Date   

Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

Neither do I I just removed some slimware driver updater junk off my dad's system that was last years junk but we never knew it existed till I found it in a folder and it was just databases and logs nothing that bad.
There were several other dangerous files said malwarebytes which I killed.
Malwarebytes is fine as a scanner for a on demand but I wouldn't really use its other features fully its accessible is semi ok, but it can take resources.
I use it to do a scan from time to time then uninstall it.

On 20/01/2017 3:29 p.m., Quentin Christensen wrote:
I think a lot of that mentality is due to much of the rest of the software
industry. Users are bombarded by so many pop-ups, notifications and other
interruptions that they learn the quickest way to just make things go away
when they are interrupted while trying to do something. First, it's a
website encouraging you to sign up for their newsletter before you even get
to the read the main page and see if it's worthwhile, but then a legitimate
security notification pops up and isn't distinguishable enough to warrant a
different approach. And, if it is distinguishable enough, then soon enough
Java will start popping up identical looking notifications wanting you to
update Java. I wonder how many average users even know what Java is,
except something that likes to be updated...

Not that I have a good answer to all of that, it's just an observation.

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:

I don't use Internet Explorer so I don't know about the reliability of
Smart Screen. But regardless, what I'm discussing illustrates a
mentality. This was discussed on another list. No one said anything about
reliability or false positives of Smart Screen. A number of people turned
it off because it interfeered with one site they wanted to use. That is
hardly a rational nor desirable way to approach security. Today it's Smart
Screen. Tomorrow, based on no information, its something else.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Thursday, January 19, 2017 7:16 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Anti virus recommendations

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 01:35 pm, Gene wrote:

Rather than deal with the minor inconvenience of being warned of known
dangerous sites when they visit one, they turn off the feature.

If you consider the amount of false positive nagging that "Smart Screen"
entails as a "minor inconvenience" then I can see why you fail to
understand why people turn it off. Security is not improved by being the
Chicken Little of cyberspace.

I've disabled a number of things, and changed antivirus suites, almost
exclusively because they've generated spurious false positives that I
absolutely knew to be false positives. They're a far bigger threat than
something that's quite a bit more lax but, when it identifies something as
a threat, it is a threat.
--
*Brian*

*He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence **lends an
illusion of profundity.*

* ~ T. De Vere White*







Re: Command Question

Quentin Christensen
 

Can you read the status bar in other programs?  The only thing I can think of is that pressing control+end takes you to the bottom of your document and if you have a blank line at the end, it will say "Blank".

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:59 PM, Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...> wrote:
I'm using a desktop. When I use that command,NVDA says "blank". Is anyone else having this experience? Is there something I need to change in settings?

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 19, 2017, at 9:29 PM, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:

If you are using desktop layout, the command is NVDA+end.  If you are using laptop keyboard layout, then the command is NVDA+shift+end.




On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:14 PM, Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...> wrote:
What is the command to get to the Status Bar (# of pages and page you are on) in a Word document? Everything I have seen says it is NVDA/End but when I do that command, NVDA says “blank”. Thanks.




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: Command Question

Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...>
 

I'm using a desktop. When I use that command,NVDA says "blank". Is anyone else having this experience? Is there something I need to change in settings?

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 19, 2017, at 9:29 PM, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:

If you are using desktop layout, the command is NVDA+end.  If you are using laptop keyboard layout, then the command is NVDA+shift+end.




On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:14 PM, Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...> wrote:
What is the command to get to the Status Bar (# of pages and page you are on) in a Word document? Everything I have seen says it is NVDA/End but when I do that command, NVDA says “blank”. Thanks.




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


salesforce

Kelsey Nicolay <piano.girl0299@...>
 

Hello,
I am considering switching to Nvda as my primary screen reader. However, I have a question I was hoping someone could answer. My employer uses Salesforce as their Crm system. It works well with JAWS, but I have not found any information on how Salesforce works with Nvda. Therefore, if anyone has used Salesforce with Nvda, please let me know how well it "withs and if there are any recommended settings. Please feel free to contact me offlist with your thoughts.
Thank you,
Kelsey Nicolay


Re: Command Question

Quentin Christensen
 

If you are using desktop layout, the command is NVDA+end.  If you are using laptop keyboard layout, then the command is NVDA+shift+end.




On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:14 PM, Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...> wrote:
What is the command to get to the Status Bar (# of pages and page you are on) in a Word document? Everything I have seen says it is NVDA/End but when I do that command, NVDA says “blank”. Thanks.




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: open office

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Angelo, glad it's mostly working!

As far as we can tell this is an issue in Open Office rather than NVDA.  I filed an issue with Open Office here: https://bz.apache.org/ooo/show_bug.cgi?id=127291

Hopefully they are able to fix it.

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:04 PM, Angelo Sonnesso <asonnesso@...> wrote:

Thanks I thought I had to change one of the settings.

It is interesting to note that NVDA is out performing Jaws in many areas.

 

 

73 N2DYN Angelo

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 8:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] open office

 

Hi Angelo, I just had a look at this and you are right, the suggested words aren't reading here either.  I did find I could use NVDA+numpad 6 (laptop: NVDA+shift+right arrow) to read through the list although that doesn't move focus, so you would need to press down arrow as you do it to ensure it reads the correct option.  I filed an issue on our tracker: https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues/6760


Regards

 

Quentin.

 

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 2:57 AM, Angelo Sonnesso <asonnesso@...> wrote:

Does anyone know how to get the cursor to move through the list of spelling
corrections.
Everything else in the programs appear to work just fine.


73 N2DYN Angelo







 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer

Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Command Question

Greg Rhodes <gkrhodes@...>
 

What is the command to get to the Status Bar (# of pages and page you are on) in a Word document? Everything I have seen says it is NVDA/End but when I do that command, NVDA says “blank”. Thanks.


Re: open office

Angelo Sonnesso
 

Thanks I thought I had to change one of the settings.

It is interesting to note that NVDA is out performing Jaws in many areas.

 

 

73 N2DYN Angelo

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2017 8:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] open office

 

Hi Angelo, I just had a look at this and you are right, the suggested words aren't reading here either.  I did find I could use NVDA+numpad 6 (laptop: NVDA+shift+right arrow) to read through the list although that doesn't move focus, so you would need to press down arrow as you do it to ensure it reads the correct option.  I filed an issue on our tracker: https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda/issues/6760


Regards

 

Quentin.

 

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 2:57 AM, Angelo Sonnesso <asonnesso@...> wrote:

Does anyone know how to get the cursor to move through the list of spelling
corrections.
Everything else in the programs appear to work just fine.


73 N2DYN Angelo







 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer

Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

 

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: Anti virus recommendations

Quentin Christensen
 

I think a lot of that mentality is due to much of the rest of the software industry.  Users are bombarded by so many pop-ups, notifications and other interruptions that they learn the quickest way to just make things go away when they are interrupted while trying to do something.  First, it's a website encouraging you to sign up for their newsletter before you even get to the read the main page and see if it's worthwhile, but then a legitimate security notification pops up and isn't distinguishable enough to warrant a different approach.  And, if it is distinguishable enough, then soon enough Java will start popping up identical looking notifications wanting you to update Java.  I wonder how many average users even know what Java is, except something that likes to be updated...

Not that I have a good answer to all of that, it's just an observation.

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 12:59 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I don't use Internet Explorer so I don't know about the reliability of Smart Screen.  But regardless, what I'm discussing illustrates a mentality.  This was discussed on another list.  No one said anything about reliability or false positives of Smart Screen.  A number of people turned it off because it interfeered with one site they wanted to use.  That is hardly a rational nor desirable way to approach security.  Today it's Smart Screen.  Tomorrow, based on no information, its something else. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 7:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti virus recommendations

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 01:35 pm, Gene wrote:
Rather than deal with the minor inconvenience of being warned of known dangerous sites when they visit one, they turn off the feature. 

If you consider the amount of false positive nagging that "Smart Screen" entails as a "minor inconvenience" then I can see why you fail to understand why people turn it off.  Security is not improved by being the Chicken Little of cyberspace.

I've disabled a number of things, and changed antivirus suites, almost exclusively because they've generated spurious false positives that I absolutely knew to be false positives.  They're a far bigger threat than something that's quite a bit more lax but, when it identifies something as a threat, it is a threat.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    





--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: Anti virus recommendations

Gene
 

I don't use Internet Explorer so I don't know about the reliability of Smart Screen.  But regardless, what I'm discussing illustrates a mentality.  This was discussed on another list.  No one said anything about reliability or false positives of Smart Screen.  A number of people turned it off because it interfeered with one site they wanted to use.  That is hardly a rational nor desirable way to approach security.  Today it's Smart Screen.  Tomorrow, based on no information, its something else. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 7:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti virus recommendations

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 01:35 pm, Gene wrote:
Rather than deal with the minor inconvenience of being warned of known dangerous sites when they visit one, they turn off the feature. 

If you consider the amount of false positive nagging that "Smart Screen" entails as a "minor inconvenience" then I can see why you fail to understand why people turn it off.  Security is not improved by being the Chicken Little of cyberspace.

I've disabled a number of things, and changed antivirus suites, almost exclusively because they've generated spurious false positives that I absolutely knew to be false positives.  They're a far bigger threat than something that's quite a bit more lax but, when it identifies something as a threat, it is a threat.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 01:35 pm, Gene wrote:
Rather than deal with the minor inconvenience of being warned of known dangerous sites when they visit one, they turn off the feature. 

If you consider the amount of false positive nagging that "Smart Screen" entails as a "minor inconvenience" then I can see why you fail to understand why people turn it off.  Security is not improved by being the Chicken Little of cyberspace.

I've disabled a number of things, and changed antivirus suites, almost exclusively because they've generated spurious false positives that I absolutely knew to be false positives.  They're a far bigger threat than something that's quite a bit more lax but, when it identifies something as a threat, it is a threat.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Reporting a minor bug between NVDA and Bard Express

Gerardo Corripio
 

HI listers

firstly for those of you guys outside the US., let me explain: Bard Express is a Windows-based program that's used for browsing and downloading Digital books and magazines off the Talking Book Library's BARD system. The bug I'm encountering between NVDA and the Bard Express program is that it only reads part of a book's details from within the list of books. For instance let's take the following book:

In the face of death casilla de verificación seleccionado no marcado Author: Noll, Peter, Subject: Biography, Annotation: When Peter Noll, a Swiss professor of jurisprudence, learned he had cancer of t, Narrator: George Backman, Series: , Reading Time: 8 hours, 30 minutes

Now with Jaws, the info within the list reads as follows

no verificado In the face of death
Noll, Peter
Biography
When Peter Noll, a Swiss professor of jurisprudence, learned he had cancer of the bladder, he decided against the radical treatments prescribed by the physicians. From December 28, 1981, until September 30, 1982, he recorded his thoughts and feelings and the progress of the disease. He died on October 9 in his daughter’s arms, leaving this legacy of his own confrontation with, and acceptance of, death.
George Backman

8 hours, 30 minutes
17 de 50

So what needs to be changed in NVDA for this part to be more-compatible with the Bard Express program?


--
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


Re: Anti virus recommendations

Arlene
 

You mean Microsoft Security? Yes it is. I think it will work for ten.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Roger Stewart
Sent: January-19-17 12:15 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti virus recommendations

Is Security Essentials still around? Thought it is now called Windows Defender or maybe these are just 2 names for the same thing in Win 10.

Roger









On 1/18/2017 10:15 PM, coffeekingms@hotmail.com wrote:
hi

I Agree, MSE is a good first step. It's good enough for most people,
especially now that it's built into windows 10. I'd go so far as to
say it's good enough for nearly all cases, unless your company you
work for mandates you use some other program. Of course there are
other options, like avast, and avira, but avast was completely
inaccessible the last time I tried it. To be completely honest though,
this was several years ago before I found out about MSE. Avira might
or might not be usable but both it and avast bug the hell out of you
to get you to upgrade to the paid version, and I find that annoying. I
also supplement windows defender, since I run windows 10 with periodic
scans using clam anti virus on linux, but I would only recommend that
to someone who already uses or plans to try linux, it's not something
a novice windows user should do, since it means learning a new OS and
not everyone is willing to do that.

Just my two cents

Kendell Clark



On 1/18/2017 9:19 PM, Robert Kingett wrote:
I would say Microsoft security essentials is accessible, fully. I can
tell you what programs are certainly not fully accessible, though!

avast. not accessible.

AVG. somewhat accessible.

There is an open source one that is accessible but is no longer being
updated. sorry, tat is all I got! I can't remember the name. darn!



Re: here's a mystery for you folks

 

I did remove the Logos keyboard, and Hebrew, in general, from my language settings. I went back inot the language settings, and added back Hebrew, and now use the Hebrew standard keyboard.


When I switch to that layout, I get almost constant error sounds. However, if I shift+tab, and then tab back, for example in an email from main body to subject and then back to subject, all works as expected. Is something messed up with my Nvda, or is it my installation of Windows? I'll try this happening in the log.






On 1/19/2017 3:15 PM, Governor staten wrote:

I alt+right shift, and then did alt+left shift, and fixed it. Now, to disable the alt+shift thing altogether.





On 1/19/2017 2:15 PM, Tyler Spivey wrote:
I can tell you what's happening, but not how to fix it. You might want to try to uninstall the biblical keyboard to see if it goes away.

I assume you're not using this while writing English.

You're pressing control and right shift, which sets the writing direction to right-to-left. If you press control left shift, that sets it back to left-to-right.

There's an option in the language bar advanced settings to disable some hotkeys, but I don't think that one is included. You might be stuck with it. One thing you can do in here, though, is disable alt+shift to switch layouts; windows+space does the same thing on Windows 8 and later, and is less easy to accidentally press.

On 1/19/2017 9:17 AM, Governor staten wrote:
Hello guys. Let me describe this as best I can.


So, i'm typing in Notepad. This also happens with Miranda-ng. My text
goes from right to left, instead of left to right. I do have the Logos
biblical keyboard installed, but, I"m obviously using it when writing
English. Any ideas as to why this is happening, and how it can be
solved? Anymore details needed, just ask.














Re: Rooting cursors with NVDA, can it be done?

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Nasrin,

In general you can use Object navigation to get to most sections of the screen and the review cursor to move around and read each section.  One example I used in the training material for instance, was the windows version dialog (press the windows key, type winver and enter) - it gives you the version and build details of your copy of Windows.  Using the regular keyboard, only the licence agreement link and ok button are readily accessible, however using object navigation and the review cursor, it is possible to move through and read all the information on that dialog.

Regards

Quentin.

On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 4:20 AM, nasrin khaksar <nasrinkhaksar3@...> wrote:
hi quentin.
i have a question in this regard.
is it possible to use inaccessible parts of pages using arrow keys?
because in jaws, when we use root jaws to pc, we navigate through the
pages like normal pages by using arrow keys.
thanks so much and God bless you.

On 1/19/17, nasrin khaksar <nasrinkhaksar3@...> wrote:
> hi.
> you can use screen review by pressing nvda+7 to activate it.
> this does the job for me.
>
> On 1/19/17, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
>> you can review the screen and, if you want to use a tutorial, you will
>> find
>> a detailed discussion of screen review commands and modes at:
>> http://www.nvda-kr.org/en/
>>
>> This page contains a tutorial covering many aspects of using NVDA.  The
>> specific sections dealing with screen review are both parts of section 3.
>>
>> It appears to me that you can either download the entire tutorial on the
>> page or individual sections.  So look around and download whatever you
>> want,
>> if anything.  I say If anything because I don't want to assume that you
>> want
>> to use a tutorial.  If you'd rather use written material, you will find
>> these matters discussed in the user guide.
>>
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: Lisa P Geibel
>> Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 5:09 AM
>> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>> Subject: [nvda] Rooting cursors with NVDA, can it be done?
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>> I know this is an NVDA list and that is my preferred screen reader, so
>> please help if anyone can? We currently have a legal copy of JAWS and
>> want to let it go, but I can't totally until I can find out how to do
>> one thing I know how to do with JAWS when it will read the screen to let
>> me. Sometimes in certain programs there are screens that the readers
>> don't easily read and in JAWS I have to do things like routing the JAWS
>> cursor to the PC cursor or vice versa. Is there a way to do this with
>> NVDA to read this hidden or not easily seen and read text? If so, please
>> tell me how? Thanks.
>> --
>> Lisa
>> E-Mail: lisapgeibel429@...
>> Facebook: http://facebook.com/ldporter1
>> Twitter: http://twitter.com/LisaLisa429
>> Philmore box shared with hubby:
>> 773-572-7897
>> Big Brother update line is option 1 of our box and the breaking TV News
>> updates line is option 9 of our box. You can hear our wedding with option
>> 2.
>> God bless everyone!!!
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> we have not sent you but as a mercy to the creation.
> holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
> in the very authentic narration is:
> imam hosein is the beacon of light and the ark of salvation.
> best website for studying islamic book in different languages
> al-islam.org
>


--
we have not sent you but as a mercy to the creation.
holy quran, chapter 21, verse 107.
in the very authentic narration is:
imam hosein is the beacon of light and the ark of salvation.
best website for studying islamic book in different languages
al-islam.org






--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Re: Anti virus recommendations

Gene
 

Clamwin, at least the Windows version, has gotten poor reviews for detection.  I haven't read about other versions. 
 
Regarding other comments, I find it disturbing how casually many people simply disable something that presents the least inconvenience.  An example is the Internet Explorer Smart Screen.  Rather than deal with the minor inconvenience of being warned of known dangerous sites when they visit one, they turn off the feature.  You can bypass the warning if you know it is incorrect for a given site but instead of dealing with that minor inconvenience, the entire protection provided is turned off. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2017 2:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti virus recommendations

Since people have mentioned Clamwin, it's also a good option but if you want the realtime download scanning that is typical of most modern antivirus programs you also have to install Clam Sentinel along side it.

Shawn Everiss has the right idea as far as installing as much passive protection as one feels one needs and as little active protection as one feels one can get away with.

I have said before, and I will say again, that those who believe that active protection is the primary way of keeping oneself safe are truly deluding themselves.  Most infections come about because the end users themselves are either careless in general, or give in to doing something that they realize they shouldn't have virtually the moment they've done it.

I am constantly engaged in "disinfection tasks" as part of the work I do on a routine basis.  When I start digging into how and when something became infected it is almost invariably, with the rarest of exceptions, because someone chose to ignore all the advice they've ever been given about what to do or not to do when interacting with cyberspace.  Infections are far more often invited in via the "front door" than sneaking in the "back door."

I've also been amazed at how many folks using third party antivirus or security suites will ignore, for months on end, messages from same that their subscriptions have expired or that they need to take some action to continue their protection.  That's why I always favor a "set it and forget it" solution, even one that has a good rather than almost perfect detection rate, because it doesn't matter how good the detection rate happens to be if the software becomes inactive through user inaction.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 12:57 pm, The Wolf wrote:
how do you add a file to a exception lists in windows defender

Settings,  Update & Security, Windows Defender Pane, Add an exclusion link.  Then go through the options in the dialog presented to tweak files or folders to be excluded.

--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

Since people have mentioned Clamwin, it's also a good option but if you want the realtime download scanning that is typical of most modern antivirus programs you also have to install Clam Sentinel along side it.

Shawn Everiss has the right idea as far as installing as much passive protection as one feels one needs and as little active protection as one feels one can get away with.

I have said before, and I will say again, that those who believe that active protection is the primary way of keeping oneself safe are truly deluding themselves.  Most infections come about because the end users themselves are either careless in general, or give in to doing something that they realize they shouldn't have virtually the moment they've done it.

I am constantly engaged in "disinfection tasks" as part of the work I do on a routine basis.  When I start digging into how and when something became infected it is almost invariably, with the rarest of exceptions, because someone chose to ignore all the advice they've ever been given about what to do or not to do when interacting with cyberspace.  Infections are far more often invited in via the "front door" than sneaking in the "back door."

I've also been amazed at how many folks using third party antivirus or security suites will ignore, for months on end, messages from same that their subscriptions have expired or that they need to take some action to continue their protection.  That's why I always favor a "set it and forget it" solution, even one that has a good rather than almost perfect detection rate, because it doesn't matter how good the detection rate happens to be if the software becomes inactive through user inaction.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    



Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

how do you add a file to a exception lists in windows defender

I used to be able to do that in windows8 but can no longer do this in windows10

On 1/19/2017 1:47 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Roger,

        Windows Defender has been Microsoft's Antivirus and Antimalware since the advent of Windows 8.  It's what I recommend pretty much exclusively these days because it's truly a "set it and forget it" affair for the most part, is part of the software that comes with the operating system, and has improved greatly in its detection rates over the last several years so it's no longer "second tier" as far as I'm concerned.

        Prior to Windows 8, the Windows Defender name was applied to their antispyware and antimalware tool, and it shipped with Windows 7 and was on by default, and Micrsoft Security Essentials was the antivirus, and it was not a part of software shipped with the OS.  It still exists and can be downloaded from the page I gave the link to if you're using Windows 7 or earlier.

         I wish they had just retired the Windows Defender name when they pretty much rolled what had been Windows Defender and Microsoft Security Essentials into a single, integrated product.  I new name would have likely eliminated a lot of the confusion that regularly springs up.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White

    




Re: Anti virus recommendations

 

Roger,

        Windows Defender has been Microsoft's Antivirus and Antimalware since the advent of Windows 8.  It's what I recommend pretty much exclusively these days because it's truly a "set it and forget it" affair for the most part, is part of the software that comes with the operating system, and has improved greatly in its detection rates over the last several years so it's no longer "second tier" as far as I'm concerned.

        Prior to Windows 8, the Windows Defender name was applied to their antispyware and antimalware tool, and it shipped with Windows 7 and was on by default, and Micrsoft Security Essentials was the antivirus, and it was not a part of software shipped with the OS.  It still exists and can be downloaded from the page I gave the link to if you're using Windows 7 or earlier.

         I wish they had just retired the Windows Defender name when they pretty much rolled what had been Windows Defender and Microsoft Security Essentials into a single, integrated product.  I new name would have likely eliminated a lot of the confusion that regularly springs up.
--
Brian

 He discloses the workings of a mind to which incoherence lends an illusion of profundity.

         ~ T. De Vere White