Date   

Re: nvda in safe mode

Gene
 

Again, I am not talking about system restore per se.  II'm talking about shadow copy, which is not the same as running system restore.  and system restore can restore system and program files.  There are times when it is perfectly appropriate to use it.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Jackie
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:59 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

System restore will not restore user files. It doesn't touch them. All
you'll do is make additional writes to your hard drive, rendering any
possibility of file recovery more problematic than it already is.

On 1/26/20, Oriana <o.neulinger@...> wrote:
> I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC
> repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the
> manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that
> will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore
> (which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command
> line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to
> recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage
> of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually
> does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still
> stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it
> will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as
> CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to
> restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore
> those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs,
> DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from
> writing over the top of any file.
>
>
> On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
>
>> I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to
>> using
>> cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that
>> discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The
>> del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes
>> them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files
>> sent
>> to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old
>> versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I
>> don't
>> know.
>>
>> Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as
>> I
>> thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch
>> file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
>>
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* Gene <gsasner@...>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
>> *Subject:* Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode
>>
>> If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has
>> nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent
>> when
>> deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle
>> bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.
>> If
>> you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system
>> Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do
>> the
>> same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default,
>> backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in
>> Windows
>> 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the
>> properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
>>
>> If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in
>> Shadow
>> Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't
>> know
>> which ones work well or if they work as well as desired.
>>
>> I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files
>> using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure
>> why
>> I think that, but I believe that is the case.
>>
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* Martin McCormick <martin.m@...>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
>> *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
>> *Subject:* [nvda] nvda in safe mode
>>
>> I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
>> have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
>> maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
>> clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
>> supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
>> my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.
>>
>> del /q/f/s *.*
>>
>> I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
>> powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
>> tells the system my path was one of the casualties.
>>
>> I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
>> so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
>> things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
>> are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.
>>
>> If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
>> with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
>> close to it.
>>
>> I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
>> buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
>> should have gone there.
>>
>> Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
>> system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
>> whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
>> is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.
>>
>> Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
>> Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
>> Mode yet?
>>
>> If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
>> part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
>> lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
>> couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
>> either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.
>>
>> This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
>> backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
>> After this mishap, it will be sooner.
>>
>> I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
>> 1763.9-something
>>
>> In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
>> files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
>> the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
>> yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.
>>
>> It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
>> tired and in a hurry.
>>
>> Martin
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>


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Re: nvda in safe mode

Gene
 

I should add that the comments on writing to the hard drive reminded me of something.  let's say that your last restore point was a week ago and that there are files you don't want to lose from the week since.  If you use old versions, I wonder if the files, being placed on the current folders might overright files that are newer and make them unrecoverable.  But then, on the other hand, it may be so cumbersome and time consuming recovering files with a recovery program and I don't know if they all would be, that it might be better to use old versions.  I don't know if it would be cumbersome and time consuming, I'm raising that as a possibility.  I haven't used such programs much. 
 
This should be discussed more by those who have more technical knowledge than I do, but I'm not sure it should be continued on the main list.  It really should be in the chat group.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I wasn't objecting to writing to the hard drive, if it means restoring files such as from old versions.  Have you used old versions?  System restore, when you run it, doesn't restore files if they are data files like documents, music, etc.  But old versions, or shadow copy, will restore deleted files. 
 
Gene
----- Original message -----
From: Oriana
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore (which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs, DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from writing over the top of any file.


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to using cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files sent to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I don't know. 
 
Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as I thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Station Playlist Studio Tutorials Using NVDA (Audio)

VIAS, ARMANDO
 

Hello guys,

Is there an audio tutorial on Station Playlist Studio? I’m testing out a new radio station, and I got it to work on Station Playlist Studio with Live365. Butm there are a lot of things to learn about the program as well.

Hope to hear from you soon.

Armando Vias
Owner of The Blind Advocate Network
Website: https://theblindadvocate.net
Email: avias@...
Like my page on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theblindadvocatenetwork
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/theblndadvn
“Getting advocacy results for the blind.”


Re: nvda in safe mode

Oriana
 

Gene,

I'm sorry for the confusion but i was referring to Jackie.

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 4:58 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I wasn't objecting to writing to the hard drive, if it means restoring files such as from old versions.  Have you used old versions?  System restore, when you run it, doesn't restore files if they are data files like documents, music, etc.  But old versions, or shadow copy, will restore deleted files. 
 
Gene
----- Original message -----
From: Oriana
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore (which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs, DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from writing over the top of any file.


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to using cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files sent to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I don't know. 
 
Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as I thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Re: nvda in safe mode

Jackie
 

System restore will not restore user files. It doesn't touch them. All
you'll do is make additional writes to your hard drive, rendering any
possibility of file recovery more problematic than it already is.

On 1/26/20, Oriana <@orineu> wrote:
I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC
repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the
manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that
will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore
(which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command
line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to
recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage
of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually
does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still
stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it
will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as
CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to
restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore
those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs,
DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from
writing over the top of any file.


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I just did a little looking online. I found information relating to
using
cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that
discussed Windows 10. But I don't see why this would have changed. The
del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin. it just deletes
them. I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files
sent
to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old
versions of Windows. What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I
don't
know.

Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as
I
thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch
file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Gene <gsasner@...>
*Sent:* Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin. This has
nothing to do with safe mode. The recycle bin is where files are sent
when
deleted in the ordinary way. If they are there, you can open the recycle
bin and you will see them. You can restore them from the recycle bin.
If
you want to do something else, we can discuss that. If you have system
Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do
the
same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7. System Restore, by default,
backs up all your files. The feature is called Shadow Copy but in
Windows
7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the
properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.

If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in
Shadow
Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't
know
which ones work well or if they work as well as desired.

I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files
using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin. I'm not sure
why
I think that, but I believe that is the case.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Martin McCormick <martin.m@...>
*Sent:* Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few. A del *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin






--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@... with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs
& check out my sites at www.brighter-vision.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Re: nvda in safe mode

Gene
 

I wasn't objecting to writing to the hard drive, if it means restoring files such as from old versions.  Have you used old versions?  System restore, when you run it, doesn't restore files if they are data files like documents, music, etc.  But old versions, or shadow copy, will restore deleted files. 
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
From: Oriana
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 3:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore (which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs, DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from writing over the top of any file.


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to using cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files sent to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I don't know. 
 
Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as I thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Re: nvda in safe mode

Oriana
 

I would recommend hiring or at least getting the advice of a local PC repair technician, or if the PC is under warranty contacting the manufacturer. As someone else said, it's a bad idea to do anything that will cause writes to the hard drive. This may include system restore (which, although ymmv, has never restored user files for me). The command line definitely bypasses the recycle bin, so the only way i know of to recover any of the files is to use one of the programs that takes advantage of hardware limitations - when windows deletes a file, what it actually does is delete the index indicating that the file exists. The data is still stored on your hard drive, but windows can't tell that it's there, so it will begin writing over the data. "Data Recovery" programs such as CCleaner's Recuva (accessibility unknown, but it claims to be able to restore data from even a reformatted drive, and it's free) will restore those index files or copy the data over to USB drives/optical storage (CDs, DVDs). I recommend the latter, obviously, in order to prevent Windows from writing over the top of any file.


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:51 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to using cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files sent to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I don't know. 
 
Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as I thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Re: nvda in safe mode

Gene
 

I just did a little looking online.  I found information relating to using cmd in XP but in the small amount of searching I did, nothing that discussed Windows 10.  But I don't see why this would have changed.  The del command in XP doesn't send files to the recycle bin.  it just deletes them.  I read parts of one or two discussions about how to have files sent to the recycle bin when using cmd but they were for XP, and other old versions of Windows.  What is discussed may apply to Windows 10 but I don't know. 
 
Evidently it isn't the use of a batch file that causes this behavior, as I thought, but use of the del command either manually entered or in a batch file, if nothing is done to change this behavior.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Re: nvda in safe mode

Gene
 

If I understand your message, you want to use the recycle bin.  This has nothing to do with safe mode.  The recycle bin is where files are sent when deleted in the ordinary way.  If they are there, you can open the recycle bin and you will see them.  You can restore them from the recycle bin.  If you want to do something else, we can discuss that.  If you have system Restore on and you have restore points, I would expect that you can do the same thing in Windows 10 as in Windows 7.  System Restore, by default, backs up all your files.  The feature is called Shadow Copy but in Windows 7, if you use it, it is called previous versions and it is in the properties of the drive, or of a folder or file.
 
If the files aren't available in the recycle bin and they aren't in Shadow Copy, you would have to use some sort of undelete program and I don't know which ones work well or if they work as well as desired. 
 
I suspect, however, though I don't know this, that when you delete files using a batch file, they aren't sent to the recycle bin.  I'm not sure why I think that, but I believe that is the case. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:34 PM
Subject: [nvda] nvda in safe mode

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few.  A del  *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is  stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



Re: nvda in safe mode

hurrikennyandopo ...
 

Hi Can you get a browser to work at present if you can I can send you to my nvda audio tutorials page at http://accessibilitycentral.net/nvda%20audio%20tutorials.html



I copied and pasted the directions of how to get into safe mode in windows. This is on a windows 10 machine. I can not remember but I think the latest versions of windows 10 might let you in without the patch.


I will drop box the patch if needed.


To use NVDA in safe mode
You will need to install a registry patch first. This file can be found at https://www.dropbox.com/s/jr72u3sk7p0za2r/Activate_Sound_in_Win10_Safe_Mode.zip?dl=0
After it has been installed it will allow you to use NVDA in safe mode. This has been tested on a Windows 7 and Windows 10 machine and with quite a few different sound cards.
Directions to go into and out of safe mode in Windows
You can reboot in to safe mode by doing the following:
Press Windows plus R and type msconfig and hit Enter
Press Ctrl plus Tab to get to the "boot tab"
Tab to "safe boot" and check the check mark/check box.
Tab to "base video" and check it as well.
Tab to the apply button. Press Enter (or spacebar).
Tab to the OK button and press it. You should get a prompt to restart the computer to apply the changes.
If you select "restart now" your PC should restart into safe mode.
Please note: When the registry patch has been installed, when you go into safe mode,  you will have sound and be able to use the NVDA screen reader.
Message you will get while in safe mode

To confirm you are in safe mode, you can use the NVDA key + letter B. Below is the type of message you will get as an example on a Windows 10 machine.
Safe Mode Microsoft (R) Windows (R) (Build 16299.rs3_release.170928-1534) Safe Mode
After finishing your PC job with safe mode, do the same steps above, but this time uncheck the two check boxes above for both safe boot, and base video. Tab to apply and press Enter. Tab to OK and press Enter (or spacebar) and restart. Your PC will restart to the normal mode.

On 27/01/2020 7:34 am, Martin McCormick wrote:
I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few. A del *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin


Re: nvda in safe mode

Jackie
 

https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda/message/56683

Having thus said, I don't think it's gonna help, because I believe
that when you use the command line, as in a batch file, then it
bypasses the recycle bin. There's nothing to indicate this is a
problem w/a driver or a service that safe mode would resolve.

I think you need some recovery software. I suggest using another
machine if possible so that writes to the hard drive in question are
kept to a minimum. Enclose it in a USB caddy if possible. Don't try to
recover the files to the drive you're trying to recover, but on a
separate drive. Again, you wanna keep writes to that hard drive to the
bare minimum.

On 1/26/20, Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:
I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few. A del *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin



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Re: Using Open audible

David Griffith
 

Sorry Pele

I got confused as to which email group I was responding to. I had not realised that you had responded directly to the NVDA group so the information appeared twice.
Anyway it is very helpful.
David Griffith

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pele West
Sent: 26 January 2020 18:20
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Using Open audible

Hi David and Everyone

Below are the instructions for installing Open Audible. I did not make a note of who originally posted this information, but I have modified the format of the text slightly.

Pele West

To install using defaults assuming the installation is on the first screen:

1. Run the Open Audible Install File

2. Press <Enter> 3 times after the screen reader has finished reading out a progress bar

3. Press <Tab> 3 times

4. Press <Enter>

5. Wait a minute or so for the files to be copied, then pres <Tab> twice

6. Press <Enter>

OpenAudible should start up.


nvda in safe mode

Martin McCormick
 

I had an accident yesterday when a batch file appears to
have deleted all the files in my c:\users\martin directory with
maybe the exception of a few. A del *.* that was supposed to
clean out a single folder deleted everything because it was
supposed to start in 1 specific directory but instead launched on
my whole file tree starting at c:\users\martin.

del /q/f/s *.*

I can log in just fine but if I run the cmd command or
powershell, I start out in c:\windows\system32 so a file that
tells the system my path was one of the casualties.

I know that deleting a file sends it to the recycle bin
so if I can recover those files that were deleted yesterday,
things should be good again but with even minor disasters, things
are all ways served with a touch of nasty sauce.

If I go to c:\users\martin, the directory is there along
with all the subdirectories but they are either all empty or
close to it.

I have opened the recycle bin but haven't found any
buttons that start the process of recovering the files that
should have gone there.

Since I normally work in unix, I have used this Windows
system primarily for it's browsers and to program two-way radios
whose programming software is only found under Windows so there
is about 60 GB out of close to 1 TB that is used.

Apparently, the best way to recover these files is in
Safe mode so my question is Does NVDA or narrator start in Safe
Mode yet?

If there is a way to tell the system to rebuild the lost
part of my home directory, this would do also as most of what was
lost is stuff that came with the installation as there were a
couple of replaceable files in Downloads and everything else was
either self-generated or can be rebuilt fairly easily.

This is no excuse but that is partly why I didn't have a
backup system going yet but was going to set one up very soon.
After this mishap, it will be sooner.

I am running Windows10 1809 with a build number of
1763.9-something

In Safe Mode, one can even use the command line to grab
files out of c:\$Recycle.Bin but when logged in as me, which is
the admin account, one can see $Recycle.Bin but listing it
yields a "File not found" error for the whole directory.

It's amazing what stupid things we can do when a bit
tired and in a hurry.

Martin


Re: Using Open audible

David Griffith
 

That is very helpful.
Many thanks.
David Griffith

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Pele West
Sent: 26 January 2020 18:20
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Using Open audible

Hi David and Everyone

Below are the instructions for installing Open Audible. I did not make a note of who originally posted this information, but I have modified the format of the text slightly.

Pele West

To install using defaults assuming the installation is on the first screen:

1. Run the Open Audible Install File

2. Press <Enter> 3 times after the screen reader has finished reading out a progress bar

3. Press <Tab> 3 times

4. Press <Enter>

5. Wait a minute or so for the files to be copied, then pres <Tab> twice

6. Press <Enter>

OpenAudible should start up.


Re: Using Open audible

David Griffith
 

Someone from the British Computer Association of the Blind list has kindly sent me the instructions for installing Open Audible without sight.
I have not installed Open audible myself but I understand that after the initial inaccessible setup the program will work nicely with NVDA.

I copy the information sent to me below.

To install using defaults assuming the installation is on the first screen:

1. Run the Open Audible Install File

2. Press <Enter> 3 times after the screen reader has finished reading out a progress bar

3. Press <Tab> 3 times

4. Press <Enter>

5. Wait a minute or so for the files to be copied, then pres <Tab> twice

6. Press <Enter>

Open Audible should start up.

David Griffith

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Griffith via Groups.Io
Sent: 26 January 2020 18:24
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Using Open audible

You can follow this link.
https://openaudible.org/

David Griffith

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dorothea Martin
Sent: 26 January 2020 15:01
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Using Open audible

Hello, All,
I'm new to this group, so I have come in on the middle of this thread.
Could you briefly explain to me what Open Audible is? Thanks.
Dotty Martin


Re: Using Open audible

David Griffith
 

You can follow this link.
https://openaudible.org/

David Griffith

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dorothea Martin
Sent: 26 January 2020 15:01
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Using Open audible

Hello, All,
I'm new to this group, so I have come in on the middle of this thread.
Could you briefly explain to me what Open Audible is? Thanks.
Dotty Martin


Re: Using Open audible

Pele West
 

Hi David and Everyone

Below are the instructions for installing Open Audible. I did not make a
note of who originally posted this information, but I have modified the
format of the text slightly.

Pele West

To install using defaults assuming the installation is on the first screen:

1. Run the Open Audible Install File

2. Press <Enter> 3 times after the screen reader has finished reading out a progress bar

3. Press <Tab> 3 times

4. Press <Enter>

5. Wait a minute or so for the files to be copied, then pres <Tab> twice

6. Press <Enter>

OpenAudible should start up.


Re: can't play an internet station using waterfox

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I tried microfost edge and it played well once I got past where you have to hit shift f-6 to open the download cycle.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 11:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

Did you try another browser?  Sometimes, you just have to use something else for a reason you may never know.  No one program may meet every need in a certain category of use. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 10:31 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

I don't have an android device.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Oriana
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 8:28 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

That being said, the stream for Android works for my Android device.

 

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020, 11:27 PM Oriana Neulinger <o.neulinger@...> wrote:

This doesn't display on the html version of the website (typo on the closing bracket of the first horizontal rule, if anyone cares), but above the first line of the website it says "We are currently offline for software updates".

 

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020, 11:21 PM Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:

www.thegridfm.com.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 8:20 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

There appear to be a number of URLs that get you to this station.  Could you please share the address you're using?

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Power is being told you're not loved and not being destroyed by it.

       ~ Madonna

 

 


Re: can't play an internet station using waterfox

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,

 

Thanks for the tip. I have another device I can play it on too.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 11:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

I'm going into detail of how you may approach a problem like this so you may have a better understanding of what to do in future when you encounter such a problem.  Those who are not interested may want to skip this message.  Those interested may find it useful in future.

 

I see no error in the Windows Mediaplayer link.  I pasted it to the clippboard using the copy address submenu function in Chrome and got the following:

 

There are many listen links but, except for the Android devices link, However, they appear to be somehow coded incorrectly.  They cause Chrome to display a save as dialog, at least on my machine.  Others may report what they do on theirs.  I doubt using another browser would solve the problem, though that is generally one of the first gthings I do in such a case.  But, based on the behavior here, I doubt it will help, though I'm not sure. 

Given the odd behavior, the thing to do is the following:

Never believe a site in such a case.  Site developers may not know what they are doing and they may mislabel links in terms of describing what they do.  Try the android devices link.  I pressed enter on it and the stream played in my browser.  In short, the Android devices link is properly configured and will play in a Windows browser.  It may play using android devices as well but, the person who labeled the link as to its purpose didn't know what the link would do and mislabeled the only one that works.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 10:21 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

www.thegridfm.com.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 8:20 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] can't play an internet station using waterfox

 

There appear to be a number of URLs that get you to this station.  Could you please share the address you're using?

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Power is being told you're not loved and not being destroyed by it.

       ~ Madonna

 

 


Re: Using Open audible

Dorothea Martin
 

Hello, All,
I'm new to this group, so I have come in on the middle of this thread. Could you briefly explain to me what Open Audible is? Thanks.
Dotty Martin