons and text as the default has really fallen by the wayside.  The first thing I do when setting up a device for myself is to make sure that icons and text, not just icons, are presented.   No one can possibly keep in mind what all the various icons mean, particularly for functions you might touch once every 10 years, if that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Claire Potter <claire.potter99@...>
 

Hi Steve, I guess the big question now is when will we be able to access Google TS for NVDA? It would be a brilliant synth!  

Warm regards, Claire Potter,   Check out my brand new website: www.pottersplace.me.uk

On 16 Jul 2018, at 22:23, Steve Nutt <steve@...> wrote:

Actually, Eloquence is beaten now for best pronunciation, by a synth that is not on Windows.  Google TTS beats Eloquence hands down for pronunciation.  I can’t find anything in the dictionary that it pronounces wrong, but I can with Eloquence.  For example, Samhain, a Pagan festival is pronounced Sowan with a hard OW as in Cow, Eloquence completely mangles that and pronounces it Samhain as spelled.

 

Google One, Eloquence definitely Nil.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 16 July 2018 17:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer. 

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers
on/

Regards










Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

This is a serious question from someone who is aware of Skype, and dabbled with it, but never adopted it for regular use:   Why is this such an issue?

It doesn't just seem to me, but it's been confirmed here, that there are many alternatives to Skype many of which are accessible.  It will also be interesting to see what UI interface changes occur, particularly with regard to accessibility, with Skype 8.0.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Re: Admin. Important. On promoting illegal software

Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 


Perhaps you mean illegally obtained software rather than illegal software?
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:34 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Admin. Important. On promoting illegal software

The problem with that position is that the current illegal copy wasn’t made legally in the first place. Sure, it uses Eloquence libraries, but Nuance isn’t selling Eloquence themselves. Yes, there is a legal copy, and sure maybe the use of the illegal version may hurt their sales, but those who use the illegal add-on aren’t pirating a legal add-on, they’re pirating the Eloquence DLL’s and libraries. Technical, yes, but it’s a distinction I feel must be taken into account. I’m not saying that it is right to use the add-on, even if Nuance doesn’t sell Eloquence to end-users, and barely makes anything with the licenses, which I think must be pretty strict owing to the DRM on PC and Android.

On Jul 16, 2018, at 1:03 PM, ely.r@... wrote:

Gene, ,

No, I fully understand the list position. The issue is theft.

However when it comes to software, it is easy to convince one’s self that it doesn’t really hurt anyone as they will never know. Sorry if this sounds pretentious , but I have been and friends have been on the opposite side of this issue, and it can make a real difference for a developer who puts in enormous time creating software and knowing that a percent of copies are simply Pirated.

Rick

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:45 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Admin. Important. On promoting illegal software

The question isn't whether NVDA has adequate selection of synthesizers nor whether it is free.  The question is whether the list should be exposed to legal liability by the promotion of any kind of illegal software. 

If someone promoted illegal software to perform OCR, the same restriction would apply or to an illegal word processing program.

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: ely.r@...

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:32 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Admin. Important. On promoting illegal software

Gene

Thanks for this post. I have been wondering over the last few days what the position of the list owner would be on supporting the illegal piracy of software. NVDA comes free to those who cannot afford the cost of a screen reader. NVDA has a more than adequate selection of synthesizers as part of its install. Our visual conditions, whatever they may be, do not include an exemption for theft.

Again thanks for your reminder,

Rick  

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Admin. Important. On promoting illegal software

I'm sending this as an administrative message along with sending it in the thread where this problem is currently occurring.  I have slightly expanded this message with another explanatory comment.

I've stated before, as much as two or three days ago, that promoting illegal software is not, I emphatically repeat not, allowed on list.  This is not my policy.  It is the policy of the list owner and it is standard policy on a lot of lists.  Gratuitously mentioning and impliedly recommending illegal software is not allowed. 

If someone wants to express a general opinion about when it is ethically acceptable to use illegal software, as I understand list policy, that is allowed.  Promoting or discussing specific programs is not. 

I support this list policy.  It doesn't matter what my personal feelings are about when and if it is justifiable to use illegal software as an ethical question.  As moderator, I am responsible for enforcing list policy.  The policy is in place not because of the views of those who run the list on the the question.  It is in place because promoting illegal software exposes the list to legal liability.  If people continue to disregard my warnings on this subject, they will be moderated temporarily.  I'm sorry to have to send this kind of stern message.  I moderate with a lite toch whenever possible.  But it's time for such discussions and implied endorsements to stop.

Gene, Moderator




Re: Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Steve Nutt
 

Actually, Eloquence is beaten now for best pronunciation, by a synth that is not on Windows.  Google TTS beats Eloquence hands down for pronunciation.  I can’t find anything in the dictionary that it pronounces wrong, but I can with Eloquence.  For example, Samhain, a Pagan festival is pronounced Sowan with a hard OW as in Cow, Eloquence completely mangles that and pronounces it Samhain as spelled.

 

Google One, Eloquence definitely Nil.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: 16 July 2018 17:21
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

What you listen to makes a difference, headphones allow for faster listening with fewer words missed at the same fast speed.  But the most important thing is what synthesizer you use.  I don't know about all the newer synthesizers so I don't know if any are as good at fast speeds as Eloquence.  In general, they aren't.  Eloquence is, in my sampling of synthesizers, the easiest to understand at fast speeds, 350, 400 or more words per minute.  It pronounces more words correctly without correcting with a speech dictionary.  The voice sounds annoying when listening at a normal rate.  It sounds raspy.  This raspiness is significantly reduced when listening at a fast rate and I don't find it bothersome.  Perhaps at first, it might be and I might have found it so.  But I quickly got used to it.  At times, for pleasure reading of long sections of text, a book, a very long article, I use a different voice such as the Dectalk synthesizer. 

 

But how anyone can stand most of the newer synthesizers is beyond my comprehension.  They slur words when joining them, leave off certain sounds when joining words, pause at unnatural times, use unnatural inflections, and I don't recall if I've left anything out.  these newer synthesizers work by sampling a specific person saying thousands or more words.  Then the synthesizer joins these actually spoken words together into speech.  They can produce words out of phonemes of the sampled voice as well but much of their speech is playing prerecorded words in the right order.  Think of how you would speak if you had prerecorded words in your brain and you spoke by a system combining prerecorded words.  Inflections would be wrong, words wouldn't be joined properly, in short, you would sound like these newer kind of synthesizers. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:23 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

 

I have found that what I am listening to makes a difference too.
If it is too fast, and there is a great deal of specifics to analyze, the information may need to be read at a slower speed.  If it is more conversational like, then a higher speed works because we can mentally predict the flow of the writing.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 2:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers

Unfortunately I think it depends on the person. I know people who regularly read so fast I simply cannot understand it. I also find that it gives me a headache if I set it too fast.
 I imagine it depends on the person, what their first language is and if they are listening in it and also the actual voice and synth in use.
 I never get anywhere near 95, but then I have no pressing need to most times.

I do find the more artifical voices better at spead than the so called human sounding ones probably due to the  whay certain sylables aare handled.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 10:22 AM
Subject: [nvda] Tips for speed reading /listening with screen readers


Hello season users of screen readers!
Advice me on this. I'm a student and require to read large texts on regular
basis. Although, this is something I love doing, it would be very beneficial
if I could improve my reading, or shall I say listening speed, with NVDA. I
would like to retain the same level of comprehension I have right now at
higher speeds. I have gradually moved up my way to 95% without boost in
NVDA, so I know it could be done. But, I'm finding it difficult to move
forward. Also, beyond 95% and in boost mode Espeak MAx starts to flutter. It
is still very comprehensible, but the fluttering voice is annoying. Can you
guys suggest me ways to upgrade my listening game? Do I need to switch to a
different variant voice of Espeak or shall I change my synthesizer? Is there
a cap to how fast can we listen?
All suggestions are welcome!
Also let me know at what speed rates do you guys read your screen readers
on/

Regards










Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

 

All my systems are for gaming mainly I mean windows games I have a lot.

But to be honest, that is a point, I mean skype is in linux, I havn't really bothered with it as such, but yeah that may end up being me to, I just have to much invested in linux to really say I can leave just like that.

On 7/17/2018 9:09 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
I use Linux with Orca for a screenreader, using Voxin for the speech engine, it is Eloquence by another name.
When Windows 8 is no longer supported, I may go totally Linux.
I mainly use the Windows computer for eMail, on-line research, and on-line purchases, and listening to audio.
I like Linux for drive partitioning and data recovery and the like at this point, but maybe it will become my main OS in the future.
Linux has all these VOIP utilities as well.

Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

As for win10, win10 is what it is.

I'd like nothing better than to stay with it, but I can't stay with 7 for ever.

And ms is making it harder to even stay with 7 anyway, the fact is a lot of the ms account services, music, then skype well they are gone now.

I may try to learn the accessibility in the win10 universal, then again, I am seriously on the hunt for another voip solution, maybe a client for skype web or is there something completely sepperate.

I don't need skype right now its just a real pain is all.

I would learn the new skype 8, but I may as well try to learn skype universal on win10.




On 7/17/2018 7:59 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Personally, I am still using 7, and soon I will purchase a Windows 8 upgrade, and I will wait until the end of Windows 7’s life cycle.
Then I will do the same with 8.
I have tried 10, and don’t much like it.
But it is what it is.
Glenn


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob DeZonia
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:44 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] [nvda] New to list, newbie question, everything new starts here I guess

Howdy list,

I am running Windows 7. Lately I'm starting to feel like the guy running XP when there's a better option available. I remember when Windows 10 first came out NVDA advised not upgrading yet. I realize that was many Windows 10 updates and a few NVDA releases ago. My question is, since you are all it seems experienced users, should I take the plunge finally? How steep is the learning curve on Windows 10, and is Edge workable with NVDA? Also I'm curious about apps since I've never tried Windows 8.1 either.
Thanks for your help and your attention.







Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

Hmmm, can you download hangouts?

I have leard about it, as for skype, if they would just improve it then well.

Cooblindtech use hangouts for podcasting and its not to bad.

On 7/17/2018 8:37 AM, Elshara Silverheart wrote:
Google Hangouts works it's more choppy at times then Skype but much
better sounding and has propper echo cancelation. I've already
switched. RIP Pre Microbloat Skype.

On 7/16/18, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@gmail.com> wrote:
Yes you can transfer files. It is called i think send files and media. I
do’t need high quality sound to do my job. As long as I can understand my
students, I’m good.

On Jul 16, 2018, at 12:14 PM, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
wrote:

I think that one important feature is to have file transferring
available.
Glenn

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 2:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I'm really not sure why everyone is hating on skype. Stereo audio is great
and all in recordings. When talking, it's just a frustrating distraction.
I just want to talk.



Team talk is nice, but who in the sighted world uses it? Nobody that I
know of, so that's a serious limitation for me.



Think skype is bad for screen readers? Try out discord. Tons of unlabeled
buttons.

Speaking of audio issues. Team talk has horrific issues if one is using
speakers and soundcard does not support echo cancelation or noise
suppression, both of which make the audio quality deteriorate so bad you
might as well use another service and save your bandwidth, too. For
talking, skype handles it wonderfully in comparison and also does a ton
better if your internet isn't the greatest.



It is still the king of multi platform, mainstream, and screen reader
accessible voice communication. Google is kind of there but I know very
few who use it. Team speak is really nice too, supports stereo audio and
blows the doors off team talk every which way. I know a few people who use
it, but not many. I think whatsapp also supports voice calling. I have
never tried it before but would be curious if you could be in calls on the
web.



Just my thoughts, for what it's worth.




On 16-Jul-2018 1:38 PM, Lino Morales wrote:
The audio quality is crap. TeamTalk is better for what you want to do.



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows 10



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Joshua
Hendrickson<louvins@gmail.com> <mailto:louvins@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 2:36:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I'm not exactly a fan of the new version of skype. If I can figure
out how to invite multiple people to a skype call, that would be
great. However, I can use this new version of skype ok. Granted, I
don't like it as well as 7.4, but I can use it.

On 7/16/18, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
<mailto:glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>wrote:
What ever happened to Microsoft Net Meeting?
I used to use that on days of dial-up and Windows 98.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eleni
Vamvakari
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I used GW Connect for a while, but now, even the patch doesn't seem to
work.
I installed it on one of my machines a few nights ago, but it wouldn't
even
let me see my contacts. This is truly sad, as it was great software.
I
don't know why Microsoft is forcing everyone to use their software,
especially when it's not even fully accessible!
Usually, I use S Portable, which is a portable version of regular Skype
7 if
I remember correctly. Granted, I don't really like the interface there
either, especially as I have to use Task Manager to close the program,
but
at least it's better than the one that my friend has on his laptop! I
tried
it and got a headache! Here is the link to S Portable.

https://portableapps.com/apps/internet/sportable
<https://portableapps.com/apps/internet/sportable>

Personally, I liked MSN/Windows Live Messenger better than all of the
above,
as it was simple, fast, and in its earlier days, didn't include all
sorts of
unnecessary features! Now, I must find an accessible alternative to
Skype.
*sigh*

All the best,
Eleni

On 16/07/2018, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
<mailto:glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>wrote:
Does anyone here still use GW Connect?
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k
Alawami
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:29 PM
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io> <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/16333
<https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/16333>
7/microsoft-killing-skype-classic-september-1





--
Facebook: elvam2167@gmail.com <mailto:elvam2167@gmail.com>

anyaudio.net <http://anyaudio.net/>: elvam2167

Skype: elvam2167






--
Joshua Hendrickson

Joshua Hendrickson







Re: Is NVDA colourblind?

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

It isn’t the screen reader at all, it’s the synth.  Eloquence says it from Code Factory as well.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: 16 July 2018 16:32
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Jaws says that too.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 3:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one,
️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, , as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I
NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


Re: Jeff's addon repository

JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Sure, Eloquence is great, and I would happily use it with NVDA. But what do you mean about NVDA" "open sourcing" Eloquence? NVDA does not own the rights to Eloquence.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elshara Silverheart
Sent: July 16, 2018 4:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Jeff's addon repository

Eloquence is king for me. I never had any problem with any addons posted to Jeffs nvda list or grossgang for that matter. What do you think about NVDA open sourcing eloquence? I think NVDA should only use open sourced add ons. This way NVDA can never get into a legal dispute. Free and open source as a requirement.

On 7/16/18, Brice Mijares <bricemijares@att.net> wrote:
I prefer one core voices.

On 7/16/2018 9:08 AM, erik burggraaf wrote:
I believe jeff's repository has add-ons for both.� I use the
software dektalk access 32 add-on myself which I download from
there.� I neither

know, nor care what it's licencing may be.� It works which is more
than

can be said for some of the paid commercial synthesizer add-ons for NVDA.

Enjoy,

On July 16, 2018 10:53:59 AM "Ervin, Glenn"
<glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
wrote:

I wonder if the dectalk one is the access32, a software dectalk.

Glenn

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Gene
*Sent:* Friday, July 13, 2018 3:45 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Jeff's addon repository

Your message may have the effect of discouraging use of add ons that
are, as far as I know, legal and probably work.� The kind of
notice you are discussing about requiring a synthesizer is for add
ons like the Dectalk Express add on.� That add on allows the
Dectalk Express to

work with NVDA.� You are told in the information for that Add On
that you need the Dectalk Express to use it.� The DecTalk Express
is an external synthesizer. So of course you need the synthesizer.

I believe there is an add on that allows the Double Talk synthesizer
to work as well.� I assume the same warning is given because that
is an external synthesizer.

I'm not generalizing in any way about what add ons are current and
which ones may or may not work with Windows 10, for example and, of
course, NVDA is going to be changing over time and many add ons on
that page may not work with new versions of NVDA in the relatively
near future.� But we need to be clear about synthesizer add ons.
Those that talk about needing a synthesizer are, as I recall the
page, for those that work with external synthesizers.

Gene

----- Original Message -----

*From:*Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<mailto:bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io>

*Sent:*Friday, July 13, 2018 3:32 PM

*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

*Subject:*Re: [nvda] Jeff's addon repository

I have not looked lately to know what this add on is, but it used to
actually say that it would only work on machines where a free to use
version of the synth was installed. This would indicate to me that
its either Via Voice or a very old copy� used with Jaws
prehistoric versions!

If the add on is very old it may not even work on newer versions of
nvda in any case. I think the site does hove abandoned and older
versions of all sorts of bits and pieces and really any of them are
truly at the users own risk. we here cannot condone their use as we
have no idea where a lot of them come from.
�Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk <mailto:bglists@blueyonder.co.uk> Sent via
blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk <mailto:briang1@blueyonder.co.uk>, putting
'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com <mailto:gsasner@ripco.com>>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 9:21 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Jeff's addon repository


That isn't a legal add on.� Eloquence can be purchased legally.�
There is a
SAPI5 version that can work with any program that supports SAPI5
speech and there is a legal add on that can be purchased.� The add
on, however, has very poor speech because the Eloquence speech has a
lot of artifacts.
The
SAPI 5 version doesn't have these artifacts.

There are demos of both Eloquence speech programs available so you
can try them.

But regarding your original question, the list doesn't offer support
on illegal software as a matter of list policy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Sociohack AC
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 3:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Jeff's addon repository


Hi!
I'm new to all this. Somebody suggested to use eloquence addon for NVDA.
It's available on this website called, Jeff's Repository. Is is�
safe to download from there?

--
Regards,
Sociohack







Re: Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

 

Google Hangouts works it's more choppy at times then Skype but much
better sounding and has propper echo cancelation. I've already
switched. RIP Pre Microbloat Skype.

On 7/16/18, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@gmail.com> wrote:
Yes you can transfer files. It is called i think send files and media. I
do’t need high quality sound to do my job. As long as I can understand my
students, I’m good.

On Jul 16, 2018, at 12:14 PM, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
wrote:

I think that one important feature is to have file transferring
available.
Glenn

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Tyler Wood
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 2:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I'm really not sure why everyone is hating on skype. Stereo audio is great
and all in recordings. When talking, it's just a frustrating distraction.
I just want to talk.



Team talk is nice, but who in the sighted world uses it? Nobody that I
know of, so that's a serious limitation for me.



Think skype is bad for screen readers? Try out discord. Tons of unlabeled
buttons.

Speaking of audio issues. Team talk has horrific issues if one is using
speakers and soundcard does not support echo cancelation or noise
suppression, both of which make the audio quality deteriorate so bad you
might as well use another service and save your bandwidth, too. For
talking, skype handles it wonderfully in comparison and also does a ton
better if your internet isn't the greatest.



It is still the king of multi platform, mainstream, and screen reader
accessible voice communication. Google is kind of there but I know very
few who use it. Team speak is really nice too, supports stereo audio and
blows the doors off team talk every which way. I know a few people who use
it, but not many. I think whatsapp also supports voice calling. I have
never tried it before but would be curious if you could be in calls on the
web.



Just my thoughts, for what it's worth.




On 16-Jul-2018 1:38 PM, Lino Morales wrote:
The audio quality is crap. TeamTalk is better for what you want to do.



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows 10



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Joshua
Hendrickson<louvins@gmail.com> <mailto:louvins@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 2:36:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I'm not exactly a fan of the new version of skype. If I can figure
out how to invite multiple people to a skype call, that would be
great. However, I can use this new version of skype ok. Granted, I
don't like it as well as 7.4, but I can use it.

On 7/16/18, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
<mailto:glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>wrote:
What ever happened to Microsoft Net Meeting?
I used to use that on days of dial-up and Windows 98.
Glenn


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eleni
Vamvakari
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 1:03 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

I used GW Connect for a while, but now, even the patch doesn't seem to
work.
I installed it on one of my machines a few nights ago, but it wouldn't
even
let me see my contacts. This is truly sad, as it was great software.
I
don't know why Microsoft is forcing everyone to use their software,
especially when it's not even fully accessible!
Usually, I use S Portable, which is a portable version of regular Skype
7 if
I remember correctly. Granted, I don't really like the interface there
either, especially as I have to use Task Manager to close the program,
but
at least it's better than the one that my friend has on his laptop! I
tried
it and got a headache! Here is the link to S Portable.

https://portableapps.com/apps/internet/sportable
<https://portableapps.com/apps/internet/sportable>

Personally, I liked MSN/Windows Live Messenger better than all of the
above,
as it was simple, fast, and in its earlier days, didn't include all
sorts of
unnecessary features! Now, I must find an accessible alternative to
Skype.
*sigh*

All the best,
Eleni

On 16/07/2018, Ervin, Glenn <glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>
<mailto:glenn.ervin@nebraska.gov>wrote:
Does anyone here still use GW Connect?
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io><nvda@nvda.groups.io>
<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sarah k
Alawami
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:29 PM
To: Nvda List <nvda@nvda.groups.io> <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Microsoft is Killing Skype Classic on September 1 -

https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/16333
<https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/skype/16333>
7/microsoft-killing-skype-classic-september-1






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Joshua Hendrickson