Date   

getting the "to protect your privacy" message even before opening a message

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, everyone,


I don't know if any of you have seen this before in thunderbird but now in some of my messages I'm getting the "to protect your privacy" message before even opening them. I never saw this before. I would get that mesage when opening an email but now I'm getting it before opening a message. Is there a way to change this? Just wondering.


Thanks.


Rosemarie


Re: Outlook 2016 and Unread Messages

 

One thing you need to remember is that the default configuration for Outlook is to mark a message read immediately upon opening, which means that by landing on a message it is automatically and instantly read, which is why you never hear unread.  I'm in a rush at the moment so cannot look up where in the Outlook options the "mark messages as read" delay can be set.  I know I have mine at about 5 seconds.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: Outlook 2016 and Unread Messages

Ralph Boersema
 

I needed the help of a sighted person to show the “Read” (envelope icon), so now the status column is visible. However, NVDA still does not announce when a message is unread, nor when it is flagged.

 

Warmly,

Ralph

 

From: Ralph Boersema [mailto:ralph@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 11:32 PM
To: 'nvda@nvda.groups.io' <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: RE: [nvda] Outlook 2016 and Unread Messages

 

Gene’s orientation about the use of ribbons was very helpful.

 

However, I still have not found the solution to how to get NVDA to announce to me that a message in Outlook 2016 is unread. I learned that unread messages  are visually indicated by a blue color, but I don’t want my program to regularly announce font colors. I’m still looking for a way to simply have Nvda announce to me that a message is unread, the way it used to do in Outlook 2007.

 

Warmly,

Ralph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 8:07 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016 and Ribbon

 

Ribbons are not menus.  They are ribbons.  In a program with ribbons, open the ribbons with alt.  Use the left and right arrow to move from ribbon to ribbon, as you would move from menu to menu.  Let's say you want to look through the view ribbon.  When you get to view, start to tab.  You will move through all the items in the view menu.  If you get to a menu, available in the ribbon in this way, press enter or space bar to open the menu.  Activate buttons in the usual way, with the space bar.  If you have problems working with structures, let us know.  There are often a lot more items in a ribbon than in one menu.  Something you intend to use regularly would be a good idea to memorize the command for.  As you move through the ribbon, such as the view ribbon, you will hear, if you let your screen-reader read to the end every time you tab, a command.  For example, this is fictitious, and if there is such a command it is coincidental, enlarge, v e.  If you press alt and then v and then e, you will activate the command or open the item, such as a menu. 

 

There are other commands to move faster between sections of a ribbon, but I'll let others discuss them.  I don't use ribbons enough to remember.  In other words, ribbons are generally divided into sections and you can move from section to section.  For example, an e-mail program may have a section in a ribbon named respond, where you will find commands such as reply and forward. 

Ribbon programs do have one menu you will find by left and right arrowing through the ribbons.  As you left and right arrow, you will come across something that says file, as I recall,  and it is a menu.  you may hear something else announced, I don't remember just what.  Perhaps something about a grid if you let your screen-reader read everything about the menu.  Don't worry about it.  Some common commands are in the menu such as save as.  You will see commands such as f,a, for save as in that menu.  Some of these commands will be the same as you are used to. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 4:56 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016 and Ribbon

 

I am having trouble using the ribbon menu. I don't know how to find whether
status flags are visible. I was doing fine with the classic menus in
Outlook, but I am quite confused with ribbon menus in Office.

Ralph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pranav
Lal
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016

Ralf,

I am using Outlook 2016. I am told when a message is unread. However, I am
not told when it is read. One shot in the dark,  Check your view settings;
Are status flags visible?

Pranav

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ralph
Boersema
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 6:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Outlook 2016

Dear Folks,

I admit that I don't regularly read these list messages and, therefore,
probably missed reading an earlier exchange about this topic. I have just
updated to Office 2016 and find that in Outlook NVDA does not read to me
whether a message is marked as read or unread. Is there some setting I need
to change in Outlook?

Warmly,
Ralph








Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Its not windows, so no Nvda will not run on it, but Google may well have an accessible interface built in as the Android operating system has, but then, I'm not really a fan of cloud based apps never mind operating systems since by definition they need constant contact with the internet to work.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "ken lawrence via Groups.io" <kenlawrence124=aol.com@groups.io>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 3:59 PM
Subject: [nvda] chromebooks and accessibility?


Hi list, ken here with a question. posted this on the tech zone but got no reply. saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new chromebook being released. I know some things about chromebooks namely that they are a bare bones computer. all they have on them is the browser and the media player. the operating system is in the cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199. that seems like a good option for those on a budget. the question is can NVDA or any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally accessibile for blind/visually impaired? not sure if anyone on this list knows the answer to that. it seems like for someone without a laptop this could be a good option for me.


Re: can't find team viewer

Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Normally if only a casual user there used to be a simple to run for that session version which is not as full featured but allows access.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "nasrin khaksar" <nasrinkhaksar3@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 9:02 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't find team viewer


hi.
you can dont install it and run it only you need it!
i installed it before, uninstall it and i run it whenever i need it.
or maybe you installed it in a different drive of your hard.
go to all program and certainly you should find it there!

On 10/19/16, Brian's Mail list account <bglists@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
Maybe its under a different name. One assumes the shortcut has for some
reason been deleted or renamed.
Of course if it was installed by a different account and not made available

to all accounts it would not appar to be there at all.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rosemarie Chavarria" <knitqueen2007@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 6:24 AM
Subject: [nvda] can't find team viewer


Hi, everyone,


I know for a fact that team view is on this computer but I can't find it.

I typed it in the start search box and it didn't work. Couldn't find it
except in the programs and features. I don't know whaqt to do! This
computer is brand-new and I'm having problems with it.


Rosemarie









--
we have not sent you but as a mercy to the creation.
holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
in the very authentic narration is:
imam hosein is the beacon of light and the ark of salvation.
best website for studying islamic book in different languages
al-islam.org


Re: speechPlayerInEspeak add-on

Lino Morales
 

YOu'd have to ask either Michael Curren or James Teh. Michael is the one responsible for that add-on.

On 10/19/2016 7:18 PM, Laughingthunder wrote:
Hi,

I am referring to the add-on, which can be found at the following link.

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/speechPlayerInEspeak.fa.html

I am wondering whether or not it will be updated.


On 10/19/2016 4:38 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
I don't know, what did You think.
Have You thought on NV speech player, which uses same phonemes, as Espeak, or what?
Marco Oros




Re: Outlook 2016 and Unread Messages

Ralph Boersema
 

Gene’s orientation about the use of ribbons was very helpful.

 

However, I still have not found the solution to how to get NVDA to announce to me that a message in Outlook 2016 is unread. I learned that unread messages  are visually indicated by a blue color, but I don’t want my program to regularly announce font colors. I’m still looking for a way to simply have Nvda announce to me that a message is unread, the way it used to do in Outlook 2007.

 

Warmly,

Ralph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 8:07 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016 and Ribbon

 

Ribbons are not menus.  They are ribbons.  In a program with ribbons, open the ribbons with alt.  Use the left and right arrow to move from ribbon to ribbon, as you would move from menu to menu.  Let's say you want to look through the view ribbon.  When you get to view, start to tab.  You will move through all the items in the view menu.  If you get to a menu, available in the ribbon in this way, press enter or space bar to open the menu.  Activate buttons in the usual way, with the space bar.  If you have problems working with structures, let us know.  There are often a lot more items in a ribbon than in one menu.  Something you intend to use regularly would be a good idea to memorize the command for.  As you move through the ribbon, such as the view ribbon, you will hear, if you let your screen-reader read to the end every time you tab, a command.  For example, this is fictitious, and if there is such a command it is coincidental, enlarge, v e.  If you press alt and then v and then e, you will activate the command or open the item, such as a menu. 

 

There are other commands to move faster between sections of a ribbon, but I'll let others discuss them.  I don't use ribbons enough to remember.  In other words, ribbons are generally divided into sections and you can move from section to section.  For example, an e-mail program may have a section in a ribbon named respond, where you will find commands such as reply and forward. 

Ribbon programs do have one menu you will find by left and right arrowing through the ribbons.  As you left and right arrow, you will come across something that says file, as I recall,  and it is a menu.  you may hear something else announced, I don't remember just what.  Perhaps something about a grid if you let your screen-reader read everything about the menu.  Don't worry about it.  Some common commands are in the menu such as save as.  You will see commands such as f,a, for save as in that menu.  Some of these commands will be the same as you are used to. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 4:56 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016 and Ribbon

 

I am having trouble using the ribbon menu. I don't know how to find whether
status flags are visible. I was doing fine with the classic menus in
Outlook, but I am quite confused with ribbon menus in Office.

Ralph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pranav
Lal
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 8:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Outlook 2016

Ralf,

I am using Outlook 2016. I am told when a message is unread. However, I am
not told when it is read. One shot in the dark,  Check your view settings;
Are status flags visible?

Pranav

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ralph
Boersema
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2016 6:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Outlook 2016

Dear Folks,

I admit that I don't regularly read these list messages and, therefore,
probably missed reading an earlier exchange about this topic. I have just
updated to Office 2016 and find that in Outlook NVDA does not read to me
whether a message is marked as read or unread. Is there some setting I need
to change in Outlook?

Warmly,
Ralph









Re: speechPlayerInEspeak add-on

David Mehler
 

Hello,

I certainly hope so.
Thanks.
Dave.

On 10/19/16, Laughingthunder <laughingthunder26@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

I am referring to the add-on, which can be found at the following link.

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/speechPlayerInEspeak.fa.html

I am wondering whether or not it will be updated.


On 10/19/2016 4:38 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
I don't know, what did You think.
Have You thought on NV speech player, which uses same phonemes, as
Espeak, or what?
Marco Oros






Re: NVDA and Fractions

 

On Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 11:50 am, Gene wrote:
Except that these synthesizers aren't developed for blind people.

No, they're developed for speakers of a given language.  Decisions have to be made.  No one, including myself, likes some of them.  Unless you want everything read letter by letter and no interpretation whatsoever of common contractions, acronyms, etc., often based on context you're going to get something that most people could not accurately interpret with any ease.

Most people want a speech synthesizer that comes as close as is technologically possible to conveying meaning based on context.  Natural language processing is a massive leap forward in text-to-speech technology.  That has nothing to do with whether you're blind or sighted.

You don't design for the very rare exception, in anything, but the rule if the target is not a specialized niche market.  To believe otherwise is folly.

If you need an exception to the rule of most users of a given technology it's up to you to make the tweaks you need for your context.  As a former programmer I find it well-nigh impossible to believe that anyone would expect a general purpose speech synthesizer to speak the arcane syntax of any programming language accurately.  If ever there was a need for a purpose-dedicated synthesizer, that would be it.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Re: speechPlayerInEspeak add-on

Laughing Thunder
 

Hi,

I am referring to the add-on, which can be found at the following link.

http://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/speechPlayerInEspeak.fa.html

I am wondering whether or not it will be updated.

On 10/19/2016 4:38 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
I don't know, what did You think.
Have You thought on NV speech player, which uses same phonemes, as Espeak, or what?
Marco Oros


Re: speechPlayerInEspeak add-on

Marco Oros
 

I don't know, what did You think.
Have You thought on NV speech player, which uses same phonemes, as Espeak, or what?
Marco Oros


Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

Nimer Jaber
 

There is so much misinformation on this topic at the moment, and most of it is off-topic for this list, but I will say that Chromevox does have the ability to navigate by headings, links, and many other web controls, and it does behave and react similar to Windows screen readers. Anybody that says they would get a cheap Windows computer with low specs before they get a Chromebook has not done their homework about what Chromevox can and cannot do. Also, Chromevox has been on Chromebooks for years now, and in the past year has been rewritten to make the hotkeys easier. the windows and Mac extension for Chromevox is not the same as the chromevox screen reader. Again, if you are interested in using Chrome with Chromevox, check out the Google groups for Chromevox or the accessible Google group for this purpose.

THanks.

On Wed, Oct 19, 2016 at 4:11 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I don't know how well Chrome Vox works as a screen-reader.  Nor how good the design is.  But if I were going to use the Internet at all seriously, I would seriously consider not getting a Chrome Book.  I am assuming that Chromevox when used on the Internet uses the same interface as the ChromeVox add on for Chrome does.  It is completely nonstandard as far as working like Windows screen-readers do on the Internet and doesn't have quick navigation keys that allow movement in the same ways.  You can move to the next element but I consider the design to be markedly inferior to what is standard in Windows screen-readers now. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] chromebooks and accessibility?

Well no chrome vox runs for chrome books but I don't know someone that
uses one.
To be honest if you want a lower end pc and don't want windows an amazon
fire with custom android may be better.



On 20/10/2016 4:13 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
> chrome books run (you guessed it, chrome os) Chrome os is not windows,
> chrome os is not windows, (this bears repeating) chrome os is not
> windows.  None of your windows programs are going to run on a chrome
> book.  Chrome os is a linux derivitive, and it runs linux apps
> specifically written for chrome os.  Sure, you can wipe it, and install
> a full version of linux if you like, and in that case, all your standard
> linux apps will work just fine, but out of the box, no, there's nothing
> you can run on a chrome book to get it to talk and be usable for the
> visually impaired.  The only thing you can do is (as mentioned above)
> install a full linux release, which would then give you the capability
> of running orca, speakup, or some combination thereof.  I suppose if
> it's got enough muscle, you might be able to get a version of windows
> installed, but generally speaking, chrome books are lower end machines,
> that wouldn't handle windows on a good day, though linux will work just
> fine.  I've seen some converted chrome books running linux, and they do
> it quite well, even with the minimal resources.  I have not, however,
> tried running orca/speakup on any of these converted boxes, as they
> weren't mine, and I had no call to experiment.  I was seriously
> considering purchasing one though, to see if I could get talkback to
> work on it, though I've not made the attempt just yet.  Perhaps next
> year I'll be able to carry out this experiment, and if I do, rest
> assured, I'll certainly let everyone on this list (and others) know my
> results.
>
>
>
> On 10/19/2016 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io wrote:
>> Hi list, ken here with a question.  posted this on the tech zone but
>> got no reply.  saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new
>> chromebook being released.  I know some things about chromebooks
>> namely that they are a bare bones computer.  all they have on them is
>> the browser and the media player.  the operating system is in the
>> cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199.  that seems
>> like a good option for those on a budget.  the question is can NVDA or
>> any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally
>> accessibile for blind/visually impaired?  not sure if anyone on this
>> list knows the answer to that.  it seems like for someone without a
>> laptop this could be a good option for me.
>>
>
>
>
>



speechPlayerInEspeak add-on

Laughing Thunder
 

Hi,


Out of curiosity, are there any plans to update the speechPlayerInEspeak add-on to use the new eSpeak NG synthesizer? Or, are there plans to implement the NV Access version of the Klatt synthesizer into eSpeak NG itself?


Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

Gene
 

I don't know how well Chrome Vox works as a screen-reader.  Nor how good the design is.  But if I were going to use the Internet at all seriously, I would seriously consider not getting a Chrome Book.  I am assuming that Chromevox when used on the Internet uses the same interface as the ChromeVox add on for Chrome does.  It is completely nonstandard as far as working like Windows screen-readers do on the Internet and doesn't have quick navigation keys that allow movement in the same ways.  You can move to the next element but I consider the design to be markedly inferior to what is standard in Windows screen-readers now. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] chromebooks and accessibility?

Well no chrome vox runs for chrome books but I don't know someone that
uses one.
To be honest if you want a lower end pc and don't want windows an amazon
fire with custom android may be better.



On 20/10/2016 4:13 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
> chrome books run (you guessed it, chrome os) Chrome os is not windows,
> chrome os is not windows, (this bears repeating) chrome os is not
> windows.  None of your windows programs are going to run on a chrome
> book.  Chrome os is a linux derivitive, and it runs linux apps
> specifically written for chrome os.  Sure, you can wipe it, and install
> a full version of linux if you like, and in that case, all your standard
> linux apps will work just fine, but out of the box, no, there's nothing
> you can run on a chrome book to get it to talk and be usable for the
> visually impaired.  The only thing you can do is (as mentioned above)
> install a full linux release, which would then give you the capability
> of running orca, speakup, or some combination thereof.  I suppose if
> it's got enough muscle, you might be able to get a version of windows
> installed, but generally speaking, chrome books are lower end machines,
> that wouldn't handle windows on a good day, though linux will work just
> fine.  I've seen some converted chrome books running linux, and they do
> it quite well, even with the minimal resources.  I have not, however,
> tried running orca/speakup on any of these converted boxes, as they
> weren't mine, and I had no call to experiment.  I was seriously
> considering purchasing one though, to see if I could get talkback to
> work on it, though I've not made the attempt just yet.  Perhaps next
> year I'll be able to carry out this experiment, and if I do, rest
> assured, I'll certainly let everyone on this list (and others) know my
> results.
>
>
>
> On 10/19/2016 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io wrote:
>> Hi list, ken here with a question.  posted this on the tech zone but
>> got no reply.  saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new
>> chromebook being released.  I know some things about chromebooks
>> namely that they are a bare bones computer.  all they have on them is
>> the browser and the media player.  the operating system is in the
>> cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199.  that seems
>> like a good option for those on a budget.  the question is can NVDA or
>> any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally
>> accessibile for blind/visually impaired?  not sure if anyone on this
>> list knows the answer to that.  it seems like for someone without a
>> laptop this could be a good option for me.
>>
>
>
>
>



Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

 

Well no chrome vox runs for chrome books but I don't know someone that uses one.
To be honest if you want a lower end pc and don't want windows an amazon fire with custom android may be better.

On 20/10/2016 4:13 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
chrome books run (you guessed it, chrome os) Chrome os is not windows,
chrome os is not windows, (this bears repeating) chrome os is not
windows. None of your windows programs are going to run on a chrome
book. Chrome os is a linux derivitive, and it runs linux apps
specifically written for chrome os. Sure, you can wipe it, and install
a full version of linux if you like, and in that case, all your standard
linux apps will work just fine, but out of the box, no, there's nothing
you can run on a chrome book to get it to talk and be usable for the
visually impaired. The only thing you can do is (as mentioned above)
install a full linux release, which would then give you the capability
of running orca, speakup, or some combination thereof. I suppose if
it's got enough muscle, you might be able to get a version of windows
installed, but generally speaking, chrome books are lower end machines,
that wouldn't handle windows on a good day, though linux will work just
fine. I've seen some converted chrome books running linux, and they do
it quite well, even with the minimal resources. I have not, however,
tried running orca/speakup on any of these converted boxes, as they
weren't mine, and I had no call to experiment. I was seriously
considering purchasing one though, to see if I could get talkback to
work on it, though I've not made the attempt just yet. Perhaps next
year I'll be able to carry out this experiment, and if I do, rest
assured, I'll certainly let everyone on this list (and others) know my
results.



On 10/19/2016 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io wrote:
Hi list, ken here with a question. posted this on the tech zone but
got no reply. saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new
chromebook being released. I know some things about chromebooks
namely that they are a bare bones computer. all they have on them is
the browser and the media player. the operating system is in the
cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199. that seems
like a good option for those on a budget. the question is can NVDA or
any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally
accessibile for blind/visually impaired? not sure if anyone on this
list knows the answer to that. it seems like for someone without a
laptop this could be a good option for me.



Re: NVDA and Fractions

 

The synth doesn't know squat.
A synth is only as good as its dictionary, and symbol data thats why you can edit it.
Be happy you can do at least that.
Back in the days when I used an old keynote gold, while I could modify a dictionary for things there was only 1, you could not customise for different situations, etc.
The dictionary was part of the software, you lost it you would have to put it in again and again.
If you wanted another language it was something like 2000 dollars, because as I was told the language was programmed in the chip rom.
Be happy we can have as many data files as we need.

On 20/10/2016 4:06 a.m., Travis Siegel wrote:
heh, this whole the synthesizer knows better than you do has been an
ongoing argument for me with apple since around 2005. I still insist,
and insist most heartily that it's the screen reader's job to read the
screen, and it's the user's job to interpret what the read information
means. But, yet, synthesizer makers insist on putting anchronyms in the
text to speech so it pronounces things, even if they're not actually
there on the screen. I can't tell you how many hours of coding time
I've lost trying to figure why my source code was saying something, only
to find out later that what my synth was reading wasn't in the code at
all, but just some damned text expansion the synth maker put into the
text to speech output to make it more convinient for the user. Well,
let me tell you, it's not more convinient for me to hear the word volume
when the letters on the screen are v o l. And, it's certainly not
useful to hear something pronounced as saint ego soars when the word is
stegosaurus. You know, sometimes the letters s and t together don't
mean street or saint, and sometimes, an I and a V together don't
necessarily mean roman numeral four. Ok, I get it, they're trying to
make them more user friendly, but in my opinion, there's nothing more
friendly than a screen reader that reads the screen and leaves the
meaning of what it reads up to me to decide.



On 10/19/2016 10:51 AM, Kevin Huber wrote:
Hi:

I have found this to be a problem with several synthesizers such as
Microsoft Anna and others. For example, it is verry annoying to here
"ca" always being pronounced as "California" when I want it to be
pronounced as Canada. There are a number of others which I cannot
remember ofhand, but it seems that a number of speech synthesizers
have abrivations hardcoded into them and the only way to eliminate the
problem is to use another synthesizer. E-speak is a good alternative
if you can get used to its speech.
Kevin Huber



Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

slery <slerythema@...>
 

Doesn’t ChromeVox work on these?

 

Cindy

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 11:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] chromebooks and accessibility?

 

chrome books run (you guessed it, chrome os) Chrome os is not windows, chrome os is not windows, (this bears repeating) chrome os is not windows.  None of your windows programs are going to run on a chrome book.  Chrome os is a linux derivitive, and it runs linux apps specifically written for chrome os.  Sure, you can wipe it, and install a full version of linux if you like, and in that case, all your standard linux apps will work just fine, but out of the box, no, there's nothing you can run on a chrome book to get it to talk and be usable for the visually impaired.  The only thing you can do is (as mentioned above) install a full linux release, which would then give you the capability of running orca, speakup, or some combination thereof.  I suppose if it's got enough muscle, you might be able to get a version of windows installed, but generally speaking, chrome books are lower end machines, that wouldn't handle windows on a good day, though linux will work just fine.  I've seen some converted chrome books running linux, and they do it quite well, even with the minimal resources.  I have not, however, tried running orca/speakup on any of these converted boxes, as they weren't mine, and I had no call to experiment.  I was seriously considering purchasing one though, to see if I could get talkback to work on it, though I've not made the attempt just yet.  Perhaps next year I'll be able to carry out this experiment, and if I do, rest assured, I'll certainly let everyone on this list (and others) know my results.

 

 

On 10/19/2016 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io wrote:

Hi list, ken here with a question.  posted this on the tech zone but got no reply.  saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new chromebook being released.  I know some things about chromebooks namely that they are a bare bones computer.  all they have on them is the browser and the media player.  the operating system is in the cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199.  that seems like a good option for those on a budget.  the question is can NVDA or any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally accessibile for blind/visually impaired?  not sure if anyone on this list knows the answer to that.  it seems like for someone without a laptop this could be a good option for me. 




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Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Well, it looks like they've done some work since the last time I checked on chromevox.  Last time I looked into chromevox, it was simply a browser extension, not a general screen reader, that's why I said you couldn't use a chrome book w/o installing something else.  I wasn't aware they'd expanded chrome vox to actually work as a stand-alone screen reader without the browser.  Good to know.



On 10/19/2016 3:04 PM, MistyDBradley@... wrote:
Hi,
Chrome books have their own built in screen reader called chrome vox. They run on the chrome operating system which is Google's operating system for chrome books, so as far as I know, NVDA or jaws or window eyes will not work with it. I am not too familiar with the chromeVox screen reader but have been researching it myself as I just ordered a new chrome book as an alternative to a laptop. The laptop I have is very heavy and cumbersome to take back and forth to school, and I wanted something light to use at school for notetaking and accessing my files on the cloud. From what I have learned doing my own research, there are lots of apps you can download that will make the chrome book just as functional as a laptop. There is a website you can go to to learn all about chromeVox, and it is www.chromevox.com.

Misty Bradley 
Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 19, 2016, at 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io <kenlawrence124@...> wrote:

Hi list, ken here with a question.  posted this on the tech zone but got no reply.  saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new chromebook being released.  I know some things about chromebooks namely that they are a bare bones computer.  all they have on them is the browser and the media player.  the operating system is in the cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199.  that seems like a good option for those on a budget.  the question is can NVDA or any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally accessibile for blind/visually impaired?  not sure if anyone on this list knows the answer to that.  it seems like for someone without a laptop this could be a good option for me. 




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Re: chromebooks and accessibility?

MistyDBradley@gmail.com <mistydbradley@...>
 

Hi,
Chrome books have their own built in screen reader called chrome vox. They run on the chrome operating system which is Google's operating system for chrome books, so as far as I know, NVDA or jaws or window eyes will not work with it. I am not too familiar with the chromeVox screen reader but have been researching it myself as I just ordered a new chrome book as an alternative to a laptop. The laptop I have is very heavy and cumbersome to take back and forth to school, and I wanted something light to use at school for notetaking and accessing my files on the cloud. From what I have learned doing my own research, there are lots of apps you can download that will make the chrome book just as functional as a laptop. There is a website you can go to to learn all about chromeVox, and it is www.chromevox.com.

Misty Bradley 
Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 19, 2016, at 10:59 AM, ken lawrence via Groups.io <kenlawrence124@...> wrote:

Hi list, ken here with a question.  posted this on the tech zone but got no reply.  saw an item in associated press yesterday about a new chromebook being released.  I know some things about chromebooks namely that they are a bare bones computer.  all they have on them is the browser and the media player.  the operating system is in the cloud this chromebook I saw released new only costs $199.  that seems like a good option for those on a budget.  the question is can NVDA or any screen reader run on a chromebook and are they generally accessibile for blind/visually impaired?  not sure if anyone on this list knows the answer to that.  it seems like for someone without a laptop this could be a good option for me. 


Re: NVDA And AVGVirus Scan

Gene
 

Also, antimalware programs have ways to turn off their shields while doing something like installing something if the shields are causing a problem.  I don't know the procedure for your specific antivirus program.  Perhaps someone else on list does.  I wouldn't be surprised if this can be done from the system trayy. 
 
If you do a google search for disable shields avg, you will find results.  Here is one that may be useful.  I haven't read it.
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 10:16 AM
Subject: [nvda] NVDA And AVGVirus Scan

I am using two computers.  On one the OS is Windows 7.  NVDA  2016.3 works fine although I using AVG As the anti-virus scanner.  On my other computer, my OS Is Windows 10.  On it I am still using NVDA 2013.  When I try to upgrade NVDA to 2016.3, AVG Blocks it.  Can you help me solve this problem?      

Anthony Bernard