Date   

Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Gene
 

Most blind Windows users do not know that enter is the equivalent of a left double clicck, that space is equivalent of a left single click and that opening the context menu with the context menu key is equivalent to a right mouse click. this simply isn't tought consistently to blind people in general and it is this specific knowledge that is necessary to use the system tray directly.

There is no harm nor violation of anything to place a few sentences in the section dealing with the system tray explaining this. I didn't say anything about the manual teaching Windows basics in general and I didn't claim that it should. I'm saying that if you don't include the system tray dialog, considering that very few blind people know what I am explaining, that it should be explained in that section.

At times, to be effective in pursuing a goall, you need to depart from ideology and do what makes sense to do in a specific situation. Neither you nor I know if our views in what should be in NVDA documentation generally agree or not, we haven't discussed that. I am talking about one very specific instance where a two decades means of working with the system tray is not included in NVDA and it is in other screen-readers. If you don't include what has become universally included elsewhere and that blind people know how to use, you should include a few lines explaining how to work with that which you are intending that blind people use as a result of what you are leaving out. I make no other statements about documentation.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 6:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] add-on for accessing the system tray

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:
Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to explain how to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely different things. NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows basics. It is entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user already knows about the System Tray and how it works. They should also be presumed to know how SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work. These are not screen reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the most tenuous connection to NVDA. The same things I said above would be applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now defunct screen readers. Users should know what's controlling what, and if they need the training to get that information, or need help from their friends, classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they need to pursue those avenues. It's not up to screen reader makers to teach basic Windows concepts in their documentation, except in passing as something screen reader specific is involved.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

~ Thomas Reed Powell


Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Richard Wells
 

I experience situations when pressing applications key or even routing
review cursor to mouse position after pressing WINDOWS-KEY+B to focus
the notification area when no action is taken on the system tray item
with which I am trying to interact. In those cases, I use the system
tray add-on to get the results I need. I don't care either way if it is
part of NVDA or not as long as I can have access to it when I want it. I
am extremely grateful to all add-on developers for the work they do that
helps me in being more productive. Every NVDA installation I set up for
myself or others has the SysTrayList add-on in case it is needed.

On 12/8/2020 6:56 PM, Bob Cavanaugh wrote:
I am with Gene on this, at least partially. I consider myself prettyuse has the
tech savvy, but for some reason I didn't know about the Windows
command to access the system tray until it was pointed out on the list
just now. I will definitely take a look at the add-on website to see
if I can benefit from any other add-ons. I've used NVDA as a secondary
screen reader for about 10 years, and interestingly have only had one
add-on running at a time.

On 12/8/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:

Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two
ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.
-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to explain how
to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely different
things.  NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows basics.  It is
entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user already knows about the
System Tray and how it works.  They should also be presumed to know how
SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work.  These are not screen
reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the most
tenuous connection to NVDA.  The same things I said above would be
applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now defunct
screen readers.  Users should know what's controlling what, and if they need
the training to get that information, or need help from their friends,
classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they need to pursue those
avenues.  It's not up to screen reader makers to teach basic Windows
concepts in their documentation, except in passing as something screen
reader specific is involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.*

~ Thomas Reed Powell







Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

On the other hand, now that I look at the add-on description, it's right there.

On 12/8/20, Bob Cavanaugh via groups.io <cavbob1993=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am with Gene on this, at least partially. I consider myself pretty
tech savvy, but for some reason I didn't know about the Windows
command to access the system tray until it was pointed out on the list
just now. I will definitely take a look at the add-on website to see
if I can benefit from any other add-ons. I've used NVDA as a secondary
screen reader for about 10 years, and interestingly have only had one
add-on running at a time.

On 12/8/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:


Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two
ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.
-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to explain
how
to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely
different
things.  NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows basics.  It is
entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user already knows about the
System Tray and how it works.  They should also be presumed to know how
SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work.  These are not
screen
reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the
most
tenuous connection to NVDA.  The same things I said above would be
applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now
defunct
screen readers.  Users should know what's controlling what, and if they
need
the training to get that information, or need help from their friends,
classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they need to pursue those
avenues.  It's not up to screen reader makers to teach basic Windows
concepts in their documentation, except in passing as something screen
reader specific is involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.*

~ Thomas Reed Powell










Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

 

Hi, mostly for Quentin,
I know I'm saying this in a public venue like this, but I would like to suggest working with people on making native Windows keyboard shortcuts more discoverable in various documentations and statements.
By the way, for people wondering about the status of SystrayList add-on: I maintained it last (until earlier this year). I personally think it would be better to move onto more modern approaches to reviewing notification area (Windows+B) rather than relying on the add-on alone.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Cavanaugh
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 4:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] add-on for accessing the system tray

I am with Gene on this, at least partially. I consider myself pretty tech savvy, but for some reason I didn't know about the Windows command to access the system tray until it was pointed out on the list just now. I will definitely take a look at the add-on website to see if I can benefit from any other add-ons. I've used NVDA as a secondary screen reader for about 10 years, and interestingly have only had one add-on running at a time.

On 12/8/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:


Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or
two ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.
-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to
explain how to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely
different things. NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows
basics. It is entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user
already knows about the System Tray and how it works. They should
also be presumed to know how
SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work. These are not
SHIFT+screen
reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the
most tenuous connection to NVDA. The same things I said above would
be applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now
defunct screen readers. Users should know what's controlling what,
and if they need the training to get that information, or need help
from their friends, classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they
need to pursue those avenues. It's not up to screen reader makers to
teach basic Windows concepts in their documentation, except in passing
as something screen reader specific is involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached
to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to,
then you have a legal mind.*

~ Thomas Reed Powell






Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

I am with Gene on this, at least partially. I consider myself pretty
tech savvy, but for some reason I didn't know about the Windows
command to access the system tray until it was pointed out on the list
just now. I will definitely take a look at the add-on website to see
if I can benefit from any other add-ons. I've used NVDA as a secondary
screen reader for about 10 years, and interestingly have only had one
add-on running at a time.

On 12/8/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:


Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two
ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.
-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to explain how
to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely different
things.  NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows basics.  It is
entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user already knows about the
System Tray and how it works.  They should also be presumed to know how
SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work.  These are not screen
reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the most
tenuous connection to NVDA.  The same things I said above would be
applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now defunct
screen readers.  Users should know what's controlling what, and if they need
the training to get that information, or need help from their friends,
classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they need to pursue those
avenues.  It's not up to screen reader makers to teach basic Windows
concepts in their documentation, except in passing as something screen
reader specific is involved.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to
something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you
have a legal mind.*

~ Thomas Reed Powell






Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Jackie
 

Ame, I can't entirely comment, my husband created the Hulu account, he
doesn't recall the credentials & I didn't know them from the
beginning.

Having said that, have you checked:
https://help.hulu.com/s/article/accessibility-features?language=en_US

It is accurate that NVDA is not mentioned in the list of supported
screen readers. It is also noteworthy that they expect their visitors
to have the latest edition of the browser they're currently using,
which may or may not be relevant to you. I don't recall that you ever
told us what browser you're using, but, basically, if you're a windows
user, they support Edge, Chrome, & Firefox.

There is also a link in the article I mentioned above to email your
specific screen reader feedback.

HTH.

On 12/8/20, Gene <gsasner@gmail.com> wrote:
I don't use Hulu so you can see if this works or helps. You evidently
turned browse mode off and were able to do a search. After you do it, turn

it on again with the same command and look at the page. See if you get
useful information.

Gene
-----Original Message-----
From: Ame
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] sudden changes to Hulu's website



I’d think so. I don’t have the foggiest idea what the heck to do. I hate
Narrator. I hate it! I think what we have here at the end of the day is
someone in the organization who knows just enough about assistive technology

to be dangerous. Lol By the way, I tried the thing with browse mode and I
was able to perform a search but I couldn’t access what I searched for even

with browse mode on. Can you give me any futther ideas? I was able to take

a baby step forward with browse mode. Now if I could just access the
results of my search, I’ll be a happy lady.








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Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

 

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 07:11 PM, Gene wrote:
Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray.
-
Believe it or not, Gene, I don't expect the folks at NVAccess to explain how to use a feature of Windows that has been present literally for decades.

What you expect in documentation, and what I do, are two entirely different things.  NVDA documentation should not be teaching Windows basics.  It is entirely reasonabl to presume that a Windows user already knows about the System Tray and how it works.  They should also be presumed to know how SHIFT+F10 or the Applications/Context Menu key work.  These are not screen reader concepts.

But with this, I'm done, because this is so meta that it has only the most tenuous connection to NVDA.  The same things I said above would be applicable to documentation for Narrator, JAWS, and a number of now defunct screen readers.  Users should know what's controlling what, and if they need the training to get that information, or need help from their friends, classmates, colleagues, etc., to get it then they need to pursue those avenues.  It's not up to screen reader makers to teach basic Windows concepts in their documentation, except in passing as something screen reader specific is involved.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

tim
 

Basicly you was told nicely that they are not going to test for useage with NVDA and only test what is listed on site.
They could be looking at NVDA as a security risk being free open source software just like companies do.

On 12/8/2020 6:50 PM, Gene wrote:
I don't believe what any accessibility specialist for a general organization says.  I don't automatically disbelieve it either, but I don't assume it is correct.  I'll try what is suggested if it makes sense or maybe even if it doesn't seem to and is not destructive but what does the person mean by no longer supports.  Does he/she mean that it was not tested with NVDA but was with JAWS?  The response talking about turning off the virtual pc cursor indicates that the site doesn't work properly with JAWS either.  Since we don't know how the site is tested, nor what the putative specialist means or knows, the statement is meaningless without further explanation.  In general, what works for web page accessibility in JAWS will work in NVDA.
Gene
-----Original Message----- From: Ame
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] sudden changes to Hulu's website
Well, this is no bug.  I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu.  That’s absolutely ridiculous.  I have NVDA because I can’t afford jaws,  Window eyes or any of the other commercial screen readers.  I can access Hulu’s content with narrator but it’s so clumsy as I said.  There’s no reason for them to do that.  I wonder who I could approach about getting them to reinstate support for NVDA.  Like I said, up till last Thursday afternoon, I never had a single problem navigating the site or accessing content.  The change was very sudden.  I’m beyond furious.


Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Gene
 

There are a lot of NVDA users who will never know aboutor be a ;part of this or other groups. There are also those who get training or learn to use NVDA in all sorts of different ways. There are some things that are simply so much conventions that they should be incorporated. In Chicago, where I live, professional radio announcers mispronounce the street Goethe for the same reason I am discussing, it is so widespread that the mispronounciation is considered correct for that purpose.

Also, unless the manual has changed, when I checked last, a year or two ago, no instruction was given for using the system tray. In other words, how to execute double left click, single left click and right click is not discussed. You don't not include something that is a convention going back for two decades and not explain how to use the alternative.

And also, as I said, there are rare times when one method works and the other doesn't, so it can't be claimed that the dialog is never needed and that the direct use of the System tray completely duplicates the functionality of the dialog.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 6:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] add-on for accessing the system tray

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 06:41 PM, Gene wrote:
It is so standardized in screen-readers that it should be a part of NVDA, particularly since a lot of users will never know about the add-on.-
Gene, what is "standardized" during times of need can be, and often is, removed once the period of actual need has passed.

A lot of users will never know about the vast majority of what their chosen screen reader supports or doesn't support. The argument from that perspective is a non-starter. It's easy enough to research via web search, which you pointed out earlier. And it should be expected in 2020 that each and every participant in a venue such as this is versed in doing basic web searches. If you cannot, then you need to be learning how, period.

One does not focus on the least skilled as the common denominator, but the far more general case and skill set.
--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

~ Thomas Reed Powell


Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

 

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 06:41 PM, Gene wrote:
It is so standardized in screen-readers that it should be a part of NVDA, particularly since a lot of users will never know about the add-on.
-
Gene, what is "standardized" during times of need can be, and often is, removed once the period of actual need has passed.

A lot of users will never know about the vast majority of what their chosen screen reader supports or doesn't support.  The argument from that perspective is a non-starter.  It's easy enough to research via web search, which you pointed out earlier.  And it should be expected in 2020 that each and every participant in a venue such as this is versed in doing basic web searches.  If you cannot, then you need to be learning how, period.

One does not focus on the least skilled as the common denominator, but the far more general case and skill set.  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Gene
 

I don't use Hulu so you can see if this works or helps. You evidently turned browse mode off and were able to do a search. After you do it, turn it on again with the same command and look at the page. See if you get useful information.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Ame
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] sudden changes to Hulu's website



I’d think so. I don’t have the foggiest idea what the heck to do. I hate Narrator. I hate it! I think what we have here at the end of the day is someone in the organization who knows just enough about assistive technology to be dangerous. Lol By the way, I tried the thing with browse mode and I was able to perform a search but I couldn’t access what I searched for even with browse mode on. Can you give me any futther ideas? I was able to take a baby step forward with browse mode. Now if I could just access the results of my search, I’ll be a happy lady.


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

 

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 06:43 PM, Ame wrote:
I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu.
-
NVDA was never supported by Hulu, in the literal sense.  They've made some stupid decision to code their webpages in a non-standard way, which will likely cause issues beyond NVDA.

Websites that follow the common existing HTML conventions are accessible by every screen reader I know of (including a couple that are no longer supported).

Mind you, if they've decided to use some newly evolving option, that simply happens.  When it comes to web accessibility there's always an element of cat and mouse because the rate of change in coding conventions is fast and will remain fast.  The web is constantly under construction.

By the way, and this isn't just specific to this situation, take what support agents say with a big grain of salt.  Most of them have no idea what a screen reader even is (and, yes, I do mean that) and most companies, even large ones, do not devote resources to a specific accessibility tech support group.  Your random phone or chat agent is not likely to have any clue beyond what they can find in a script, if such exists, and have also been known to "wing it," often giving inaccurate information.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Ame
 

I’d think so.  I don’t have the foggiest idea what the heck to do.  I hate Narrator.  I hate it!  I think what we have here at the end of the day is someone in the organization who knows just enough about assistive technology to be dangerous. Lol  By the way, I tried the thing with browse mode and I was able to perform a search but I couldn’t access what I searched for even with browse mode on.  Can you give me any futther ideas?  I was able to take a baby step forward with browse mode.  Now if I could just access the results of my search, I’ll be a happy lady.


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Guy Schlosser
 

I don’t blame you for being furious. I would be too. That’s crazy, and sorry to hear about the news.

On Dec 8, 2020, at 6:45 PM, Ame <abk043@...> wrote:



Well, this is no bug.  I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu.  That’s absolutely ridiculous.  I have NVDA because I can’t afford jaws,  Window eyes or any of the other commercial screen readers.  I can access Hulu’s content with narrator but it’s so clumsy as I said.  There’s no reason for them to do that.  I wonder who I could approach about getting them to reinstate support for NVDA.  Like I said, up till last Thursday afternoon, I never had a single problem navigating the site or accessing content.  The change was very sudden.  I’m beyond furious. 


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Gene
 

I don't believe what any accessibility specialist for a general organization says. I don't automatically disbelieve it either, but I don't assume it is correct. I'll try what is suggested if it makes sense or maybe even if it doesn't seem to and is not destructive but what does the person mean by no longer supports. Does he/she mean that it was not tested with NVDA but was with JAWS? The response talking about turning off the virtual pc cursor indicates that the site doesn't work properly with JAWS either. Since we don't know how the site is tested, nor what the putative specialist means or knows, the statement is meaningless without further explanation. In general, what works for web page accessibility in JAWS will work in NVDA.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Ame
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] sudden changes to Hulu's website



Well, this is no bug. I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu. That’s absolutely ridiculous. I have NVDA because I can’t afford jaws, Window eyes or any of the other commercial screen readers. I can access Hulu’s content with narrator but it’s so clumsy as I said. There’s no reason for them to do that. I wonder who I could approach about getting them to reinstate support for NVDA. Like I said, up till last Thursday afternoon, I never had a single problem navigating the site or accessing content. The change was very sudden. I’m beyond furious.


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

g melconian <gmelconian619@...>
 

They probably want you to be on there mobile apps  whether that be I os or android .  that’s   where  they make most of  their profits from. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ame
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 3:44 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] sudden changes to Hulu's website

 

Well, this is no bug.  I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu.  That’s absolutely ridiculous.  I have NVDA because I can’t afford jaws,  Window eyes or any of the other commercial screen readers.  I can access Hulu’s content with narrator but it’s so clumsy as I said.  There’s no reason for them to do that.  I wonder who I could approach about getting them to reinstate support for NVDA.  Like I said, up till last Thursday afternoon, I never had a single problem navigating the site or accessing content.  The change was very sudden.  I’m beyond furious. 


Re: sudden changes to Hulu's website

Ame
 

Well, this is no bug.  I was told by a chat agent that NVDA is no longer supported by Hulu.  That’s absolutely ridiculous.  I have NVDA because I can’t afford jaws,  Window eyes or any of the other commercial screen readers.  I can access Hulu’s content with narrator but it’s so clumsy as I said.  There’s no reason for them to do that.  I wonder who I could approach about getting them to reinstate support for NVDA.  Like I said, up till last Thursday afternoon, I never had a single problem navigating the site or accessing content.  The change was very sudden.  I’m beyond furious. 


Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Gene
 

It is needed on rare occasions. At times, you can't access something properly using the system tray itself and you can with the add-on. At times, the reverse is true.

And whether it is needed isn't really to the point. It has been the custom for screen-readers to provide a system tray dialog since Windows 98. At that time, that was the only way the system tray was accessible. It is so standardized in screen-readers that it should be a part of NVDA, particularly since a lot of users will never know about the add-on. Who knows how many users never learn about this list or other places where they would be encouraged to explore add-ons. At times, you just do something because it makes sense under existing conditions. NVDA developers believe that NVDA should do almost nothing outside of be a pure screen-reader. If taken too far, that is ideology and, as with all ideologies that are followed too dogmatically, results in bad decisions.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Lino Morales
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] add-on for accessing the system tray

Its a nice add-on, but not needed. WIN key B regardless of whatever
screen reader you use is great.

On 12/8/2020 6:21 PM, Bob Cavanaugh wrote:
Hi everyone,
I remember hearing from another user that I need an add-on to access
the system tray by pressing NVDA+F11. Can someone please send me the
link to that add-on? This is something else that I think should be
built into NVDA.
Thanks,
Bob





Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

 

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 06:34 PM, Gene wrote:
Do a Google search for NVDA system tray add-on.
-
Or make a point of bookmarking the NVDA Community Add-Ons Website.  Right now, since that page is sorted by most recent update date, the systrayList add-on is at the bottom of the page.

While there's occasional discussion of an unofficial add-on, most of them, including systrayList, that come up repeatedly can be found on that page.
 
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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

If you think that you can think about a thing, inextricably attached to something else, without thinking of the thing it is attached to, then you have a legal mind.

        ~ Thomas Reed Powell

 


Re: add-on for accessing the system tray

Gene
 

Do a Google search for NVDA system tray add-on. You will find the page in the first results.

Gene

If you have problems, let us know. -----Original Message-----

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Bob Cavanaugh
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2020 5:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] add-on for accessing the system tray

Hi everyone,
I remember hearing from another user that I need an add-on to access
the system tray by pressing NVDA+F11. Can someone please send me the
link to that add-on? This is something else that I think should be
built into NVDA.
Thanks,
Bob

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