Date   

Re: FW: Chrome updates

Gene
 

Perhaps someone with the technical knowledge might explain why the JAWS cursor or the Window-eyes mouse pointer seems to be different than working with an actual physical mouse.  As I understand it, when you move the JAWS cursor or the Window-eyes mouse pointer, you are actually moving whatever the physical mouse moves internally.  I don't know enough to know how to express that accurately.  But it appears there are times you can get information with the physical mouse and NVDA that you can't get with the JAWS or Window-eyes mouse movement commands. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:58 pm, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:
I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy.

It was really, really interesting to me when I started playing with NVDA because, to my knowledge, it is the only screen reader that has the mouse tracking feature and that behaves as NVDA does in response to actual mouse movement.  I understand why, both for practical and historical reasons, the mouse has been a non-entity in the screen-reader-user world.  A good friend of mine refers to it as "the rodent," which I've always found extremely amusing.

But, with the advent of touch screens, where the finger is acting as a direct "mouse pointer" it's clear to me that the concepts that NVDA is using with mouse tracking will map, but in a very functional way, to finger travel on the touch screen.  My clients who use smartphones don't find it peculiar at all to use the touch screen with their finger even though they can't see it, because the finger position covers the actual screen territory.  With a mouse pad there's a "smaller to larger" mapping that's not directly intuitive and you can (and do) fall off the edge and sometimes re-emerge on the other if you go to far.  That's even worse with a conventional mouse and monitor.  The correspondence between a touch screen and "finger pointer" is more direct, tactile, and visceral.

I foresee the use of "mouse tracking" as applied to finger pointing as having huge potential to allow a person to explore a screen quickly, and at random locations, should they wish to do so.  There's a huge power in that and it's not being tapped on a routine basis as things stand now.

Brian



Re: nvda remote unofficial servers

Ben J. Bloomgren
 

Gene

Thank you for that site. I had heard of it before, but I just hadn't visited it. It's an invaluable resource. Thank you.
Ben
On Mar 30, 2016, at 16:28, Gene New Zealand <hurrikennyandopo@outlook.co.nz> wrote:

Hi Ben

The user manual for nvda remote can be found under the help section for
the add on in the nvda add on manager.

If you are interested, a while back I did a audio and also a written
tutorial on using it. It can be found on the nvda audio tutorials page
at http://accessibilitycentral.net/nvda%20audio%20tutorials.html
When you get there jump down by headings to the section that refers to
NVDA remote.
It starts below this heading called How to provide assistance to another
NVDA user (using the NVDA Remote Support add-on)

It should be easy enough to follow. Again it is in both written and you
can listen to a audio version.

hope this helps.

Gene nz


On 31-Mar-16 12:17 PM, Ben J. Bloomgren wrote:
is there a tutorial on how to use NVDA Remote?

Ben
On Mar 30, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi.
well I just read this on twitter but there are some unofficial remote servers.
nvdaremote.com is the main server.
nvra.me is the server list there are 16 servers and could be room for more they want to put servers world wide eventually.
--
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net




Re: FW: Chrome updates

Gene
 

one thing that I have never seen discussed is whether the physical mouse can be used by a blind person with NVDA on a web page where some problem exists that prevents Flash from being worked with.  I haven't used a physical mouse and I don't know if NVDA can see Flash controls when working with it.
 
I've seen it stated that some links can only be clicked with a physical mouse and for some reason, are coded not to work from the keyboard.  I expect this is nothing more than bad coding and design and I have either never or almost never come across such links but that's another interesting aspect of the discussion.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 6:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

Hi, Brian,

I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy. Thanks for bringing this point up.

Rosemarie
On 3/30/2016 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

Gene
 

Here is something interesting about NVDA not seeing most of the About screen. Someone, I believe on this list, reported today that if they unload NVDA and then reload it, they can read the screen.  I tried it and it works.  Evidently, Chrome isn't loading almost all of the about page when the page loads normally.  I have no idea why exiting and running NVDA again loads the page properly.  I'm not sure what the physical mouse is doing.  I don't have one and I can't experiment.  But it sounds from your discussion as though the physical mouse is reading the actual web page and not from the MSAA buffer.  That's interesting and it implies that the physical mouse never accesses the MSAA buffer but always works directly with the page.  
 
I realize that the Chrome browser is not working properly with this page but this topic may help developers and NVDA users work with web pages under unusual circumstances.  I have never had this happen before that I know of with any web page but in future, I'll keep the option of exiting an running NVDA in mind if I see something that looks like it may be the same problem.  That is, where I expect a page to load but I see nothing or almost nothing.  At rare times, unloading and loading NVDA may help and I may try it, on rare occasions.  I may also buy a physical mouse because it might be interesting to play with it at times when trying to deal with an accessibility problem and other methods don't work.
 
Gene  
 


Re: FW: Chrome updates

 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:58 pm, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:
I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy.

It was really, really interesting to me when I started playing with NVDA because, to my knowledge, it is the only screen reader that has the mouse tracking feature and that behaves as NVDA does in response to actual mouse movement.  I understand why, both for practical and historical reasons, the mouse has been a non-entity in the screen-reader-user world.  A good friend of mine refers to it as "the rodent," which I've always found extremely amusing.

But, with the advent of touch screens, where the finger is acting as a direct "mouse pointer" it's clear to me that the concepts that NVDA is using with mouse tracking will map, but in a very functional way, to finger travel on the touch screen.  My clients who use smartphones don't find it peculiar at all to use the touch screen with their finger even though they can't see it, because the finger position covers the actual screen territory.  With a mouse pad there's a "smaller to larger" mapping that's not directly intuitive and you can (and do) fall off the edge and sometimes re-emerge on the other if you go to far.  That's even worse with a conventional mouse and monitor.  The correspondence between a touch screen and "finger pointer" is more direct, tactile, and visceral.

I foresee the use of "mouse tracking" as applied to finger pointing as having huge potential to allow a person to explore a screen quickly, and at random locations, should they wish to do so.  There's a huge power in that and it's not being tapped on a routine basis as things stand now.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:38 pm, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Chrome doesn't allow you not to update whereas Firefox allows you to turn off updates or to be prompted and accept or not.  That is a significant difference.

 Absolutely, and I prefer the Firefox approach.  Firefox is, however, configured just like Chrome - automatically update - unless you know how to change that setting.  Your average user does not, and that's just what the folks at Firefox are relying on.

While there are legitimate reasons to postpone updates, one should not indulge in that urge for too long when the program interacts on a regular basis with the web at large.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,

I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy. Thanks for bringing this point up.

Rosemarie

On 3/30/2016 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

Gene
 

Chrome doesn't allow you not to update whereas Firefox allows you to turn off updates or to be prompted and accept or not.  That is a significant difference.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 6:15 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

Ben
On Mar 30, 2016, at 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:15 pm, Ben J. Bloomgren <bbloomgren@...> wrote:
it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

That's true.  Both constantly monitor for updates and apply them without user intervention.  There are occasions where Chrome, in particular, applies the update but requires a restart of Chrome for it to take effect.

Both are "low to no maintenance" programs and both now make it quite difficult to hold on to outdated versions.  Keeping outdated web browsers is generally not a good idea.

Brian

P.S.  I just updated Chrome and the latest is Version 49.0.2623.110 m



Re: nvda remote unofficial servers

Kenny Dog <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi Ben

The user manual for nvda remote can be found under the help section for
the add on in the nvda add on manager.

If you are interested, a while back I did a audio and also a written
tutorial on using it. It can be found on the nvda audio tutorials page
at http://accessibilitycentral.net/nvda%20audio%20tutorials.html
When you get there jump down by headings to the section that refers to
NVDA remote.
It starts below this heading called How to provide assistance to another
NVDA user (using the NVDA Remote Support add-on)

It should be easy enough to follow. Again it is in both written and you
can listen to a audio version.

hope this helps.

Gene nz

On 31-Mar-16 12:17 PM, Ben J. Bloomgren wrote:
is there a tutorial on how to use NVDA Remote?

Ben
On Mar 30, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi.
well I just read this on twitter but there are some unofficial remote servers.
nvdaremote.com is the main server.
nvra.me is the server list there are 16 servers and could be room for more they want to put servers world wide eventually.



--
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


Re: nvda remote unofficial servers

Ben J. Bloomgren
 

is there a tutorial on how to use NVDA Remote?

Ben

On Mar 30, 2016, at 12:37 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi.
well I just read this on twitter but there are some unofficial remote servers.
nvdaremote.com is the main server.
nvra.me is the server list there are 16 servers and could be room for more they want to put servers world wide eventually.



Re: FW: Chrome updates

Ben J. Bloomgren
 

it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

Ben

On Mar 30, 2016, at 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Re: FW: Chrome updates

 

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian


Re: Text to speech program?

john s
 

Matt, yep, Balabolka, a free program.



earlier, Matt Turner, wrote:

Hi, does anyone no of a program that will convert PDF files to audio?

John


Re: Text to speech program?

Kelly Sapergia
 

Hi Matt,

I use TextAloud from www.nextup.com to convert text files to audio. I know PDF files are supported, but I've never converted one with the program.

Hope this helps.

Yours Sincerely,
Kelly John Sapergia
Show Host and Production Director
The Global Voice Internet Radio
http://www.theglobalvoice.info

Personal Website: http://www.ksapergia.net
Business Website (KJS Productions): http://www.kjsproductions.com
Follow me on Twitter at: kjsapergia


Re: orbit reader 20

 

Thats good will looky at this.

On 31/03/2016 10:54 a.m., Josh Kennedy wrote:
here pasted below is the official news article about orbit reader 20.
its the first dust-resistant fluid resistant braille display.
News Details
Â
Orbit Research and the Transforming Braille Group Introduce the World's
Most Affordable Refreshable Braille Display
Thursday 24th March 2016:
Revolutionary technology from Orbit Research enables TBGï¿¿s objective
of achieving affordable braille for all

WILMINGTON, DE -- March 23, 2016 -- An affordable braille display has
long been the dream of blind people and educators across the world. The
Orbit Reader 20, announced today by Orbit Research and the Transforming
Braille Group finally makes this a reality. It is the worldï¿¿s most
affordable, full-feature Refreshable Braille Display, priced at a
fraction of the cost of similar devices. Based on revolutionary braille
technology from Orbit Research, the Orbit Reader 20 provides
signage-quality braille in a compact hand-held device with 20 eight-dot
braille cells.

The Orbit Reader 20 is a unique 3-in-1 device and serves as a
self-contained book reader, a note taker and as a braille display by
connecting to a computer or smartphone via USB or Bluetooth. As a
braille display, the device works with all platforms including Windows,
Mac OS, iOS and Android, to provide access to all the features of these
platforms using popular screen reader programs. It enables access to all
applications, such as email, web-browsing, text messaging, creating and
editing documents, etc. Though feature-rich, the device is extremely
simple to use and allows switching between the different functions
seamlessly.

In addition to the braille cells, the Orbit Reader 20 also includes a
high-quality, 8-key keyboard, a cursor pad and rocker keys for
navigation and panning, and an SD-card slot for loading books and files
for reading and editing in a standalone mode. It is fluid and dust
resistant and its construction is optimized for durability in extreme
environmental conditions.

"The Orbit Reader 20 represents the next step in our continuing mission
to bring affordable products to the blind and visually impaired
community. It is tremendously exciting and humbling to be able to bring
to the market a product that has the potential to catalyze literacy for
millions of blind people across the world" said Dr. Gina Spagnoli, Orbit
Researchï¿¿s Founder.

TBG President, Kevin Carey said: "The Orbit Reader 20 and its disruptive
braille technology alters the refreshable braille landscape forever. It
achieves TBG's objective of providing an affordable solution for
accessing e-books and other digital content via braille."

The Orbit Reader 20 is available for pre-order now and will ship in late
2016.

About Orbit Research:
Orbit Research develops and manufactures innovative and affordable
products that enable an independent lifestyle for people who are blind
or visually impaired. Founded with the mission to fulfill the urgent
need for affordable assistive technology products, the company has
introduced breakthrough products like the Orion Talking Scientific
Calculators and the iBill Talking Banknote Identifier that define the
state-of-the-art in features, functionality, convenience and cost. For
more information, visit www.orbitresearch.com.


About the Transforming Braille Group:
The Transforming Braille Group LLC is a global consortium of
organizations of and for the blind.


orbit reader 20

Josh Kennedy
 

here pasted below is the official news article about orbit reader 20. its the first dust-resistant fluid resistant braille display.
News Details
Â
Orbit Research and the Transforming Braille Group Introduce the World's Most Affordable Refreshable Braille Display
Thursday 24th March 2016:
Revolutionary technology from Orbit Research enables TBGï¿¿s objective of achieving affordable braille for all

WILMINGTON, DE -- March 23, 2016 -- An affordable braille display has long been the dream of blind people and educators across the world. The Orbit Reader 20, announced today by Orbit Research and the Transforming Braille Group finally makes this a reality. It is the worldï¿¿s most affordable, full-feature Refreshable Braille Display, priced at a fraction of the cost of similar devices. Based on revolutionary braille technology from Orbit Research, the Orbit Reader 20 provides signage-quality braille in a compact hand-held device with 20 eight-dot braille cells.

The Orbit Reader 20 is a unique 3-in-1 device and serves as a self-contained book reader, a note taker and as a braille display by connecting to a computer or smartphone via USB or Bluetooth. As a braille display, the device works with all platforms including Windows, Mac OS, iOS and Android, to provide access to all the features of these platforms using popular screen reader programs. It enables access to all applications, such as email, web-browsing, text messaging, creating and editing documents, etc. Though feature-rich, the device is extremely simple to use and allows switching between the different functions seamlessly.

In addition to the braille cells, the Orbit Reader 20 also includes a high-quality, 8-key keyboard, a cursor pad and rocker keys for navigation and panning, and an SD-card slot for loading books and files for reading and editing in a standalone mode. It is fluid and dust resistant and its construction is optimized for durability in extreme environmental conditions.

"The Orbit Reader 20 represents the next step in our continuing mission to bring affordable products to the blind and visually impaired community. It is tremendously exciting and humbling to be able to bring to the market a product that has the potential to catalyze literacy for millions of blind people across the world" said Dr. Gina Spagnoli, Orbit Researchï¿¿s Founder.

TBG President, Kevin Carey said: "The Orbit Reader 20 and its disruptive braille technology alters the refreshable braille landscape forever. It achieves TBG's objective of providing an affordable solution for accessing e-books and other digital content via braille."

The Orbit Reader 20 is available for pre-order now and will ship in late 2016.

About Orbit Research:
Orbit Research develops and manufactures innovative and affordable products that enable an independent lifestyle for people who are blind or visually impaired. Founded with the mission to fulfill the urgent need for affordable assistive technology products, the company has introduced breakthrough products like the Orion Talking Scientific Calculators and the iBill Talking Banknote Identifier that define the state-of-the-art in features, functionality, convenience and cost. For more information, visit www.orbitresearch.com.


About the Transforming Braille Group:
The Transforming Braille Group LLC is a global consortium of organizations of and for the blind.

--
follow me on twitter @joshknnd1982


Text to speech program?

Matt Turner
 

Hi, does anyone no of a program that will convert PDF files to audio?


Re: FW: Chrome updates

David Moore
 

Hi,
You need to have the OCR add on for NVDA installed. You need to OCR the about page and then I read that I have version 49 and it is up to date. That add on is easy to find and install. Have a great one.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 11:00 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

David,

As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial

Hi Cearbhall,

Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office folder.
I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the gmail basic html system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.

Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google Chrome? Does it update automatically? I am just wondering how it is accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.

Best regards,
Ronan
Ronan

On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:
Ronan,

As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
folder. I hope you still share it!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
To: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie
Subject: Chrome

Hi Cearbhall,
I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked .

Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?

Many thanks,
Ronan


nvda remote unofficial servers

 

Hi.
well I just read this on twitter but there are some unofficial remote servers.
nvdaremote.com is the main server.
nvra.me is the server list there are 16 servers and could be room for more they want to put servers world wide eventually.