Date   

Re: The more or less finished tutorial

Gene
 

I found one or two minor mistakes I didn't notice.  I'll correct them and send the correctet version either later tonight or tomorrow.
 
Gene
 
 


Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hi,

The URL has been deprecated.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Ballou
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:58 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hi Joseph,

 

That's Rather odd, I went to the link and the page still opened up.

 

Tony

 

On 5/27/2017 8:41 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,

No, that URL is no more.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Ballou
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hey Gene,

 

Here ya go!

 

http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/

 

Tony

 

On 5/27/2017 8:33 PM, Gene wrote:

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene

 

 


Project Contact Lenses: a community initiative proposal to invite more people to NVDA ecosystem

 

Dear NVDA community,

 

First, a huge thanks to NV Access and other presenters at NVDACon 2017, as well as those who organized and participated in this event. As the founder of NVDACon, I’m proud of what Derek Riemer and his friends have accomplished in organizing this successful gathering. To organizers of the 2018 gathering, I wish you the best of luck.

 

To the matter at hand:

 

Many of you may have heard about the end of sales for Window-Eyes screen reader. In the early 2000’s, Window-Eyes was considered a good alternative to JAWS for Windows when it came to using Microsoft Windows with screen readers. With the acquisition of GW Micro by AI Squared, which in turn was acquired by VFO last year, many analysts predicted the end of life for this screen reader, which occurred on May 15, 2017.

 

This news has huge implications for the global NVDA community, as well as opening opportunities for us. As many Window-Eyes users are eligible to upgrade to JAWS 18, some would choose to switch to NVDA. At the moment several individuals are producing tutorials aimed at helping Window-Eyes users transition to NVDA with ease. But users aren’t the only members of the Window-Eyes community: with the end of sales for Window-Eyes, many scripts (or apps) for Window-Eyes became unsupported, and it won’t be matter of time before they become part of history.

 

In hopes of inviting Window-Eyes users and developers to join the NVDA ecosystem (provided they are willing), I’d like to propose a community-wide initiative under the umbrella of Project Contact Lenses. Although this project may take different forms, the overall aim is to educate Window-Eyes community that NVDA is a viable option for many people, and a chance for writers of Window-Eyes apps to port their code to the add-ons infrastructure. Other activities may include equipping some Window-Eyes app developers to contribute code to NVDA Core, producing promotional materials, organizing online seminars and so on. Although the bulk of this project is aimed at Window-Eyes users, the ultimate goal is to embrace users of other screen readers to taste NVDA.

 

Some of the activities I plan to do include:

 

  • An online seminar or an intensive lab on creating add-ons and/or getting started with contributing code to NVDA Core.
  • Talking to Window-Eyes app writers about possibility of open-sourcing their code and helping them port apps to the add-ons infrastructure.

 

Some of the things the global community can do include:

 

  • Producing transition materials.
  • Contacting Window-Eyes distributors in your local community and inviting them to try NVDA.
  • Contacting script writers regarding apps and proposing add-ons.
  • Holding seminars aimed at users of other screen readers 9mostly Window-Eyes users) on how to master various NVDA concepts such as object navigation, browse mode and others.

 

As for the duration of this initiative, I don’t know, but I expect this to be at least several months or more.

 

Comments are appreciated.

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Tony Ballou
 

Hi Joseph,


I've got the new link Thanks.




On 5/27/2017 8:41 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,

No, that URL is no more.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Ballou
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hey Gene,

 

Here ya go!

 

http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/

 

Tony

 

On 5/27/2017 8:33 PM, Gene wrote:

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene

 



Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Tony Ballou
 

Hi Joseph,


That's Rather odd, I went to the link and the page still opened up.


Tony


On 5/27/2017 8:41 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,

No, that URL is no more.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Ballou
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hey Gene,

 

Here ya go!

 

http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/

 

Tony

 

On 5/27/2017 8:33 PM, Gene wrote:

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene

 



The more or less finished tutorial

Gene
 

Here is my brief tutorial on making the transition from Window-eyes to NVDA.  I'm not sure if I'm completely satisfied with it and I'll consider making changes based on comments.  But this may well be the final or just about the final version.
 
Gene
Moving from Window-eyes to NVDA
A very short tutorial telling you just what you need to know to do a lot of what
 
you did before.
 
Many people are apprehensive about switching to NVDA or any other screen-reader
 
from Window-eyes.  This tutorial will explain and demonstrate that such
 
apprehensions are largely based on misunderstandings. 
 
Before I discuss the misunderstanding that causes most of this apprehension, I'll
 
briefly discuss installing NVDA and changing the synthesizer used and speech
 
parameters.
 
NVDA has a talking installer.  run the file as you would any installation file. 
 
you may get a dialog asking if you want to run the file.  Use the command alt r
 
for run.  If you get a UAC prompt, answer alt y. 
Run narrator.  Then run the NVDA installer. 
when you run the installer, there will be a pause and then a bit of music will
 
play.  Not long after, the talking installer will run.  Unload Narrator at that
 
point.  return to the install dialog.
Tab through the dchoices.  Accept the license agreement and then tab to install. 
 
You will get other options but install is the one you want.
Don't stop using NvDA because of the voice.  A lot of people don't try NVDA because
 
of the voice.  As soon as you get it set up, I'll tell you how to change the
 
synthesizer used.
 
When NVDA is installed and running, a dialog box comes up with some explanatory
 
text and the ability to set one or two options.  While I know a lot of people very
 
much dislike the default voice, it's worth listening to the dialog and looking at
 
the settings by tabbing through them. 
 
I would recommend checking the check box to use caps lock as an NVDA modifier. 
 
You'll see why I recommend this in later discussion.
 
After you go through the initial parameters dialog, it's time to learn how to
 
change the synthesizer. 
Issue the command control insert s.  Use either insert.  From now on, assume you
 
can use either insert unless I state differently.
A synthesizer selection dialog will open.
You will see a list of different possibly available synthesizers.  Choose SAPI 5. 
 
I know everyone has at least one SAPI 5 voice on their machine.  Up and down arrow
 
through the list and stop on SAPI five.  Press enter.
You will now hear another voice.  It may be the same voice you hear in Narrator. 
Now issue the command control insert v.
You are now in the voice selection and adjustment dialog. 
Up and down arrow to see what voices are available.  Stop on the one you want. 
Now tab through the dialog and change settings for the voice. 
Once you find a voice you want and tab through and set whatever you want such as
 
speed and punctuation, press the ok button. 
 
Now, let's continue with what I spoke of at the start of this tutorial.  The
 
misunderstanding that makes the switch seem daunting is that the user doesn't
 
realize that most of the commands he/she uses are Windows commands and program
 
commands and they won't change.
 
Consider the following examples:
Opening menus was and still is alt.  That's a Windows command to open menus in
 
programs.  It's the same no matter which screen-reader you use. 
Control o for open doesn't change.  Using the arrow keys to move in a document
 
doesn't change.  Tabbing through dialogs doesn't change.  Neither does how you move
 
in a list or a treeview or work with a combo box, and the list goes on. 
Screen-reader commands, many of which may change, such as read title bar, provide
 
access to information you can't get or can't get conveniently by using Windows or
 
program commands.  for example, read title bar.  In Window-eyes, the command is
 
control shift t.  In NVDA, it's insert t.  I am assuming throughout this tutorial
 
that you are using the default desktop layout in NVDA.  All commands are given in
 
that layout.  The title bar is something a sighted person looks at.  You can't move
 
to it with the pc cursor or application cursor, whatever you wish to call it,
 
because there is no need.  A sighted person can just see it.  So the screen-reader
 
has a command, read title bar.  That command is not a Windows nor a program
 
command.
 
Here are the screen-reader commands you will need to know to allow you to do a lot
 
of what you did before.
To unload NVDA, insert q then enter.
Read title bar, insert t. 
Time, insert f12. 
Announce formatting information, insert f.
Read current Window, insert b.  In Window-eyes the command is control shift w. 
Read to end, insert down arrow.  Use the down arrow on the main keyboard.
In the laptop layout, read to end is NVDA key a. 
Stop speech with control, as with screen-readers in general. 
Commands such as control home, control end, control left and right arrow are
 
Windows movement commands for moving in any standard edit field including word
 
processor edit fields.  None of them will change.
More screen-reader commands:
Screen review commands:
Note the pattern as I give these commands:
Read previous line, numpad 7. 
Read current line, numpad 8.
Read next line numpad nine.
You move in screen review to the previous or next line when you issue those
 
commands.  You can keep moving and reading until you get to the top or bottom of
 
the screen.
Read previous word, numpad 4.
Read current word, numpad 5.
Read next word, numpad 6.
Read previous character, numpad 1.
Read current character, numpad 2.
Read next character, numpad 3.
Note the pattern.  Read current is the key in the middle of each of these rows.
Move to and read previous is the key on the left. 
Move to and read next is the key to the right.
The lower the numbers the smaller the movement unit.  1 2 and 3 move by character. 
 
4 5 and 6 move by word.  Etc.
Now, here are the laptop layout review commands:
Read current line, NVDA shift  period
Move to and read next line, NVDA down arrow.
Move to and read previous line NVDA up arrow.
Read current word NVDA control period
Read previous word NVDA control left arrow
Read next word NVDA control right arrow
Announce current character NVDA period.
Move to and read previous character NVDA left arrow
Move to and read next character NVDA right arrow.
After a little more discussion, I'll tell you how to change the keyboard layout to
 
laptop.
 
Getting back to the review keys in the laptop layout, There are sort of patterns
 
in the laptop layout but not the kind of uniform pattern as in the desktop layout.
 
 If I had a laptop computer without a numpad, I'd buy a USB numpad and not fool
 
around with the laptop layout.  But you can decide that for yourself.  But aside
 
from predictable keys such as that period is used for current, and that left and
 
right arrows are useed with modifiers, you can't generalize more.  Such patterns
 
are not followed in every previous and next item.  In one of the previous and next
 
items, up and down arrow is used. 
 
I shall now explain how to change the layout from the desktop to the laptop layout
 
and discuss causing the caps lock to be used as an NVDA key.  If you add capslock,
 
you can still use either insert.  there are times when caps lock is very
 
convenient.
 
to open the keyboard layout issue the command control insert k.
You are now in a list of layouts.
the desktop is the default and the first in the list. 
If you want to switch to the laptop layout, down arrow once and then tab to and
 
activate the ok button. 
You will notice as you tab, check boxes about which keys serve as the NVDA key.
Caps lock is not checked.  Check it with the space bar.
You can stay in the desk top layout and still tab and see these check boxes.  I
 
use the caps lock key as an NVDA key often and I use the desktop layout.  I find
 
it much more convenient to use for the read to end command.  I hold caps lock and
 
press down arrow.  That is, to me, much more convenient than using insert down
 
arrow, regardless of which insert I use. 
If you want to toggle caps lock on and off for typing, press it twice quickly.  If
 
you press it once and hold it, it serves as an NVDA key.  If you press it twice
 
quickly, it toggles caps lock on and off.
 
Here are two more important commands:
Jump to top of window, shift numpad 7.
Jump to bottom of window is shift numpad 9.
 
I've said top and bottom of Window but that's oversimplified.  It depends what kind
 
of review mode you are using.  I won't go into that to any extent in this very
 
short tutorial. 
You should usually be in object review.  Unless you change it, you will remain
 
there.  If you use another review mode, afterword, make sure you return to object
 
reviewIf you don't, you won't hear what you expect to hear at various times. 
To make sure you are in object review, issue the command numpad insert nummpad 1. 
 
When you are already in object review and can't move to another review mode, you
 
will hear no previous review mode.  You will then know you are in the right one. 
 
Or if you are returning from another review mode, when you hear object review, you
 
will know you are back in the right one.
I won't describe its use here, but screen review is similar not in commands, but in
 
how you review the screen to the Window-eyes cursor.  Object review is different
 
from any review mode available in Window-eyes.  It is valuable to know for various
 
uses.  Depending on how you use your computer, you may find it valuable or not.  I'm
 
simply making you aware that it is different and that you may want to learn it.
 
I'll provide a resource that teaches in great detail how to use NVDA.
This tutorial is to get you going using NVDA and to show you that even with the
 
little I will teach, you can still do a good deal of what you used to do.  You may
 
then learn more as you wish.
 
Believe it or not, that is just about all I will teach in this very short tutorial
 
but  I'll tell you a few more things.
Internet browsing:
When you are on a web page, quick navigation commands are almost identical whether
 
you are using NVDA or Window-eyes. 
Move by headings is h.  Skip blocks of links is n. 
Move to next button is b, 
Next combo box is c.
Next check box is x.
NVDA has an input help mode which is similar to what is in Window-eyes.  Insert and
 
1 on the main keyboard turns it on.  When you press a key or combination of keys
 
that might be a command, you will hear what the keys are and what, if any command
 
they execute.  This varies depending on where you are.
When in a browser that supports browse mode, typing a lot of individual letters
 
will give you information about what the keys do in browse mode.  I already gave
 
much of that information above but you may want to press a lot of keys using input
 
mode in a browser. 
 
To turn input mode off use the same command you used to turn it on, insert 1.
 
to learn more about NVDA, a popular tutorial is available at
 
http://www.josephsl.net/tutorials
On that page, you will see links to download different sections dealing with
 
different subjects.  You can also download the entire tutorial as a zip file.
 
There is also an e-mail list for NVDA users.  To join, send a blank message to this
 
 
I hope that this tutorial has removed much of your apprehension about switching to
 
NVDA.  Now, as you wish or need, you may consult the tutorial I gave a link to. 
 
NVDA is a powerful screen-reader and it will meet a lot of users needs as well as
 
JAWS or Window-eyes does.  I hope this very short tutorial gives you a good
 
foundation on which to build confidence that the transition should be much easier
 
than you may have thought and that it will help make it much more enjoyable.


Re: Accessible music notation software

 

Brandon,

           I forwarded your message to a dear friend of mine who's an organist and who's been blind since birth.  Here is her response:
--------------------
He needs to learn braille music, and somewhere out there is something, don't know what to call it, that shows what the print notation looks like, but personally I'd have to ask questions before I could answer his. If you think I'd be helpful, permission granted to give him my email.
--------------------
           If you wish to take her up on her offer please send me a private message and I'll arrange a cyber introduction.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.332

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Gene
 

Thanks.  I'll be sending my finished tutorial immediately after this message now that I have the preferred link.. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 7:34 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Hi,

http://www.josephsl.net/tutorials

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:33 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene


Re: update on orbit20

Ben J. Bloomgren
 

You'll have to send us a final report on how it works with NVDA once it comes out.

On May 27, 2017, at 08:49, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:

hello

An update on the orbit20 for you all. I was asked by a-p-h if I wanted to test the final orbit20 product before they start selling it. So I said yes and gave my mailing address. They said when I receive the final production unit to send back the old prototype but to keep the USB cable, memory sd card and charging brick because they will work with the production unit. The production unit is the one you all will see when you buy your orbit20 devices for $449 plus shipping. a-p-h also said that I may, or may not, be able to keep the production unit once the orbit20 officially goes on sale and that well I imagine once it goes on sale I would just pay a-p-h $449 for the unit they send me when the time comes to pay the money. So by thursday or friday of next week I should have a final production orbit20 unit in my hands and will be able to report back on the differences between the 7 to 12 month old prototype and the final production units. I am very excited to receive a final production unit. I was told the 7 to 12 month old prototype I currently have is a very expensive handMade unit with an older buggy pin-set. These production units are made in an automated factory process. The final production unit will be the final $449 united states dollars, product that you all and I will be purchasing.


Josh





Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hi,

No, that URL is no more.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Ballou
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:41 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Hey Gene,

 

Here ya go!

 

http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/

 

Tony

 

On 5/27/2017 8:33 PM, Gene wrote:

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene

 


Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Tony Ballou
 

Hey Gene,


Here ya go!


http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/


Tony


On 5/27/2017 8:33 PM, Gene wrote:
Joseph and all,
 
I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 
 
Thanks. 
 
Gene


Re: the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:33 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

 

Joseph and all,

 

I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 

 

Thanks. 

 

Gene


the new URL for the Joseph Lee tutorial

Gene
 

Joseph and all,
 
I am finishing my transition tutorial but I don't recall the new URL for the tutorial that was originally on the Korean English site. I know it is still there but my impression is that it won't be there much longer.  Please let me know the new address. 
 
Thanks. 
 
Gene


OCR addon update?

Josh Kennedy
 

hi

two questions about NVDA OCR. 1. could you update to the latest tesseract engine if its not updated already for best accuracy and language support? 2. could a feature be added where if you are in a pdf document and it says "alert this document appears to be empty it may be a scanned image..." so if its a pdf that is just pictures you could hit a command, NVDA OCR would scan the pdf and then send it to your web browser for easy reading? This would make reading inaccessible pdf files much easier. thanks.


Re: Accessible music notation software

John Sanfilippo
 

Hi,

You might try these:

1, www.lilypond.org: This is open source software which runs on many
platforms. It is text based, so you learn a text coding which is
interpreted by lilypond, and output as PDF and MIDI files. You print the
pdf and optionally listen to the midi file.

2, www.Musescore.org is an open source scoring program like Sibelius or
Finale. Scores are written on screen using keyboard and mouse. They are
aware of accessibility, but they say that the program is right now more
suitable for reading scores than writing them for visually impaired.

Now, if you have some funds there are two other scoring programs:

3, Sibelius which has Jaws and some NVDA support.
More info is here:
http://www.raisedbar.co.uk/Sibelius/SibeliusAccessV5.htm

4, www.dancingdots.com develops a program called Goodfeel. For this you
must run Jaws. I know of no NVDA support, though that may be
forthcoming. This is a suite of programs which includes SharpEye, a
music OCR program for scanning printed music, Lime, a print music
scoring program made accessible by Jaws scripts called LimeAloud, and
Goodfeel, a braille music transcribing software which converts Lime
scores into braille music.

Hope this helps some.

John S

On 5/27/17 15:45, brandon wrote:
Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon

--
- JS o -


Re: Antivirus Programs

Roger Stewart
 

Windows Defender and in particular the version that comes with Creators Update.


Roger

On 5/27/2017 5:05 PM, kelby carlson wrote:
What are the best free antivirus programs that work well with NVDA?



Antivirus Programs

kelby carlson
 

What are the best free antivirus programs that work well with NVDA?


configuration profile for IE11

David Mehler
 

Hello,

I'm using NVDA 2017.1 on a win10 1607 box.

Whenever I start IE11 a profile loads loading the sapi5 synth, rather
than my default synth.

I'm wondering if this profile comes with IE and NVDA now or if I created one?

Also, does anyone have any podcasts on NVDA and edge, specifically
configuration and setup?

Thanks.
Dave.


Accessible music notation software

brandon
 

Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon


Re: update on orbit20

kelby carlson
 

Did they indicate when the final product will come out? There have
been a lot of delays.

On 5/27/17, Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@gmail.com> wrote:
hello

An update on the orbit20 for you all. I was asked by a-p-h if I wanted
to test the final orbit20 product before they start selling it. So I
said yes and gave my mailing address. They said when I receive the final
production unit to send back the old prototype but to keep the USB
cable, memory sd card and charging brick because they will work with the
production unit. The production unit is the one you all will see when
you buy your orbit20 devices for $449 plus shipping. a-p-h also said
that I may, or may not, be able to keep the production unit once the
orbit20 officially goes on sale and that well I imagine once it goes on
sale I would just pay a-p-h $449 for the unit they send me when the time
comes to pay the money. So by thursday or friday of next week I should
have a final production orbit20 unit in my hands and will be able to
report back on the differences between the 7 to 12 month old prototype
and the final production units. I am very excited to receive a final
production unit. I was told the 7 to 12 month old prototype I currently
have is a very expensive handMade unit with an older buggy pin-set.
These production units are made in an automated factory process. The
final production unit will be the final $449 united states dollars,
product that you all and I will be purchasing.


Josh