Date   

Re: LibreOffice and NVDA

 

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=format+numbers+LibreOffice+Calc 


Formatting number of digits in LibreOffice Calc, MS Excel ... 
      (one can always use the Decimal Places field under options, ticking the number up to whatever you need, too)

Custom Number Format Basics - LibreOffice Calc ...
       (this one covers very "non general" cases where you want to customize all sorts of things about how a number may be presented, including but not limited to having custom text, e.g. "miles," or "quarterly," trailing it.)

Calc: Customize 'General' number format ... - Ask LibreOffice
        (this one gets into customizing the Calc blank spreadsheet template if you want your general number format to constantly be something other than what it defaults to, which is stripped of leading zeros and trailing zero decimals)


--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: LibreOffice and NVDA

Chris Mullins
 

Hi

I have been using Libra Office for about 6 months and am not an intensive user as all I need it for are a few letters and spreadsheets.  I can get by with it, I have the occasional crash which I have never been able to establish a reason for but my most annoying problem is that I cannot find how to format numbers in Calc, the Libra equivalent of Excel as I can’t stop it from truncating trailing zeroes in decimal numbers.

 

Cheers

Chris    

 

From: UMIT ERDEM Yigitoglu
Sent: 10 December 2020 17:32
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] libraoffice and nvda

 

Hello,
I just got a new labtop andnaturally lost my office programs. I don't want to use a piret program and can not efford the prise. have any of you used libraoffice instead of michrosopht? what is your experience with it? 

 


Re: LibreOffice and NVDA

 

LibreOffice is a frequently recommended alternative to Microsoft Office.  It is very actively supported and is accessible.  It can handle all MS-Office file formats and can, if you so choose, be set up to save in those formats by default rather than using the equivalent open document file formats.  Word, or at least any recent versions, is capable of opening Open Document Template (.odt) files, and I'd have to believe that the equivalents for the other office suite programs can open their counterparts as well.

Like any change, it takes a bit of time to get used to the LibreOffice way of doing things.  But it's not anywhere near impossible, just the standard and annoying learning curve.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


LibreOffice and NVDA

UMIT ERDEM Yigitoglu
 

Hello,
I just got a new labtop andnaturally lost my office programs. I don't want to use a piret program and can not efford the prise. have any of you used libraoffice instead of michrosopht? what is your experience with it? 


Re: TWBlue no longer outputting to NVDA, help

Sarah k Alawami
 

Have you deployed the method for scanning windows and repairing any errors that might be on the drive? Find out more here

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Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

Check out my adventures with a shadow machine.

to subscribe to the feed click here and you can also follow us on twitter

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Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 10 Dec 2020, at 9:13, Joshua Tubbs wrote:

Hello everyone,

My computer restarted overnight, and I wake up to find that TWBlue is
no longer sending information to NVDA. Windows Update says I'm up to
date, and there's no indication in the action center that any updates
were performed.

Whatever the case, the invisible interface of TWBlue no longer works.
I hear the ready sound when it is done loading buffers, but no "ready"
string from NVDA.

What can I try to fix this?


TWBlue no longer outputting to NVDA, help

Joshua Tubbs
 

Hello everyone,

My computer restarted overnight, and I wake up to find that TWBlue is
no longer sending information to NVDA. Windows Update says I'm up to
date, and there's no indication in the action center that any updates
were performed.

Whatever the case, the invisible interface of TWBlue no longer works.
I hear the ready sound when it is done loading buffers, but no "ready"
string from NVDA.

What can I try to fix this?


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

JM Casey
 

Hey Bob.
Clearly there is something wrong with System Access if the process wont' stop even if it is supposed to be unloaded.
If you are having trouble using task manager during the system slowdown, you can kill the process using the taskkill command. You shouldn't need to open a command prompt to do this. Open run box with windows + r and try typing:
Taskkill /f /im systemaccess.exe

Note that I don't know the name of the system access executable, so you can just substitute systemaccess.exe for whatever it really is. This will normally force anything to close quickly and efficiently.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Cavanaugh
Sent: December 9, 2020 06:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Hi all,
This might not be worth it anymore depending on the future of System Access, but if System Access stays around, I think this should be fixed if at all possible. The problem is that if you inadvertantly or maybe even deliberately fire up System Access and NVDA at the same time, the whole system slows down to a point where it becomes almost unusable. Alt-tab doesn't work as expected, and applications that should run smoothly suddenly stop responding. The other thing that almost always happens is modifiers in NVDA quit working, making it quite hard to shut down NVDA once it is running. In my case, I still use System Access to go, and it happens to me most frequently when I've just shut down SA. This morning was a perfect example. I had System Access open in IE, and a stream open in Firefox. As I wanted to make a call on my Google Voice number, the plan was to close IE, shutting down SA, then fire up NVDA, and switch to Voice in the existing Firefox window. I closed IE, and System Access shut down as expected, or so I thought. I fired up NVDA, switched to Firefox, and went to Google Voice, though sometimes the effect is right away, such that I won't even be able to do that. Not long after, I noticed a dramatic slow down in performance. The solution is to open task manager, make sure more details are showing, and go down to background processes. System Access will still be running as a background process, which needs to be ended in order for performance to return to normal.
This is just where it's most likely to happen to me, but in general, performance should not be this degraded when trying to run two screen readers. System Access and Narrator don't behave like this, nor do NVDA and Narrator.
Bob


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

JM Casey
 

That’s odd, I have never seen that prompt from narrator. Note that I never would normally have two screen-readers running at the same time, but there are times when JFW or NVDA will appear to lock up and starting Narrator will at least result in a bit of access. Maybe enough o go into task maanger or issue a  “taskkill” to get rid of the stuck screen-reader process.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of g melconian
Sent: December 9, 2020 07:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

That’s  true.that’s  one good thing about narrator and if something is sluggish with nvda or jaws an if you fire up narrator, narrator will detect an tell you that a second screenreader is running and to  turn it off in order to  make use of narrator.i think that  other screen readers should learn from this concept and add this useful  feature into their screen readers as well. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 06:54 PM, Bob Cavanaugh wrote:

The problem is that if you inadvertantly or maybe even deliberately fire up System Access and NVDA at the same time, the whole system slows down to a point where it becomes almost unusable.

-
I'd guess that this would be the result if any two third-party screen readers are fired up at the same time.

Narrator, as a built-in component of Windows 10 (and 8.1), is likely sui generis in terms of the resources allocated to it that isolate it from another screen reader.

Just like I tell my clients you should never, ever, ever run two antivirus programs/security suites at the same time on the same machine, I say the same with regard to screen readers.  Unload one before you load another.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

Let me respond to everyone in one message, since there were several messages on this topic. I generally do not run to screen readers at once, simply because of the fact that it would get very annoying at times. However, I occasionally run into a situation where I suspect one screen reader is not reading some thing correctly, so I will switch over to the other to see if it reads things differently.System Access shuts down NVDA when it is loaded, and that is fine. The problem described only happens about once a week, and from what I understand it’s a problem having to do with running it on 10 Let me respond to everyone in one message, since there were several messages on this topic. I generally do not run to screen readers at once, simply because of the fact that it would get very annoying at times. However, I occasionally run into a situation where I suspect one screen reader is not reading some thing correctly, so I will switch over to the other to see if it reads things differently.

On Dec 9, 2020, at 5:55 PM, Fresh Start <dan@jvillefreshstart.org> wrote:

II use NVDA, System Access and JAWS but never run them at the same time.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 6:46 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

But if you unload a screen-reader, the process should not be running. If this is consistent behavior and it happens on other machines, it is an error in how System Access is designed. If it was going to be around longer, they might correct it but I think it is being withdrawn at the end of the year.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 6:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:29 PM, Gene wrote:
System Access was unloaded but continues to run.- Which, just for clarity on my side, means it wasn't unloaded. I use the term "unloaded," or "exited," to mean the program is not active/running in either the foreground or background.

I also agree that it is unlikely that any screen reader is going to go to any effort to fix performance degradation that only occurs if or when you have another screen reader running with it concurrently. It's entirely reasonable to expect that, at any given moment, a screen reader, not multiple screen readers, will be running.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.

~ Thomas Reed Powell
















Re: How do I copy tables from a webpage while preserving their formatting

Pranav Lal
 

Hi Brian,

 

I hear you. This however is a work laptop so getting something installed is a challenge but if it is the  only way to go, I will take it.

 

Pranav


Re: Listing links in Word

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 09:03 PM, Fresh Start wrote:
I agree with the other people who told you about the link list only working in a browser.
-
But no one has asserted that.  In fact, the opposite has been asserted, and the solution used.

When you're using a word processor the vast majority of the time you'd be editing a document, and NVDA defaults to focus mode, which makes that easier.

If, however, you want to review elements in a document that are the same as elements that exist in a web page (and there are others, that don't, too), you can switch to browse mode and use INS+F7 to invoke the Elements List dialog in Word.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: Listing links in Word

Fresh Start <dan@...>
 

I agree with the other people who told you about the link list only working
in a browser.
However, you can make a link be clickable from the internet that you have
placed into a document.
First whenyou are in the browser like internet explorer, press alt plus the
letter D.
Then Press control plus the letter C for copy to clipboard.
Next alt tab back to your document and press control plus the letter V to
past the link into the document where you wish.
Next, place your cursor at the beginning of the url and highlight that line
by pressing shift plus the end key.
Then press control plus k.
Next tab to ok and press enter.
If you only hear cancel when tabing once you didn't get the complet
highlighted or you didn't actualy copy over the url.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 9:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Listing links in Word

When I press insert+f7 in Word, instead of a list of links I am placed in
spell check. Does insert+f7 not list links in programs other than internet
browsers? Am I missing a trick?

Thanks


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Fresh Start <dan@...>
 

II use NVDA, System Access and JAWS but never run them at the same time.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 6:46 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

But if you unload a screen-reader, the process should not be running. If this is consistent behavior and it happens on other machines, it is an error in how System Access is designed. If it was going to be around longer, they might correct it but I think it is being withdrawn at the end of the year.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 6:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:29 PM, Gene wrote:
System Access was unloaded but continues to run.- Which, just for clarity on my side, means it wasn't unloaded. I use the term "unloaded," or "exited," to mean the program is not active/running in either the foreground or background.

I also agree that it is unlikely that any screen reader is going to go to any effort to fix performance degradation that only occurs if or when you have another screen reader running with it concurrently. It's entirely reasonable to expect that, at any given moment, a screen reader, not multiple screen readers, will be running.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.

~ Thomas Reed Powell


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Blaster
 

I switch between SA and NVDA with no issues. I'm sure a reboot solved
any conflicts with no permanent problems.

HTH,
Blaster

On 12/9/20, Gene <gsasner@gmail.com> wrote:
While I don't particularly have an opinion about general behavior when
you run a screen-reader while another is running, here is a case where a
screen-reader should shut down another one. If you are installing a new
screen-reader, even if it has a talking installer, you would want your
current screen-reader running when you run the installer. If it isn't
running, you would be unaware of any error messages or anything you need
to respond to such as Windows can't verify the installer and being asked
if you want to run it. Then the currently running screen-reader should
be shut down by the installer.


If you want to install a version of NVDA by running the installer and a
different version of NVDA is already running, my recollection is that
the installer shuts down the currently running version before the
talking installer is active.


Gene

On 12/9/2020 6:39 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:30 PM, g melconian wrote:

add this useful feature [if another screen reader is running,
force it to exit before moving further into starting] into their
screen readers as well.

-
Though I don't disagree, per se, there are trade offs and dangers to
this approach. I personally think that folks should be trained or
train themselves to shut down one screen reader before starting
another. There are things I want the user of specific types of
software to have to do themselves, mostly because it promotes
awareness on a number of levels.

I guess it's a matter of preference, really. But I've observed over
the decades that making lots of things occur "automagically" tends to
result in complete obliviousness as to how things work or what one
might do when something inevitably goes wrong and requires end user
intervention. Knowing where the sweet spot lies between entirely
manual in all respects (yuk) or fully automatic is not a simple thing,
and opinions of where that spot is will differ.

--

Brian -Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*/If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached
to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to,
then you have a legal mind./*

~ Thomas Reed Powell






Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:57 PM, Gene wrote:
If you want to install a version of NVDA by running the installer and a different version of NVDA is already running, my recollection is that the installer shuts down the currently running version before the talking installer is active.
-
Very common behavior for programs that allow what I call "install over installs," and these days that's most of them.

I don't want any program shutting down a running instance of something that's not an earlier version of itself, ever.  An arrangement where something bows out when it detects something it would conflict with, sure, e.g. Windows Security will shut itself down when another Security Suite signals it's being installed, but that's it.  I wouldn't want one to be able to kill the other.  That way lies a lot of potential madness, and is a security nightmare.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Gene
 

While I don't particularly have an opinion about general behavior when you run a screen-reader while another is running, here is a case where a screen-reader should shut down another one.  If you are installing a new screen-reader, even if it has a talking installer, you would want your current screen-reader running when you run the installer.  If it isn't running, you would be unaware of any error messages or anything you need to respond to such as  Windows can't verify the installer and being asked if you want to run it.  Then the currently running screen-reader should be shut down by the installer. 


If you want to install a version of NVDA by running the installer and a different version of NVDA is already running, my recollection is that the installer shuts down the currently running version before the talking installer is active.


Gene

On 12/9/2020 6:39 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:30 PM, g melconian wrote:
add this useful  feature [if another screen reader is running, force it to exit before moving further into starting] into their screen readers as well. 
-
Though I don't disagree, per se, there are trade offs and dangers to this approach.  I personally think that folks should be trained or train themselves to shut down one screen reader before starting another.  There are things I want the user of specific types of software to have to do themselves, mostly because it promotes awareness on a number of levels.

I guess it's a matter of preference, really.  But I've observed over the decades that making lots of things occur "automagically" tends to result in complete obliviousness as to how things work or what one might do when something inevitably goes wrong and requires end user intervention.  Knowing where the sweet spot lies between entirely manual in all respects (yuk) or fully automatic is not a simple thing, and opinions of where that spot is will differ.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:46 PM, Gene wrote:
But if you unload a screen-reader, the process should not be running.
-
Agreed.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

Gene
 

But if you unload a screen-reader, the process should not be running. If this is consistent behavior and it happens on other machines, it is an error in how System Access is designed. If it was going to be around longer, they might correct it but I think it is being withdrawn at the end of the year.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, December 09, 2020 6:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:29 PM, Gene wrote:
System Access was unloaded but continues to run.-
Which, just for clarity on my side, means it wasn't unloaded. I use the term "unloaded," or "exited," to mean the program is not active/running in either the foreground or background.

I also agree that it is unlikely that any screen reader is going to go to any effort to fix performance degradation that only occurs if or when you have another screen reader running with it concurrently. It's entirely reasonable to expect that, at any given moment, a screen reader, not multiple screen readers, will be running.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

~ Thomas Reed Powell


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

g melconian
 

Do agree with you bryan. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 4:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:30 PM, g melconian wrote:

add this useful  feature [if another screen reader is running, force it to exit before moving further into starting] into their screen readers as well. 

-
Though I don't disagree, per se, there are trade offs and dangers to this approach.  I personally think that folks should be trained or train themselves to shut down one screen reader before starting another.  There are things I want the user of specific types of software to have to do themselves, mostly because it promotes awareness on a number of levels.

I guess it's a matter of preference, really.  But I've observed over the decades that making lots of things occur "automagically" tends to result in complete obliviousness as to how things work or what one might do when something inevitably goes wrong and requires end user intervention.  Knowing where the sweet spot lies between entirely manual in all respects (yuk) or fully automatic is not a simple thing, and opinions of where that spot is will differ.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: NVDA snd System Access, not a good combination

 

On Wed, Dec 9, 2020 at 07:30 PM, g melconian wrote:
add this useful  feature [if another screen reader is running, force it to exit before moving further into starting] into their screen readers as well. 
-
Though I don't disagree, per se, there are trade offs and dangers to this approach.  I personally think that folks should be trained or train themselves to shut down one screen reader before starting another.  There are things I want the user of specific types of software to have to do themselves, mostly because it promotes awareness on a number of levels.

I guess it's a matter of preference, really.  But I've observed over the decades that making lots of things occur "automagically" tends to result in complete obliviousness as to how things work or what one might do when something inevitably goes wrong and requires end user intervention.  Knowing where the sweet spot lies between entirely manual in all respects (yuk) or fully automatic is not a simple thing, and opinions of where that spot is will differ.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 

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