Date   

Re: free accessible video converter?

Sascha Cowley
 

Handbrake works, but can be a bit fiddly. There is also a command line version available.

FFMPEG is accessible (it is a command line program), but is not for the faint-of-heart.

On 18/12/2019 18:50, Simone Dal Maso wrote:
Hello,
Before I start testing lots of software, do you know some accessible videoconverter tool?
I have some hd video made with my iphone and they takes lots of spaces.
I'd like to reduce their size, are there some accessible tool?
Thank you.


Re: free accessible video converter?

Adriano Barbieri
 

Hi Simone,


Have you tried out Format Factory? is free.
I feel very good, and it's fast too, just be careful during installation because it also proposes to install other apps, but you can deselect the checkbox.
I think it also exists in a portable version.

Regards
Adriano


Il 18/12/2019 08:50, Simone Dal Maso ha scritto:

Hello,
Before I start testing lots of software, do you know some accessible videoconverter tool?
I have some hd video made with my iphone and they takes lots of spaces.
I'd like to reduce their size, are there some accessible tool?
Thank you.





free accessible video converter?

Simone Dal Maso
 

Hello,
Before I start testing lots of software, do you know some accessible videoconverter tool?
I have some hd video made with my iphone and they takes lots of spaces.
I'd like to reduce their size, are there some accessible tool?
Thank you.


Re: How to copy previous spoken message by NVDA without speech history addon

Gene
 

The correct command is NVDA key numpad 5, if you are using the desktop layout.  You can use numpad insert numpad 5.  But this isn't related to the last speech.  It copies the text of the current object to the clipboard. 
 
If you write a bit of text in Notepad, then use alt f4, you will get the do you want to save the changes message.  Yes is the current object, as you can hear by using read current object, numpad 8.  &You must be in object review to reliably hear the correct text and only the correct text. Using numpad insert numpad 5 will copy the word "yes" to the clipboard, the current object.  But that isn't necessarily what is desired and isn't related to the last speech, only to what the current object is.  You may thereby copy something you want, but you may hear a good deal read that won't be copied that you want to copy.
 
Gene . 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2019 12:26 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] How to copy previous spoken message by NVDA without speech history addon

By pressing numpad 5 quickly thrice also helps in copying the the last utterence to the clipboard.


On Wed, 18 Dec, 2019, 4:57 AM Nimer Jaber, <nimerjaber1@...> wrote:
Hello,

You can enable the speech viewer. Then, perform the task which causes the utterance you want to copy. Go back to the speech viewer and copy the resulting output.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 3:21 PM Mr. Wong Chi Wai, William <cwwong.pro@...> wrote:
Hello,

I would like to know, if without the addon speech history.

How can one copy the previous spoken message by NVDA?

Especially there are items not able to be copied via current review cursor.

Thanks,

William







--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Re: How to copy previous spoken message by NVDA without speech history addon

Ishant Rajput <ishantrajput11@...>
 

By pressing numpad 5 quickly thrice also helps in copying the the last utterence to the clipboard.


On Wed, 18 Dec, 2019, 4:57 AM Nimer Jaber, <nimerjaber1@...> wrote:
Hello,

You can enable the speech viewer. Then, perform the task which causes the utterance you want to copy. Go back to the speech viewer and copy the resulting output.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 3:21 PM Mr. Wong Chi Wai, William <cwwong.pro@...> wrote:
Hello,

I would like to know, if without the addon speech history.

How can one copy the previous spoken message by NVDA?

Especially there are items not able to be copied via current review cursor.

Thanks,

William







--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Re: issues with zoom and menus and text chat

Ralf Kefferpuetz
 

Same issue here.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen
Sent: Dienstag, 17. Dezember 2019 23:24
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] issues with zoom and menus and text chat

Hi there.
When typing in text chat, and I try using the arrows to review what I've just typed before pressing enter, the text
isn't spoken.
Similarly, if I click edit personal note, none of what I type is able to be reviewed with the arrow keys.
Is anyone else having the issue using the latest version of NVDA and Zoom?
Cheers.


Re: Using NVDA on a tablet.

 

Hi,
Ah, touchscreens...
1. Moving around text inside a window: this is done with what's called "text mode" (you can toggle between at least two touch modes by doing a three finger single tap; I'll explain why I said "at least two modes" below). In text mode, one finger flick right or left will move to next or previous character, two finger flick right or left will move to next or previous word, and one finger flick down or up will move to next or previous line. This is in relation to review cursor.
2. Thunderbird email entries: if the logic from other email clients is applicable, then yes, you can move between messages by using one finger flick left or right in object mode.
3. Touchscreen tutorial: already covered by yours truly as part of Welcome to NVDA series.

As for my remark on touch modes above: yes, I did say "at least two modes". The reason: Enhanced Touch Gestures add-on (I know, I find myself advertising my add-ons on a monthly basis...). IN addition to text and object modes, Enhanced Touch Gestures adds two additional touch modes:
* Synth settings: used to change synthesizer settings on the fly such as rate and voice (two finger flick left or right to step through settings, two finger flick up or down to change settings).
* Web: used to navigate between different web elements (one finger flick up or down to go through web elements (regular/normal, headings, links, form fields, frames, tables, landmarks), one finger flick left or right to move amongst elements).
But that's a small taste of what that add-on can do (it is perhaps one of the most powerful add-ons out there besides Remote and Windows 10 App Essentials).
Cheers,
JOseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Isige
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 9:13 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Using NVDA on a tablet.

Hey all. I know this has been talked about in here before, but it seems to have been pretty brief. I don't want a whole crash course on using a tablet, I'll keep it to a simple use case.


I have QRead, or Notepad, or whatever open with some text. I pull the tablet off of the keyboard, so now it's a tablet, it's a Surface Pro, if that matters. I can move around on the desktop or whatever to get to a program, and double tap it, and it will open. I still haven't figured out if that puts me in its window, so let's say the window's already open. How do I:


1. Get to the window, and put focus in the window?


2. Make the window read, i.e. a say-all, the equivalent of NVDA-a in the laptop layout? I assume touching anywhere on the screen will stop it.


I've briefly tried messing with this, and although I get the basic
swiping to objects and such, I still haven't figured out what happens
once an object is active, lie what I'm talking about here. I don't know
how to get inside of it and manipulate the insides, so to speak, with
touch gestures. As another example, assume I open Thunderbird. I'm not
sure the individual messages get treated as objects, do they?


If somebody can cover this use case, I can start playing with things,
and I can see about making a tutorial, at least in text and possibly
audio, since I know I'm not the only person to ask about this.


Using NVDA on a tablet.

John Isige
 

Hey all. I know this has been talked about in here before, but it seems to have been pretty brief. I don't want a whole crash course on using a tablet, I'll keep it to a simple use case.


I have QRead, or Notepad, or whatever open with some text. I pull the tablet off of the keyboard, so now it's a tablet, it's a Surface Pro, if that matters. I can move around on the desktop or whatever to get to a program, and double tap it, and it will open. I still haven't figured out if that puts me in its window, so let's say the window's already open. How do I:


1. Get to the window, and put focus in the window?


2. Make the window read, i.e. a say-all, the equivalent of NVDA-a in the laptop layout? I assume touching anywhere on the screen will stop it.


I've briefly tried messing with this, and although I get the basic swiping to objects and such, I still haven't figured out what happens once an object is active, lie what I'm talking about here. I don't know how to get inside of it and manipulate the insides, so to speak, with touch gestures. As another example, assume I open Thunderbird. I'm not sure the individual messages get treated as objects, do they?


If somebody can cover this use case, I can start playing with things, and I can see about making a tutorial, at least in text and possibly audio, since I know I'm not the only person to ask about this.


Re: key commands for NVDA?

Chikodinaka mr. Oguledo
 

any questions email joesuf lee

On 12/17/19, Chikodinaka mr. Oguledo via Groups.Io
<chikodinaka.2girls=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I hope this will help you out! NVDA 2019.2.1 User Guide
Table of Contents
• 1. Introduction
• 1.1. General Features
• 1.2. Internationalization
• 1.3. Speech Synthesizer Support
• 1.4. Braille support
• 1.5. License and Copyright
• 2. System Requirements
• 3. Getting and Setting Up NVDA
• 3.1. Portable and Temporary Copy Restrictions
• 3.2. Installing NVDA
• 3.2.1. Incompatible add-ons warning
• 3.2.2. Start at Windows Logon
• 3.2.3. Create Desktop Shortcut (ctrl+alt+n)
• 3.2.4. Copy Portable Configuration to Current User Account
• 3.3. Creating a Portable Copy
• 4. Getting started with NVDA
• 4.1. Launching NVDA
• 4.1.1. Welcome Dialog
• 4.2. About NVDA keyboard commands
• 4.2.1. The NVDA Modifier Key
• 4.2.2. Keyboard Layouts
• 4.3. NVDA Touch Gestures
• 4.3.1. Exploring the Screen
• 4.3.2. Touch Gestures
• 4.3.3. Touch Modes
• 4.3.4. Touch keyboard
• 4.4. Input Help Mode
• 4.5. The NVDA menu
• 4.6. Basic NVDA commands
• 4.7. Reporting System Information
• 5. Navigating with NVDA
• 5.1. Objects
• 5.2. Navigating with the System Focus
• 5.3. Navigating with the System Caret
• 5.4. Object Navigation
• 5.5. Reviewing Text
• 5.6. Review Modes
• 5.6.1. Object Review
• 5.6.2. Document Review
• 5.6.3. Screen Review
• 5.7. Navigating with the Mouse
• 6. Browse Mode
• 6.1. Single Letter Navigation
• 6.2. The Elements List
• 6.3. Searching for text
• 6.4. Embedded Objects
• 7. Reading Mathematical Content
• 7.1. Interactive Navigation
• 8. Braille
• 8.1. Control Type, State and Landmark abbreviations
• 8.2. Braille Input
• 9. Content Recognition
• 9.1. Windows 10 OCR
• 10. Application Specific Features
• 10.1. Microsoft Word
• 10.1.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
• 10.1.2. Browse Mode in Microsoft Word
• 10.1.3. Reporting Comments
• 10.2. Microsoft Excel
• 10.2.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
• 10.2.2. The Elements List
• 10.2.3. Reporting Comments
• 10.2.4. Reading Protected Cells
• 10.2.5. Form Fields
• 10.3. Microsoft PowerPoint
• 10.4. foobar2000
• 10.5. Miranda IM
• 10.6. Poedit
• 10.7. Skype
• 10.8. Kindle for PC
• 10.8.1. Text Selection
• 10.8.2. User Notes
• 10.9. Azardi
• 11. Configuring NVDA
• 11.1. NVDA Settings
• 11.1.1. General (NVDA+control+g)
• 11.1.2. Speech Settings (NVDA+control+v)
• 11.1.3. Select Synthesizer (NVDA+control+s)
• 11.1.4. Synth settings ring
• 11.1.5. Braille
• 11.1.6. Select Braille Display (NVDA+control+a)
• 11.1.7. Keyboard (NVDA+control+k)
• 11.1.8. Mouse (NVDA+control+m)
• 11.1.9. Touch Interaction
• 11.1.10. Review Cursor
• 11.1.11. Object Presentation (NVDA+control+o)
• 11.1.12. Input Composition
• 11.1.13. Browse Mode (NVDA+control+b)
• 11.1.14. Document Formatting (NVDA+control+d)
• 11.1.15. Windows 10 OCR Settings
• 11.1.16. Advanced Settings
• 11.2. miscellaneous Settings
• 11.2.1. Speech dictionaries
• 11.2.2. Punctuation/symbol pronunciation
• 11.2.3. Input Gestures
• 11.3. Saving and Reloading the configuration
• 11.4. Configuration Profiles
• 11.4.1. Basic Management
• 11.4.2. Creating a Profile
• 11.4.3. Manual Activation
• 11.4.4. Triggers
• 11.4.5. Editing a Profile
• 11.4.6. Temporarily Disabling Triggers
• 11.4.7. Activating a profile using input gestures
• 11.5. Location of Configuration files
• 12. Extra Tools
• 12.1. Log Viewer
• 12.2. Speech Viewer
• 12.3. Add-ons Manager
• 12.4. Incompatible Add-ons Manager
• 12.5. Python Console
• 12.6. Reload plugins
• 13. Supported Speech Synthesizers
• 13.1. eSpeak NG
• 13.2. Microsoft Speech API version 4 (SAPI 4)
• 13.3. Microsoft Speech API version 5 (SAPI 5)
• 13.4. Microsoft Speech Platform
• 13.5. Windows OneCore Voices
• 13.6. Audiologic Tts3
• 14. Supported Braille Displays
• 14.1. Displays supporting automatic detection in the background
• 14.2. Freedom Scientific Focus/PAC Mate Series
• 14.3. Optelec ALVA 6 series/protocol converter
• 14.4. Handy Tech Displays
• 14.5. MDV Lilli
• 14.6. Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit Braille Displays
• 14.7. hedo ProfiLine USB
• 14.8. hedo MobilLine USB
• 14.9. HumanWare Brailliant BI/B Series / BrailleNote Touch
• 14.9.1. Key assignments for All models
• 14.9.2. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 32, BI 40 and B 80
• 14.9.3. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 14
• 14.10. HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
• 14.11. Seika Braille Displays
• 14.12. Papenmeier BRAILLEX Newer Models
• 14.13. Papenmeier Braille BRAILLEX Older Models
• 14.14. HumanWare BrailleNote
• 14.15. EcoBraille
• 14.16. SuperBraille
• 14.17. Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
• 14.18. BRLTTY
• 15. Advanced Topics
• 15.1. Command Line Options
• 15.2. System Wide Parameters
• 16. Further Information
1. Introduction
Welcome to NVDA!
NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA) is a free and open source screen
reader for the Microsoft Windows operating system. Providing feedback
via synthetic speech and Braille, it enables blind or vision impaired
people to access computers running Windows for no more cost than a
sighted person. NVDA is developed by NV Access, with contributions
from the community.
1.1. General Features
NVDA allows blind and vision impaired people to access and interact
with the Windows operating system and many third party applications.
Major highlights include:
• Support for popular applications including web browsers, email
clients, internet chat programs and office suites
• Built-in speech synthesizer supporting over 80 languages
• Reporting of textual formatting where available such as font name
and size, style and spelling errors
• Automatic announcement of text under the mouse and optional audible
indication of the mouse position
• Support for many refreshable braille displays, including the ability
to detect many of them automatically as well as braille input on
braille displays with a braille keyboard
• Ability to run entirely from a USB flash drive or other portable
media without the need for installation
• Easy to use talking installer
• Translated into 54 languages
• Support for modern Windows Operating Systems including both 32 and
64 bit variants
• Ability to run on Windows logon and other secure screens
• Announcing controls and text while using touch gestures
• Support for common accessibility interfaces such as Microsoft Active
Accessibility, Java Access Bridge, IAccessible2 and UI Automation (UI
Automation only supported in Windows 7 and later)
• Support for Windows Command Prompt and console applications
1.2. Internationalization
It is important that people anywhere in the world, no matter what
language they speak, get equal access to technology. Besides English,
NVDA has been translated into 54 languages including: Afrikaans,
Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Aragonese, Bulgarian, Burmese, Catalan,
Chinese (simplified and traditional), Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch,
Farsi, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German (Germany and
Switzerland), Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish,
Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Kyrgyz, Lithuanian, Macedonian,
Mongolian, Nepali, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil and
Portugal), Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian,
Spanish (Colombia and Spain), Swedish, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian
and Vietnamese.
1.3. Speech Synthesizer Support
Apart from providing its messages and interface in several languages,
NVDA can also enable the user to read content in any language, as long
as they have a speech synthesizer that can speak that language.
NVDA is bundled with eSpeak NG, a free, open-source, multi-lingual
speech synthesizer.
Information about other speech synthesizers that NVDA supports can be
found in the Supported Speech Synthesizers section.
1.4. Braille support
For users that own a refreshable braille display, NVDA can output its
information in braille. Both uncontracted and contracted braille input
via a braille keyboard is also supported. Furthermore, NVDA will
detect many braille displays automatically by default. Please see the
Supported Braille Displays section for information about the supported
braille displays.
NVDA supports braille codes for many languages, including contracted,
uncontracted and computer braille codes.
1.5. License and Copyright
NVDA is copyright 2006-2019 NVDA contributors.
NVDA is covered by the GNU General Public License (Version 2). You are
free to share or change this software in any way you like as long as
it is accompanied by the license and you make all source code
available to anyone who wants it. This applies to both original and
modified copies of this software, plus any derivative works. For
further details, you can view the full licence.
2. System Requirements
• Operating Systems: all 32-bit and 64-bit editions of Windows 7,
Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10, and all Server Operating Systems
starting from Windows Server 2008 R2.
• For Windows 7, NVDA requires Service Pack 1 or higher.
• For Windows Server 2008 R2, NVDA requires Service Pack 1 or higher.
• Memory: 256 mb or more of RAM
• Processor speed: 1.0 ghz or above
• About 90 MB of storage space.
3. Getting and Setting Up NVDA
If you have not yet got a copy of NVDA, you can download it from
www.nvaccess.org.
Go to the download section and you will find a link to download the
latest version of NVDA.
Running the file you have just downloaded will start a temporary copy
of NVDA. You will then be asked if you want to install NVDA, create a
portable copy or just continue using the temporary copy.
If you plan to always use NVDA on this computer, you will want to
choose to install NVDA. Installing NVDA will allow for additional
functionality such as automatic starting after logon, the ability to
read the Windows Logon and Windows security screens (which cannot be
done with portable and temporary copies) and creation of Start Menu
and desktop shortcuts. The installed copy is also able to create a
portable copy itself at any time.
If you want to take NVDA with you on a USB thumb drive or other
writable media, then you should choose to create a portable copy.
The portable copy also has the ability to install itself on any
computer at a later time. However, if you wish to copy NVDA onto
read-only media such as a CD, you should just copy the download
package. Running the portable version directly from read-only media is
not supported at this time.
Using the temporary copy of NVDA is also an option (e.g. for
demonstration purposes), though starting NVDA in this way each time
can become very time consuming.
3.1. Portable and Temporary Copy Restrictions
Apart from the inability to automatically start during and/or after
log-on, the portable and temporary copies of NVDA also have the
following restrictions:
• The inability to interact with applications running with
administrative privileges, unless of course NVDA itself has been run
also with these privileges (not recommended).
• The inability to read User Account Control (UAC) screens when trying
to start an application with administrative privileges.
• Windows 8 and later: the inability to support input from a touchscreen.
• Windows 8 and later: the inability to provide features such as
browse mode and speaking of typed characters in Windows Store apps.
• Windows 8 and later: audio ducking is not supported.
3.2. Installing NVDA
If installing NVDA directly from the NVDA download package, press the
Install NVDA button. If you have already closed this dialog or are
wanting to install from a portable copy, please choose the Install
NVDA menu item found under Tools in the NVDA menu.
The installation dialog that appears will confirm whether you wish to
install NVDA and will also tell you whether this installation will be
updating a previous install. Pressing the Continue button will start
installing NVDA. There are also a few options in this dialog which are
explained below. Once the installation has completed, a message will
appear telling you that it was successful. Pressing OK at this point
will restart the newly installed copy of NVDA.
3.2.1. Incompatible add-ons warning
If you have add-ons already installed there may also be a warning that
incompatible add-ons will be disabled. Before you're able to press the
Continue button you will have to use the checkbox to confirm that you
understand that these add-ons will be disabled. There will also be a
button present to review the add-ons that will be disabled. Refer to
the incompatible add-ons dialog section for more help on this button.
3.2.2. Start at Windows Logon
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should
automatically start while on the Windows Logon screen, before you have
entered a password. This also includes User Account Control and other
secure screens. This option is enabled by default for fresh
installations.
3.2.3. Create Desktop Shortcut (ctrl+alt+n)
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should create a
shortcut on the desktop to start NVDA. If created, this shortcut will
also be assigned a shortcut key of control+alt+n, allowing you to
start NVDA at any time with this key stroke.
3.2.4. Copy Portable Configuration to Current User Account
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should copy the
user configuration from the currently running NVDA into the
configuration for the currently logged on user, for the installed
copy of NVDA. This will not copy the configuration for any other
users of this system nor to the system configuration for use at
Windows Logon and other secure screens. This option is only available
when installing from a portable copy, not when installing directly
from the downloaded Launcher package.
3.3. Creating a Portable Copy
If creating a portable copy directly from the NVDA download package,
simply press the Create Portable Copy button. If you have already
closed this dialog or you are running an installed copy of NVDA,
choose the Create Portable copy menu item found under Tools in the
NVDA menu.
The Dialog that appears allows you to choose where the portable copy
should be created. This can be a directory on your hard drive or a
location on a USB thumb drive or other portable media. There is also
an option to choose whether NVDA should copy the logged on user's
current NVDA configuration for use with the newly created portable
copy. This option is only available when creating a portable copy from
an installed copy, not when creating from the download package.
Pressing Continue will create the portable copy. Once creation is
complete, a message will appear telling you it was successful. Press
OK to dismiss this dialog.
4. Getting started with NVDA
4.1. Launching NVDA
If you have installed NVDA with the installer, then starting NVDA is
as simple as either pressing control+alt+n, or choosing NVDA from the
NVDA menu under Programs on the Start Menu. Additionally you can type
NVDA into the Run dialog and press Enter. You can also pass some
command line options which allows you to restart NVDA (-r), quit (-q),
disable add-ons (--disable-addons), etc.
For installed copies, NVDA stores the configuration in the roaming
application data folder of the current user by default (e.g.
"C:\Users\<user>\AppData\Roaming"). It is possible to change this in a
way that NVDA loads its configuration from the local application data
folder instead. Consult the section about system wide parameters for
more details.
To start the portable version, go to the directory you unpacked NVDA
to, and press enter or double click on nvda.exe.
As NVDA starts, you will first hear an ascending set of tones (telling
you that NVDA is loading). Depending on how fast your computer is, or
if you are running NVDA off a USB key or other slow media, it may take
a little while to start. If it is taking an extra-long time to start,
NVDA should say "Loading NVDA. Please wait..."
If you don't hear any of this, or you hear the Windows error sound, or
a descending set of tones, then this means that NVDA has an error, and
you will need to possibly report a bug to the developers. Please check
out the NVDA website for how to do this.
4.1.1. Welcome Dialog
When NVDA starts for the first time, you will be greeted by a dialog
box which provides you with some basic information about the NVDA
modifier key and the NVDA menu. (Please see further sections about
these topics.) The dialog box also contains a combo box and three
checkboxes. The combo box lets you select the keyboard layout. The
first checkbox lets you control if NVDA should use the capslock as an
NVDA modifier key. The second specifies whether NVDA should start
automatically after you log on to Windows and is only available for
installed copies of NVDA. The third lets you control if this Welcome
dialog should appear each time NVDA starts.
4.2. About NVDA keyboard commands
4.2.1. The NVDA Modifier Key
Most NVDA-specific keyboard commands consist of pressing a particular
key called the NVDA modifier key in conjunction with one or more other
keys. Notable exceptions to this are the text review commands for the
desktop keyboard layout which just use the numpad keys by themselves,
but there are some other exceptions as well.
NVDA can be configured so that the numpad Insert, Extended Insert
and/or capslock key can be used as the NVDA modifier key. By default,
both the numpad Insert and Extended Insert keys are set as NVDA
modifier keys.
If you wish to cause one of the NVDA modifier keys to behave as it
usually would if NVDA were not running (e.g. you wish to turn capslock
on when you have set capslock to be an NVDA modifier key), you can
press the key twice in quick succession.
4.2.2. Keyboard Layouts
NVDA currently comes with two sets of key commands (known as keyboard
layouts): the desktop layout and the laptop layout. By default, NVDA
is set to use the Desktop layout, though you can switch to the Laptop
layout in the Keyboard category of the NVDA Settings dialog, found
under Preferences in the NVDA menu.
The Desktop layout makes heavy use of the numpad (with numlock off).
Although most laptops do not have a physical numpad, some laptops can
emulate one by holding down the FN key and pressing letters and
numbers on the right-hand side of the keyboard (7, 8, 9, u, i, o, j,
k, l, etc.). If your laptop cannot do this or does not allow you to
turn numlock off, you may want to switch to the Laptop layout instead.
4.3. NVDA Touch Gestures
If you are running NVDA on a device with a touchscreen and running
Windows 8 or higher, you can also control NVDA directly via touch
commands. While NVDA is running, all touch input will go directly to
NVDA. Therefore, actions that can be performed normally without NVDA
will not work.
4.3.1. Exploring the Screen
The most basic action you can perform with the touch screen is to
announce the control or text at any point on the screen. To do this,
place one finger anywhere on the screen. You can also keep your finger
on the screen and move it around to read other controls and text that
your finger moves over.
4.3.2. Touch Gestures
When NVDA commands are described later in this user guide, they may
list a touch gesture which can be used to activate that command with
the touchscreen. Following are some instructions on how to perform the
various touch gestures.
Taps
Tap the screen quickly with one or more fingers.
Tapping once with one finger is simply known as a tap. Tapping with 2
fingers at the same time is a 2-finger tap and so on.
If the same tap is performed one or more times again in quick
succession, NVDA will instead treat this as a multi-tap gesture.
Tapping twice will result in a double tap. Tapping 3 times will result
in a triple tap and so on. Of course, these multi-tap gestures also
recognize how many fingers were used, so it's possible to have
gestures like a 2-finger triple tap, a 4-finger tap, etc.
Flicks
Quickly swipe your finger across the screen.
There are 4 possible flick gestures depending on the direction: flick
left, flick right, flick up and flick down.
Just like taps, more than one finger can be used to perform the
gesture. Therefore, gestures such as 2-finger flick up and 4-finger
flick left are all possible.
4.3.3. Touch Modes
As there are many more NVDA commands than possible touch gestures,
NVDA has several touch modes you can switch between which make certain
subsets of commands available. The two modes are text mode and object
mode. Certain NVDA commands listed in this document may have a touch
mode listed in brackets after the touch gesture. For example, flick up
(text mode) means that the command will be performed if you flick up,
but only while in text mode. If the command does not have a mode
listed, it will work in any mode.
To toggle touch modes, perform a 3-finger tap.
4.3.4. Touch keyboard
The touch keyboard is used to enter text and commands from a
touchscreen. When focused on an edit field, you can bring up the touch
keyboard by double-tapping the touch keyboard icon on the bottom of
the screen. For tablets such as Microsoft Surface Pro, the touch
keyboard is always available when the keyboard is undocked. To dismiss
the touch keyboard, double-tap the touch keyboard icon or move away
from the edit field.
While the touch keyboard is active, to locate keys on the touch
keyboard, move your finger to where the touch keyboard is located
(typically at the bottom of the screen), then move around the keyboard
with one finger. When you find the key you wish to press, double-tap
the key or lift your finger, depending on options chosen from Touch
Interaction Settings category of the NVDA Settings.
4.4. Input Help Mode
Many NVDA commands are mentioned throughout the rest of this user
guide, but an easy way to explore all the different commands is to
turn on input help.
To turn on input help, press NVDA+1. To turn it off, press NVDA+1
again. While in input help, performing any input gesture (such as
pressing a key or performing a touch gesture) will report the action
and describe what it does (if anything). The actual commands will not
execute while in input help mode.
4.5. The NVDA menu
The NVDA menu allows you to control NVDA's settings, access help,
save/revert your configuration, Modify speech dictionaries, access
additional tools and exit NVDA.
To get to the NVDA menu from anywhere in Windows while NVDA is
running, press NVDA+n on the keyboard or perform a 2-finger double tap
on the touch screen. You can also get to the NVDA menu via the Windows
system tray. Either right-click on the NVDA icon located in the system
tray, or access the system tray by pressing the Windows logo key+B,
DownArrow to the NVDA icon and press the applications key located next
to the right control key on most keyboards. When the menu comes up,
You can use the arrow keys to navigate the menu, and the enter key to
activate an item.
4.6. Basic NVDA commands
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Stop speech
Control
control
2-finger tap
Instantly stops speaking
Pause Speech
shift
shift
none
Instantly pauses speech. Pressing it again will continue speaking
where it left off (if pausing is supported by the current synthesizer)
NVDA Menu
NVDA+n
NVDA+n
2-finger double tap
Pops up the NVDA menu to allow you to access preferences, tools, help, etc.
Toggle Speech Mode
NVDA+s
NVDA+s
none
Toggles speech mode between speech, beeps and off.
Toggle Input Help Mode
NVDA+1
NVDA+1
none
Pressing any key in this mode will report the key, and the description
of any NVDA command associated with it
Quit NVDA
NVDA+q
NVDA+q
none
Exits NVDA
Pass next key through
NVDA+f2
NVDA+f2
none
Tells NVDA to pass the next key press straight through to the active
application, even if it is normally treated as an NVDA key command
Toggle application sleep mode on and off
NVDA+shift+s
NVDA+shift+z
none
sleep mode disables all NVDA commands and speech/braille output for
the current application. This is most useful in applications that
provide their own speech or screen reading features. Press this
command again to disable sleep mode.
4.7. Reporting System Information
Name
key
Description
Report date/time
NVDA+f12
Pressing once reports the current time, pressing twice reports the date
Report battery status
NVDA+shift+b
Reports the battery status i.e. whether AC power is in use or the
current charge percentage.
Report clipboard text
NVDA+c
Reports the Text in the clipboard if there is any.
5. Navigating with NVDA
NVDA allows you to explore and navigate the system in several ways,
including both normal interaction and review.
5.1. Objects
Each Application and the operating system itself consist of many
objects. An object is a single item such as a piece of text, button,
checkbox, slider, list or editable text field.
5.2. Navigating with the System Focus
The system focus, also known simply as the focus, is the object which
receives keys typed on the keyboard. For example, if you are typing
into an editable text field, the editable text field has the focus.
The most common way of navigating around Windows with NVDA is to
simply move the system focus using standard Windows keyboard commands,
such as pressing tab and shift+tab to move forward and back between
controls, pressing alt to get to the menu bar and then using the
arrows to navigate menus, and using alt+tab to move between running
applications. As you do this, NVDA will report information about the
object with focus, such as its name, type, value, state, description,
keyboard shortcut and positional information.
There are some key commands that are useful when moving with the System
focus:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Report current focus
NVDA+tab
NVDA+tab
announces the current object or control that has the System focus.
Pressing twice will spell the information
Report title
NVDA+t
NVDA+t
Reports the title of the currently active window. Pressing twice will
spell the information. Pressing three times will copy it to the
clipboard
Read active window
NVDA+b
NVDA+b
reads all the controls in the currently active window (useful for dialogs)
Report Status Bar
NVDA+end
NVDA+shift+end
Reports the Status Bar if NVDA finds one. It also moves the navigator
object to this location. Pressing twice will spell the information.
Pressing three times will copy it to the clipboard
5.3. Navigating with the System Caret
When an object that allows navigation and/or editing of text is
focused, you can move through the text using the system caret, also
known as the edit cursor.
When the focus is on an object that has the system caret, you can use
the arrow keys, page up, page down, home, end, etc. to move through
the text. You can also change the text if the control supports
editing. NVDA will announce as you move by character, word and line,
and will also announce as you select and unselect text.
NVDA provides the following key commands in relation to the system caret:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Say all
NVDA+downArrow
NVDA+a
Starts reading from the current position of the system caret, moving
it along as it goes
Read current line
NVDA+upArrow
NVDA+l
Reads the line where the system caret is currently situated. Pressing
twice spells the line. Pressing three times spells the line using
character descriptions.
Read current text selection
NVDA+Shift+upArrow
NVDA+shift+s
Reads any currently selected text
Next sentence
alt+downArrow
alt+downArrow
Moves the caret to the next sentence and announces it. (only supported
in Microsoft Word and Outlook)
Previous sentence
alt+upArrow
alt+upArrow
Moves the caret to the previous sentence and announces it. (only
supported in Microsoft Word and Outlook)
When within a table, the following key commands are also available:
Name
Key
Description
Move to previous column
control+alt+leftArrow
Moves the system caret to the previous column (staying in the same row)
Move to next column
control+alt+rightArrow
Moves the system caret to the next column (staying in the same row)
Move to previous row
control+alt+upArrow
Moves the system caret to the previous row (staying in the same column)
Move to next row
control+alt+downArrow
Moves the system caret to the next row (staying in the same column)
5.4. Object Navigation
Most of the time, you will work with applications using commands which
move the focus and the caret. However, sometimes, you may wish to
explore the current application or the Operating System without moving
the focus or caret. You may also wish to work with objects that cannot
be accessed normally using the keyboard. In these cases, you can use
object navigation.
Object navigation allows you to move between and obtain information
about individual objects. When you move to an object, NVDA will report
it similarly to the way it reports the system focus. For a way to
review all text as it appears on the screen, you can instead use
screen review.
Rather than having to move back and forth between every single object
on the system, the objects are organized hierarchically. This means
that some objects contain other objects and you must move inside them
to access the objects they contain. For example, a list contains list
items, so you must move inside the list in order to access its items.
If you have moved to a list item, moving next and previous will take
you to other list items in the same list. Moving to a list item's
containing object will take you back to the list. You can then move
past the list if you wish to access other objects. Similarly, a
toolbar contains controls, so you must move inside the toolbar to
access the controls in the toolbar.
The object currently being reviewed is called the navigator object.
Once you navigate to an object, you can review its content using the
text review commands while in Object review mode. By default, the
navigator object moves along with the System focus, though this
behavior can be toggled on and off.
Note that braille follows both the focus and caret as well as object
navigation and text review by default. If you want it to follow the
focus and caret only, you need to configure braille to be tethered to
focus. In this case, braille will not follow object navigation and
text review. If you want braille to follow object navigation and text
review instead, you need to configure braille to be tethered to
review.
To navigate by object, use the following commands:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Report current object
NVDA+numpad5
NVDA+shift+o
none
Reports the current navigator object. Pressing twice spells the
information, and pressing 3 times copies this object's name and value
to the clipboard.
Move to containing object
NVDA+numpad8
NVDA+shift+upArrow
flick up (object mode)
Moves to the object containing the current navigator object
Move to previous object
NVDA+numpad4
NVDA+shift+leftArrow
flick left (object mode)
Moves to the object before the current navigator object
Move to next object
NVDA+numpad6
NVDA+shift+rightArrow
flick right (object mode)
Moves to the object after the current navigator object
Move to first contained object
NVDA+numpad2
NVDA+shift+downArrow
flick down (object mode)
Moves to the first object contained by the current navigator object
Move to focus object
NVDA+numpadMinus
NVDA+backspace
none
Moves to the object that currently has the system focus, and also
places the review cursor at the position of the System caret, if it is
showing
Activate current navigator object
NVDA+numpadEnter
NVDA+enter
double tap
Activates the current navigator object (similar to clicking with the
mouse or pressing space when it has the system focus)
Move System focus or caret to current review position
NVDA+shift+numpadMinus
NVDA+shift+backspace
none
pressed once Moves the System focus to the current navigator object,
pressed twice moves the system caret to the position of the review
cursor
Report review cursor location
NVDA+numpadDelete
NVDA+delete
none
Reports information about the location of the text or object at the
review cursor. For example, this might include the percentage through
the document, the distance from the edge of the page or the exact
screen position. Pressing twice may provide further detail.
Note: numpad keys require numlock key to be turned off to work properly.
5.5. Reviewing Text
NVDA allows you to read the contents of the screen, current document
or current object by character, word or line. This is mostly useful in
places (including Windows command consoles) where there is no system
caret. For example, you might use it to review the text of a long
information message in a dialog.
When moving the review cursor, the System caret does not follow along,
so you can review text without losing your editing position. However,
by default, when the System caret moves, the review cursor follows
along. This can be toggled on and off.
Note that braille follows the focus and caret by default, rather than
object navigation and text review. If you want it to follow object
navigation and text review instead, you need to configure braille to
be tethered to review.
The following commands are available for reviewing text:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Move to top line in review
shift+numpad7
NVDA+control+home
none
Moves the review cursor to the top line of the text
Move to previous line in review
numpad7
NVDA+upArrow
flick up (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous line of text
Report current line in review
numpad8
NVDA+shift+.
none
Announces the current line of text where the review cursor is
positioned. Pressing twice spells the line. Pressing three times
spells the line using character descriptions.
Move to next line in review
numpad9
NVDA+downArrow
flick down (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next line of text
Move to bottom line in review
shift+numpad9
NVDA+control+end
none
Moves the review cursor to the bottom line of text
Move to previous word in review
numpad4
NVDA+control+leftArrow
2-finger flick left (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous word in the text
Report current word in review
numpad5
NVDA+control+.
none
Announces the current word in the text where the review cursor is
positioned. Pressing twice spells the word. Pressing three times
spells the word using character descriptions.
Move to next word in review
numpad6
NVDA+control+rightArrow
2-finger flick right (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next word in the text
Move to start of line in review
shift+numpad1
NVDA+home
none
Moves the review cursor to the start of the current line in the text
Move to previous character in review
numpad1
NVDA+leftArrow
flick left (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous character on the current line
in the text
Report current character in review
numpad2
NVDA+.
none
Announces the current character on the line of text where the review
cursor is positioned. Pressing twice reports a description or example
of that character. Pressing three times reports the numeric value of
the character in decimal and hexadecimal.
Move to next character in review
numpad3
NVDA+rightArrow
flick right (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next character on the current line of text
Move to end of line in review
shift+numpad3
NVDA+end
none
Moves the review cursor to the end of the current line of text
Say all with review
numpadPlus
NVDA+shift+a
3-finger flick down (text mode)
Reads from the current position of the review cursor, moving it as it goes
Select then Copy from review cursor
NVDA+f9
NVDA+f9
none
Starts the select then copy process from the current position of the
review cursor. The actual action is not performed until you tell NVDA
where the end of the text range is
Select then Copy to review cursor
NVDA+f10
NVDA+f10
none
On the first press, text is selected from the position previously set
start marker up to and including the review cursor's current position.
After pressing this key a second time, the text will be copied to the
Windows clipboard
Report text formatting
NVDA+f
NVDA+f
none
Reports the formatting of the text where the review cursor is
currently situated. Pressing twice shows the information in browse
mode
Report current symbol replacement
None
None
none
Speaks the symbol where the review cursor is positioned. Pressed
twice, shows the symbol and the text used to speak it in browse mode.
Note: numpad keys require numlock key to be turned off to work properly.
A good way to remember the basic text review commands when using the
Desktop layout is to think of them as being in a grid of three by
three, with top to bottom being line, word and character and left to
right being previous, current and next. The layout is illustrated as
follows:
Previous line
Current line
Next line
Previous word
Current word
Next word
Previous character
Current character
Next character
5.6. Review Modes
NVDA's text review commands can review content within the current
navigator object, current document or screen, depending on the review
mode selected. Review modes are a replacement for the older Flat
Review concept found in NVDA.
The following commands switch between review modes:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Switch to next review mode
NVDA+numpad7
NVDA+pageUp
2-finger flick up
switches to the next available review mode
Switch to previous review mode
NVDA+numpad1
NVDA+pageDown
2-finger flick down
switches to the previous available review mode
5.6.1. Object Review
While in object review mode, you are able to only review the content
of the current navigator object. For objects such as editable text
fields or other basic text controls, this will generally be the text
content. For other objects, this may be the name and/or value.
5.6.2. Document Review
When the navigator object is within a browse mode document (e.g. web
page) or other complex document (e.g. a Lotus Symphony document), it
is possible to switch to the document review mode. The document review
mode allows you to review the text of the entire document.
When switching from object review to document review, the review
cursor is placed in the document at the position of the navigator
object. When moving around the document with review commands, the
navigator object is automatically updated to the object found at the
current review cursor position.
Note that NVDA will switch to document review from object review
automatically when moving around browse mode documents.
5.6.3. Screen Review
The screen review mode allows you to review the text of the screen as
it appears visually within the current application. This is similar to
the screen review or mouse cursor functionality in many other Windows
screen readers.
When switching to screen review mode, the review cursor is placed at
the screen position of the current navigator object. When moving
around the screen with review commands, the navigator object is
automatically updated to the object found at the screen position of
the review cursor.
Note that in some newer applications, NVDA may not see some or all
text displayed on the screen due to the use of newer screen drawing
technologies which are impossible to support at this time.
5.7. Navigating with the Mouse
When you move the mouse, NVDA by default reports the text that is
directly under the mouse pointer as the pointer moves over it. Where
supported, NVDA will read the surrounding paragraph of text, though
some controls may only read by line.
NVDA can be configured to also announce the type of object under the
mouse as it moves (e.g. list, button, etc.). This may be useful for
totally blind users, as sometimes, the text isn't enough.
NVDA provides a way for users to understand where the mouse is located
relative to the dimensions of the screen by playing the current mouse
coordinates as audio beeps. The higher the mouse is on the screen, the
higher the pitch of the beeps. The further left or right the mouse is
located on the screen, the further left or right the sound will be
played (assuming the user has stereo speakers or headphones).
These extra mouse features are not turned on by default in NVDA. If
you wish to take advantage of them, you can configure them from the
Mouse settings category of the NVDA Settings dialog, found in the NVDA
Preferences menu.
Although a physical mouse or trackpad should be used to navigate with
the mouse, NVDA has a few key commands related to the mouse:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Left mouse button click
numpadDivide
NVDA+[
clicks the left mouse button once. The common double click can be
performed by pressing this key twice in quick succession
Left mouse button lock
shift+numpadDivide
NVDA+control+[
Locks the left mouse button down. Press again to release it. To drag
the mouse, press this key to lock the left button down and then move
the mouse either physically or use one of the other mouse routing
commands
Right mouse click
numpadMultiply
NVDA+]
Clicks the right mouse button once.
Right mouse button lock
shift+numpadMultiply
NVDA+control+]
Locks the right mouse button down. Press again to release it. To drag
the mouse, press this key to lock the right button down and then move
the mouse either physically or use one of the other mouse routing
commands
Move mouse to current navigator object
NVDA+numpadDivide
NVDA+shift+m
Moves the mouse to the location of the current navigator object and
review cursor
Navigate to the object under the mouse
NVDA+numpadMultiply
NVDA+shift+n
Set the navigator object to the object located at the position of the mouse
6. Browse Mode
Complex read-only documents such as web pages are browsed in NVDA
using browse mode. This includes documents in the following
applications:
• Mozilla Firefox
• Microsoft Internet Explorer
• Mozilla Thunderbird
• HTML messages in Microsoft Outlook
• Google Chrome
• Microsoft Edge
• Adobe Reader
• Foxit Reader
• Adobe Flash
• Supported books in Amazon Kindle for PC
Browse mode is also optionally available for Microsoft Word documents.
In browse mode, the content of the document is made available in a
flat representation that can be navigated with the cursor keys as if
it were a normal text document. All of NVDA's system caret key
commands will work in this mode; e.g. say all, report formatting,
table navigation commands, etc. Information such as whether text is a
link, heading, etc. is reported along with the text as you move.
Sometimes, you will need to interact directly with controls in these
documents. For example, you will need to do this for editable text
fields and lists so that you can type characters and use the cursor
keys to work with the control. You do this by switching to focus mode,
where almost all keys are passed to the control. When in Browse mode,
by default, NVDA will automatically switch to focus mode if you tab to
or click on a particular control that requires it. Conversely, tabbing
to or clicking on a control that does not require focus mode will
switch back to browse mode. You can also press enter or space to
switch to focus mode on controls that require it. Pressing escape will
switch back to browse mode. In addition, you can manually force focus
mode, after which it will remain in effect until you choose to disable
it.
Name
Key
Description
Toggle browse/focus modes
NVDA+space
Toggles between focus mode and browse mode
Exit focus mode
escape
Switches back to browse mode if focus mode was previously switched to
automatically
Refresh browse mode document
NVDA+f5
Reloads the current document content (useful if certain content seems
to be missing from the document. Not available in Microsoft Word and
Outlook.)
Find
NVDA+control+f
Pops up a dialog in which you can type some text to find in the
current document. See searching for text for more information.
Find next
NVDA+f3
Finds the next occurrence of the text in the document that you
previously searched for
Find previous
NVDA+shift+f3
Finds the previous occurrence of the text in the document you
previously searched for
Open long description
NVDA+d
Opens a new window containing a long description for the element you
are on if it has one.
6.1. Single Letter Navigation
While in browse mode, for quicker navigation, NVDA also provides
single character keys to jump to certain fields in the document. Note
that not all of these commands are supported in every type of
document.
The following keys by themselves jump to the next available element,
while adding the shift key causes them to jump to the previous
element:
• h: heading
• l: list
• i: list item
• t: table
• k: link
• n: nonLinked text
• f: form field
• u: unvisited link
• v: visited link
• e: edit field
• b: button
• x: checkbox
• c: combo box
• r: radio button
• q: block quote
• s: separator
• m: frame
• g: graphic
• d: landmark
• o: embedded object (audio and video player, application, dialog, etc.)
• 1 to 6: headings at levels 1 to 6 respectively
• a: annotation (comment, editor revision, etc.)
• w: spelling error
To move to the beginning or end of containing elements such as lists
and tables:
Name
Key
Description
Move to start of container
shift+comma
Moves to the start of the container (list, table, etc.) where the
caret is positioned
Move past end of container
comma
Moves past the end of the container (list, table, etc.) where the
caret is positioned
Some web applications such as Gmail, Twitter and Facebook use single
letters as shortcut keys. If you want to use these while still being
able to use your cursor keys to read in browse mode, you can
temporarily disable NVDA's single letter navigation keys. To toggle
single letter navigation on and off for the current document, press
NVDA+shift+space.
6.2. The Elements List
The elements list provides access to a list of various types of
elements in the document as appropriate for the application. For
example, in web browsers, the elements list can list links, headings,
form fields, buttons or landmarks. Radio buttons allow you to switch
between the different types of elements. An edit field is also
provided in the dialog which allows you to filter the list to help you
search for a particular item on the page. Once you have chosen an
item, you can use the provided buttons in the dialog to move to or
activate that item.
Name
Key
Description
Browse mode elements list
NVDA+f7
Lists various types of elements in the current document
6.3. Searching for text
This dialog allows you to search for terms in the current document. In
the "Type the text you wish to find" field, the text to be found can
be entered. The "Case sensitive" checkbox makes the search consider
uppercase and lowercase letters differently. For example, with "Case
sensitive" selected you can find "NV Access" but not "nv access". Use
the following keys for performing searches:
Name
Key
Description
Find text
NVDA+control+f
Opens the search dialog
Find next
NVDA+f3
searches the next occurrence of the current search term
Find previous
NVDA+shift+f3
searches the previous occurrence of the current search term
6.4. Embedded Objects
Pages can include rich content using technologies such as Adobe Flash,
Oracle Java and HTML5, as well as applications and dialogs. Where
these are encountered in browse mode, NVDA will report "embedded
object", "application" or "dialog", respectively. You can quickly move
to them using the o and shift+o embedded object single letter
navigation keys. To interact with these objects, you can press enter
on them. If it is accessible, you can then tab around it and interact
with it like any other application. A key command is provided to
return to the original page containing the embedded object:
Name
Key
Description
Move to containing browse mode document
NVDA+control+space
Moves the focus out of the current embedded object and into the
document that contains it
7. Reading Mathematical Content
Using MathPlayer 4 from Design Science, NVDA can read and
interactively navigate supported mathematical content. This requires
that MathPlayer 4 is installed on the computer. MathPlayer is
available as a free download from:
http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathplayer/
NVDA supports the following types of mathematical content:
• MathML in Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Google Chrome.
• Design Science MathType in Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. MathType
needs to be installed in order for this to work. The trial version is
sufficient.
• MathML in Adobe Reader. Note that this is not an official standard
yet, so there is currently no publicly available software that can
produce this content.
• Math in Kindle for PC for books with accessible math.
When reading a document, NVDA will speak any supported mathematical
content where it occurs. If you are using a braille display, it will
also be displayed in braille.
7.1. Interactive Navigation
If you are working primarily with speech, in most cases, you will
probably wish to examine the expression in smaller segments, rather
than hearing the entire expression at once.
If you are in browse mode, you can do this by moving the cursor to the
mathematical content and pressing enter.
If you are not in browse mode:
1. move the review cursor to the mathematical content. By default, the
review cursor follows the system caret, so you can usually use the
system caret to move to the desired content.
2. Then, activate the following command:
Name
Key
Description
Interact with math content
NVDA+alt+m
Begins interaction with math content.
At this point, you can use MathPlayer commands such as the arrow keys
to explore the expression. For example, you can move through the
expression with the left and right arrow keys and zoom into a portion
of the expression such as a fraction using the down arrow key. Please
see the MathPlayer documentation about navigation commands for further
information.
When you wish to return to the document, simply press the escape key.
8. Braille
If you own a braille display, NVDA can display information in braille.
If your braille display has a Perkins-style keyboard, you can also
enter contracted or uncontracted braille.
Please see the Supported Braille Displays section for information
about the supported braille displays. This section also contains
information about what displays support NVDA's automatic background
braille display detection functionality. You can configure braille
using the Braille category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
8.1. Control Type, State and Landmark abbreviations
In order to fit as much information as possible on a braille display,
the following abbreviations have been defined to indicate control type
and state as well as landmarks.
Abbreviation
Control type
app
application
bqt
block quote
btn
button
drbtn
drop down button
spnbtn
spin button
splbtn
split button
tgbtn
toggle button
cbo
combo box
chk
checkbox
dlg
dialog
doc
document
edt
editable text field
pwdedt
password edit
embedded
embedded object
enote
end note
fnote
foot note
gra
graphic
grp
grouping
hN
heading at level n, e.g. h1, h2.
hlp
help baloon
lmk
landmark
lnk
link
vlnk
visited link
lst
list
mnu
menu
mnubar
menu bar
mnubtn
menu button
mnuitem
menu item
pnl
panel
prgbar
progress bar
rbtn
radio button
scrlbar
scroll bar
sect
section
stbar
status bar
tabctl
tab control
tbl
table
cN
table column number n, e.g. c1, c2.
rN
table row number n, e.g. r1, r2.
term
terminal
tlbar
tool bar
tltip
tool tip
tv
tree view
tvbtn
tree view button
tvitem
tree view item
lv N
a tree view item has a hierarchical level N|
wnd
window
⠤⠤⠤⠤⠤
separator
The following state indicators are also defined:
Abbreviation
Control state
...
displayed when an object supports autocompletion
⢎⣿⡱
displayed when an object (e.g. a toggle button) is pressed
⢎⣀⡱
displayed when an object (e.g. a toggle button) is not pressed
⣏⣿⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is checked
⣏⣸⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is half checked
⣏⣀⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is not checked
-
displayed when an object (e.g. a tree view item) is collapsible
+
displayed when an object (e.g. a tree view item) is Expandable
***
displayed when a protected control or document is encountered
clk
displayed when an object is clickable
cmnt
displayed when there is a comment for a spreadsheet cell or piece of
text in a document
frml
displayed when there is a formula on a spreadsheet cell
invalid
displayed when an invalid entry has been made
ldesc
displayed when an object (usually a graphic) has a long description
mln
displayed when an edit field allows typing multiple lines of text such
as comment fields on websites
req
displayed when a required form field is encountered
ro
displayed when an object (e.g. an editable text field) is read-only
sel
displayed when an object is selected
nsel
displayed when an object is not selected
sorted asc
displayed when an object is sorted ascending
sorted desc
displayed when an object is sorted descending
submnu
displayed when an object has a popup (usually a sub-menu)
Finally, the following abbreviations for landmarks are defined:
Abbreviation
Landmark
bnnr
banner
cinf
content info
cmpl
complementary
form
form
main
main
navi
navigation
srch
search
rgn
region
8.2. Braille Input
NVDA supports entry of both uncontracted and contracted braille via a
braille keyboard. You can select the translation table used to
translate braille into text using the Input table setting in the
Braille category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
When uncontracted braille is being used, text is inserted as soon as
it is entered. When using contracted braille, text is inserted when
you press space or enter at the end of a word. Note that translation
can only reflect the braille word you are typing and cannot consider
existing text. For example, if you are using a braille code that
begins numbers with a number sign and you press backspace to move to
the end of a number, you will need to type the number sign again to
enter additional numbers.
Pressing dot 7 erases the last entered braille cell or character. Dot
8 translates any braille input and presses the enter key. Pressing dot
7 + dot 8 translates any braille input, but without adding a space or
pressing enter.
9. Content Recognition
When authors don't provide sufficient information for a screen reader
user to determine the content of something, various tools can be used
to attempt to recognize the content from an image. NVDA supports the
optical character recognition (OCR) functionality built into Windows
10 to recognize text from images. Additional content recognizers can
be provided in NVDA add-ons.
When you use a content recognition command, NVDA recognizes content
from the current navigator object. By default, the navigator object
follows the system focus or browse mode cursor, so you can usually
just move the focus or browse mode cursor where desired. For example,
if you move the browse mode cursor to a graphic, recognition will
recognize content from the graphic by default. However, you may wish
to use object navigation directly to, for example, recognize the
content of an entire application window.
Once recognition is complete, the result will be presented in a
document similar to browse mode, allowing you to read the information
with cursor keys, etc. Pressing enter or space will activate (normally
click) the text at the cursor if possible. Pressing escape dismisses
the recognition result.
9.1. Windows 10 OCR
Windows 10 includes OCR for many languages. NVDA can use this to
recognize text from images or inaccessible applications.
You can set the language to use for text recognition in the Windows 10
OCR category of the NVDA Settings dialog. Additional languages can be
installed by opening the Start menu, choosing Settings, selecting Time
& Language -> Region & Language and then choosing Add a language.
To recognize the text in the current navigator object using Windows 10
OCR, press NVDA+r.
10. Application Specific Features
NVDA provides its own extra features for some applications to make
certain tasks easier or to provide access to functionality which is
not otherwise accessible to screen reader users.
10.1. Microsoft Word
10.1.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
NVDA is able to automatically announce appropriate row and column
headers when navigating around tables in Microsoft Word. This firstly
requires that the Report Table row / column headers option in NVDA's
Document Formatting settings, found in the NVDA Settings dialog, be
turned on. Secondly, NVDA needs to know which row or column contains
the headers in any given table. After moving to the first cell in the
column or row containing the headers, use one of the following
commands:
Name
Key
Description
Set column headers
NVDA+shift+c
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the row
that contains column headers, which should be automatically announced
when moving between columns below this row. Pressing twice will clear
the setting.
Set row headers
NVDA+shift+r
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the
column that contains row headers, which should be automatically
announced when moving between rows after this column. Pressing twice
will clear the setting.
These settings will be stored in the document as bookmarks compatible
with other screen readers such as Jaws. This means that users of other
screen readers who open this document at a later date will
automatically have the row and column headers already set.
10.1.2. Browse Mode in Microsoft Word
Similar to the web, Browse mode can be used in Microsoft Word to allow
you to use features such as Quick navigation and the Elements List. To
toggle Browse mode on and off in Microsoft Word, press NVDA+space. For
further information about Browse mode and Quick Navigation, see the
Browse Mode section.
10.1.2.1. The Elements List
While in Browse mode in Microsoft Word, you can access the Elements
List by pressing NVDA+f7. The Elements List can list headings, links,
annotations (which includes comments and track changes) and errors
(currently limited to spelling errors).
10.1.3. Reporting Comments
To report any comments at the current caret position, press
NVDA+alt+c. All comments for the document, along with other tracked
changes, can also be listed in the NVDA Elements List when selecting
Annotations as the type.
10.2. Microsoft Excel
10.2.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
NVDA is able to automatically announce appropriate row and column
headers when navigating around Excel worksheets. This firstly requires
that the Report Table row / column headers option in NVDA's Document
Formatting settings, found in the NVDA Settings dialog, be turned on.
Secondly, NVDA needs to know which row or column contains the headers.
After moving to the first cell in the column or row containing the
headers, use one of the following commands:
Name
Key
Description
Set column headers
NVDA+shift+c
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the row
that contains column headers, which should be automatically announced
when moving between columns below this row. Pressing twice will clear
the setting.
Set row headers
NVDA+shift+r
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the
column that contains row headers, which should be automatically
announced when moving between rows after this column. Pressing twice
will clear the setting.
These settings will be stored in the workbook as defined name ranges
compatible with other screen readers such as Jaws. This means that
users of other screen readers who open this workbook at a later date
will automatically have the row and column headers already set.
10.2.2. The Elements List
Similar to the web, NVDA has an Elements List for Microsoft Excel that
allows you to list and access several different types of information.
To access the Elements List in Excel, press NVDA+f7. The various types
of information available in the Elements List are:
• Charts: This lists all charts in the active worksheet. Selecting a
chart and pressing enter or the Move to button focuses the chart for
navigating and reading with the arrow keys.
• Comments: This lists all cells in the active worksheet containing
comments. The cell address along with its comments are shown for each
cell. Pressing enter or the Move To button when on a listed comment
will move directly to that cell.
• Formulas: This lists all cells in the worksheet containing a
formula. The cell address along with its formula are shown for each
cell. Pressing enter or the Move To button on a listed formula will
move directly to that cell.
• Sheets: This lists all sheets in the workbook. Pressing f2 when on
a listed sheet allows you to rename the sheet. Pressing enter or the
Move To button while on the listed sheet will switch to that sheet.
• Form fields: This lists all form fields in the active worksheet. For
each form field, the Elements List shows the alternative text of the
field along with the addresses of the cells it covers. Selecting a
form field and pressing enter or the Move to button moves to that
field in browse mode.
10.2.3. Reporting Comments
To report any comments for the currently focused cell, press
NVDA+alt+c. All comments for the worksheet can also be listed in the
NVDA Elements List.
10.2.4. Reading Protected Cells
If a workbook has been protected, it may not be possible to move focus
to particular cells that have been locked for editing. To allow moving
to locked cells, switch to Browse Mode by pressing NVDA+space, and
then use standard Excel movement commands such as the arrow keys to
move around all cells on the current worksheet.
10.2.5. Form Fields
Excel worksheets can include form fields. You can access these using
the Elements List or the f and shift+f form field single letter
navigation keys. Once you move to a form field in browse mode, you can
press enter or space to either activate it or switch to focus mode so
you can interact with it, depending on the control. For further
information about Browse mode and single letter navigation, see the
Browse Mode section.
10.3. Microsoft PowerPoint
Name
Key
Description
Toggle speaker notes reading
control+shift+s
When in a running slide show, this command will toggle between the
speaker notes for the slide and the content for the slide. This only
affects what NVDA reads, not what is displayed on screen.
10.4. foobar2000
Name
Key
Description
Report remaining time
control+shift+r
Reports the remaining time of the currently playing track, if any.
Report elapsed time
control+shift+e
Reports the elapsed time of the currently playing track, if any.
Report track length
control+shift+t
Reports the length of the currently playing track, if any.
Note: The above shortcuts work only with the default formatting string
for foobar's status line.
10.5. Miranda IM
Name
Key
Description
Report recent message
NVDA+control+1-4
Reports one of the recent messages, depending on the number pressed;
e.g. NVDA+control+2 reads the second most recent message.
10.6. Poedit
Name
Key
Description
Report Comments Window
control+shift+c
Reports any comments in the comments window.
Report notes for translators
control+shift+a
Reports any notes for translators.
10.7. Skype
When in a conversation:
Name
Key
Description
Review message
NVDA+control+1-0
Reports and moves the review cursor to a recent message, depending on
the number pressed; e.g. NVDA+control+2 reads the second most recent
message.
10.8. Kindle for PC
NVDA supports reading and navigating books in Amazon Kindle for PC.
This functionality is only available in Kindle books designated with
"Screen Reader: Supported" which you can check on the details page for
the book.
Browse mode is used to read books. It is enabled automatically when
you open a book or focus the book area. The page will be turned
automatically as appropriate when you move the cursor or use the say
all command. You can manually turn to the next page with the pageDown
key and turn to the previous page with the pageUp key.
Single letter navigation is supported for links and graphics, but only
within the current page. Navigating by link also includes footnotes.
NVDA provides early support for reading and interactive navigation of
mathematical content for books with accessible math. Please see the
Reading Mathematical Content section for further information.
10.8.1. Text Selection
Kindle allows you to perform various functions on selected text,
including obtaining a dictionary definition, adding notes and
highlights, copying the text to the clipboard and searching the web.
To do this, first select text as you normally would in browse mode;
e.g. by using shift and the cursor keys. Once you have selected text,
press the applications key or shift+f10 to show the available options
for working with the selection. If you do this with no text selected,
options will be shown for the word at the cursor.
10.8.2. User Notes
You can add a note regarding a word or passage of text. To do this,
first select the relevant text and access the selection options as
described above. Then, choose Add Note.
When reading in browse mode, NVDA refers to these notes as comments.
To view, edit or delete a note:
1. Move the cursor to the text containing the note.
2. Access the options for the selection as described above.
3. Choose Edit Note.
10.9. Azardi
When in the table view of added books:
Name
Key
Description
Enter
enter
Opens the selected book.
Context menu
applications
Opens the context menu for the selected book.
11. Configuring NVDA
Most configuration can be performed using dialog boxes accessed
through the Preferences sub-menu of the NVDA menu. Many of these
settings can be found in the multi-page NVDA Settings dialog. In all
dialog boxes, press the OK button to accept any changes you have made.
To cancel any changes, press the Cancel button or the escape key. For
certain dialogs, you can press Apply button to let the settings take
effect immediately without closing the dialog. Some settings can also
be changed using shortcut keys, which are listed where relevant in the
sections below.
11.1. NVDA Settings
The NVDA Settings dialog contains many configuration parameters that
can be changed. This dialog contains a list with several categories of
settings to choose from. When you select a category, several settings
related to this category will be shown in this dialog. These settings
can be applied using the apply button, in which case the dialog will
stay open. If you want to save your settings and close the NVDA
Settings dialog, you can use the OK button.
Some settings categories have dedicated shortcut keys. If pressed, the
shortcut key will open the NVDA Settings dialog in that particular
category. By default, not all categories can be accessed with keyboard
commands. If you wish to access categories which do not have dedicated
shortcut keys, use the Input Gestures dialog to add a custom gesture
such as a keyboard command or touch gesture for that category.
The settings categories found in the NVDA Settings dialog will be
outlined below.
11.1.1. General (NVDA+control+g)
The General category of the NVDA Settings dialog sets NVDA's overall
behavior such as interface language and whether or not it should check
for updates. This category contains the following options:
Language
This is a combo box which allows you to select the language that
NVDA's user interface and messages should be shown in. There are many
languages, however the default option is "User Default, Windows". This
option tells NVDA to use the language that Windows is currently set
to.
Please note that NVDA must be restarted when changing the language.
When the confirmation dialog appears, select "restart now" or "restart
later" if you wish to use the new language now or at a later time,
respectively. If "restart later" is selected, the configuration must
be saved (either manually or using the save on exit functionality).
Save configuration on exit
This option is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to
automatically save the current configuration when you exit NVDA.
Show exit options when exiting NVDA
This option is a checkbox that allows you to choose whether or not a
dialog appears when you exit NVDA that asks what action you want to
perform. When checked, a dialog will appear when you attempt to exit
NVDA asking whether you want to exit, restart, restart with addons
disabled or install pending updates (if any). When unchecked, NVDA
will exit immediately.
Play sounds when starting or exiting NVDA
This option is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to play
sounds when it starts or exits.
Logging level
This is a combo box that lets you choose how much NVDA will log as
it's running. Generally users should not need to touch this as not too
much is logged. However, if you wish to provide information in a bug
report, or enable or disable logging altogether, then it may be a
useful option.
The available logging levels are:
• Disabled: Apart from a brief startup message, NVDA will not log
anything while it runs.
• Info: NVDA will log basic information such as startup messages and
information useful for developers.
• Debug warning: Warning messages that are not caused by severe errors
will be logged.
• Input/output: Input from keyboard and braille displays, as well as
speech and braille output will be logged. If you are concerned about
privacy, do not set logging level to this option.
• Debug: In addition to info, warning, and input/output messages,
additional debug messages will be logged. Just like input/output, if
you are concerned about privacy, you should not set logging level to
this option.
Automatically start NVDA after I log on to Windows
If this option is enabled, NVDA will start automatically as soon as
you log on to Windows. This option is only available for installed
copies of NVDA.
Use NVDA on the Windows Logon screen (requires administrator privileges)
If you log on to Windows by providing a user name and password, then
enabling this option will make NVDA start automatically at the logon
screen when Windows starts. This option is only available for
installed copies of NVDA.
Use currently saved settings on the logon and other secure screens
(requires administrator privileges)
Pressing this button copies your currently saved NVDA user
configuration to NVDA's system configuration directory, so that NVDA
will use it when running on the logon, User Account Control (UAC) and
other secure Windows screens. To make sure that all your settings are
transferred, make sure to save your configuration first with
control+NVDA+c or Save configuration in the NVDA menu. This option is
only available for installed copies of NVDA.
Automatically check for updates to NVDA
If this is enabled, NVDA will automatically check for updated versions
of NVDA and inform you when an update is available. You can also
manually check for updates by selecting Check for updates under Help
in the NVDA menu. When manually or automatically checking for updates,
it is necessary for NVDA to send some information to the update server
in order to receive the correct update for your system. The following
information is always sent:
• Current NVDA version
• Operating System version
• Whether the Operating System is 64 or 32 bit
Allow the NVDA project to gather NVDA usage statistics
If this is enabled, NV Access will use the information from update
checks in order to track the number of NVDA users including
particular demographics such as Operating system and country of
origin. Note that although your IP address will be used to calculate
your country during the update check, the IP address is never kept.
Apart from the mandatory information required to check for updates,
the following extra information is also currently sent:
• NVDA interface language
• Whether this copy of NVDA is portable or installed
• Name of the current speech synthesizer in use (including the name of
the add-on the driver comes from)
• Name of the current Braille display in use (including the name of
the add-on the driver comes from)
• The current output Braille table (if Braille is in use)
This information greatly aides NV Access to prioritize future
development of NVDA.
Notify for pending updates on startup
If this is enabled, NVDA will inform you when there is a pending
update on startup, offering you the possibility to install it. You can
also manually install the pending update from the Exit NVDA dialog (if
enabled), from the NVDA menu, or when you perform a new check from
the Help menu.
11.1.2. Speech Settings (NVDA+control+v)
The speech category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options that
lets you change the speech synthesizer as well as voice
characteristics for the chosen synthesizer. For a quicker alternative
way of controlling speech parameters from anywhere, please see the
Synth Settings Ring section.
The Speech Settings category contains the following options:
Change synthesizer
The first option in the Speech Settings category is the Change...
button. This button activates the Select Synthesizer dialog, which
allows you to select the active speech synthesizer and output device.
This dialog opens on top of the NVDA Settings dialog. Saving or
dismissing the settings in the Select Synthesizer dialog will return
you to the NVDA Settings dialog.
Voice
The Voice option is a combo box listing all the voices of the current
synthesizer that you have installed. You can use the arrow keys to
listen to all the various choices. Left and Up arrow take you up in
the list, while right and down arrow move you down in the list.
Variant
If you are using the Espeak NG synthesizer that is packaged with NVDA,
this is a combo box that lets you select the Variant the synthesizer
should speak with. ESpeak NG's Variants are rather like voices, as
they provide slightly different attributes to the eSpeak NG voice.
Some variants will sound like a male, some like a female, and some
even like a frog.
Rate
This option allows you to change the rate of your voice. This is a
slider that goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the slowest, 100 being the
fastest).
Pitch
This option allows you to change the pitch of the current voice. It is
a slider which goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the lowest pitch and 100
being the highest).
Volume
This option is a slider which goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the lowest
volume and 100 being the highest).
Inflection
This option is a slider that lets you choose how much inflection (rise
and fall in pitch) the synthesizer should use to speak with. (The only
synthesizer that provides this option at the present time is eSpeak
NG).
Automatic Language switching
This checkbox allows you to toggle whether NVDA should switch speech
synthesizer languages automatically if the text being read specifies
its language. This option is enabled by default. Currently only the
eSpeak NG synthesizer supports automatic language switching.
Automatic Dialect switching
This checkbox allows you to toggle whether or not dialect changes
should be made, rather than just actual language changes. For example,
if reading in an English U.S. voice but a document specifies that some
text is in English U.K., then the synthesizer will switch accents if
this option is enabled. This option is disabled by default.
Punctuation/Symbol Level
Key: NVDA+p
This allows you to choose the amount of punctuation and other symbols
that should be spoken as words. For example, when set to all, all
symbols will be spoken as words. This option applies to all
synthesizers, not just the currently active synthesizer.
Trust voice's language when processing characters and symbols
On by default, this option tells NVDA if the current voice's language
can be trusted when processing symbols and characters. If you find
that NVDA is reading punctuation in the wrong language for a
particular synthesizer or voice, you may wish to turn this off to
force NVDA to use its global language setting instead.
Include Unicode Consortium data (including emoji) when processing
characters and symbols
When this checkbox is enabled, NVDA will include additional symbol
pronunciation dictionaries when pronouncing characters and symbols.
These dictionaries contain descriptions for symbols (particularly
emoji) that are provided by the Unicode Consortium as part of their
Common Locale Data Repository. If you want NVDA to speak descriptions
of emoji characters based on this data, you should enable this option.
However, if you are using a speech synthesizer that supports speaking
emoji descriptions natively, you may wish to turn this off.
Note that manually added or edited character descriptions are saved as
part of your user settings. Therefore, if you change the description
of a particular emoji, your custom description will be spoken for that
emoji regardless of whether this option is enabled. You can add, edit
or remove symbol descriptions in NVDA's punctuation/symbol
pronunciation dialog.
Capital pitch change percentage
This edit field allows you to type the amount that the pitch of the
voice will change when speaking a capital letter. This value is a
percentage, where a negative value lowers the pitch and a positive
value raises it. For no pitch change you would use 0.
Say "cap" before capitals
This setting is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to say the
word "cap" before any capital letter when spoken as an individual
character such as when spelling. Usually, NVDA raises the pitch
slightly for any capital letter, but some synthesizers may not support
this well, so perhaps this option may be of use.
Beep for capitals
If this checkbox is checked, NVDA will make a small beep each time it
encounters a capitalized character by itself. Like the "say cap for
capitals" checkbox, this is useful for Synthesizers that can't change
their pitch for capital letters.
Use spelling functionality if supported
Some words consist of only one character, but the pronunciation is
different depending on whether the character is being spoken as an
individual character (such as when spelling) or a word. For example,
in English, "a" is both a letter and a word and is pronounced
differently in each case. This option allows the synthesizer to
differentiate between these two cases if the synthesizer supports
this. Most synthesizers do support it.
This option should generally be enabled. However, some Microsoft
Speech API synthesizers do not implement this correctly and behave
strangely when it is enabled. If you are having problems with the
pronunciation of individual characters, try disabling this option.
11.1.3. Select Synthesizer (NVDA+control+s)
The Synthesizer dialog, which can be opened by activating the
Change... button in the speech category of the NVDA settings dialog,
allows you to select which Synthesizer NVDA should use to speak with.
Once you have selected your synthesizer of choice, you can press Ok
and NVDA will load the selected Synthesizer. If there is an error
loading the synthesizer, NVDA will notify you with a message, and
continue using the previous synthesizer.
Synthesizer
This option allows you to choose the synthesizer you wish NVDA to use
for speech output.
For a list of the Synthesizers that NVDA supports, please see the
Supported Speech Synthesizers section.
One special item that will always appear in this list is "No speech",
which allows you to use NVDA with no speech output whatsoever. This
may be useful for someone who wishes to only use NVDA with braille, or
perhaps to sighted developers who only wish to use the Speech Viewer.
Output device
This option allows you to choose the sound card that NVDA should
instruct the selected synthesizer to speak through.
Audio Ducking Mode
Key: NVDA+shift+d
On Windows 8 and above, this option allows you to choose if NVDA
should lower the volume of other applications while NVDA is speaking,
or all the time while NVDA is running.
• No Ducking: NVDA will never lower the volume of other audio.
• Duck when outputting speech and sounds: NVDA will only lower the
volume of other audio when NVDA is speaking or playing sounds. This
may not work for all synthesizers.
• Always duck: NVDA will keep the volume of other audio lower the
whole time NVDA is running.
This option is only available if NVDA has been installed. It is not
possible to support audio ducking for portable and temporary copies of
NVDA.
11.1.4. Synth settings ring
If you wish to quickly change speech settings without going to the
Speech category of the NVDA settings dialog, there are some NVDA key
commands that allow you to move through the most common speech
settings from anywhere while running NVDA:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Move to next synth setting
NVDA+control+rightArrow
NVDA+shift+control+rightArrow
Moves to the next available speech setting after the current, wrapping
around to the first setting again after the last
Move to previous synth setting
NVDA+control+leftArrow
NVDA+shift+control+leftArrow
Moves to the next available speech setting before the current,
wrapping around to the last setting after the first
Increment current synth setting
NVDA+control+upArrow
NVDA+shift+control+upArrow
increases the current speech setting you are on. E.g. increases the
rate, chooses the next voice, increases the volume
Decrement current synth setting
NVDA+control+downArrow
NVDA+shift+control+downArrow
decreases the current speech setting you are on. E.g. decreases the
rate, chooses the previous voice, decreases the volume
11.1.5. Braille
The Braille category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options that
let you change several aspects of braille input and output. This
category contains the following options:
Change braille display
The Change... button in the Braille category of the NVDA Settings
dialog activates the Select Braille Display dialog, which allows you
to select the active braille display. This dialog opens on top of the
NVDA Settings dialog. Saving or dismissing the settings in the Select
Braille Display dialog will return you to the NVDA Settings dialog.
Output Table
The next option you will come to in this category is the braille
output table combo box. In this combo box, you will find braille
tables for different languages, braille standards and grades. The
chosen table will be used to translate text into braille to be
presented on your braille display. You can move from braille table to
braille table in the list by using the arrow keys.
Input Table
Complementary to the previous option, the next setting you will find
is the braille input table combo box. The chosen table will be used to
translate braille entered on your braille display's Perkins-style
keyboard into text. You can move from braille table to braille table
in the list by using the arrow keys.
Note that this option is only useful if your braille display has a
Perkins-style keyboard and this feature is supported by the braille
display driver. If input is not supported on a display which does have
a braille keyboard, this will be noted in the Supported Braille
Displays section.
Expand to computer braille for the word at the cursor
This option allows the word that is under the cursor to be displayed
in non-contracted computer braille.
Show Cursor
This option allows the braille cursor to be turned on and off. It
applies to the system caret and review cursor, but not to the
selection indicator.
Blink Cursor
This option allows the braille cursor to blink. If blinking is turned
off, the braille cursor will constantly be in the "up" position. The
selection indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots
7 and 8 without blinking.
Cursor Blink Rate (ms)
This option is a numerical field that allows you to change the blink
rate of the cursor in milliseconds.
Cursor Shape for Focus
This option allows you to choose the shape (dot pattern) of the
braille cursor when braille is tethered to focus. The selection
indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots 7 and 8
without blinking.
Cursor Shape for Review
This option allows you to choose the shape (dot pattern) of the
braille cursor when braille is tethered to review. The selection
indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots 7 and 8
without blinking.
Message Timeout (sec)
This option is a numerical field that controls how long NVDA messages
are displayed on the braille display. Specifying 0 disables displaying
of these messages completely.
Show Messages Indefinitely
This option allows NVDA messages to be displayed on the braille
display indefinitely.
Tether Braille
Key: NVDA+control+t
This option allows you to choose whether the braille display will
follow the system focus, the navigator object / review cursor, or
both. When "automatically" is selected, NVDA will follow the system
focus and caret by default. In this case, when the navigator object or
the review cursor position is changed by means of explicit user
interaction, NVDA will tether to review temporarily, until the focus
or the caret changes.
Read by Paragraph
If enabled, braille will be displayed by paragraphs instead of lines.
Also, the next and previous line commands will move by paragraph
accordingly. This means that you do not have to scroll the display at
the end of each line even where more text would fit on the display.
This may allow for more fluent reading of large amounts of text. It is
disabled by default.
Avoid splitting words when possible
If this is enabled, a word which is too large to fit at the end of the
braille display will not be split. Instead, there will be some blank
space at the end of the display. When you scroll the display, you will
be able to read the entire word. This is sometimes called "word wrap".
Note that if the word is too large to fit on the display even by
itself, the word must still be split.
If this is disabled, as much of the word as possible will be
displayed, but the rest will be cut off. When you scroll the display,
you will then be able to read the rest of the word.
Enabling this may allow for more fluent reading, but generally
requires you to scroll the display more.
Focus context presentation
This option allows you to choose what context information NVDA will
show on the braille display when an object gets focus. Context
information refers to the hierarchy of objects containing the focus.
For example, when you focus a list item, this list item is part of a
list. This list might be contained by a dialog, etc. Please consult
the section about object navigation for more information about the
hierarchy that applies to objects in NVDA.
When set to fill display for context changes, NVDA will try to display
as much context information as possible on the braille display, but
only for the parts of the context that have changed. For the example
above, this means that when changing focus to the list, NVDA will show
the list item on the braille display. Furthermore, if there is enough
space left on the braille display, NVDA will try to show that the list
item is part of a list. If you then start moving through the list with
your arrow keys, it is assumed that you are aware that you are still
in the list. Thus, for the remaining list items you focus, NVDA will
only show the focused list item on the display. In order for you to
read the context again (i.e. that you are in a list and that the list
is part of a dialog), you will have to scroll your braille display
back.
When this option is set to always fill the display, NVDA will try to
show as much context information as possible on the braille display,
regardless of whether you have seen the same context information
before. This has the advantage that NVDA will fit as much information
as possible on the display. However, the downside is that there is
always a difference in the position where the focus starts on the
braille display. This can make it difficult to skim a long list of
items, for example, as you will need to continually move your finger
to find the start of the item. This was the default behavior for NVDA
2017.2 and before.
When you set the focus context presentation option to only show the
context information when scrolling back, NVDA never shows context
information on your braille display by default. Thus, in the example
above, NVDA will display that you focused a list item. However, in
order for you to read the context (i.e. that you are in a list and
that the list is part of a dialog), you will have to scroll your
braille display back.
To toggle focus context presentation from anywhere, please assign a
custom gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.1.6. Select Braille Display (NVDA+control+a)
The Select Braille Display dialog, which can be opened by activating
the Change... button in the Braille category of the NVDA settings
dialog, allows you to select which Braille display NVDA should use for
braille output. Once you have selected your braille display of choice,
you can press Ok and NVDA will load the selected display. If there is
an error loading the display driver, NVDA will notify you with a
message, and continue using the previous display, if any.
Braille Display
This combo box presents you with several options depending on what
braille display drivers are available on your system. Move between
these options with the arrow keys.
The automatic option will allow NVDA to search for many supported
braille displays in the background. When this feature is enabled and
you connect a supported display using USB or bluetooth, NVDA will
automatically connect with this display.
No braille means that you are not using braille.
Please see the Supported Braille Displays section for more information
about supported braille displays and which of these support automatic
detection in the background.
Port
This option, if available, allows you to choose what port or type of
connection will be used to communicate with the braille display you
have selected. It is a combo box containing the possible choices for
your braille display.
By default, NVDA employs automatic port detection, which means the
connection with the braille device will be established automatically
by scanning for available USB and bluetooth devices on your system.
However, for some braille displays, you may be able to explicitly
choose what port should be used. Common options are "Automatic" (which
tells NVDA to employ the default automatic port selection procedure),
"USB", "Bluetooth" and legacy serial communication ports if your
braille display supports this type of communication.
This option won't be available if your braille display only supports
automatic port detection.
You may consult the documentation for your braille display in the
section Supported Braille Displays to check for more details on the
supported types of communication and available ports.
11.1.7. Keyboard (NVDA+control+k)
The Keyboard category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options
that sets how NVDA behaves as you use and type on your keyboard. This
settings category contains the following options:
Keyboard layout
This combo box lets you choose what type of keyboard layout NVDA
should use. Currently the two that come with NVDA are Desktop and
Laptop.
Select NVDA Modifier Keys
The checkboxes in this list control what keys can be used as NVDA
modifier keys. The following keys are available to choose from:
• The caps lock key
• The insert key on the number pad
• The extended insert key (usually found above the arrow keys, near
home and end)
If no key is chosen as the NVDA key it may be impossible to access
certain NVDA commands. Therefore, The NVDA settings dialog will
display an error message if all keys are unselected when pressing Ok
or Apply. After dismissing the error message, you must select at least
one before being able to press Ok to dismiss the dialog properly.
Speak Typed Characters
Key: NVDA+2
When enabled, NVDA will announce all characters you type on the keyboard.
Speak Typed Words
Key: NVDA+3
When enabled, NVDA will announce all words you type on the keyboard.
Speech interrupt for typed characters
If on, this option will cause speech to be interrupted each time a
character is typed. This is on by default.
Speech interrupt for Enter key
If on, this option will cause speech to be interrupted each time the
Enter key is pressed. This is on by default.
Allow skim reading in Say All
If on, certain navigation commands (such as quick navigation in browse
mode or moving by line or paragraph) do not stop Say All, rather Say
All jumps to the new position and continues reading.
Beep if Typing Lowercase Letters when Caps Lock is On
When enabled, a warning beep will be heard if a letter is typed with
the shift key while caps lock is on. Generally, typing shifted letters
with caps lock is unintentional and is usually due to not realizing
that caps lock is enabled. Therefore, it can be quite helpful to be
warned about this.
Speak Command Keys
Key: NVDA+4
When enabled, NVDA will announce all non-character keys you type on
the keyboard. This includes key combinations such as control plus
another letter.
Play sound for spelling errors while typing
When enabled, a short buzzer sound will be played when a word you type
contains a spelling error. This option is only available if reporting
of spelling errors is enabled in NVDA's Document Formatting Settings,
found in the NVDA Settings dialog.
Handle keys from other applications
This option allows the user to control if key presses generated by
applications such as on-screen keyboards and speech recognition
software should be processed by NVDA. This option is on by default,
though certain users may wish to turn this off, such as those typing
Vietnamese with the Unikey typing software as it will cause incorrect
character input.
11.1.8. Mouse (NVDA+control+m)
The Mouse category in the NVDA Settings dialog allows NVDA to track
the mouse, play mouse coordinate beeps and sets other mouse usage
options. This category contains the following options:
Report Mouse Shape Changes
A checkbox, that when checked means that NVDA will announce the shape
of the mouse pointer each time it changes. The mouse pointer in
Windows changes shape to convey certain information such as when
something is editable, or when something is loading etc.
Enable mouse tracking
Key: NVDA+m
When enabled, NVDA will announce the text currently under the mouse
pointer, as you move it around the screen. This allows you to find
things on the screen, by physically moving the mouse, rather than
trying to find them through object navigation.
Text unit resolution
If NVDA is set to announce the text under the mouse as you move it,
this option allows you to choose exactly how much text will be spoken.
The options are character, word, line and paragraph.
To toggle text unit resolution from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
Report role when mouse enters object
If this checkbox is checked, NVDA will announce the role (type) of
object as the mouse moves inside it.
Play audio coordinates when mouse moves
Checking this checkbox makes NVDA play beeps as the mouse moves, so
that the user can work out where the mouse is in regards to the
dimensions of the screen. The higher the mouse is on the screen, the
higher the pitch of the beeps. The further left or right the mouse is
located on the screen, the further left or right the sound will be
played (assuming the user has stereo speakers or headphones).
Brightness controls audio coordinates volume
If the "play audio coordinates when mouse moves" checkbox is checked,
then checking this checkbox means that the volume of the audio
coordinates beeps is controlled by how bright the screen is under the
mouse. This setting is unchecked by default.
Ignore mouse input from other applications
This option allows the user to ignore mouse events (including mouse
movement and button presses) generated by other applications such as
TeamViewer and other remote control software. This option is unchecked
by default. If you check this option and you have the "Enable mouse
tracking" option enabled, NVDA will not announce what is under the
mouse if the mouse is moved by another application.
11.1.9. Touch Interaction
This settings category, only available on computers running Windows 8
and later with touch capabilities, allows you to configure how NVDA
interacts with touchscreens. This category contains the following
options:
Touch typing mode
This checkbox allows you to specify the method you wish to use when
entering text using the touch keyboard. If this checkbox is checked,
when you locate a key on the touch keyboard, you can lift your finger
and the selected key will be pressed. If this is unchecked, you need
to double-tap on the touch keyboard key to press the key.
11.1.10. Review Cursor
The Review Cursor category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used to
configure NVDA's review cursor behavior. This category contains the
following options:
Follow System Focus
Key: NVDA+7
When enabled, The review cursor will always be placed in the same
object as the current system focus whenever the focus changes.
Follow System Caret
Key: NVDA+6
When enabled, the review cursor will automatically be moved to the
position of the System caret each time it moves.
Follow mouse cursor
When enabled, the review cursor will follow the mouse as it moves.
Simple Review mode
When enabled, NVDA will filter the hierarchy of objects that can be
navigated to exclude objects that aren't of interest to the user; e.g.
invisible objects and objects used only for layout purposes.
To toggle simple review mode from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.1.11. Object Presentation (NVDA+control+o)
The Object Presentation category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used
to set how much information NVDA will present about controls such as
description, position information and so on. This category contains
the following options:
Report Tool Tips
A checkbox that when checked tells NVDA to report tool tips as they
appear. Many Windows and controls show a small message (or tool tip)
when you move the mouse pointer over them, or sometimes when you move
the focus to them.
Report Help Balloons
This checkbox when checked tells NVDA to report help balloons as they
appear. Help Balloons are like tool tips, but are usually larger in
size, and are associated with system events such as a network cable
being unplugged, or perhaps to alert you about Windows security
issues.
Report Object Shortcut Keys
When this checkbox is checked, NVDA will include the shortcut key that
is associated with a certain object or control when it is reported.
For example the File menu on a menu bar may have a shortcut key of
alt+f.
Report object position information
This option lets you choose whether you wish to have an object's
position (e.g. 1 of 4) reported when moving to the object with the
focus or object navigation.
Guess Object Position Information when unavailable
If reporting of object position information is turned on, this option
allows NVDA to guess object position information when it is otherwise
unavailable for a particular control.
When on, NVDA will report position information for more controls such
as menus and toolbars, however this information may be slightly
inaccurate.
Report Object descriptions
Uncheck this checkbox if you don't wish to have the description
reported along with objects.
Progress bar output
Key: NVDA+u
This option controls how NVDA reports progress bar updates to you.
It has the following options:
• Off: Progress bars will not be reported as they change.
• Speak: This option tells NVDA to speak the progress bar in
percentages. Each time the progress bar changes, NVDA will speak the
new value.
• Beep: This tells NVDA to beep each time the progress bar changes.
The higher the beep, the closer the progress bar is to completion.
• Beep and speak: This option tells NVDA to both beep and speak when a
progress bar updates.
Report background progress bars
This is an option that, when checked, tells NVDA to keep reporting a
progress bar, even if it is not physically in the foreground. If you
minimize or switch away from a window that contains a progress bar,
NVDA will keep track of it, allowing you to do other things while NVDA
tracks the progress bar.
Report dynamic content changes
Key: NVDA+5
Toggles the announcement of new content in particular objects such as
terminals and the history control in chat programs.
Play a sound when auto-suggestions appear
Toggles announcement of appearance of auto-suggestions, and if
enabled, NVDA will play a sound to indicate this. Auto-suggestions are
lists of suggested entries based on text entered into certain edit
fields and documents. For example, when you enter text into the search
box in Start menu in Windows Vista and later, Windows displays a list
of suggestions based on what you typed. For some edit fields such as
search fields in various Windows 10 apps, NVDA can notify you that a
list of suggestions has appeared when you type text. The
auto-suggestions list will close once you move away from the edit
field, and for some fields, NVDA can notify you of this when this
happens.
11.1.12. Input Composition
The Input Composition category allows you to control how NVDA reports
the input of Asian characters, such as with IME or Text Service input
methods. Note that due to the fact that input methods vary greatly by
available features and by how they convey information, it will most
likely be necessary to configure these options differently for each
input method to get the most efficient typing experience.
Automatically report all available candidates
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether or
not all visible candidates should be reported automatically when a
candidate list appears or its page is changed. Having this option on
for pictographic input methods such as Chinese New ChangJie or
Boshiami is useful, as you can automatically hear all symbols and
their numbers and you can choose one right away. However, for phonetic
input methods such as Chinese New Phonetic, it may be more useful to
turn this option off, as all the symbols will sound the same and you
will have to use the arrow keys to navigate the list items
individually to gain more information from the character descriptions
for each candidate.
Announce Selected Candidate
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether NVDA
should announce the selected candidate when a candidate list appears
or when the selection is changed. For input methods where the
selection can be changed with the arrow keys (such as Chinese New
Phonetic) this is necessary, but for some input methods it may be more
efficient typing with this option turned off. Note that even with this
option off, the review cursor will still be placed on the selected
candidate allowing you to use object navigation / review to manually
read this or other candidates.
Always include short character descriptions for candidates
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether or
not NVDA should provide a short description for each character in a
candidate, either when it's selected or when it's automatically read
when the candidate list appears. Note that for locales such as
Chinese, the announcement of extra character descriptions for the
selected candidate is not affected by this option. This option may be
useful for Korean and Japanese input methods.
Report changes to the reading string
Some input methods such as Chinese New Phonetic and New ChangJie have
a reading string (sometimes known as a precomposition string). You can
choose whether or not NVDA should announce new characters being typed
into this reading string with this option. This option is on by
default. Note some older input methods such as Chinese ChangJie may
not use the reading string to hold precomposition characters, but
instead use the composition string directly. Please see the next
option for configuring reporting of the composition string.
Report changes to the composition string
After reading or precomposition data has been combined into a valid
pictographic symbol, most input methods place this symbol into a
composition string for temporary storage along with other combined
symbols before they are finally inserted into the document. This
option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should report new
symbols as they appear in the composition string. This option is on
by default.
11.1.13. Browse Mode (NVDA+control+b)
The Browse Mode category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used to
configure NVDA's behavior when you read and navigate complex documents
such as web pages. This category contains the following options:
Maximum Number of Characters on One Line
This field sets the maximum length of a line in browse mode (in
characters).
Maximum Lines Per Page
This field sets the amount of lines you will move by when pressing
page up or page down while in browse mode.
Use screen layout
Key: NVDA+v
This option allows you to specify whether content in browse mode
should place content such as links and other fields on their own line,
or if it should keep them in the flow of text as it is visually shown.
If the option is enabled then things will stay as they are visually
shown, but if it is disabled then fields will be placed on their own
line.
Enable browse mode on page load
This checkbox toggles whether browse mode should be automatically
enabled when loading a page. When this option is disabled, browse mode
can still be manually activated on pages or in documents where browse
mode is supported. See the Browse Mode section for a list of
applications supported by browse mode. Note that this option does not
apply to situations where browse mode is always optional, e.g. in
Microsoft Word. This option is enabled by default.
Automatic Say All on page load
This checkbox toggles the automatic reading of a page after it loads
in browse mode. This option is enabled by default.
Include layout tables
This option affects how NVDA handles tables used purely for layout
purposes. When on, NVDA will treat these as normal tables, reporting
them based on Document Formatting Settings and locating them with
quick navigation commands. When off, they will not be reported nor
found with quick navigation. However, the content of the tables will
still be included as normal text. This option is turned off by
default.
To toggle inclusion of layout tables from anywhere, please assign a
custom gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
Configuring reporting of fields such as links and headings
Please see the options in the Document Formatting category of the NVDA
Settings dialog to configure the fields that are reported when
navigating, such as links, headings and tables.
Automatic focus mode for focus changes
This option allows focus mode to be invoked if focus changes. For
example, when on a web page, if you press tab and you land on a form,
if this option is checked, focus mode will automatically be invoked.
Automatic focus mode for caret movement
This option, when checked, allows NVDA to enter and leave focus mode
when using arrow keys. For example, if arrowing down a web page and
you land on an edit box, NVDA will automatically bring you into focus
mode. If you arrow out of the edit box, NVDA will put you back in
browse mode.
Audio indication of Focus and Browse modes
If this option is enabled, NVDA will play special sounds when it
switches between browse mode and focus mode, rather than speaking the
change.
Trap non-command gestures from reaching the document
Enabled by default, this option allows you to choose if gestures (such
as key presses) that do not result in an NVDA command and are not
considered to be a command key in general, should be trapped from
going through to the document you are currently focused on. As an
example, if enabled, if the letter j was pressed, it would be trapped
from reaching the document, even though it is not a quick navigation
command nor is it likely to be a command in the application itself.
11.1.14. Document Formatting (NVDA+control+d)
Most of the checkboxes in this category are for configuring what type
of formatting you wish to have reported as you move the cursor around
documents. For example, if you check the report font name checkbox,
each time you arrow onto text with a different font, the name of the
font will be announced.
The document formatting options are organized into groups. You can
configure reporting of:
• Font
• Font name
• Font size
• Font attributes
• Emphasis
• Style
• Colors
• Document information
• Comments
• Editor revisions
• Spelling errors
• Pages and spacing
• Page numbers
• Line numbers
• Line indentation reporting (Off, Speech, Tones, Both Speech and Tones)
• Paragraph indentation (e.g. hanging indent, first line indent)
• Line spacing (single, double, etc.)
• Alignment
• Table information
• Tables
• Row/column headers
• Cell coordinates
• Cell borders [(Off, Styles, Both Colors and Styles)
• Elements
• Headings
• Links
• Lists
• Block quotes
• Landmarks
• Frames
• Clickable
To toggle these settings from anywhere, please assign custom gestures
using the Input Gestures dialog.
Report formatting changes after the cursor
If enabled, this setting tells NVDA to try and detect all the
formatting changes on a line as it reports it, even if doing this may
slow down NVDA's performance.
By default, NVDA will detect the formatting at the position of the
System caret / Review Cursor, and in some instances may detect
formatting on the rest of the line, only if it is not going to cause a
performance decrease.
Enable this option while proof reading documents in applications such
as WordPad, where formatting is important.
Line indentation reporting
This option allows you to configure how indentation at the beginning
of lines is reported. The Report line indentation with combo box has
four options.
• Off: NVDA will not treat indentation specially.
• Speech: If speech is selected, when the amount of indentation
changes, NVDA will say something like "twelve space" or "four tab."
• Tones: If Tones is selected, when the amount of indentation
changes, tones indicate the amount of change in indent. The tone will
increase in pitch every space, and for a tab, it will increase in
pitch the equivalent of 4 spaces.
• Both Speech and Tones: This option reads indentation using both of
the above methods.
11.1.15. Windows 10 OCR Settings
The settings in this category allow you to configure Windows 10 OCR.
This category contains the following options:
Recognition language
This combo box allows you to choose the language to be used for text
recognition.
11.1.16. Advanced Settings
Warning! The settings in this category are for advanced users and may
cause NVDA to not function correctly if configured in the wrong way.
Only make changes to these settings if you are sure you know what you
are doing or if you have been specifically instructed to by an NVDA
developer.
Making changes to advanced settings
In order to make changes to the advanced settings, the controls must
be enabled by confirming, with the checkbox, that you understand the
risks of modifying these settings
Restoring the default settings
The button restores the default values for the settings, even if the
confirmation checkbox is not ticked. After changing settings you may
wish to revert to the default values. This may also be the case if you
are unsure if the settings have been changed.
Enable loading custom code from Developer Scratchpad Directory
When developing add-ons for NVDA, it is useful to be able to test code
as you are writing it. This option when enabled, allows NVDA to load
custom appModules, globalPlugins, brailleDisplayDrivers and
synthDrivers, from a special developer scratchpad directory in your
NVDA user configuration directory. Previously NVDA would load custom
code directly from the user configuration directory, with no way of
disabling this. This option is off by default, ensuring that no
untested code is ever run in NVDA with out the user's explicit
knowledge. If you wish to distribute custom code to others, you should
package it as an NVDA add-on.
Open Developer Scratchpad Directory
This button opens the directory where you can place custom code while
developing it. This button is only enabled if NVDA is configured to
enable loading custom code from the Developer Scratchpad Directory.
Use UI automation to access Microsoft Word document controls when available
When this option is enabled, NVDA will try to use the Microsoft UI
Automation accessibility api in order to fetch information from
Microsoft Word document controls. This includes in Microsoft Word
itself, and also the Microsoft Outlook message viewer and composer.
For the most recent versions of Microsoft Office 2016/365 running on
windows 10, UI Automation support is complete enough to provide access
to Microsoft Word documents almost equal to NVDA's existing Microsoft
Word support, with the added advantage that responsiveness is majorly
increased. However, There may be some information which is either not
exposed, or exposed incorrectly in some versions of Microsoft Office,
which means this UI automation support cannot always be relied upon.
We still do not recommend that the majority of users turn this on by
default, though we do welcome users of Office 2016/365 to test this
feature and provide feedback.
Use UI Automation to access the Windows Console when available
When this option is enabled, NVDA will use a new, work in progress
version of its support for Windows Console which takes advantage of
accessibility improvements made by Microsoft. This feature is highly
experimental and is still incomplete, so its use is not yet
recommended. However, once completed, it is anticipated that this new
support will become the default, improving NVDA's performance and
stability in Windows command consoles.
Speak passwords in UIA consoles
This setting controls whether characters are spoken by speak typed
characters or speak typed words in situations where the screen does
not update (such as password entry) in the Windows Console with UI
automation support enabled. For security purposes, this setting should
be left disabled. However, you may wish to enable it if you experience
performance issues or instability with typed character and/or word
reporting while using NVDA's new experimental console support.
Automatically set system focus to focusable elements in Browse Mode
Key: NVDA+8
Enabled by default, this option allows you to choose if the system
focus should automatically be set to elements that can take the system
focus (links, form fields, etc.) when navigating content with the
browse mode caret. If enabled, this represents default behavior of
NVDA as of version 2019.1 and before. Disabling this option will not
automatically focus focusable elements when they are selected with the
browse mode caret. This might result in faster browsing experience and
better responsiveness in browse mode. The focus will yet be updated to
the particular element when interacting with it (e.g. pressing a
button, checking a check box). This functionality is experimental as
of NVDA 2019.2.
Caret move timeout (in MS)
This option allows you to configure the number of milliseconds NVDA
will wait for the caret (insertion point) to move in editable text
controls. If you find that NVDA seems to be incorrectly tracking the
caret E.g. it seems to be always one character behind or is repeating
lines, then you may wish to try increasing this value.
Debug logging categories
The checkboxes in this list allow you to enable specific categories of
debug messages in NVDA's log. Logging these messages can resort in
decreased performance and large log files. Only turn one of these on
if specifically instructed to by an NVDA developer e.g. when debugging
why a braille display driver is not functioning correctly.
11.2. miscellaneous Settings
Besides the NVDA Settings dialog, The Preferences sub-menu of the NVDA
Menu contains several other items which are outlined below.
11.2.1. Speech dictionaries
The speech dictionaries menu (found in the Preferences menu) contains
dialogs that allow you to manage the way NVDA pronounces particular
words or phrases. There are currently three different types of speech
dictionaries. They are:
• Default: rules in this dictionary affect all speech in NVDA.
• Voice: rules in this dictionary affect speech for the synthesizer
voice currently being used.
• Temporary: rules in this dictionary affect all speech in NVDA, but
only for the current session. These rules are temporary and will be
lost if NVDA is restarted.
You need to assign custom gestures using the Input Gestures dialog if
you wish to open any of these dictionary dialogs from anywhere.
All dictionary dialogs contain a list of rules which will be used for
processing the speech. The dialog also contains Add, Edit and Remove
buttons.
To add a new rule to the dictionary, press the Add button, and fill in
the fields in the dialog box that appears and then press Ok. You will
then see your new rule in the list of rules. However, to make sure
your rule is actually saved, make sure to press Ok to exit the
dictionary dialog completely once you have finished adding/editing
rules.
The rules for NVDA's speech dictionaries allow you to change one
string of characters into another. For example, you could create a
rule which causes NVDA to say the word "frog" instead of "bird"
whenever the word "bird" is encountered. In the Add rule dialog, the
easiest way to do this is to type the word bird in the Pattern field,
and the word frog in the Replacement field. You may also want to type
a description of the rule in the Comment field (something like:
changes bird to frog).
NVDA's speech dictionaries however are much more powerful than simple
word replacement. The Add rule dialog also contains a checkbox to say
whether or not you want the rule to be case sensitive (meaning that
NVDA should care whether the characters are uppercase or lowercase.
NVDA ignores case by default).
Finally, a set of radio buttons allows you to tell NVDA whether your
pattern should match anywhere, should only match if it is a complete
word or should be treated as a "Regular expression". Setting the
pattern to match as a whole word means that the replacement will only
be made if the pattern does not occur as part of a larger word; i.e. a
character other than an alphanumeric character or an underscore (or no
character at all) comes both immediately before and after the pattern.
Thus, using the earlier example of replacing the word "bird" with
"frog", if you were to make this a whole word replacement, it would
not match "birds" or "bluebird".
A regular expression is a pattern containing special symbols that
allow you to match on more than one character at a time, or match on
just numbers, or just letters, as a few examples. Regular expressions
are not covered in this user guide, but there are many tutorials on
the web which can provide you with more information.
11.2.2. Punctuation/symbol pronunciation
This dialog allows you to change the way punctuation and other symbols
are pronounced, as well as the symbol level at which they are spoken.
The language for which symbol pronunciation is being edited will be
shown in the dialog's title. Note that this dialog respects the "Trust
voice's language for processing symbols and characters" option found
in the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog; i.e. it uses the
voice language rather than the NVDA global language setting when this
option is enabled.
To change a symbol, first select it in the Symbols list. You can
filter the symbols by entering the symbol or a part of the symbol's
replacement into the Filter by edit box.
• The Replacement field allows you to change the text that should be
spoken in place of this symbol.
• Using the Level field, you can adjust the lowest symbol level at
which this symbol should be spoken.
• The Send actual symbol to synthesizer field specifies when the
symbol itself (in contrast to its replacement) should be sent to the
synthesizer. This is useful if the symbol causes the synthesizer to
pause or change the inflection of the voice. For example, a comma
causes the synthesizer to pause. There are three options:
• never: Never send the actual symbol to the synthesizer.
• always: Always send the actual symbol to the synthesizer.
• only below symbols' level: Send the actual symbol only if the
configured speech symbol level is lower than the level set for this
symbol. For example, you might use this so that a symbol will have
its replacement spoken at higher levels without pausing, while still
being indicated with a pause at lower levels.
You can add new symbols by pressing the Add button. In the dialog that
appears, enter the symbol and press the OK button. Then, change the
fields for the new symbol as you would for other symbols.
You can remove a symbol you previously added by pressing the Remove button.
When you are finished, press the OK button to save your changes or the
Cancel button to discard them.
11.2.3. Input Gestures
In this dialog, you can customize the input gestures (keys on the
keyboard, buttons on a braille display, etc.) for NVDA commands.
Only commands that are applicable immediately before the dialog is
opened are shown. For example, if you want to customize commands
related to browse mode, you should open the Input Gestures dialog
while you are in browse mode.
The tree in this dialog lists all of the applicable NVDA commands
grouped by category. You can filter them by entering one or more words
from the command's name into the Filter by edit box in any order. Any
gestures associated with a command are listed beneath the command.
To add an input gesture to a command, select the command and press the
Add button. Then, perform the input gesture you wish to associate;
e.g. press a key on the keyboard or a button on a braille display.
Often, a gesture can be interpreted in more than one way. For example,
if you pressed a key on the keyboard, you may wish it to be specific
to the current keyboard layout (e.g. desktop or laptop) or you may
wish it to apply for all layouts. In this case, a menu will appear
allowing you to select the desired option.
To remove a gesture from a command, select the gesture and press the
Remove button.
When you are finished making changes, press the OK button to save them
or the Cancel button to discard them.
11.3. Saving and Reloading the configuration
By default NVDA will automatically save your settings on exit. Note,
however, that this option can be changed under the general options in
the preferences menu. To save the settings manually at any time,
choose the Save configuration item in the NVDA menu.
If you ever make a mistake with your settings and need to revert back
to the saved settings, choose the "revert to saved configuration" item
in the NVDA menu. You can also reset your settings to their original
factory defaults by choosing Reset Configuration To Factory Defaults,
which is also found in the NVDA menu.
The following NVDA key commands are also useful:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Save configuration
NVDA+control+c
NVDA+control+c
Saves your current configuration so that it is not lost when you exit NVDA
Revert configuration
NVDA+control+r
NVDA+control+r
Pressing once resets your configuration to when you last saved it.
Pressing three times will reset it back to factory defaults.
11.4. Configuration Profiles
Sometimes, you may wish to have different settings for different
situations. For example, you may wish to have reporting of indentation
enabled while you are editing or reporting of font attributes enabled
while you are proofreading. NVDA allows you to do this using
configuration profiles.
A configuration profile contains only those settings which are changed
while the profile is being edited. Most settings can be changed in
configuration profiles except for those in the General category of the
NVDA Settings dialog, which apply to the entirety of NVDA.
Configuration profiles can be manually activated either from a dialog
or using custom added gestures. They can also be activated
automatically due to triggers such as switching to a particular
application.
11.4.1. Basic Management
You manage configuration profiles by selecting "Configuration
profiles" in the NVDA menu. You can also do this using a key command:
• NVDA+control+p: Show the Configuration Profiles dialog.
The first control in this dialog is the profile list from which you
can select one of the available profiles. When you open the dialog,
the profile you are currently editing is selected. Additional
information is also shown for active profiles, indicating whether they
are manually activated, triggered and/or being edited.
To rename or delete a profile, press the Rename or Delete buttons,
respectively.
Press the Close button to close the dialog.
11.4.2. Creating a Profile
To create a profile, press the New button.
In the New Profile dialog, you can enter a name for the profile. You
can also select how this profile should be used. If you only want to
use this profile manually, select Manual activation, which is the
default. Otherwise, select a trigger which should automatically
activate this profile. For convenience, if you haven't entered a name
for the profile, selecting a trigger will fill in the name
accordingly. See below for more information about triggers.
Pressing OK will create the profile and close the Configuration
Profiles dialog so you can edit it.
11.4.3. Manual Activation
You can manually activate a profile by selecting a profile and
pressing the Manual activate button. Once activated, other profiles
can still be activated due to triggers, but any settings in the
manually activated profile will override them. For example, if a
profile is triggered for the current application and reporting of
links is enabled in that profile but disabled it in the manually
activated profile, links will not be reported. However, if you have
changed the voice in the triggered profile but have never changed it
in the manually activated profile, the voice from the triggered
profile will be used. Any settings you change will be saved in the
manually activated profile. To deactivate a manually activated
profile, select it in the Configuration Profiles dialog and press the
Manual deactivate button.
11.4.4. Triggers
Pressing the Triggers button in the Configuration Profiles dialog
allows you to change the profiles which should be automatically
activated for various triggers.
The Triggers list shows the available triggers, which are as follows:
• Current application: Triggered when you switch to the current
application.
• Say all: Triggered while reading with the say all command.
To change the profile which should be automatically activated for a
trigger, select the trigger and then select the desired profile from
the Profile list. You can select "(normal configuration)" if you don't
want a profile to be used.
Press the Close button to return to the Configuration Profiles dialog.
11.4.5. Editing a Profile
If you have manually activated a profile, any settings you change will
be saved to that profile. Otherwise, any settings you change will be
saved to the most recently triggered profile. For example, if you have
associated a profile with the Notepad application and you switch to
Notepad, any changed settings will be saved to that profile. Finally,
if there is neither a manually activated nor a triggered profile, any
settings you change will be saved to your normal configuration.
To edit the profile associated with say all, you must manually
activate that profile.
11.4.6. Temporarily Disabling Triggers
Sometimes, it is useful to temporarily disable all triggers. For
example, you might wish to edit a manually activated profile or your
normal configuration without triggered profiles interfering. You can
do this by checking the Temporarily disable all triggers checkbox in
the Configuration Profiles dialog.
To toggle disabling triggers from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.4.7. Activating a profile using input gestures
For every profile you add, you are able to assign one or more input
gestures to activate it. By default, configuration profiles do not
have input gestures assigned. You can add gestures to activate a
profile using the Input Gestures dialog. Every profile has its own
entry under the configuration profiles category. When you rename a
profile, any gesture you added previously will still be available.
Removing a profile will automatically delete the gestures associated
with it.
11.5. Location of Configuration files
Portable versions of NVDA store all settings and add-ons in a
directory called userConfig, found in the NVDA directory.
Installed versions of NVDA store all settings and add-ons in a special
NVDA directory located in your Windows user profile. This means that
each user on the system can have their own NVDA settings. To get to
your settings directory for an installed version of NVDA, on the start
menu you can go to programs -> NVDA -> explore user configuration
directory.
Settings for NVDA when running on the logon or UAC screens are stored
in the systemConfig directory in NVDA's installation directory.
Usually, this configuration should not be touched. To change NVDA's
configuration on the logon/UAC screens, configure NVDA as you wish
while logged into Windows, save the configuration, and then press the
"Use currently saved settings on the logon and other secure screens"
button in the General category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
12. Extra Tools
12.1. Log Viewer
The log viewer, found under Tools in the NVDA menu, allows you to view
all the logging output that has occurred up until now from when you
last started NVDA. Using NVDA+F1 will open the log viewer and display
developer information about the current navigator object.
Apart from reading the content, you can also Save a copy of the log
file, or refresh the viewer so that it shows the most recent output
since the Log viewer was opened. These actions are available under the
viewer's Log menu.
12.2. Speech Viewer
For sighted software developers or people demoing NVDA to sighted
audiences, a floating window is available that allows you to view all
the text that NVDA is currently speaking.
To enable the speech viewer, check the "Speech Viewer" menu item under
Tools in the NVDA menu. Uncheck the menu item to disable it.
The speech viewer window contains a check box labeled "Show speech
viewer on startup". If this is checked, the speech viewer will open
when NVDA is started. The speech viewer window will always attempt to
re-open with the same dimensions and location as when it was closed.
While the speech viewer is enabled, it constantly updates to show you
the most current text being spoken. However, if you click or focus
inside the viewer, NVDA will temporarily stop updating the text, so
that you are able to easily select or copy the existing content.
To toggle the speech viewer from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
12.3. Add-ons Manager
The Add-ons Manager, accessed by selecting Manage add-ons under Tools
in the NVDA menu, allows you to install, uninstall, enable and disable
add-on packages for NVDA. These packages are provided by the community
and contain custom code that may add or change features in NVDA or
even provide support for extra Braille displays or speech
synthesizers.
The Add-ons Manager contains a list that displays all the add-ons
currently installed in your NVDA user configuration. Package name,
status, version and author are shown for each add-on, though further
information such as a description and URL can be viewed by selecting
the add-on and pressing the About add-on button. If there is help
available for the selected add-on, you can access it by pressing the
Add-on help button.
To browse and download available add-ons online, press the Get add-ons
button. This button opens the NVDA Add-ons page. If NVDA is installed
and running on your system, you can open the add-on directly from the
browser to begin the installation process as described below.
Otherwise, save the add-on package and follow the instructions below.
To install an Add-on you previously obtained, press the Install
button. This will allow you to browse for an add-on package
(.nvda-addon file) somewhere on your computer or on a network. Once
you press Open, the installation process will begin.
When an add-on is being installed, NVDA will first ask you to confirm
that you really wish to install the add-on. As the functionality of
add-ons is unrestricted inside NVDA, which in theory could include
accessing your personal data or even the entire system if NVDA is an
installed copy, it is very important to only install add-ons from
sources you trust. Once the add-on is installed, NVDA must be
restarted for the add-on to start running. Until you do, a status of
"install" will show for that add-on in the list.
To remove an add-on, select the add-on from the list and press the
Remove button. NVDA will ask if you really wish to do this. As with
installing, NVDA must be restarted for the add-on to be fully
removed. Until you do, a status of "remove" will be shown for that
add-on in the list.
To disable an add-on, press the "disable" button. To enable a
previously disabled add-on, press the "enable" button. You can disable
an add-on if the add-on status indicates it is "enabled", or enable
it if the add-on is "disabled". For each press of the enable/disable
button, add-on status changes to indicate what will happen when NVDA
restarts. If the add-on was previously "disabled", a status will show
"enabled after restart". If the add-on was previously "enabled", a
status will show "disabled after restart" Just like when you install
or remove add-ons, you need to restart NVDA in order for changes to
take effect.
The manager also has a Close button to close the dialog. If you have
installed, removed or changed the status of an add-on, NVDA will first
ask you if you wish to restart so that your changes can take effect.
Some older add-ons may no longer be compatible with the version of
NVDA that you have. When using an older version of NVDA, some new
add-ons may not be compatible either. Attempting to install an
incompatible add-on will result in an error explaining why the add-on
is considered incompatible. To inspect these incompatible add-ons, you
can use the "view incompatible add-ons" button to launch the
incompatible add-ons manager.
To access the Add-ons Manager from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
12.4. Incompatible Add-ons Manager
The Incompatible Add-ons Manager, which can be accessed via the "view
incompatible add-ons" buttons in the Add-on manager, allows you to
inspect any incompatible add-ons, and the reason they are considered
incompatible. Add-ons are considered incompatible when they have not
been updated to work with significant changes to NVDA, or when they
rely on a feature not available in the version of NVDA you are using.
The Incompatible add-ons manager has a short message to explain its
purpose as well as the version of NVDA. The incompatible add-ons are
presented in a list with the following columns:
1. Package, the name of the add-on
2. Version, the version of the add-on
3. Incompatible reason, an explanation of why the addon is considered
incompatible
The Incompatible add-ons manager also has an "About add-on..." button.
This opens will let you know the full details of the add-on, which is
helpful when contacting the add-on author.
12.5. Python Console
The NVDA Python console, found under Tools in the NVDA menu, is a
development tool which is useful for debugging, general inspection of
NVDA internals or inspection of the accessibility hierarchy of an
application. For more information, please see the NVDA Developer
Guide.
12.6. Reload plugins
This item, once activated, reloads app modules and global plugins
without restarting NVDA, which can be useful for developers.
13. Supported Speech Synthesizers
This section contains information about the speech synthesizers
supported by NVDA. For an even more extensive list of free and
commercial synthesizers that you can purchase and download for use
with NVDA, please see extra voices page.
13.1. eSpeak NG
The eSpeak NG synthesizer is built directly into NVDA and does not
require any other special drivers or components to be installed. NVDA
starts using eSpeak NG by default. As this synthesizer is built into
NVDA, this is a great choice for when running NVDA off a USB thumb
drive on other systems.
Each voice that comes with eSpeak NG speaks a different language.
There are over 43 different languages supported by eSpeak NG.
There are also many variants which can be chosen to alter the sound of
the voice.
13.2. Microsoft Speech API version 4 (SAPI 4)
SAPI 4 is an older Microsoft standard for software speech
synthesizers. NVDA still supports this for users who already have SAPI
4 synthesizers installed. However, Microsoft no longer support this
and needed components are no longer available from Microsoft.
When using this synthesizer with NVDA, the available voices (accessed
from the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog or by the Synth
Settings Ring) will contain all the voices from all the installed SAPI
4 engines found on your system.
13.3. Microsoft Speech API version 5 (SAPI 5)
SAPI 5 is a Microsoft standard for software speech synthesizers. Many
speech synthesizers that comply with this standard may be purchased or
downloaded for free from various companies and websites, though your
system will probably already come with at least one SAPI 5 voice
preinstalled. When using this synthesizer with NVDA, the available
voices (accessed from the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog
or by the Synth Settings Ring) will contain all the voices from all
the installed SAPI 5 engines found on your system.
13.4. Microsoft Speech Platform
The Microsoft Speech Platform provides voices for many languages which
are normally used in the development of server-based speech
applications. These voices can also be used with NVDA.
To use these voices, you will need to install two components:
• Microsoft Speech Platform - Runtime (Version 11) , x86:
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27225
• Microsoft Speech Platform - Runtime Languages (Version 11):
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27224
• This page includes many files for both speech recognition and
text-to-speech. Choose the files containing the TTS data for the
desired languages/voices. For example, the file
MSSpeech_TTS_en-US_ZiraPro.msi is a U.S. English voice.
13.5. Windows OneCore Voices
Windows 10 includes new voices known as "OneCore" or "mobile" voices.
Voices are provided for many languages, and they are more responsive
than the Microsoft voices available using Microsoft Speech API version
5.
Please see this Microsoft article for a list of available voices and
instructions to install them:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/22797/windows-10-narrator-tts-voices
Please note that the faster rates available with Narrator are not
currently available with NVDA. Also, the speed you select in the
Windows Settings affects the rate set in NVDA. These are issues we
cannot resolve without changes to Windows. We are hopeful that these
will be addressed in a future Windows update.
13.6. Audiologic Tts3
This is a commercial speech synthesizer specifically for the Italian
language. You must have the synthesizer installed on your system in
order for it to be used with NVDA. For more information, please visit
the Audiologic website at www.audiologic.it.
This synthesizer does not support spelling functionality.
14. Supported Braille Displays
This section contains information about the Braille displays supported by
NVDA.
14.1. Displays supporting automatic detection in the background
NVDA has the ability to detect many braille displays in the background
automatically, either via USB or bluetooth. This behavior is achieved
by selecting the Automatic option as the preferred braille display
from NVDA's Braille Settings dialog. This option is selected by
default.
The following displays support this automatic detection functionality.
• Handy Tech displays
• Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit braille displays
• HumanWare Brailliant BI/B series
• HumanWare BrailleNote
• SuperBraille
• Optelec ALVA 6 series
• HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
• Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
14.2. Freedom Scientific Focus/PAC Mate Series
All Focus and PAC Mate displays from Freedom Scientific are supported
when connected via USB or bluetooth. You will need the Freedom
Scientific braille display drivers installed on your system. If you do
not have them already, you can obtain them from
http://www2.freedomscientific.com/downloads/focus-40-blue/focus-40-14-blue-downloads.asp.
Although this page only mentions the Focus Blue display, the drivers
support all Freedom Scientific Focus and Pacmate displays.
By default, NVDA can automatically detect and connect to these
displays either via USB or bluetooth. However, when configuring the
display, you can explicitly select "USB" or "Bluetooth" ports to
restrict the connection type to be used. This might be useful if you
want to connect the focus display to NVDA using bluetooth, but still
be able to charge it using USB power from your computer. NVDA's
automatic braille display detection will also recognize the display on
USB or Bluetooth.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
topRouting1 (first cell on display)
Scroll braille display forward
topRouting20/40/80 (last cell on display)
Scroll braille display back
leftAdvanceBar
Scroll braille display forward
rightAdvanceBar
Toggle braille tethered to
leftGDFButton+rightGDFButton
Toggle left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelPress
Move back using left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelUp
Move forward using left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelDown
Toggle right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelPress
Move back using right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelUp
Move forward using right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelDown
Route to braille cell
routing
shift+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2
tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot5
upArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1
downArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4
control+leftArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2
control+rightArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot5
leftArrow
brailleSpaceBar+dot3
rightArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot6
home key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3
end key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot6
control+home key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot3
control+end key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot5+dot6
alt key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3+dot4
alt+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5
alt+shift+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6
windows+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot3+dot4
escape key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot5
windows key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6
space key
brailleSpaceBar
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6
Report Current Line
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot4
NVDA menu
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5
For newer Focus models that contain rocker bar keys (focus 40, focus
80 and focus blue):
Name
Key
Move braille display to previous line
leftRockerBarUp, rightRockerBarUp
Move braille display to next line
leftRockerBarDown, rightRockerBarDown
For Focus 80 only:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
leftBumperBarUp, rightBumperBarUp
Scroll braille display forward
leftBumperBarDown, rightBumperBarDown
14.3. Optelec ALVA 6 series/protocol converter
Both the ALVA BC640 and BC680 displays from Optelec are supported when
connected via USB or bluetooth. Alternatively, you can connect an
older Optelec display, such as a Braille Voyager, using a protocol
converter supplied by Optelec. You do not need any specific drivers to
be installed to use these displays. Just plug in the display and
configure NVDA to use it.
Note: NVDA might be unable to use an ALVA BC6 display over Bluetooth
when it is paired using the ALVA Bluetooth utility. When you have
paired your device using this utility and NVDA is unable to detect
your device, we recommend you to pair your ALVA display the regular
way using the Windows Bluetooth settings.
Note: while some of these displays do have a braille keyboard, they
handle translation from braille to text themselves by default. This
means that NVDA's braille input system is not in use in the default
situation (i.e. the input braille table setting has no effect). For
ALVA displays with recent firmware, it is possible to disable this HID
keyboard simulation using an input gesture.
Following are key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please see
the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys can
be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
t1, etouch1
Move braille display to previous line
t2
Move to current focus
t3
Move braille display to next line
t4
Scroll braille display forward
t5, etouch3
Route to braille cell
routing
Report text formatting under braille cell
secondary routing
Toggle HID keyboard simulation
t1+spEnter
Move to top line in review
t1+t2
Move to bottom line in review
t4+t5
Toggle braille tethered to
t1+t3
Report title
etouch2
Report status bar
etouch4
shift+tab key
sp1
alt key
sp2, alt
escape key
sp3
tab key
sp4
upArrow key
spUp
downArrow key
spDown
leftArrow key
spLeft
rightArrow key
spRight
enter key
spEnter, enter
Report date/time
sp2+sp3
NVDA Menu
sp1+sp3
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
sp1+sp4
windows+b key (focus system tray)
sp3+sp4
windows key
sp1+sp2, windows
alt+tab key
sp2+sp4
control+home key
t3+spUp
control+end key
t3+spDown
home key
t3+spLeft
end key
t3+spRight
control key
control
14.4. Handy Tech Displays
NVDA supports most displays from Handy Tech when connected via USB,
serial port or bluetooth. For older USB displays, you will need to
install the USB drivers from Handy Tech on your system.
The following displays are not supported out of the box, but can be
used via Handy Tech's universal driver and NVDA add-on:
• Braillino
• Bookworm
• Modular displays with firmware version 1.13 or lower. Please note
that the firmware of this displays can be updated.
Following are the key assignments for Handy Tech displays with NVDA.
Please see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these
keys can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left, up, b3
Scroll braille display forward
right, down, b6
Move braille display to previous line
b4
Move braille display to next line
b5
Route to braille cell
routing
shift+tab key
esc, left triple action key up+down
alt key
b2+b4+b5
escape key
b4+b6
tab key
enter, right triple action key up+down
enter key
esc+enter, left+right triple action key up+down, joystickAction
upArrow key
joystickUp
downArrow key
joystickDown
leftArrow key
joystickLeft
rightArrow key
joystickRight
NVDA Menu
b2+b4+b5+b6
Toggle braille tethered to
b2
Toggle the braille cursor
b1
Toggle focus context presentation
b7
Toggle braille input
space+b1+b3+b4 (space+capital B)
14.5. MDV Lilli
The Lilli braille display available from MDV is supported. You do not
need any specific drivers to be installed to use this display. Just
plug in the display and configure NVDA to use it.
This display does not support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display backward
LF
Scroll braille display forward
RG
Move braille display to previous line
UP
Move braille display to next line
DN
Route to braille cell
route
shift+tab key
SLF
tab key
SRG
alt+tab key
SDN
alt+shift+tab key
SUP
14.6. Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit Braille Displays
Several Baum, HumanWare, APH and Orbit displays are supported when
connected via USB, bluetooth or serial. These include:
• Baum: SuperVario, PocketVario, VarioUltra, Pronto!, SuperVario2, Vario
340
• HumanWare: Brailliant, BrailleConnect, Brailliant2
• APH: Refreshabraille
• Orbit: Orbit Reader 20
Some other displays manufactured by Baum may also work, though this
has not been tested.
If connecting via USB to displays which do not use HID, you must first
install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer. The VarioUltra
and Pronto! use HID. The Refreshabraille and Orbit Reader 20 can use
HID if configured appropriately.
The USB serial mode of the Orbit Reader 20 is currently only supported
in Windows 10. USB HID should generally be used instead.
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see your display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
d2
Scroll braille display forward
d5
Move braille display to previous line
d1
Move braille display to next line
d3
Route to braille cell
routing
For displays which have a joystick:
Name
Key
upArrow key
up
downArrow key
down
leftArrow key
left
rightArrow key
right
enter key
select
14.7. hedo ProfiLine USB
The hedo ProfiLine USB from hedo Reha-Technik is supported. You must
first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
This display does not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
K1
Scroll braille display forward
K3
Move braille display to previous line
B2
Move braille display to next line
B5
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
K2
Say all
B6
14.8. hedo MobilLine USB
The hedo MobilLine USB from hedo Reha-Technik is supported. You must
first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
This display does not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
K1
Scroll braille display forward
K3
Move braille display to previous line
B2
Move braille display to next line
B5
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
K2
Say all
B6
14.9. HumanWare Brailliant BI/B Series / BrailleNote Touch
The Brailliant BI and B series of displays from HumanWare, including
the BI 14, BI 32, BI 40 and B 80, are supported when connected via USB
or bluetooth. If connecting via USB with the protocol set to
HumanWare, you must first install the USB drivers provided by the
manufacturer. USB drivers are not required if the protocol is set to
OpenBraille.
The BrailleNote Touch is also supported, and does not require any
drivers to be installed.
Following are the key assignments for the Brailliant BI/B and
BrailleNote touch displays with NVDA. Please see the display's
documentation for descriptions of where these keys can be found.
14.9.1. Key assignments for All models
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
down
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
up+down
upArrow key
space+dot1
downArrow key
space+dot4
leftArrow key
space+dot3
rightArrow key
space+dot6
shift+tab key
space+dot1+dot3
tab key
space+dot4+dot6
alt key
space+dot1+dot3+dot4 (space+m)
escape key
space+dot1+dot5 (space+e)
enter key
dot8
windows key
space+dot3+dot4
alt+tab key
space+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+t)
NVDA Menu
space+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+n)
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
space+dot1+dot4+dot5 (space+d)
Say all
space+dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6
14.9.2. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 32, BI 40 and B 80
Name
Key
NVDA Menu
c1+c3+c4+c5 (command n)
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
c1+c4+c5 (command d)
Say all
c1+c2+c3+c4+c5+c6
14.9.3. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 14
Name
Key
up arrow key
joystick up
down arrow key
joystick down
left arrow key
joystick left
right arrow key
joystick right
enter key
joystick action
14.10. HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
NVDA supports Braille Sense, Braille EDGE, Smart Beetle and Sync
Braille displays from Hims when connected via USB or bluetooth. If
connecting via USB, you will need to install the USB drivers from HIMS
on your system. You can download these from here:
http://www.himsintl.com/upload/HIMS_USB_Driver_v25.zip
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Route to braille cell
routing
Scroll braille display back
leftSideScrollUp, rightSideScrollUp, leftSideScroll
Scroll braille display forward
leftSideScrollDown, rightSideScrollDown, rightSideScroll
Move braille display to previous line
leftSideScrollUp+rightSideScrollUp
Move braille display to next line
leftSideScrollDown+rightSideScrollDown
Move to previous line in review
rightSideUpArrow
Move to next line in review
rightSideDownArrow
Move to previous character in review
rightSideLeftArrow
Move to next character in review
rightSideRightArrow
Move to current focus
leftSideScrollUp+leftSideScrollDown,
rightSideScrollUp+rightSideScrollDown, leftSideScroll+rightSideScroll
control key
smartbeetle:f1, brailleedge:f3
windows key
f7, smartbeetle:f2
alt key
dot1+dot3+dot4+space, f2, smartbeetle:f3, brailleedge:f4
shift key
f5
insert key
dot2+dot4+space, f6
applications key
dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+space, f8
capsLock key
dot1+dot3+dot6+space
tab key
dot4+dot5+space, f3, brailleedge:f2
shift+alt+tab key
f2+f3+f1
alt+tab key
f2+f3
shift+tab key
dot1+dot2+space
end key
dot4+dot6+space
control+end key
dot4+dot5+dot6+space
home key
dot1+dot3+space, smartbeetle:f4
control+home key
dot1+dot2+dot3+space
alt+f4 key
dot1+dot3+dot5+dot6+space
leftArrow key
dot3+space, leftSideLeftArrow
control+shift+leftArrow key
dot2+dot8+space+f1
control+leftArrow key
dot2+space
shift+alt+leftArrow key
dot2+dot7+f1
alt+leftArrow key
dot2+dot7
rightArrow key
dot6+space, leftSideRightArrow
control+shift+rightArrow key
dot5+dot8+space+f1
control+rightArrow key
dot5+space
shift+alt+rightArrow key
dot5+dot7+f1
alt+rightArrow key
dot5+dot7
pageUp key
dot1+dot2+dot6+space
control+pageUp key
dot1+dot2+dot6+dot8+space
upArrow key
dot1+space, leftSideUpArrow
control+shift+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot8+space+f1
control+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+space
shift+alt+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot7+f1
alt+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot7
shift+upArrow key
leftSideScrollDown+space
pageDown key
dot3+dot4+dot5+space
control+pageDown key
dot3+dot4+dot5+dot8+space
downArrow key
dot4+space, leftSideDownArrow
control+shift+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot8+space+f1
control+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+space
shift+alt+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot7+f1
alt+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot7
shift+downArrow key
space+rightSideScrollDown
escape key
dot1+dot5+space, f4, brailleedge:f1
delete key
dot1+dot3+dot5+space, dot1+dot4+dot5+space
f1 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+space
f3 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot8
f4 key
dot7+f3
windows+b key
dot1+dot2+f1
windows+d key
dot1+dot4+dot5+f1
control+insert key
smartbeetle:f1+rightSideScroll
alt+insert key
smartbeetle:f3+rightSideScroll
14.11. Seika Braille Displays
The Seika Version 3, 4 and 5 (40 cells) and Seika80 (80 cells) braille
displays from Nippon Telesoft are supported. You can find more
information about these displays at http://www.seika-braille.com/. You
must first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
These displays do not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
b3
Move braille display to next line
b4
Toggle braille tethered to
b5
Say all
b6
tab
b1
shift+tab
b2
alt+tab
b1+b2
NVDA Menu
left+right
Route to braille cell
routing
14.12. Papenmeier BRAILLEX Newer Models
The following Braille displays are supported:
• BRAILLEX EL 40c, EL 80c, EL 20c, EL 60c (USB)
• BRAILLEX EL 40s, EL 80s, EL 2d80s, EL 70s, EL 66s (USB)
• BRAILLEX Trio (USB and bluetooth)
• BRAILLEX Live 20, BRAILLEX Live and BRAILLEX Live Plus (USB and
bluetooth)
These displays do not support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
If BrxCom is installed, NVDA will use BrxCom. BrxCom is a tool that
allows keyboard input from the braille display to function
independently from a screen reader. Keyboard input is possible with
the Trio and BRAILLEX Live models.
Most devices have an Easy Access Bar (EAB) that allows intuitive and
fast operation. The EAB can be moved in four directions where
generally each direction has two switches. The C and Live series are
the only exceptions to this rule.
The c-series and some other displays have two routing rows whereby the
upper row is used to report formatting information. Holding one of the
upper routing keys and pressing the EAB on c-series devices emulates
the second switch state. The live series displays have one routing row
only and the EAB has one step per direction. The second step may be
emulated by pressing one of the routing keys and pressing the EAB in
the corresponding direction. Pressing and holding the up, down, right
and left keys (or EAB) causes the corresponding action to be repeated.
Generally, the following keys are available on these braille displays:
Name
Key
l1
Left front key
l2
Left rear key
r1
Right front key
r2
Right rear key
up
1 Step up
up2
2 Steps up
left
1 Step left
left2
2 Steps left
right
1 Step right
right2
2 Steps right
dn
1 Step down
dn2
2 Steps down
Following are the Papenmeier command assignments for NVDA:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Route to braille cell
routing
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Report title
l1+up
Report Status Bar
l2+down
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to previous object
left2
Move to next object
right2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing row
The Trio model has four additional keys which are in front of the
braille keyboard. These are (ordered from left to right):
• left thumb key (lt)
• space
• space
• right thumb key (rt)
Currently, the right thumb key is not in use. The inner keys are both
mapped to space.
Name
Key
escape key
space with dot 7
upArrow key
space with dot 2
leftArrow key
space with dot 1
rightArrow key
space with dot 4
downArrow
space with dot 5
control key
lt+dot2
alt key
lt+dot3
control+escape key
space with dot 1 2 3 4 5 6
tab key
space with dot 3 7
14.13. Papenmeier Braille BRAILLEX Older Models
The following Braille displays are supported:
• BRAILLEX EL 80, EL 2D-80, EL 40 P
• BRAILLEX Tiny, 2D Screen
Note that these displays can only be connected via a serial port. Due
to this, these displays do not support NVDA's automatic background
braille display detection functionality. You should select the port to
which the display is connected after you have chosen this driver in
the Select Braille Display dialog.
Some of these devices have an Easy Access Bar (EAB) that allows
intuitive and fast operation. The EAB can be moved in four directions
where generally each direction has two switches. Pressing and holding
the up, down, right and left keys (or EAB) causes the corresponding
action to be repeated. Older devices do not have an EAB; front keys
are used instead.
Generally, the following keys are available on braille displays:
Name
Key
l1
Left front key
l2
Left rear key
r1
Right front key
r2
Right rear key
up
1 Step up
up2
2 Steps up
left
1 Step left
left2
2 Steps left
right
1 Step right
right2
2 Steps right
dn
1 Step down
dn2
2 Steps down
Following are the Papenmeier command assignments for NVDA:
Devices with EAB:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Route to braille cell
routing
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Report title
l1up
Report Status Bar
l2down
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to next object
right2
Move to previous object
left2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
BRAILLEX Tiny:
Name
Key
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Move to containing object
r1+up
Move to first contained object
r1+dn
Move to previous object
r1+left
Move to next object
r1+right
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
Report title
l1+up
Report status bar
l2+down
BRAILLEX 2D Screen:
Name
Key
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
Move braille display to previous line
up
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to next line
dn
Move to next object
left2
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to previous object
right2
14.14. HumanWare BrailleNote
NVDA supports the BrailleNote notetakers from Humanware when acting as
a display terminal for a screen reader. The following models are
supported:
• BrailleNote Classic (serial connection only)
• BrailleNote PK (Serial and bluetooth connections)
• BrailleNote MPower (Serial and bluetooth connections)
• BrailleNote Apex (USB and Bluetooth connections)
For BrailleNote Touch, please refer to the Brailliant BI Series /
BrailleNote Touch section.
Except for BrailleNote PK, both braille (BT) and QWERTY (QT) keyboards
are supported. For BrailleNote QT, PC keyboard emulation isn't
supported. You can also enter braille dots using the QT keyboard.
Please check the braille terminal section of the BrailleNote manual
guide for details.
If your device supports more than one type of connection, when
connecting your BrailleNote to NVDA, you must set the braille terminal
port in braille terminal options. Please check the BrailleNote manual
for details. In NVDA, you may also need to set the port in the Select
Braille Display dialog. If you are connecting via USB or bluetooth,
you can set the port to "Automatic", "USB" or "Bluetooth", depending
on the available choices. If connecting using a legacy serial port (or
a USB to serial converter) or if none of the previous options appear,
you must explicitly choose the communication port to be used from the
list of hardware ports.
Before connecting your BrailleNote Apex using its USB client
interface, you must install the drivers provided by HumanWare.
On the BrailleNote Apex BT, you can use the scroll wheel located
between dots 1 and 4 for various NVDA commands. The wheel consists of
four directional dots, a center click button, and a wheel that spins
clockwise or counterclockwise.
Following are the BrailleNote command assignments for NVDA. Please
check your BrailleNote's documentation to find where these keys are
located.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
back
Scroll braille display forward
advance
Move braille display to previous line
previous
Move braille display to next line
next
Route to braille cell
routing
NvDA menu
space+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+n)
Toggle braille tethered to
previous+next
Up arrow key
space+dot1
Down arrow key
space+dot4
Left Arrow key
space+dot3
Right arrow key
space+dot6
Page up key
space+dot1+dot3
Page down key
space+dot4+dot6
Home key
space+dot1+dot2
End key
space+dot4+dot5
Control+home keys
space+dot1+dot2+dot3
Control+end keys
space+dot4+dot5+dot6
Space key
space
Enter
space+dot8
Backspace
space+dot7
Tab key
space+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+t)
Shift+tab keys
space+dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6
Windows key
space+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6 (space+w)
Alt key
space+dot1+dot3+dot4 (space+m)
Toggle input help
space+dot2+dot3+dot6 (space+lower h)
Following are commands assigned to BrailleNote QT when it is not in
braille input mode.
Name
Key
NvDA menu
read+n
Up arrow key
upArrow
Down arrow key
downArrow
Left Arrow key
leftArrow|
Right arrow key
rightArrow
Page up key
function+upArrow
Page down key
function+downArrow
Home key
function+leftArrow
End key
function+rightArrow
Control+home keys
read+t
Control+end keys
read+b
Enter key
enter
Backspace key
backspace
Tab key
tab
Shift+tab keys
shift+tab
Windows key
read+w
Alt key
read+m
Toggle input help
read+1
Following are commands assigned to the scroll wheel:
Name
Key
Up arrow key
upArrow
Down arrow key
downArrow
Left Arrow key
leftArrow
Right arrow key
rightArrow
Enter key
center button
Tab key
scroll wheel clockwise
Shift+tab keys
scroll wheel counterclockwise
14.15. EcoBraille
NVDA supports EcoBraille displays from ONCE. The following models are
supported:
• EcoBraille 20
• EcoBraille 40
• EcoBraille 80
• EcoBraille Plus
In NVDA, you can set the serial port to which the display is connected
in the Select Braille Display dialog. These displays do not support
NVDA's automatic background braille display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for EcoBraille displays. Please see
the EcoBraille documentation for descriptions of where these keys can
be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
T2
Scroll braille display forward
T4
Move braille display to previous line
T1
Move braille display to next line
T5
Route to braille cell
Routing
Activate current navigator object
T3
Switch to next review mode
F1
Move to containing object
F2
Switch to previous review mode
F3
Move to previous object
F4
Report current object
F5
Move to next object
F6
Move to focus object
F7
Move to first contained object
F8
Move System focus or caret to current review position
F9
Report review cursor location
F0
Toggle braille tethered to
A
14.16. SuperBraille
The SuperBraille device, mostly available in Taiwan, can be connected
to by either USB or serial. As the SuperBraille does not have any
physical typing keys or scrolling buttons, all input must be performed
via a standard computer keyboard. Due to this, and to maintain
compatibility with other screen readers in Taiwan, two key bindings
for scrolling the braille display have been provided:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
numpadMinus
Scroll braille display forward
numpadPlus
14.17. Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
The Esys, Esytime and Iris displays from Eurobraille are supported by
NVDA. Esys and Esytime-Evo devices are supported when connected via
USB or bluetooth. Older Esytime devices only support USB. Iris
displays can only be connected via a serial port. Therefore, for these
displays, you should select the port to which the display is connected
after you have chosen this driver in the Braille Settings dialog.
Iris and Esys displays have a braille keyboard with 10 keys. Of the
two keys placed like a space bar, the left key is corresponding to the
backspace key and the right key to the space key.
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
switch1-6left, l1
Scroll braille display forward
switch1-6Right, l8
Move to current focus
switch1-6Left+switch1-6Right, l1+l8
Route to braille cell
routing
Report text formatting under braille cell
doubleRouting
Move to previous line in review
joystick1Up
Move to next line in review
joystick1Down
Move to previous character in review
joystick1Left
Move to next character in review
joystick1Right
Switch to previous review mode
joystick1Left+joystick1Up
Switch to next review mode
joystick1Right+joystick1Down
Erase the last entered braille cell or character
backSpace
Translate any braille input and press the enter key
backSpace+space
insert key
dot3+dot5+space, l7
delete key
dot3+dot6+space
home key
dot1+dot2+dot3+space, joystick2Left+joystick2Up
end key
dot4+dot5+dot6+space, joystick2Right+joystick2Down
leftArrow key
dot2+space, joystick2Left, leftArrow
rightArrow key
dot5+space, joystick2Right, rightArrow
upArrow key
dot1+space, joystick2Up, upArrow
downArrow key
dot6+space, joystick2Down, downArrow
enter key
joystick2Center
pageUp key
dot1+dot3+space
pageDown key
dot4+dot6+space
numpad1 key
dot1+dot6+backspace
numpad2 key
dot1+dot2+dot6+backspace
numpad3 key
dot1+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpad4 key
dot1+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad5 key
dot1+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad6 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpad7 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad8 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad9 key
dot2+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpadInsert key
dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpadDecimal key
dot2+backspace
numpadDivide key
dot3+dot4+backspace
numpadMultiply key
dot3+dot5+backspace
numpadMinus key
dot3+dot6+backspace
numpadPlus key
dot2+dot3+dot5+backspace
numpadEnter key
dot3+dot4+dot5+backspace
escape key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+space, l2
tab key
dot2+dot5+dot6+space, l3
shift+tab key
dot2+dot3+dot5+space
printScreen key
dot1+dot3+dot4+dot6+space
pause key
dot1+dot4+space
applications key
dot5+dot6+backspace
f1 key
dot1+backspace
f2 key
dot1+dot2+backspace
f3 key
dot1+dot4+backspace
f4 key
dot1+dot4+dot5+backspace
f5 key
dot1+dot5+backspace
f6 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+backspace
f7 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+backspace
f8 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+backspace
f9 key
dot2+dot4+backspace
f10 key
dot2+dot4+dot5+backspace
f11 key
dot1+dot3+backspace
f12 key
dot1+dot2+dot3+backspace
windows key
dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+backspace
capsLock key
dot7+backspace, dot8+backspace
numLock key
dot3+backspace, dot6+backspace
shift key
dot7+space, l4
Toggle shift key
dot1+dot7+space, dot4+dot7+space
control key
dot7+dot8+space, l5
Toggle control key
dot1+dot7+dot8+space, dot4+dot7+dot8+space
alt key
dot8+space, l6
Toggle alt key
dot1+dot8+space, dot4+dot8+space
ToggleHID keyboard input simulation
esytime):l1+joystick1Down, esytime):l8+joystick1Down
14.18. BRLTTY
BRLTTY is a separate program which can be used to support many more
braille displays. In order to use this, you need to install BRLTTY for
Windows. You should download and install the latest installer package,
which will be named, for example, brltty-win-4.2-2.exe. When
configuring the display and port to use, be sure to pay close
attention to the instructions, especially if you are using a USB
display and already have the manufacturer's drivers installed.
For displays which have a braille keyboard, BRLTTY currently handles
braille input itself. Therefore, NVDA's braille input table setting is
not relevant.
BRLTYY is not involved in NVDA's automatic background braille display
detection functionality.
Following are the BRLTTY command assignments for NVDA. Please see the
BRLTTY key binding lists for information about how BRLTTY commands are
mapped to controls on braille displays.
Name
BRLTTY command
Scroll braille display back
fwinlt (go left one window)
Scroll braille display forward
fwinrt (go right one window)
Move braille display to previous line
lnup (go up one line)
Move braille display to next line
lndn (go down one line)
Route to braille cell
route (bring cursor to character)
15. Advanced Topics
15.1. Command Line Options
NVDA can accept one or more additional options when it starts which
alter its behavior. You can pass as many options as you need. These
options can be passed when starting from a shortcut (in the shortcut
properties), from the Run dialog (Start Menu -> Run or Windows+r) or
from a Windows command console. Options should be separated from the
name of NVDA's executable file and from other options by spaces. For
example, the Desktop shortcut that NVDA creates during installation
has the -r option, which tells NVDA to close the currently running
copy before starting the new one. Another useful option is
--disable-addons, which tells NVDA to suspend all running add-ons.
This allows you to determine whether a problem is caused by an add-on
and to recover from serious problems caused by add-ons.
As an example, you can exit the currently running copy of NVDA by
entering the following in the Run dialog:
nvda -q
Some of the command line options have a short and a long version,
while some of them have only a long version. For those which have a
short version, you can combine them like this:
nvda -rm
This will exit the currently running copy of NVDA and will start a new
copy with startup sounds disabled, etc.
nvda -rm --disable-addons
Same as above, but with add-ons disabled
Some of the command line options accept additional parameters; e.g.
how detailed the logging should be or the path to the user
configuration directory. Those parameters should be placed after the
option, separated from the option by a space when using the short
version or an equals sign (=) when using the long version; e.g.:
nvda -l 10
Tells NVDA to start with log level set to debug
nvda --log-file=c:\nvda.log
Tells NVDA to write its log to c:\nvda.log
nvda --log-level=20 -f c:\nvda.log
Tells NVDA to start with log level set to info and to write its log to
c:\nvda.log
Following are the command line options for NVDA:
Short
Long
Description
-h
--help
show command line help and exit
-q
--quit
Quit already running copy of NVDA
-r
--replace
Quit already running copy of NVDA and start this one
-k
--check-running
Report whether NVDA is running via the exit code; 0 if running, 1 if not
running
-f LOGFILENAME
--log-file=LOGFILENAME
The file where log messages should be written to
-l LOGLEVEL
--log-level=LOGLEVEL
The lowest level of message logged (debug 10, input/output 12, debug
warning 15, info 20, warning 30, error 40, critical 50, disabled 100),
default is warning
-c CONFIGPATH
--config-path=CONFIGPATH
The path where all settings for NVDA are stored
-m
--minimal
No sounds, no interface, no start message, etc.
-s
--secure
Secure mode (disables Python console and logging features, used often
in secure screens)
None
--disable-addons
Addons will have no effect
None
--debug-logging
Enable debug level logging just for this run. This setting will
override any other log level ( --loglevel, -l) argument given,
including no logging option.
None
--no-logging
Disable logging altogether while using NVDA. This setting can be
overwritten if a log level ( --loglevel, -l) is specified from command
line or if debug logging is turned on.
None
--no-sr-flag
Don't change the global system screen reader flag
None
--install
Installs NVDA (starting the newly installed copy)
None
--install-silent
Silently installs NVDA (does not start the newly installed copy)
None
--enable-start-on-logon=True|False
When installing, enable NVDA's start on the logon screen
None
--create-portable
Creates a portable copy of NVDA (starting the newly created copy).
Requires --portable-path to be specified
None
--create-portable-silent
Creates a portable copy of NVDA (does not start the newly installed
copy). Requires --portable-path to be specified
None
--portable-path=PORTABLEPATH
The path where a portable copy will be created
15.2. System Wide Parameters
NVDA allows some values to be set in the system registry which alter
the system wide behavior of NVDA. These values are stored in the
registry under one of the following keys:
• 32-bit system: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\nvda"
• 64-bit system: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\nvda"
The following values can be set under this registry key:
Name
Type
Possible values
Description
configInLocalAppData
DWORD
0 (default) to disable, 1 to enable
If enabled, stores the NVDA user configuration in the local
application data instead of the roaming application data
serviceDebug
DWORD
0 (default) to disable, 1 to enable
If enabled, disables secure mode on windows secure desktops, allowing
the use of the Python console and Log viewer. Due to several major
security implications, the use of this option is strongly discouraged
16. Further Information
If you require further information or assistance regarding NVDA,
please visit the NVDA web site at http://www.nvaccess.org/. Here, you
can find additional documentation, as well as technical support and
community resources. This site also provides information and resources
concerning NVDA development. . good luck
help.questions? www.nvaccess.org there you can email the makers of
NVDA with with your question. injoy the worlds screenreader NVDA!

On 12/17/19, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:
Hi Troy,

You can find both the Commands quick reference (straight list of commands
and keys) and the User Guide (has more detail) from NVDA's help menu.
Press NVDA+n to open the NVDA menu, then H for help. The NVDA key will
be
either INSERT or CAPS LOCK, depending on how you set it up.

As you are coming from Jaws, another document you might be interested in,
is the guide to Switching from Jaws to NVDA, which you can find here:
https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/SwitchingFromJawsToNVDA

As for your specific question, in Desktop keyboard layout, NVDA uses
NVDA+up arrow to read the current line, but that is the up arrow key
itself, not the 8 on the number pad. Note that you can set the NVDA
modifier key and whether NVDA uses desktop or laptop keyboard layout
independently of each other). In laptop keyboard layout, the keystroke
to
read the current line is NVDA+L. Similarly the keystroke to read from
the
current point onwards is NVDA+down arrow in desktop keyboard layout and
NVDA+A in laptop keyboard layout.

If you are interested in learning NVDA from scratch, we do have "Basic
Training for NVDA" available. You might find that you do already know a
lot of it, so work through the switching from Jaws to NVDA guide first
and
see how you feel after that. If you are interested in Basic Training for
NVDA, it is available from our shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 2:06 PM Troy Burnham <troyburnham34@...>
wrote:

Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now
switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands
are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with
NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with
jaws.

Thanks.

Troy




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Web: www.nvaccess.org
Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/
User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess <https://twitter.com/NVAccess>






Re: key commands for NVDA?

Chikodinaka mr. Oguledo
 

I hope this will help you out! NVDA 2019.2.1 User Guide
Table of Contents
• 1. Introduction
• 1.1. General Features
• 1.2. Internationalization
• 1.3. Speech Synthesizer Support
• 1.4. Braille support
• 1.5. License and Copyright
• 2. System Requirements
• 3. Getting and Setting Up NVDA
• 3.1. Portable and Temporary Copy Restrictions
• 3.2. Installing NVDA
• 3.2.1. Incompatible add-ons warning
• 3.2.2. Start at Windows Logon
• 3.2.3. Create Desktop Shortcut (ctrl+alt+n)
• 3.2.4. Copy Portable Configuration to Current User Account
• 3.3. Creating a Portable Copy
• 4. Getting started with NVDA
• 4.1. Launching NVDA
• 4.1.1. Welcome Dialog
• 4.2. About NVDA keyboard commands
• 4.2.1. The NVDA Modifier Key
• 4.2.2. Keyboard Layouts
• 4.3. NVDA Touch Gestures
• 4.3.1. Exploring the Screen
• 4.3.2. Touch Gestures
• 4.3.3. Touch Modes
• 4.3.4. Touch keyboard
• 4.4. Input Help Mode
• 4.5. The NVDA menu
• 4.6. Basic NVDA commands
• 4.7. Reporting System Information
• 5. Navigating with NVDA
• 5.1. Objects
• 5.2. Navigating with the System Focus
• 5.3. Navigating with the System Caret
• 5.4. Object Navigation
• 5.5. Reviewing Text
• 5.6. Review Modes
• 5.6.1. Object Review
• 5.6.2. Document Review
• 5.6.3. Screen Review
• 5.7. Navigating with the Mouse
• 6. Browse Mode
• 6.1. Single Letter Navigation
• 6.2. The Elements List
• 6.3. Searching for text
• 6.4. Embedded Objects
• 7. Reading Mathematical Content
• 7.1. Interactive Navigation
• 8. Braille
• 8.1. Control Type, State and Landmark abbreviations
• 8.2. Braille Input
• 9. Content Recognition
• 9.1. Windows 10 OCR
• 10. Application Specific Features
• 10.1. Microsoft Word
• 10.1.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
• 10.1.2. Browse Mode in Microsoft Word
• 10.1.3. Reporting Comments
• 10.2. Microsoft Excel
• 10.2.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
• 10.2.2. The Elements List
• 10.2.3. Reporting Comments
• 10.2.4. Reading Protected Cells
• 10.2.5. Form Fields
• 10.3. Microsoft PowerPoint
• 10.4. foobar2000
• 10.5. Miranda IM
• 10.6. Poedit
• 10.7. Skype
• 10.8. Kindle for PC
• 10.8.1. Text Selection
• 10.8.2. User Notes
• 10.9. Azardi
• 11. Configuring NVDA
• 11.1. NVDA Settings
• 11.1.1. General (NVDA+control+g)
• 11.1.2. Speech Settings (NVDA+control+v)
• 11.1.3. Select Synthesizer (NVDA+control+s)
• 11.1.4. Synth settings ring
• 11.1.5. Braille
• 11.1.6. Select Braille Display (NVDA+control+a)
• 11.1.7. Keyboard (NVDA+control+k)
• 11.1.8. Mouse (NVDA+control+m)
• 11.1.9. Touch Interaction
• 11.1.10. Review Cursor
• 11.1.11. Object Presentation (NVDA+control+o)
• 11.1.12. Input Composition
• 11.1.13. Browse Mode (NVDA+control+b)
• 11.1.14. Document Formatting (NVDA+control+d)
• 11.1.15. Windows 10 OCR Settings
• 11.1.16. Advanced Settings
• 11.2. miscellaneous Settings
• 11.2.1. Speech dictionaries
• 11.2.2. Punctuation/symbol pronunciation
• 11.2.3. Input Gestures
• 11.3. Saving and Reloading the configuration
• 11.4. Configuration Profiles
• 11.4.1. Basic Management
• 11.4.2. Creating a Profile
• 11.4.3. Manual Activation
• 11.4.4. Triggers
• 11.4.5. Editing a Profile
• 11.4.6. Temporarily Disabling Triggers
• 11.4.7. Activating a profile using input gestures
• 11.5. Location of Configuration files
• 12. Extra Tools
• 12.1. Log Viewer
• 12.2. Speech Viewer
• 12.3. Add-ons Manager
• 12.4. Incompatible Add-ons Manager
• 12.5. Python Console
• 12.6. Reload plugins
• 13. Supported Speech Synthesizers
• 13.1. eSpeak NG
• 13.2. Microsoft Speech API version 4 (SAPI 4)
• 13.3. Microsoft Speech API version 5 (SAPI 5)
• 13.4. Microsoft Speech Platform
• 13.5. Windows OneCore Voices
• 13.6. Audiologic Tts3
• 14. Supported Braille Displays
• 14.1. Displays supporting automatic detection in the background
• 14.2. Freedom Scientific Focus/PAC Mate Series
• 14.3. Optelec ALVA 6 series/protocol converter
• 14.4. Handy Tech Displays
• 14.5. MDV Lilli
• 14.6. Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit Braille Displays
• 14.7. hedo ProfiLine USB
• 14.8. hedo MobilLine USB
• 14.9. HumanWare Brailliant BI/B Series / BrailleNote Touch
• 14.9.1. Key assignments for All models
• 14.9.2. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 32, BI 40 and B 80
• 14.9.3. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 14
• 14.10. HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
• 14.11. Seika Braille Displays
• 14.12. Papenmeier BRAILLEX Newer Models
• 14.13. Papenmeier Braille BRAILLEX Older Models
• 14.14. HumanWare BrailleNote
• 14.15. EcoBraille
• 14.16. SuperBraille
• 14.17. Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
• 14.18. BRLTTY
• 15. Advanced Topics
• 15.1. Command Line Options
• 15.2. System Wide Parameters
• 16. Further Information
1. Introduction
Welcome to NVDA!
NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA) is a free and open source screen
reader for the Microsoft Windows operating system. Providing feedback
via synthetic speech and Braille, it enables blind or vision impaired
people to access computers running Windows for no more cost than a
sighted person. NVDA is developed by NV Access, with contributions
from the community.
1.1. General Features
NVDA allows blind and vision impaired people to access and interact
with the Windows operating system and many third party applications.
Major highlights include:
• Support for popular applications including web browsers, email
clients, internet chat programs and office suites
• Built-in speech synthesizer supporting over 80 languages
• Reporting of textual formatting where available such as font name
and size, style and spelling errors
• Automatic announcement of text under the mouse and optional audible
indication of the mouse position
• Support for many refreshable braille displays, including the ability
to detect many of them automatically as well as braille input on
braille displays with a braille keyboard
• Ability to run entirely from a USB flash drive or other portable
media without the need for installation
• Easy to use talking installer
• Translated into 54 languages
• Support for modern Windows Operating Systems including both 32 and
64 bit variants
• Ability to run on Windows logon and other secure screens
• Announcing controls and text while using touch gestures
• Support for common accessibility interfaces such as Microsoft Active
Accessibility, Java Access Bridge, IAccessible2 and UI Automation (UI
Automation only supported in Windows 7 and later)
• Support for Windows Command Prompt and console applications
1.2. Internationalization
It is important that people anywhere in the world, no matter what
language they speak, get equal access to technology. Besides English,
NVDA has been translated into 54 languages including: Afrikaans,
Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Aragonese, Bulgarian, Burmese, Catalan,
Chinese (simplified and traditional), Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch,
Farsi, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German (Germany and
Switzerland), Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish,
Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Kyrgyz, Lithuanian, Macedonian,
Mongolian, Nepali, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil and
Portugal), Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian,
Spanish (Colombia and Spain), Swedish, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian
and Vietnamese.
1.3. Speech Synthesizer Support
Apart from providing its messages and interface in several languages,
NVDA can also enable the user to read content in any language, as long
as they have a speech synthesizer that can speak that language.
NVDA is bundled with eSpeak NG, a free, open-source, multi-lingual
speech synthesizer.
Information about other speech synthesizers that NVDA supports can be
found in the Supported Speech Synthesizers section.
1.4. Braille support
For users that own a refreshable braille display, NVDA can output its
information in braille. Both uncontracted and contracted braille input
via a braille keyboard is also supported. Furthermore, NVDA will
detect many braille displays automatically by default. Please see the
Supported Braille Displays section for information about the supported
braille displays.
NVDA supports braille codes for many languages, including contracted,
uncontracted and computer braille codes.
1.5. License and Copyright
NVDA is copyright 2006-2019 NVDA contributors.
NVDA is covered by the GNU General Public License (Version 2). You are
free to share or change this software in any way you like as long as
it is accompanied by the license and you make all source code
available to anyone who wants it. This applies to both original and
modified copies of this software, plus any derivative works. For
further details, you can view the full licence.
2. System Requirements
• Operating Systems: all 32-bit and 64-bit editions of Windows 7,
Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10, and all Server Operating Systems
starting from Windows Server 2008 R2.
• For Windows 7, NVDA requires Service Pack 1 or higher.
• For Windows Server 2008 R2, NVDA requires Service Pack 1 or higher.
• Memory: 256 mb or more of RAM
• Processor speed: 1.0 ghz or above
• About 90 MB of storage space.
3. Getting and Setting Up NVDA
If you have not yet got a copy of NVDA, you can download it from
www.nvaccess.org.
Go to the download section and you will find a link to download the
latest version of NVDA.
Running the file you have just downloaded will start a temporary copy
of NVDA. You will then be asked if you want to install NVDA, create a
portable copy or just continue using the temporary copy.
If you plan to always use NVDA on this computer, you will want to
choose to install NVDA. Installing NVDA will allow for additional
functionality such as automatic starting after logon, the ability to
read the Windows Logon and Windows security screens (which cannot be
done with portable and temporary copies) and creation of Start Menu
and desktop shortcuts. The installed copy is also able to create a
portable copy itself at any time.
If you want to take NVDA with you on a USB thumb drive or other
writable media, then you should choose to create a portable copy.
The portable copy also has the ability to install itself on any
computer at a later time. However, if you wish to copy NVDA onto
read-only media such as a CD, you should just copy the download
package. Running the portable version directly from read-only media is
not supported at this time.
Using the temporary copy of NVDA is also an option (e.g. for
demonstration purposes), though starting NVDA in this way each time
can become very time consuming.
3.1. Portable and Temporary Copy Restrictions
Apart from the inability to automatically start during and/or after
log-on, the portable and temporary copies of NVDA also have the
following restrictions:
• The inability to interact with applications running with
administrative privileges, unless of course NVDA itself has been run
also with these privileges (not recommended).
• The inability to read User Account Control (UAC) screens when trying
to start an application with administrative privileges.
• Windows 8 and later: the inability to support input from a touchscreen.
• Windows 8 and later: the inability to provide features such as
browse mode and speaking of typed characters in Windows Store apps.
• Windows 8 and later: audio ducking is not supported.
3.2. Installing NVDA
If installing NVDA directly from the NVDA download package, press the
Install NVDA button. If you have already closed this dialog or are
wanting to install from a portable copy, please choose the Install
NVDA menu item found under Tools in the NVDA menu.
The installation dialog that appears will confirm whether you wish to
install NVDA and will also tell you whether this installation will be
updating a previous install. Pressing the Continue button will start
installing NVDA. There are also a few options in this dialog which are
explained below. Once the installation has completed, a message will
appear telling you that it was successful. Pressing OK at this point
will restart the newly installed copy of NVDA.
3.2.1. Incompatible add-ons warning
If you have add-ons already installed there may also be a warning that
incompatible add-ons will be disabled. Before you're able to press the
Continue button you will have to use the checkbox to confirm that you
understand that these add-ons will be disabled. There will also be a
button present to review the add-ons that will be disabled. Refer to
the incompatible add-ons dialog section for more help on this button.
3.2.2. Start at Windows Logon
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should
automatically start while on the Windows Logon screen, before you have
entered a password. This also includes User Account Control and other
secure screens. This option is enabled by default for fresh
installations.
3.2.3. Create Desktop Shortcut (ctrl+alt+n)
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should create a
shortcut on the desktop to start NVDA. If created, this shortcut will
also be assigned a shortcut key of control+alt+n, allowing you to
start NVDA at any time with this key stroke.
3.2.4. Copy Portable Configuration to Current User Account
This option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should copy the
user configuration from the currently running NVDA into the
configuration for the currently logged on user, for the installed
copy of NVDA. This will not copy the configuration for any other
users of this system nor to the system configuration for use at
Windows Logon and other secure screens. This option is only available
when installing from a portable copy, not when installing directly
from the downloaded Launcher package.
3.3. Creating a Portable Copy
If creating a portable copy directly from the NVDA download package,
simply press the Create Portable Copy button. If you have already
closed this dialog or you are running an installed copy of NVDA,
choose the Create Portable copy menu item found under Tools in the
NVDA menu.
The Dialog that appears allows you to choose where the portable copy
should be created. This can be a directory on your hard drive or a
location on a USB thumb drive or other portable media. There is also
an option to choose whether NVDA should copy the logged on user's
current NVDA configuration for use with the newly created portable
copy. This option is only available when creating a portable copy from
an installed copy, not when creating from the download package.
Pressing Continue will create the portable copy. Once creation is
complete, a message will appear telling you it was successful. Press
OK to dismiss this dialog.
4. Getting started with NVDA
4.1. Launching NVDA
If you have installed NVDA with the installer, then starting NVDA is
as simple as either pressing control+alt+n, or choosing NVDA from the
NVDA menu under Programs on the Start Menu. Additionally you can type
NVDA into the Run dialog and press Enter. You can also pass some
command line options which allows you to restart NVDA (-r), quit (-q),
disable add-ons (--disable-addons), etc.
For installed copies, NVDA stores the configuration in the roaming
application data folder of the current user by default (e.g.
"C:\Users\<user>\AppData\Roaming"). It is possible to change this in a
way that NVDA loads its configuration from the local application data
folder instead. Consult the section about system wide parameters for
more details.
To start the portable version, go to the directory you unpacked NVDA
to, and press enter or double click on nvda.exe.
As NVDA starts, you will first hear an ascending set of tones (telling
you that NVDA is loading). Depending on how fast your computer is, or
if you are running NVDA off a USB key or other slow media, it may take
a little while to start. If it is taking an extra-long time to start,
NVDA should say "Loading NVDA. Please wait..."
If you don't hear any of this, or you hear the Windows error sound, or
a descending set of tones, then this means that NVDA has an error, and
you will need to possibly report a bug to the developers. Please check
out the NVDA website for how to do this.
4.1.1. Welcome Dialog
When NVDA starts for the first time, you will be greeted by a dialog
box which provides you with some basic information about the NVDA
modifier key and the NVDA menu. (Please see further sections about
these topics.) The dialog box also contains a combo box and three
checkboxes. The combo box lets you select the keyboard layout. The
first checkbox lets you control if NVDA should use the capslock as an
NVDA modifier key. The second specifies whether NVDA should start
automatically after you log on to Windows and is only available for
installed copies of NVDA. The third lets you control if this Welcome
dialog should appear each time NVDA starts.
4.2. About NVDA keyboard commands
4.2.1. The NVDA Modifier Key
Most NVDA-specific keyboard commands consist of pressing a particular
key called the NVDA modifier key in conjunction with one or more other
keys. Notable exceptions to this are the text review commands for the
desktop keyboard layout which just use the numpad keys by themselves,
but there are some other exceptions as well.
NVDA can be configured so that the numpad Insert, Extended Insert
and/or capslock key can be used as the NVDA modifier key. By default,
both the numpad Insert and Extended Insert keys are set as NVDA
modifier keys.
If you wish to cause one of the NVDA modifier keys to behave as it
usually would if NVDA were not running (e.g. you wish to turn capslock
on when you have set capslock to be an NVDA modifier key), you can
press the key twice in quick succession.
4.2.2. Keyboard Layouts
NVDA currently comes with two sets of key commands (known as keyboard
layouts): the desktop layout and the laptop layout. By default, NVDA
is set to use the Desktop layout, though you can switch to the Laptop
layout in the Keyboard category of the NVDA Settings dialog, found
under Preferences in the NVDA menu.
The Desktop layout makes heavy use of the numpad (with numlock off).
Although most laptops do not have a physical numpad, some laptops can
emulate one by holding down the FN key and pressing letters and
numbers on the right-hand side of the keyboard (7, 8, 9, u, i, o, j,
k, l, etc.). If your laptop cannot do this or does not allow you to
turn numlock off, you may want to switch to the Laptop layout instead.
4.3. NVDA Touch Gestures
If you are running NVDA on a device with a touchscreen and running
Windows 8 or higher, you can also control NVDA directly via touch
commands. While NVDA is running, all touch input will go directly to
NVDA. Therefore, actions that can be performed normally without NVDA
will not work.
4.3.1. Exploring the Screen
The most basic action you can perform with the touch screen is to
announce the control or text at any point on the screen. To do this,
place one finger anywhere on the screen. You can also keep your finger
on the screen and move it around to read other controls and text that
your finger moves over.
4.3.2. Touch Gestures
When NVDA commands are described later in this user guide, they may
list a touch gesture which can be used to activate that command with
the touchscreen. Following are some instructions on how to perform the
various touch gestures.
Taps
Tap the screen quickly with one or more fingers.
Tapping once with one finger is simply known as a tap. Tapping with 2
fingers at the same time is a 2-finger tap and so on.
If the same tap is performed one or more times again in quick
succession, NVDA will instead treat this as a multi-tap gesture.
Tapping twice will result in a double tap. Tapping 3 times will result
in a triple tap and so on. Of course, these multi-tap gestures also
recognize how many fingers were used, so it's possible to have
gestures like a 2-finger triple tap, a 4-finger tap, etc.
Flicks
Quickly swipe your finger across the screen.
There are 4 possible flick gestures depending on the direction: flick
left, flick right, flick up and flick down.
Just like taps, more than one finger can be used to perform the
gesture. Therefore, gestures such as 2-finger flick up and 4-finger
flick left are all possible.
4.3.3. Touch Modes
As there are many more NVDA commands than possible touch gestures,
NVDA has several touch modes you can switch between which make certain
subsets of commands available. The two modes are text mode and object
mode. Certain NVDA commands listed in this document may have a touch
mode listed in brackets after the touch gesture. For example, flick up
(text mode) means that the command will be performed if you flick up,
but only while in text mode. If the command does not have a mode
listed, it will work in any mode.
To toggle touch modes, perform a 3-finger tap.
4.3.4. Touch keyboard
The touch keyboard is used to enter text and commands from a
touchscreen. When focused on an edit field, you can bring up the touch
keyboard by double-tapping the touch keyboard icon on the bottom of
the screen. For tablets such as Microsoft Surface Pro, the touch
keyboard is always available when the keyboard is undocked. To dismiss
the touch keyboard, double-tap the touch keyboard icon or move away
from the edit field.
While the touch keyboard is active, to locate keys on the touch
keyboard, move your finger to where the touch keyboard is located
(typically at the bottom of the screen), then move around the keyboard
with one finger. When you find the key you wish to press, double-tap
the key or lift your finger, depending on options chosen from Touch
Interaction Settings category of the NVDA Settings.
4.4. Input Help Mode
Many NVDA commands are mentioned throughout the rest of this user
guide, but an easy way to explore all the different commands is to
turn on input help.
To turn on input help, press NVDA+1. To turn it off, press NVDA+1
again. While in input help, performing any input gesture (such as
pressing a key or performing a touch gesture) will report the action
and describe what it does (if anything). The actual commands will not
execute while in input help mode.
4.5. The NVDA menu
The NVDA menu allows you to control NVDA's settings, access help,
save/revert your configuration, Modify speech dictionaries, access
additional tools and exit NVDA.
To get to the NVDA menu from anywhere in Windows while NVDA is
running, press NVDA+n on the keyboard or perform a 2-finger double tap
on the touch screen. You can also get to the NVDA menu via the Windows
system tray. Either right-click on the NVDA icon located in the system
tray, or access the system tray by pressing the Windows logo key+B,
DownArrow to the NVDA icon and press the applications key located next
to the right control key on most keyboards. When the menu comes up,
You can use the arrow keys to navigate the menu, and the enter key to
activate an item.
4.6. Basic NVDA commands
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Stop speech
Control
control
2-finger tap
Instantly stops speaking
Pause Speech
shift
shift
none
Instantly pauses speech. Pressing it again will continue speaking
where it left off (if pausing is supported by the current synthesizer)
NVDA Menu
NVDA+n
NVDA+n
2-finger double tap
Pops up the NVDA menu to allow you to access preferences, tools, help, etc.
Toggle Speech Mode
NVDA+s
NVDA+s
none
Toggles speech mode between speech, beeps and off.
Toggle Input Help Mode
NVDA+1
NVDA+1
none
Pressing any key in this mode will report the key, and the description
of any NVDA command associated with it
Quit NVDA
NVDA+q
NVDA+q
none
Exits NVDA
Pass next key through
NVDA+f2
NVDA+f2
none
Tells NVDA to pass the next key press straight through to the active
application, even if it is normally treated as an NVDA key command
Toggle application sleep mode on and off
NVDA+shift+s
NVDA+shift+z
none
sleep mode disables all NVDA commands and speech/braille output for
the current application. This is most useful in applications that
provide their own speech or screen reading features. Press this
command again to disable sleep mode.
4.7. Reporting System Information
Name
key
Description
Report date/time
NVDA+f12
Pressing once reports the current time, pressing twice reports the date
Report battery status
NVDA+shift+b
Reports the battery status i.e. whether AC power is in use or the
current charge percentage.
Report clipboard text
NVDA+c
Reports the Text in the clipboard if there is any.
5. Navigating with NVDA
NVDA allows you to explore and navigate the system in several ways,
including both normal interaction and review.
5.1. Objects
Each Application and the operating system itself consist of many
objects. An object is a single item such as a piece of text, button,
checkbox, slider, list or editable text field.
5.2. Navigating with the System Focus
The system focus, also known simply as the focus, is the object which
receives keys typed on the keyboard. For example, if you are typing
into an editable text field, the editable text field has the focus.
The most common way of navigating around Windows with NVDA is to
simply move the system focus using standard Windows keyboard commands,
such as pressing tab and shift+tab to move forward and back between
controls, pressing alt to get to the menu bar and then using the
arrows to navigate menus, and using alt+tab to move between running
applications. As you do this, NVDA will report information about the
object with focus, such as its name, type, value, state, description,
keyboard shortcut and positional information.
There are some key commands that are useful when moving with the System focus:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Report current focus
NVDA+tab
NVDA+tab
announces the current object or control that has the System focus.
Pressing twice will spell the information
Report title
NVDA+t
NVDA+t
Reports the title of the currently active window. Pressing twice will
spell the information. Pressing three times will copy it to the
clipboard
Read active window
NVDA+b
NVDA+b
reads all the controls in the currently active window (useful for dialogs)
Report Status Bar
NVDA+end
NVDA+shift+end
Reports the Status Bar if NVDA finds one. It also moves the navigator
object to this location. Pressing twice will spell the information.
Pressing three times will copy it to the clipboard
5.3. Navigating with the System Caret
When an object that allows navigation and/or editing of text is
focused, you can move through the text using the system caret, also
known as the edit cursor.
When the focus is on an object that has the system caret, you can use
the arrow keys, page up, page down, home, end, etc. to move through
the text. You can also change the text if the control supports
editing. NVDA will announce as you move by character, word and line,
and will also announce as you select and unselect text.
NVDA provides the following key commands in relation to the system caret:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Say all
NVDA+downArrow
NVDA+a
Starts reading from the current position of the system caret, moving
it along as it goes
Read current line
NVDA+upArrow
NVDA+l
Reads the line where the system caret is currently situated. Pressing
twice spells the line. Pressing three times spells the line using
character descriptions.
Read current text selection
NVDA+Shift+upArrow
NVDA+shift+s
Reads any currently selected text
Next sentence
alt+downArrow
alt+downArrow
Moves the caret to the next sentence and announces it. (only supported
in Microsoft Word and Outlook)
Previous sentence
alt+upArrow
alt+upArrow
Moves the caret to the previous sentence and announces it. (only
supported in Microsoft Word and Outlook)
When within a table, the following key commands are also available:
Name
Key
Description
Move to previous column
control+alt+leftArrow
Moves the system caret to the previous column (staying in the same row)
Move to next column
control+alt+rightArrow
Moves the system caret to the next column (staying in the same row)
Move to previous row
control+alt+upArrow
Moves the system caret to the previous row (staying in the same column)
Move to next row
control+alt+downArrow
Moves the system caret to the next row (staying in the same column)
5.4. Object Navigation
Most of the time, you will work with applications using commands which
move the focus and the caret. However, sometimes, you may wish to
explore the current application or the Operating System without moving
the focus or caret. You may also wish to work with objects that cannot
be accessed normally using the keyboard. In these cases, you can use
object navigation.
Object navigation allows you to move between and obtain information
about individual objects. When you move to an object, NVDA will report
it similarly to the way it reports the system focus. For a way to
review all text as it appears on the screen, you can instead use
screen review.
Rather than having to move back and forth between every single object
on the system, the objects are organized hierarchically. This means
that some objects contain other objects and you must move inside them
to access the objects they contain. For example, a list contains list
items, so you must move inside the list in order to access its items.
If you have moved to a list item, moving next and previous will take
you to other list items in the same list. Moving to a list item's
containing object will take you back to the list. You can then move
past the list if you wish to access other objects. Similarly, a
toolbar contains controls, so you must move inside the toolbar to
access the controls in the toolbar.
The object currently being reviewed is called the navigator object.
Once you navigate to an object, you can review its content using the
text review commands while in Object review mode. By default, the
navigator object moves along with the System focus, though this
behavior can be toggled on and off.
Note that braille follows both the focus and caret as well as object
navigation and text review by default. If you want it to follow the
focus and caret only, you need to configure braille to be tethered to
focus. In this case, braille will not follow object navigation and
text review. If you want braille to follow object navigation and text
review instead, you need to configure braille to be tethered to
review.
To navigate by object, use the following commands:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Report current object
NVDA+numpad5
NVDA+shift+o
none
Reports the current navigator object. Pressing twice spells the
information, and pressing 3 times copies this object's name and value
to the clipboard.
Move to containing object
NVDA+numpad8
NVDA+shift+upArrow
flick up (object mode)
Moves to the object containing the current navigator object
Move to previous object
NVDA+numpad4
NVDA+shift+leftArrow
flick left (object mode)
Moves to the object before the current navigator object
Move to next object
NVDA+numpad6
NVDA+shift+rightArrow
flick right (object mode)
Moves to the object after the current navigator object
Move to first contained object
NVDA+numpad2
NVDA+shift+downArrow
flick down (object mode)
Moves to the first object contained by the current navigator object
Move to focus object
NVDA+numpadMinus
NVDA+backspace
none
Moves to the object that currently has the system focus, and also
places the review cursor at the position of the System caret, if it is
showing
Activate current navigator object
NVDA+numpadEnter
NVDA+enter
double tap
Activates the current navigator object (similar to clicking with the
mouse or pressing space when it has the system focus)
Move System focus or caret to current review position
NVDA+shift+numpadMinus
NVDA+shift+backspace
none
pressed once Moves the System focus to the current navigator object,
pressed twice moves the system caret to the position of the review
cursor
Report review cursor location
NVDA+numpadDelete
NVDA+delete
none
Reports information about the location of the text or object at the
review cursor. For example, this might include the percentage through
the document, the distance from the edge of the page or the exact
screen position. Pressing twice may provide further detail.
Note: numpad keys require numlock key to be turned off to work properly.
5.5. Reviewing Text
NVDA allows you to read the contents of the screen, current document
or current object by character, word or line. This is mostly useful in
places (including Windows command consoles) where there is no system
caret. For example, you might use it to review the text of a long
information message in a dialog.
When moving the review cursor, the System caret does not follow along,
so you can review text without losing your editing position. However,
by default, when the System caret moves, the review cursor follows
along. This can be toggled on and off.
Note that braille follows the focus and caret by default, rather than
object navigation and text review. If you want it to follow object
navigation and text review instead, you need to configure braille to
be tethered to review.
The following commands are available for reviewing text:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Move to top line in review
shift+numpad7
NVDA+control+home
none
Moves the review cursor to the top line of the text
Move to previous line in review
numpad7
NVDA+upArrow
flick up (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous line of text
Report current line in review
numpad8
NVDA+shift+.
none
Announces the current line of text where the review cursor is
positioned. Pressing twice spells the line. Pressing three times
spells the line using character descriptions.
Move to next line in review
numpad9
NVDA+downArrow
flick down (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next line of text
Move to bottom line in review
shift+numpad9
NVDA+control+end
none
Moves the review cursor to the bottom line of text
Move to previous word in review
numpad4
NVDA+control+leftArrow
2-finger flick left (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous word in the text
Report current word in review
numpad5
NVDA+control+.
none
Announces the current word in the text where the review cursor is
positioned. Pressing twice spells the word. Pressing three times
spells the word using character descriptions.
Move to next word in review
numpad6
NVDA+control+rightArrow
2-finger flick right (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next word in the text
Move to start of line in review
shift+numpad1
NVDA+home
none
Moves the review cursor to the start of the current line in the text
Move to previous character in review
numpad1
NVDA+leftArrow
flick left (text mode)
Moves the review cursor to the previous character on the current line
in the text
Report current character in review
numpad2
NVDA+.
none
Announces the current character on the line of text where the review
cursor is positioned. Pressing twice reports a description or example
of that character. Pressing three times reports the numeric value of
the character in decimal and hexadecimal.
Move to next character in review
numpad3
NVDA+rightArrow
flick right (text mode)
Move the review cursor to the next character on the current line of text
Move to end of line in review
shift+numpad3
NVDA+end
none
Moves the review cursor to the end of the current line of text
Say all with review
numpadPlus
NVDA+shift+a
3-finger flick down (text mode)
Reads from the current position of the review cursor, moving it as it goes
Select then Copy from review cursor
NVDA+f9
NVDA+f9
none
Starts the select then copy process from the current position of the
review cursor. The actual action is not performed until you tell NVDA
where the end of the text range is
Select then Copy to review cursor
NVDA+f10
NVDA+f10
none
On the first press, text is selected from the position previously set
start marker up to and including the review cursor's current position.
After pressing this key a second time, the text will be copied to the
Windows clipboard
Report text formatting
NVDA+f
NVDA+f
none
Reports the formatting of the text where the review cursor is
currently situated. Pressing twice shows the information in browse
mode
Report current symbol replacement
None
None
none
Speaks the symbol where the review cursor is positioned. Pressed
twice, shows the symbol and the text used to speak it in browse mode.
Note: numpad keys require numlock key to be turned off to work properly.
A good way to remember the basic text review commands when using the
Desktop layout is to think of them as being in a grid of three by
three, with top to bottom being line, word and character and left to
right being previous, current and next. The layout is illustrated as
follows:
Previous line
Current line
Next line
Previous word
Current word
Next word
Previous character
Current character
Next character
5.6. Review Modes
NVDA's text review commands can review content within the current
navigator object, current document or screen, depending on the review
mode selected. Review modes are a replacement for the older Flat
Review concept found in NVDA.
The following commands switch between review modes:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Touch
Description
Switch to next review mode
NVDA+numpad7
NVDA+pageUp
2-finger flick up
switches to the next available review mode
Switch to previous review mode
NVDA+numpad1
NVDA+pageDown
2-finger flick down
switches to the previous available review mode
5.6.1. Object Review
While in object review mode, you are able to only review the content
of the current navigator object. For objects such as editable text
fields or other basic text controls, this will generally be the text
content. For other objects, this may be the name and/or value.
5.6.2. Document Review
When the navigator object is within a browse mode document (e.g. web
page) or other complex document (e.g. a Lotus Symphony document), it
is possible to switch to the document review mode. The document review
mode allows you to review the text of the entire document.
When switching from object review to document review, the review
cursor is placed in the document at the position of the navigator
object. When moving around the document with review commands, the
navigator object is automatically updated to the object found at the
current review cursor position.
Note that NVDA will switch to document review from object review
automatically when moving around browse mode documents.
5.6.3. Screen Review
The screen review mode allows you to review the text of the screen as
it appears visually within the current application. This is similar to
the screen review or mouse cursor functionality in many other Windows
screen readers.
When switching to screen review mode, the review cursor is placed at
the screen position of the current navigator object. When moving
around the screen with review commands, the navigator object is
automatically updated to the object found at the screen position of
the review cursor.
Note that in some newer applications, NVDA may not see some or all
text displayed on the screen due to the use of newer screen drawing
technologies which are impossible to support at this time.
5.7. Navigating with the Mouse
When you move the mouse, NVDA by default reports the text that is
directly under the mouse pointer as the pointer moves over it. Where
supported, NVDA will read the surrounding paragraph of text, though
some controls may only read by line.
NVDA can be configured to also announce the type of object under the
mouse as it moves (e.g. list, button, etc.). This may be useful for
totally blind users, as sometimes, the text isn't enough.
NVDA provides a way for users to understand where the mouse is located
relative to the dimensions of the screen by playing the current mouse
coordinates as audio beeps. The higher the mouse is on the screen, the
higher the pitch of the beeps. The further left or right the mouse is
located on the screen, the further left or right the sound will be
played (assuming the user has stereo speakers or headphones).
These extra mouse features are not turned on by default in NVDA. If
you wish to take advantage of them, you can configure them from the
Mouse settings category of the NVDA Settings dialog, found in the NVDA
Preferences menu.
Although a physical mouse or trackpad should be used to navigate with
the mouse, NVDA has a few key commands related to the mouse:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Left mouse button click
numpadDivide
NVDA+[
clicks the left mouse button once. The common double click can be
performed by pressing this key twice in quick succession
Left mouse button lock
shift+numpadDivide
NVDA+control+[
Locks the left mouse button down. Press again to release it. To drag
the mouse, press this key to lock the left button down and then move
the mouse either physically or use one of the other mouse routing
commands
Right mouse click
numpadMultiply
NVDA+]
Clicks the right mouse button once.
Right mouse button lock
shift+numpadMultiply
NVDA+control+]
Locks the right mouse button down. Press again to release it. To drag
the mouse, press this key to lock the right button down and then move
the mouse either physically or use one of the other mouse routing
commands
Move mouse to current navigator object
NVDA+numpadDivide
NVDA+shift+m
Moves the mouse to the location of the current navigator object and
review cursor
Navigate to the object under the mouse
NVDA+numpadMultiply
NVDA+shift+n
Set the navigator object to the object located at the position of the mouse
6. Browse Mode
Complex read-only documents such as web pages are browsed in NVDA
using browse mode. This includes documents in the following
applications:
• Mozilla Firefox
• Microsoft Internet Explorer
• Mozilla Thunderbird
• HTML messages in Microsoft Outlook
• Google Chrome
• Microsoft Edge
• Adobe Reader
• Foxit Reader
• Adobe Flash
• Supported books in Amazon Kindle for PC
Browse mode is also optionally available for Microsoft Word documents.
In browse mode, the content of the document is made available in a
flat representation that can be navigated with the cursor keys as if
it were a normal text document. All of NVDA's system caret key
commands will work in this mode; e.g. say all, report formatting,
table navigation commands, etc. Information such as whether text is a
link, heading, etc. is reported along with the text as you move.
Sometimes, you will need to interact directly with controls in these
documents. For example, you will need to do this for editable text
fields and lists so that you can type characters and use the cursor
keys to work with the control. You do this by switching to focus mode,
where almost all keys are passed to the control. When in Browse mode,
by default, NVDA will automatically switch to focus mode if you tab to
or click on a particular control that requires it. Conversely, tabbing
to or clicking on a control that does not require focus mode will
switch back to browse mode. You can also press enter or space to
switch to focus mode on controls that require it. Pressing escape will
switch back to browse mode. In addition, you can manually force focus
mode, after which it will remain in effect until you choose to disable
it.
Name
Key
Description
Toggle browse/focus modes
NVDA+space
Toggles between focus mode and browse mode
Exit focus mode
escape
Switches back to browse mode if focus mode was previously switched to
automatically
Refresh browse mode document
NVDA+f5
Reloads the current document content (useful if certain content seems
to be missing from the document. Not available in Microsoft Word and
Outlook.)
Find
NVDA+control+f
Pops up a dialog in which you can type some text to find in the
current document. See searching for text for more information.
Find next
NVDA+f3
Finds the next occurrence of the text in the document that you
previously searched for
Find previous
NVDA+shift+f3
Finds the previous occurrence of the text in the document you
previously searched for
Open long description
NVDA+d
Opens a new window containing a long description for the element you
are on if it has one.
6.1. Single Letter Navigation
While in browse mode, for quicker navigation, NVDA also provides
single character keys to jump to certain fields in the document. Note
that not all of these commands are supported in every type of
document.
The following keys by themselves jump to the next available element,
while adding the shift key causes them to jump to the previous
element:
• h: heading
• l: list
• i: list item
• t: table
• k: link
• n: nonLinked text
• f: form field
• u: unvisited link
• v: visited link
• e: edit field
• b: button
• x: checkbox
• c: combo box
• r: radio button
• q: block quote
• s: separator
• m: frame
• g: graphic
• d: landmark
• o: embedded object (audio and video player, application, dialog, etc.)
• 1 to 6: headings at levels 1 to 6 respectively
• a: annotation (comment, editor revision, etc.)
• w: spelling error
To move to the beginning or end of containing elements such as lists
and tables:
Name
Key
Description
Move to start of container
shift+comma
Moves to the start of the container (list, table, etc.) where the
caret is positioned
Move past end of container
comma
Moves past the end of the container (list, table, etc.) where the
caret is positioned
Some web applications such as Gmail, Twitter and Facebook use single
letters as shortcut keys. If you want to use these while still being
able to use your cursor keys to read in browse mode, you can
temporarily disable NVDA's single letter navigation keys. To toggle
single letter navigation on and off for the current document, press
NVDA+shift+space.
6.2. The Elements List
The elements list provides access to a list of various types of
elements in the document as appropriate for the application. For
example, in web browsers, the elements list can list links, headings,
form fields, buttons or landmarks. Radio buttons allow you to switch
between the different types of elements. An edit field is also
provided in the dialog which allows you to filter the list to help you
search for a particular item on the page. Once you have chosen an
item, you can use the provided buttons in the dialog to move to or
activate that item.
Name
Key
Description
Browse mode elements list
NVDA+f7
Lists various types of elements in the current document
6.3. Searching for text
This dialog allows you to search for terms in the current document. In
the "Type the text you wish to find" field, the text to be found can
be entered. The "Case sensitive" checkbox makes the search consider
uppercase and lowercase letters differently. For example, with "Case
sensitive" selected you can find "NV Access" but not "nv access". Use
the following keys for performing searches:
Name
Key
Description
Find text
NVDA+control+f
Opens the search dialog
Find next
NVDA+f3
searches the next occurrence of the current search term
Find previous
NVDA+shift+f3
searches the previous occurrence of the current search term
6.4. Embedded Objects
Pages can include rich content using technologies such as Adobe Flash,
Oracle Java and HTML5, as well as applications and dialogs. Where
these are encountered in browse mode, NVDA will report "embedded
object", "application" or "dialog", respectively. You can quickly move
to them using the o and shift+o embedded object single letter
navigation keys. To interact with these objects, you can press enter
on them. If it is accessible, you can then tab around it and interact
with it like any other application. A key command is provided to
return to the original page containing the embedded object:
Name
Key
Description
Move to containing browse mode document
NVDA+control+space
Moves the focus out of the current embedded object and into the
document that contains it
7. Reading Mathematical Content
Using MathPlayer 4 from Design Science, NVDA can read and
interactively navigate supported mathematical content. This requires
that MathPlayer 4 is installed on the computer. MathPlayer is
available as a free download from:
http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathplayer/
NVDA supports the following types of mathematical content:
• MathML in Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Internet Explorer and Google Chrome.
• Design Science MathType in Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. MathType
needs to be installed in order for this to work. The trial version is
sufficient.
• MathML in Adobe Reader. Note that this is not an official standard
yet, so there is currently no publicly available software that can
produce this content.
• Math in Kindle for PC for books with accessible math.
When reading a document, NVDA will speak any supported mathematical
content where it occurs. If you are using a braille display, it will
also be displayed in braille.
7.1. Interactive Navigation
If you are working primarily with speech, in most cases, you will
probably wish to examine the expression in smaller segments, rather
than hearing the entire expression at once.
If you are in browse mode, you can do this by moving the cursor to the
mathematical content and pressing enter.
If you are not in browse mode:
1. move the review cursor to the mathematical content. By default, the
review cursor follows the system caret, so you can usually use the
system caret to move to the desired content.
2. Then, activate the following command:
Name
Key
Description
Interact with math content
NVDA+alt+m
Begins interaction with math content.
At this point, you can use MathPlayer commands such as the arrow keys
to explore the expression. For example, you can move through the
expression with the left and right arrow keys and zoom into a portion
of the expression such as a fraction using the down arrow key. Please
see the MathPlayer documentation about navigation commands for further
information.
When you wish to return to the document, simply press the escape key.
8. Braille
If you own a braille display, NVDA can display information in braille.
If your braille display has a Perkins-style keyboard, you can also
enter contracted or uncontracted braille.
Please see the Supported Braille Displays section for information
about the supported braille displays. This section also contains
information about what displays support NVDA's automatic background
braille display detection functionality. You can configure braille
using the Braille category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
8.1. Control Type, State and Landmark abbreviations
In order to fit as much information as possible on a braille display,
the following abbreviations have been defined to indicate control type
and state as well as landmarks.
Abbreviation
Control type
app
application
bqt
block quote
btn
button
drbtn
drop down button
spnbtn
spin button
splbtn
split button
tgbtn
toggle button
cbo
combo box
chk
checkbox
dlg
dialog
doc
document
edt
editable text field
pwdedt
password edit
embedded
embedded object
enote
end note
fnote
foot note
gra
graphic
grp
grouping
hN
heading at level n, e.g. h1, h2.
hlp
help baloon
lmk
landmark
lnk
link
vlnk
visited link
lst
list
mnu
menu
mnubar
menu bar
mnubtn
menu button
mnuitem
menu item
pnl
panel
prgbar
progress bar
rbtn
radio button
scrlbar
scroll bar
sect
section
stbar
status bar
tabctl
tab control
tbl
table
cN
table column number n, e.g. c1, c2.
rN
table row number n, e.g. r1, r2.
term
terminal
tlbar
tool bar
tltip
tool tip
tv
tree view
tvbtn
tree view button
tvitem
tree view item
lv N
a tree view item has a hierarchical level N|
wnd
window
⠤⠤⠤⠤⠤
separator
The following state indicators are also defined:
Abbreviation
Control state
...
displayed when an object supports autocompletion
⢎⣿⡱
displayed when an object (e.g. a toggle button) is pressed
⢎⣀⡱
displayed when an object (e.g. a toggle button) is not pressed
⣏⣿⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is checked
⣏⣸⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is half checked
⣏⣀⣹
displayed when an object (e.g. a checkbox) is not checked
-
displayed when an object (e.g. a tree view item) is collapsible
+
displayed when an object (e.g. a tree view item) is Expandable
***
displayed when a protected control or document is encountered
clk
displayed when an object is clickable
cmnt
displayed when there is a comment for a spreadsheet cell or piece of
text in a document
frml
displayed when there is a formula on a spreadsheet cell
invalid
displayed when an invalid entry has been made
ldesc
displayed when an object (usually a graphic) has a long description
mln
displayed when an edit field allows typing multiple lines of text such
as comment fields on websites
req
displayed when a required form field is encountered
ro
displayed when an object (e.g. an editable text field) is read-only
sel
displayed when an object is selected
nsel
displayed when an object is not selected
sorted asc
displayed when an object is sorted ascending
sorted desc
displayed when an object is sorted descending
submnu
displayed when an object has a popup (usually a sub-menu)
Finally, the following abbreviations for landmarks are defined:
Abbreviation
Landmark
bnnr
banner
cinf
content info
cmpl
complementary
form
form
main
main
navi
navigation
srch
search
rgn
region
8.2. Braille Input
NVDA supports entry of both uncontracted and contracted braille via a
braille keyboard. You can select the translation table used to
translate braille into text using the Input table setting in the
Braille category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
When uncontracted braille is being used, text is inserted as soon as
it is entered. When using contracted braille, text is inserted when
you press space or enter at the end of a word. Note that translation
can only reflect the braille word you are typing and cannot consider
existing text. For example, if you are using a braille code that
begins numbers with a number sign and you press backspace to move to
the end of a number, you will need to type the number sign again to
enter additional numbers.
Pressing dot 7 erases the last entered braille cell or character. Dot
8 translates any braille input and presses the enter key. Pressing dot
7 + dot 8 translates any braille input, but without adding a space or
pressing enter.
9. Content Recognition
When authors don't provide sufficient information for a screen reader
user to determine the content of something, various tools can be used
to attempt to recognize the content from an image. NVDA supports the
optical character recognition (OCR) functionality built into Windows
10 to recognize text from images. Additional content recognizers can
be provided in NVDA add-ons.
When you use a content recognition command, NVDA recognizes content
from the current navigator object. By default, the navigator object
follows the system focus or browse mode cursor, so you can usually
just move the focus or browse mode cursor where desired. For example,
if you move the browse mode cursor to a graphic, recognition will
recognize content from the graphic by default. However, you may wish
to use object navigation directly to, for example, recognize the
content of an entire application window.
Once recognition is complete, the result will be presented in a
document similar to browse mode, allowing you to read the information
with cursor keys, etc. Pressing enter or space will activate (normally
click) the text at the cursor if possible. Pressing escape dismisses
the recognition result.
9.1. Windows 10 OCR
Windows 10 includes OCR for many languages. NVDA can use this to
recognize text from images or inaccessible applications.
You can set the language to use for text recognition in the Windows 10
OCR category of the NVDA Settings dialog. Additional languages can be
installed by opening the Start menu, choosing Settings, selecting Time
& Language -> Region & Language and then choosing Add a language.
To recognize the text in the current navigator object using Windows 10
OCR, press NVDA+r.
10. Application Specific Features
NVDA provides its own extra features for some applications to make
certain tasks easier or to provide access to functionality which is
not otherwise accessible to screen reader users.
10.1. Microsoft Word
10.1.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
NVDA is able to automatically announce appropriate row and column
headers when navigating around tables in Microsoft Word. This firstly
requires that the Report Table row / column headers option in NVDA's
Document Formatting settings, found in the NVDA Settings dialog, be
turned on. Secondly, NVDA needs to know which row or column contains
the headers in any given table. After moving to the first cell in the
column or row containing the headers, use one of the following
commands:
Name
Key
Description
Set column headers
NVDA+shift+c
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the row
that contains column headers, which should be automatically announced
when moving between columns below this row. Pressing twice will clear
the setting.
Set row headers
NVDA+shift+r
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the
column that contains row headers, which should be automatically
announced when moving between rows after this column. Pressing twice
will clear the setting.
These settings will be stored in the document as bookmarks compatible
with other screen readers such as Jaws. This means that users of other
screen readers who open this document at a later date will
automatically have the row and column headers already set.
10.1.2. Browse Mode in Microsoft Word
Similar to the web, Browse mode can be used in Microsoft Word to allow
you to use features such as Quick navigation and the Elements List. To
toggle Browse mode on and off in Microsoft Word, press NVDA+space. For
further information about Browse mode and Quick Navigation, see the
Browse Mode section.
10.1.2.1. The Elements List
While in Browse mode in Microsoft Word, you can access the Elements
List by pressing NVDA+f7. The Elements List can list headings, links,
annotations (which includes comments and track changes) and errors
(currently limited to spelling errors).
10.1.3. Reporting Comments
To report any comments at the current caret position, press
NVDA+alt+c. All comments for the document, along with other tracked
changes, can also be listed in the NVDA Elements List when selecting
Annotations as the type.
10.2. Microsoft Excel
10.2.1. Automatic Column and Row Header Reading
NVDA is able to automatically announce appropriate row and column
headers when navigating around Excel worksheets. This firstly requires
that the Report Table row / column headers option in NVDA's Document
Formatting settings, found in the NVDA Settings dialog, be turned on.
Secondly, NVDA needs to know which row or column contains the headers.
After moving to the first cell in the column or row containing the
headers, use one of the following commands:
Name
Key
Description
Set column headers
NVDA+shift+c
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the row
that contains column headers, which should be automatically announced
when moving between columns below this row. Pressing twice will clear
the setting.
Set row headers
NVDA+shift+r
Pressing this once tells NVDA this is the first header cell in the
column that contains row headers, which should be automatically
announced when moving between rows after this column. Pressing twice
will clear the setting.
These settings will be stored in the workbook as defined name ranges
compatible with other screen readers such as Jaws. This means that
users of other screen readers who open this workbook at a later date
will automatically have the row and column headers already set.
10.2.2. The Elements List
Similar to the web, NVDA has an Elements List for Microsoft Excel that
allows you to list and access several different types of information.
To access the Elements List in Excel, press NVDA+f7. The various types
of information available in the Elements List are:
• Charts: This lists all charts in the active worksheet. Selecting a
chart and pressing enter or the Move to button focuses the chart for
navigating and reading with the arrow keys.
• Comments: This lists all cells in the active worksheet containing
comments. The cell address along with its comments are shown for each
cell. Pressing enter or the Move To button when on a listed comment
will move directly to that cell.
• Formulas: This lists all cells in the worksheet containing a
formula. The cell address along with its formula are shown for each
cell. Pressing enter or the Move To button on a listed formula will
move directly to that cell.
• Sheets: This lists all sheets in the workbook. Pressing f2 when on
a listed sheet allows you to rename the sheet. Pressing enter or the
Move To button while on the listed sheet will switch to that sheet.
• Form fields: This lists all form fields in the active worksheet. For
each form field, the Elements List shows the alternative text of the
field along with the addresses of the cells it covers. Selecting a
form field and pressing enter or the Move to button moves to that
field in browse mode.
10.2.3. Reporting Comments
To report any comments for the currently focused cell, press
NVDA+alt+c. All comments for the worksheet can also be listed in the
NVDA Elements List.
10.2.4. Reading Protected Cells
If a workbook has been protected, it may not be possible to move focus
to particular cells that have been locked for editing. To allow moving
to locked cells, switch to Browse Mode by pressing NVDA+space, and
then use standard Excel movement commands such as the arrow keys to
move around all cells on the current worksheet.
10.2.5. Form Fields
Excel worksheets can include form fields. You can access these using
the Elements List or the f and shift+f form field single letter
navigation keys. Once you move to a form field in browse mode, you can
press enter or space to either activate it or switch to focus mode so
you can interact with it, depending on the control. For further
information about Browse mode and single letter navigation, see the
Browse Mode section.
10.3. Microsoft PowerPoint
Name
Key
Description
Toggle speaker notes reading
control+shift+s
When in a running slide show, this command will toggle between the
speaker notes for the slide and the content for the slide. This only
affects what NVDA reads, not what is displayed on screen.
10.4. foobar2000
Name
Key
Description
Report remaining time
control+shift+r
Reports the remaining time of the currently playing track, if any.
Report elapsed time
control+shift+e
Reports the elapsed time of the currently playing track, if any.
Report track length
control+shift+t
Reports the length of the currently playing track, if any.
Note: The above shortcuts work only with the default formatting string
for foobar's status line.
10.5. Miranda IM
Name
Key
Description
Report recent message
NVDA+control+1-4
Reports one of the recent messages, depending on the number pressed;
e.g. NVDA+control+2 reads the second most recent message.
10.6. Poedit
Name
Key
Description
Report Comments Window
control+shift+c
Reports any comments in the comments window.
Report notes for translators
control+shift+a
Reports any notes for translators.
10.7. Skype
When in a conversation:
Name
Key
Description
Review message
NVDA+control+1-0
Reports and moves the review cursor to a recent message, depending on
the number pressed; e.g. NVDA+control+2 reads the second most recent
message.
10.8. Kindle for PC
NVDA supports reading and navigating books in Amazon Kindle for PC.
This functionality is only available in Kindle books designated with
"Screen Reader: Supported" which you can check on the details page for
the book.
Browse mode is used to read books. It is enabled automatically when
you open a book or focus the book area. The page will be turned
automatically as appropriate when you move the cursor or use the say
all command. You can manually turn to the next page with the pageDown
key and turn to the previous page with the pageUp key.
Single letter navigation is supported for links and graphics, but only
within the current page. Navigating by link also includes footnotes.
NVDA provides early support for reading and interactive navigation of
mathematical content for books with accessible math. Please see the
Reading Mathematical Content section for further information.
10.8.1. Text Selection
Kindle allows you to perform various functions on selected text,
including obtaining a dictionary definition, adding notes and
highlights, copying the text to the clipboard and searching the web.
To do this, first select text as you normally would in browse mode;
e.g. by using shift and the cursor keys. Once you have selected text,
press the applications key or shift+f10 to show the available options
for working with the selection. If you do this with no text selected,
options will be shown for the word at the cursor.
10.8.2. User Notes
You can add a note regarding a word or passage of text. To do this,
first select the relevant text and access the selection options as
described above. Then, choose Add Note.
When reading in browse mode, NVDA refers to these notes as comments.
To view, edit or delete a note:
1. Move the cursor to the text containing the note.
2. Access the options for the selection as described above.
3. Choose Edit Note.
10.9. Azardi
When in the table view of added books:
Name
Key
Description
Enter
enter
Opens the selected book.
Context menu
applications
Opens the context menu for the selected book.
11. Configuring NVDA
Most configuration can be performed using dialog boxes accessed
through the Preferences sub-menu of the NVDA menu. Many of these
settings can be found in the multi-page NVDA Settings dialog. In all
dialog boxes, press the OK button to accept any changes you have made.
To cancel any changes, press the Cancel button or the escape key. For
certain dialogs, you can press Apply button to let the settings take
effect immediately without closing the dialog. Some settings can also
be changed using shortcut keys, which are listed where relevant in the
sections below.
11.1. NVDA Settings
The NVDA Settings dialog contains many configuration parameters that
can be changed. This dialog contains a list with several categories of
settings to choose from. When you select a category, several settings
related to this category will be shown in this dialog. These settings
can be applied using the apply button, in which case the dialog will
stay open. If you want to save your settings and close the NVDA
Settings dialog, you can use the OK button.
Some settings categories have dedicated shortcut keys. If pressed, the
shortcut key will open the NVDA Settings dialog in that particular
category. By default, not all categories can be accessed with keyboard
commands. If you wish to access categories which do not have dedicated
shortcut keys, use the Input Gestures dialog to add a custom gesture
such as a keyboard command or touch gesture for that category.
The settings categories found in the NVDA Settings dialog will be
outlined below.
11.1.1. General (NVDA+control+g)
The General category of the NVDA Settings dialog sets NVDA's overall
behavior such as interface language and whether or not it should check
for updates. This category contains the following options:
Language
This is a combo box which allows you to select the language that
NVDA's user interface and messages should be shown in. There are many
languages, however the default option is "User Default, Windows". This
option tells NVDA to use the language that Windows is currently set
to.
Please note that NVDA must be restarted when changing the language.
When the confirmation dialog appears, select "restart now" or "restart
later" if you wish to use the new language now or at a later time,
respectively. If "restart later" is selected, the configuration must
be saved (either manually or using the save on exit functionality).
Save configuration on exit
This option is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to
automatically save the current configuration when you exit NVDA.
Show exit options when exiting NVDA
This option is a checkbox that allows you to choose whether or not a
dialog appears when you exit NVDA that asks what action you want to
perform. When checked, a dialog will appear when you attempt to exit
NVDA asking whether you want to exit, restart, restart with addons
disabled or install pending updates (if any). When unchecked, NVDA
will exit immediately.
Play sounds when starting or exiting NVDA
This option is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to play
sounds when it starts or exits.
Logging level
This is a combo box that lets you choose how much NVDA will log as
it's running. Generally users should not need to touch this as not too
much is logged. However, if you wish to provide information in a bug
report, or enable or disable logging altogether, then it may be a
useful option.
The available logging levels are:
• Disabled: Apart from a brief startup message, NVDA will not log
anything while it runs.
• Info: NVDA will log basic information such as startup messages and
information useful for developers.
• Debug warning: Warning messages that are not caused by severe errors
will be logged.
• Input/output: Input from keyboard and braille displays, as well as
speech and braille output will be logged. If you are concerned about
privacy, do not set logging level to this option.
• Debug: In addition to info, warning, and input/output messages,
additional debug messages will be logged. Just like input/output, if
you are concerned about privacy, you should not set logging level to
this option.
Automatically start NVDA after I log on to Windows
If this option is enabled, NVDA will start automatically as soon as
you log on to Windows. This option is only available for installed
copies of NVDA.
Use NVDA on the Windows Logon screen (requires administrator privileges)
If you log on to Windows by providing a user name and password, then
enabling this option will make NVDA start automatically at the logon
screen when Windows starts. This option is only available for
installed copies of NVDA.
Use currently saved settings on the logon and other secure screens
(requires administrator privileges)
Pressing this button copies your currently saved NVDA user
configuration to NVDA's system configuration directory, so that NVDA
will use it when running on the logon, User Account Control (UAC) and
other secure Windows screens. To make sure that all your settings are
transferred, make sure to save your configuration first with
control+NVDA+c or Save configuration in the NVDA menu. This option is
only available for installed copies of NVDA.
Automatically check for updates to NVDA
If this is enabled, NVDA will automatically check for updated versions
of NVDA and inform you when an update is available. You can also
manually check for updates by selecting Check for updates under Help
in the NVDA menu. When manually or automatically checking for updates,
it is necessary for NVDA to send some information to the update server
in order to receive the correct update for your system. The following
information is always sent:
• Current NVDA version
• Operating System version
• Whether the Operating System is 64 or 32 bit
Allow the NVDA project to gather NVDA usage statistics
If this is enabled, NV Access will use the information from update
checks in order to track the number of NVDA users including
particular demographics such as Operating system and country of
origin. Note that although your IP address will be used to calculate
your country during the update check, the IP address is never kept.
Apart from the mandatory information required to check for updates,
the following extra information is also currently sent:
• NVDA interface language
• Whether this copy of NVDA is portable or installed
• Name of the current speech synthesizer in use (including the name of
the add-on the driver comes from)
• Name of the current Braille display in use (including the name of
the add-on the driver comes from)
• The current output Braille table (if Braille is in use)
This information greatly aides NV Access to prioritize future
development of NVDA.
Notify for pending updates on startup
If this is enabled, NVDA will inform you when there is a pending
update on startup, offering you the possibility to install it. You can
also manually install the pending update from the Exit NVDA dialog (if
enabled), from the NVDA menu, or when you perform a new check from
the Help menu.
11.1.2. Speech Settings (NVDA+control+v)
The speech category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options that
lets you change the speech synthesizer as well as voice
characteristics for the chosen synthesizer. For a quicker alternative
way of controlling speech parameters from anywhere, please see the
Synth Settings Ring section.
The Speech Settings category contains the following options:
Change synthesizer
The first option in the Speech Settings category is the Change...
button. This button activates the Select Synthesizer dialog, which
allows you to select the active speech synthesizer and output device.
This dialog opens on top of the NVDA Settings dialog. Saving or
dismissing the settings in the Select Synthesizer dialog will return
you to the NVDA Settings dialog.
Voice
The Voice option is a combo box listing all the voices of the current
synthesizer that you have installed. You can use the arrow keys to
listen to all the various choices. Left and Up arrow take you up in
the list, while right and down arrow move you down in the list.
Variant
If you are using the Espeak NG synthesizer that is packaged with NVDA,
this is a combo box that lets you select the Variant the synthesizer
should speak with. ESpeak NG's Variants are rather like voices, as
they provide slightly different attributes to the eSpeak NG voice.
Some variants will sound like a male, some like a female, and some
even like a frog.
Rate
This option allows you to change the rate of your voice. This is a
slider that goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the slowest, 100 being the
fastest).
Pitch
This option allows you to change the pitch of the current voice. It is
a slider which goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the lowest pitch and 100
being the highest).
Volume
This option is a slider which goes from 0 to 100, (0 being the lowest
volume and 100 being the highest).
Inflection
This option is a slider that lets you choose how much inflection (rise
and fall in pitch) the synthesizer should use to speak with. (The only
synthesizer that provides this option at the present time is eSpeak
NG).
Automatic Language switching
This checkbox allows you to toggle whether NVDA should switch speech
synthesizer languages automatically if the text being read specifies
its language. This option is enabled by default. Currently only the
eSpeak NG synthesizer supports automatic language switching.
Automatic Dialect switching
This checkbox allows you to toggle whether or not dialect changes
should be made, rather than just actual language changes. For example,
if reading in an English U.S. voice but a document specifies that some
text is in English U.K., then the synthesizer will switch accents if
this option is enabled. This option is disabled by default.
Punctuation/Symbol Level
Key: NVDA+p
This allows you to choose the amount of punctuation and other symbols
that should be spoken as words. For example, when set to all, all
symbols will be spoken as words. This option applies to all
synthesizers, not just the currently active synthesizer.
Trust voice's language when processing characters and symbols
On by default, this option tells NVDA if the current voice's language
can be trusted when processing symbols and characters. If you find
that NVDA is reading punctuation in the wrong language for a
particular synthesizer or voice, you may wish to turn this off to
force NVDA to use its global language setting instead.
Include Unicode Consortium data (including emoji) when processing
characters and symbols
When this checkbox is enabled, NVDA will include additional symbol
pronunciation dictionaries when pronouncing characters and symbols.
These dictionaries contain descriptions for symbols (particularly
emoji) that are provided by the Unicode Consortium as part of their
Common Locale Data Repository. If you want NVDA to speak descriptions
of emoji characters based on this data, you should enable this option.
However, if you are using a speech synthesizer that supports speaking
emoji descriptions natively, you may wish to turn this off.
Note that manually added or edited character descriptions are saved as
part of your user settings. Therefore, if you change the description
of a particular emoji, your custom description will be spoken for that
emoji regardless of whether this option is enabled. You can add, edit
or remove symbol descriptions in NVDA's punctuation/symbol
pronunciation dialog.
Capital pitch change percentage
This edit field allows you to type the amount that the pitch of the
voice will change when speaking a capital letter. This value is a
percentage, where a negative value lowers the pitch and a positive
value raises it. For no pitch change you would use 0.
Say "cap" before capitals
This setting is a checkbox that, when checked, tells NVDA to say the
word "cap" before any capital letter when spoken as an individual
character such as when spelling. Usually, NVDA raises the pitch
slightly for any capital letter, but some synthesizers may not support
this well, so perhaps this option may be of use.
Beep for capitals
If this checkbox is checked, NVDA will make a small beep each time it
encounters a capitalized character by itself. Like the "say cap for
capitals" checkbox, this is useful for Synthesizers that can't change
their pitch for capital letters.
Use spelling functionality if supported
Some words consist of only one character, but the pronunciation is
different depending on whether the character is being spoken as an
individual character (such as when spelling) or a word. For example,
in English, "a" is both a letter and a word and is pronounced
differently in each case. This option allows the synthesizer to
differentiate between these two cases if the synthesizer supports
this. Most synthesizers do support it.
This option should generally be enabled. However, some Microsoft
Speech API synthesizers do not implement this correctly and behave
strangely when it is enabled. If you are having problems with the
pronunciation of individual characters, try disabling this option.
11.1.3. Select Synthesizer (NVDA+control+s)
The Synthesizer dialog, which can be opened by activating the
Change... button in the speech category of the NVDA settings dialog,
allows you to select which Synthesizer NVDA should use to speak with.
Once you have selected your synthesizer of choice, you can press Ok
and NVDA will load the selected Synthesizer. If there is an error
loading the synthesizer, NVDA will notify you with a message, and
continue using the previous synthesizer.
Synthesizer
This option allows you to choose the synthesizer you wish NVDA to use
for speech output.
For a list of the Synthesizers that NVDA supports, please see the
Supported Speech Synthesizers section.
One special item that will always appear in this list is "No speech",
which allows you to use NVDA with no speech output whatsoever. This
may be useful for someone who wishes to only use NVDA with braille, or
perhaps to sighted developers who only wish to use the Speech Viewer.
Output device
This option allows you to choose the sound card that NVDA should
instruct the selected synthesizer to speak through.
Audio Ducking Mode
Key: NVDA+shift+d
On Windows 8 and above, this option allows you to choose if NVDA
should lower the volume of other applications while NVDA is speaking,
or all the time while NVDA is running.
• No Ducking: NVDA will never lower the volume of other audio.
• Duck when outputting speech and sounds: NVDA will only lower the
volume of other audio when NVDA is speaking or playing sounds. This
may not work for all synthesizers.
• Always duck: NVDA will keep the volume of other audio lower the
whole time NVDA is running.
This option is only available if NVDA has been installed. It is not
possible to support audio ducking for portable and temporary copies of
NVDA.
11.1.4. Synth settings ring
If you wish to quickly change speech settings without going to the
Speech category of the NVDA settings dialog, there are some NVDA key
commands that allow you to move through the most common speech
settings from anywhere while running NVDA:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Move to next synth setting
NVDA+control+rightArrow
NVDA+shift+control+rightArrow
Moves to the next available speech setting after the current, wrapping
around to the first setting again after the last
Move to previous synth setting
NVDA+control+leftArrow
NVDA+shift+control+leftArrow
Moves to the next available speech setting before the current,
wrapping around to the last setting after the first
Increment current synth setting
NVDA+control+upArrow
NVDA+shift+control+upArrow
increases the current speech setting you are on. E.g. increases the
rate, chooses the next voice, increases the volume
Decrement current synth setting
NVDA+control+downArrow
NVDA+shift+control+downArrow
decreases the current speech setting you are on. E.g. decreases the
rate, chooses the previous voice, decreases the volume
11.1.5. Braille
The Braille category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options that
let you change several aspects of braille input and output. This
category contains the following options:
Change braille display
The Change... button in the Braille category of the NVDA Settings
dialog activates the Select Braille Display dialog, which allows you
to select the active braille display. This dialog opens on top of the
NVDA Settings dialog. Saving or dismissing the settings in the Select
Braille Display dialog will return you to the NVDA Settings dialog.
Output Table
The next option you will come to in this category is the braille
output table combo box. In this combo box, you will find braille
tables for different languages, braille standards and grades. The
chosen table will be used to translate text into braille to be
presented on your braille display. You can move from braille table to
braille table in the list by using the arrow keys.
Input Table
Complementary to the previous option, the next setting you will find
is the braille input table combo box. The chosen table will be used to
translate braille entered on your braille display's Perkins-style
keyboard into text. You can move from braille table to braille table
in the list by using the arrow keys.
Note that this option is only useful if your braille display has a
Perkins-style keyboard and this feature is supported by the braille
display driver. If input is not supported on a display which does have
a braille keyboard, this will be noted in the Supported Braille
Displays section.
Expand to computer braille for the word at the cursor
This option allows the word that is under the cursor to be displayed
in non-contracted computer braille.
Show Cursor
This option allows the braille cursor to be turned on and off. It
applies to the system caret and review cursor, but not to the
selection indicator.
Blink Cursor
This option allows the braille cursor to blink. If blinking is turned
off, the braille cursor will constantly be in the "up" position. The
selection indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots
7 and 8 without blinking.
Cursor Blink Rate (ms)
This option is a numerical field that allows you to change the blink
rate of the cursor in milliseconds.
Cursor Shape for Focus
This option allows you to choose the shape (dot pattern) of the
braille cursor when braille is tethered to focus. The selection
indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots 7 and 8
without blinking.
Cursor Shape for Review
This option allows you to choose the shape (dot pattern) of the
braille cursor when braille is tethered to review. The selection
indicator is not affected by this option, it is always dots 7 and 8
without blinking.
Message Timeout (sec)
This option is a numerical field that controls how long NVDA messages
are displayed on the braille display. Specifying 0 disables displaying
of these messages completely.
Show Messages Indefinitely
This option allows NVDA messages to be displayed on the braille
display indefinitely.
Tether Braille
Key: NVDA+control+t
This option allows you to choose whether the braille display will
follow the system focus, the navigator object / review cursor, or
both. When "automatically" is selected, NVDA will follow the system
focus and caret by default. In this case, when the navigator object or
the review cursor position is changed by means of explicit user
interaction, NVDA will tether to review temporarily, until the focus
or the caret changes.
Read by Paragraph
If enabled, braille will be displayed by paragraphs instead of lines.
Also, the next and previous line commands will move by paragraph
accordingly. This means that you do not have to scroll the display at
the end of each line even where more text would fit on the display.
This may allow for more fluent reading of large amounts of text. It is
disabled by default.
Avoid splitting words when possible
If this is enabled, a word which is too large to fit at the end of the
braille display will not be split. Instead, there will be some blank
space at the end of the display. When you scroll the display, you will
be able to read the entire word. This is sometimes called "word wrap".
Note that if the word is too large to fit on the display even by
itself, the word must still be split.
If this is disabled, as much of the word as possible will be
displayed, but the rest will be cut off. When you scroll the display,
you will then be able to read the rest of the word.
Enabling this may allow for more fluent reading, but generally
requires you to scroll the display more.
Focus context presentation
This option allows you to choose what context information NVDA will
show on the braille display when an object gets focus. Context
information refers to the hierarchy of objects containing the focus.
For example, when you focus a list item, this list item is part of a
list. This list might be contained by a dialog, etc. Please consult
the section about object navigation for more information about the
hierarchy that applies to objects in NVDA.
When set to fill display for context changes, NVDA will try to display
as much context information as possible on the braille display, but
only for the parts of the context that have changed. For the example
above, this means that when changing focus to the list, NVDA will show
the list item on the braille display. Furthermore, if there is enough
space left on the braille display, NVDA will try to show that the list
item is part of a list. If you then start moving through the list with
your arrow keys, it is assumed that you are aware that you are still
in the list. Thus, for the remaining list items you focus, NVDA will
only show the focused list item on the display. In order for you to
read the context again (i.e. that you are in a list and that the list
is part of a dialog), you will have to scroll your braille display
back.
When this option is set to always fill the display, NVDA will try to
show as much context information as possible on the braille display,
regardless of whether you have seen the same context information
before. This has the advantage that NVDA will fit as much information
as possible on the display. However, the downside is that there is
always a difference in the position where the focus starts on the
braille display. This can make it difficult to skim a long list of
items, for example, as you will need to continually move your finger
to find the start of the item. This was the default behavior for NVDA
2017.2 and before.
When you set the focus context presentation option to only show the
context information when scrolling back, NVDA never shows context
information on your braille display by default. Thus, in the example
above, NVDA will display that you focused a list item. However, in
order for you to read the context (i.e. that you are in a list and
that the list is part of a dialog), you will have to scroll your
braille display back.
To toggle focus context presentation from anywhere, please assign a
custom gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.1.6. Select Braille Display (NVDA+control+a)
The Select Braille Display dialog, which can be opened by activating
the Change... button in the Braille category of the NVDA settings
dialog, allows you to select which Braille display NVDA should use for
braille output. Once you have selected your braille display of choice,
you can press Ok and NVDA will load the selected display. If there is
an error loading the display driver, NVDA will notify you with a
message, and continue using the previous display, if any.
Braille Display
This combo box presents you with several options depending on what
braille display drivers are available on your system. Move between
these options with the arrow keys.
The automatic option will allow NVDA to search for many supported
braille displays in the background. When this feature is enabled and
you connect a supported display using USB or bluetooth, NVDA will
automatically connect with this display.
No braille means that you are not using braille.
Please see the Supported Braille Displays section for more information
about supported braille displays and which of these support automatic
detection in the background.
Port
This option, if available, allows you to choose what port or type of
connection will be used to communicate with the braille display you
have selected. It is a combo box containing the possible choices for
your braille display.
By default, NVDA employs automatic port detection, which means the
connection with the braille device will be established automatically
by scanning for available USB and bluetooth devices on your system.
However, for some braille displays, you may be able to explicitly
choose what port should be used. Common options are "Automatic" (which
tells NVDA to employ the default automatic port selection procedure),
"USB", "Bluetooth" and legacy serial communication ports if your
braille display supports this type of communication.
This option won't be available if your braille display only supports
automatic port detection.
You may consult the documentation for your braille display in the
section Supported Braille Displays to check for more details on the
supported types of communication and available ports.
11.1.7. Keyboard (NVDA+control+k)
The Keyboard category in the NVDA Settings dialog contains options
that sets how NVDA behaves as you use and type on your keyboard. This
settings category contains the following options:
Keyboard layout
This combo box lets you choose what type of keyboard layout NVDA
should use. Currently the two that come with NVDA are Desktop and
Laptop.
Select NVDA Modifier Keys
The checkboxes in this list control what keys can be used as NVDA
modifier keys. The following keys are available to choose from:
• The caps lock key
• The insert key on the number pad
• The extended insert key (usually found above the arrow keys, near
home and end)
If no key is chosen as the NVDA key it may be impossible to access
certain NVDA commands. Therefore, The NVDA settings dialog will
display an error message if all keys are unselected when pressing Ok
or Apply. After dismissing the error message, you must select at least
one before being able to press Ok to dismiss the dialog properly.
Speak Typed Characters
Key: NVDA+2
When enabled, NVDA will announce all characters you type on the keyboard.
Speak Typed Words
Key: NVDA+3
When enabled, NVDA will announce all words you type on the keyboard.
Speech interrupt for typed characters
If on, this option will cause speech to be interrupted each time a
character is typed. This is on by default.
Speech interrupt for Enter key
If on, this option will cause speech to be interrupted each time the
Enter key is pressed. This is on by default.
Allow skim reading in Say All
If on, certain navigation commands (such as quick navigation in browse
mode or moving by line or paragraph) do not stop Say All, rather Say
All jumps to the new position and continues reading.
Beep if Typing Lowercase Letters when Caps Lock is On
When enabled, a warning beep will be heard if a letter is typed with
the shift key while caps lock is on. Generally, typing shifted letters
with caps lock is unintentional and is usually due to not realizing
that caps lock is enabled. Therefore, it can be quite helpful to be
warned about this.
Speak Command Keys
Key: NVDA+4
When enabled, NVDA will announce all non-character keys you type on
the keyboard. This includes key combinations such as control plus
another letter.
Play sound for spelling errors while typing
When enabled, a short buzzer sound will be played when a word you type
contains a spelling error. This option is only available if reporting
of spelling errors is enabled in NVDA's Document Formatting Settings,
found in the NVDA Settings dialog.
Handle keys from other applications
This option allows the user to control if key presses generated by
applications such as on-screen keyboards and speech recognition
software should be processed by NVDA. This option is on by default,
though certain users may wish to turn this off, such as those typing
Vietnamese with the Unikey typing software as it will cause incorrect
character input.
11.1.8. Mouse (NVDA+control+m)
The Mouse category in the NVDA Settings dialog allows NVDA to track
the mouse, play mouse coordinate beeps and sets other mouse usage
options. This category contains the following options:
Report Mouse Shape Changes
A checkbox, that when checked means that NVDA will announce the shape
of the mouse pointer each time it changes. The mouse pointer in
Windows changes shape to convey certain information such as when
something is editable, or when something is loading etc.
Enable mouse tracking
Key: NVDA+m
When enabled, NVDA will announce the text currently under the mouse
pointer, as you move it around the screen. This allows you to find
things on the screen, by physically moving the mouse, rather than
trying to find them through object navigation.
Text unit resolution
If NVDA is set to announce the text under the mouse as you move it,
this option allows you to choose exactly how much text will be spoken.
The options are character, word, line and paragraph.
To toggle text unit resolution from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
Report role when mouse enters object
If this checkbox is checked, NVDA will announce the role (type) of
object as the mouse moves inside it.
Play audio coordinates when mouse moves
Checking this checkbox makes NVDA play beeps as the mouse moves, so
that the user can work out where the mouse is in regards to the
dimensions of the screen. The higher the mouse is on the screen, the
higher the pitch of the beeps. The further left or right the mouse is
located on the screen, the further left or right the sound will be
played (assuming the user has stereo speakers or headphones).
Brightness controls audio coordinates volume
If the "play audio coordinates when mouse moves" checkbox is checked,
then checking this checkbox means that the volume of the audio
coordinates beeps is controlled by how bright the screen is under the
mouse. This setting is unchecked by default.
Ignore mouse input from other applications
This option allows the user to ignore mouse events (including mouse
movement and button presses) generated by other applications such as
TeamViewer and other remote control software. This option is unchecked
by default. If you check this option and you have the "Enable mouse
tracking" option enabled, NVDA will not announce what is under the
mouse if the mouse is moved by another application.
11.1.9. Touch Interaction
This settings category, only available on computers running Windows 8
and later with touch capabilities, allows you to configure how NVDA
interacts with touchscreens. This category contains the following
options:
Touch typing mode
This checkbox allows you to specify the method you wish to use when
entering text using the touch keyboard. If this checkbox is checked,
when you locate a key on the touch keyboard, you can lift your finger
and the selected key will be pressed. If this is unchecked, you need
to double-tap on the touch keyboard key to press the key.
11.1.10. Review Cursor
The Review Cursor category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used to
configure NVDA's review cursor behavior. This category contains the
following options:
Follow System Focus
Key: NVDA+7
When enabled, The review cursor will always be placed in the same
object as the current system focus whenever the focus changes.
Follow System Caret
Key: NVDA+6
When enabled, the review cursor will automatically be moved to the
position of the System caret each time it moves.
Follow mouse cursor
When enabled, the review cursor will follow the mouse as it moves.
Simple Review mode
When enabled, NVDA will filter the hierarchy of objects that can be
navigated to exclude objects that aren't of interest to the user; e.g.
invisible objects and objects used only for layout purposes.
To toggle simple review mode from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.1.11. Object Presentation (NVDA+control+o)
The Object Presentation category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used
to set how much information NVDA will present about controls such as
description, position information and so on. This category contains
the following options:
Report Tool Tips
A checkbox that when checked tells NVDA to report tool tips as they
appear. Many Windows and controls show a small message (or tool tip)
when you move the mouse pointer over them, or sometimes when you move
the focus to them.
Report Help Balloons
This checkbox when checked tells NVDA to report help balloons as they
appear. Help Balloons are like tool tips, but are usually larger in
size, and are associated with system events such as a network cable
being unplugged, or perhaps to alert you about Windows security
issues.
Report Object Shortcut Keys
When this checkbox is checked, NVDA will include the shortcut key that
is associated with a certain object or control when it is reported.
For example the File menu on a menu bar may have a shortcut key of
alt+f.
Report object position information
This option lets you choose whether you wish to have an object's
position (e.g. 1 of 4) reported when moving to the object with the
focus or object navigation.
Guess Object Position Information when unavailable
If reporting of object position information is turned on, this option
allows NVDA to guess object position information when it is otherwise
unavailable for a particular control.
When on, NVDA will report position information for more controls such
as menus and toolbars, however this information may be slightly
inaccurate.
Report Object descriptions
Uncheck this checkbox if you don't wish to have the description
reported along with objects.
Progress bar output
Key: NVDA+u
This option controls how NVDA reports progress bar updates to you.
It has the following options:
• Off: Progress bars will not be reported as they change.
• Speak: This option tells NVDA to speak the progress bar in
percentages. Each time the progress bar changes, NVDA will speak the
new value.
• Beep: This tells NVDA to beep each time the progress bar changes.
The higher the beep, the closer the progress bar is to completion.
• Beep and speak: This option tells NVDA to both beep and speak when a
progress bar updates.
Report background progress bars
This is an option that, when checked, tells NVDA to keep reporting a
progress bar, even if it is not physically in the foreground. If you
minimize or switch away from a window that contains a progress bar,
NVDA will keep track of it, allowing you to do other things while NVDA
tracks the progress bar.
Report dynamic content changes
Key: NVDA+5
Toggles the announcement of new content in particular objects such as
terminals and the history control in chat programs.
Play a sound when auto-suggestions appear
Toggles announcement of appearance of auto-suggestions, and if
enabled, NVDA will play a sound to indicate this. Auto-suggestions are
lists of suggested entries based on text entered into certain edit
fields and documents. For example, when you enter text into the search
box in Start menu in Windows Vista and later, Windows displays a list
of suggestions based on what you typed. For some edit fields such as
search fields in various Windows 10 apps, NVDA can notify you that a
list of suggestions has appeared when you type text. The
auto-suggestions list will close once you move away from the edit
field, and for some fields, NVDA can notify you of this when this
happens.
11.1.12. Input Composition
The Input Composition category allows you to control how NVDA reports
the input of Asian characters, such as with IME or Text Service input
methods. Note that due to the fact that input methods vary greatly by
available features and by how they convey information, it will most
likely be necessary to configure these options differently for each
input method to get the most efficient typing experience.
Automatically report all available candidates
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether or
not all visible candidates should be reported automatically when a
candidate list appears or its page is changed. Having this option on
for pictographic input methods such as Chinese New ChangJie or
Boshiami is useful, as you can automatically hear all symbols and
their numbers and you can choose one right away. However, for phonetic
input methods such as Chinese New Phonetic, it may be more useful to
turn this option off, as all the symbols will sound the same and you
will have to use the arrow keys to navigate the list items
individually to gain more information from the character descriptions
for each candidate.
Announce Selected Candidate
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether NVDA
should announce the selected candidate when a candidate list appears
or when the selection is changed. For input methods where the
selection can be changed with the arrow keys (such as Chinese New
Phonetic) this is necessary, but for some input methods it may be more
efficient typing with this option turned off. Note that even with this
option off, the review cursor will still be placed on the selected
candidate allowing you to use object navigation / review to manually
read this or other candidates.
Always include short character descriptions for candidates
This option, which is on by default, allows you to choose whether or
not NVDA should provide a short description for each character in a
candidate, either when it's selected or when it's automatically read
when the candidate list appears. Note that for locales such as
Chinese, the announcement of extra character descriptions for the
selected candidate is not affected by this option. This option may be
useful for Korean and Japanese input methods.
Report changes to the reading string
Some input methods such as Chinese New Phonetic and New ChangJie have
a reading string (sometimes known as a precomposition string). You can
choose whether or not NVDA should announce new characters being typed
into this reading string with this option. This option is on by
default. Note some older input methods such as Chinese ChangJie may
not use the reading string to hold precomposition characters, but
instead use the composition string directly. Please see the next
option for configuring reporting of the composition string.
Report changes to the composition string
After reading or precomposition data has been combined into a valid
pictographic symbol, most input methods place this symbol into a
composition string for temporary storage along with other combined
symbols before they are finally inserted into the document. This
option allows you to choose whether or not NVDA should report new
symbols as they appear in the composition string. This option is on
by default.
11.1.13. Browse Mode (NVDA+control+b)
The Browse Mode category in the NVDA Settings dialog is used to
configure NVDA's behavior when you read and navigate complex documents
such as web pages. This category contains the following options:
Maximum Number of Characters on One Line
This field sets the maximum length of a line in browse mode (in characters).
Maximum Lines Per Page
This field sets the amount of lines you will move by when pressing
page up or page down while in browse mode.
Use screen layout
Key: NVDA+v
This option allows you to specify whether content in browse mode
should place content such as links and other fields on their own line,
or if it should keep them in the flow of text as it is visually shown.
If the option is enabled then things will stay as they are visually
shown, but if it is disabled then fields will be placed on their own
line.
Enable browse mode on page load
This checkbox toggles whether browse mode should be automatically
enabled when loading a page. When this option is disabled, browse mode
can still be manually activated on pages or in documents where browse
mode is supported. See the Browse Mode section for a list of
applications supported by browse mode. Note that this option does not
apply to situations where browse mode is always optional, e.g. in
Microsoft Word. This option is enabled by default.
Automatic Say All on page load
This checkbox toggles the automatic reading of a page after it loads
in browse mode. This option is enabled by default.
Include layout tables
This option affects how NVDA handles tables used purely for layout
purposes. When on, NVDA will treat these as normal tables, reporting
them based on Document Formatting Settings and locating them with
quick navigation commands. When off, they will not be reported nor
found with quick navigation. However, the content of the tables will
still be included as normal text. This option is turned off by
default.
To toggle inclusion of layout tables from anywhere, please assign a
custom gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
Configuring reporting of fields such as links and headings
Please see the options in the Document Formatting category of the NVDA
Settings dialog to configure the fields that are reported when
navigating, such as links, headings and tables.
Automatic focus mode for focus changes
This option allows focus mode to be invoked if focus changes. For
example, when on a web page, if you press tab and you land on a form,
if this option is checked, focus mode will automatically be invoked.
Automatic focus mode for caret movement
This option, when checked, allows NVDA to enter and leave focus mode
when using arrow keys. For example, if arrowing down a web page and
you land on an edit box, NVDA will automatically bring you into focus
mode. If you arrow out of the edit box, NVDA will put you back in
browse mode.
Audio indication of Focus and Browse modes
If this option is enabled, NVDA will play special sounds when it
switches between browse mode and focus mode, rather than speaking the
change.
Trap non-command gestures from reaching the document
Enabled by default, this option allows you to choose if gestures (such
as key presses) that do not result in an NVDA command and are not
considered to be a command key in general, should be trapped from
going through to the document you are currently focused on. As an
example, if enabled, if the letter j was pressed, it would be trapped
from reaching the document, even though it is not a quick navigation
command nor is it likely to be a command in the application itself.
11.1.14. Document Formatting (NVDA+control+d)
Most of the checkboxes in this category are for configuring what type
of formatting you wish to have reported as you move the cursor around
documents. For example, if you check the report font name checkbox,
each time you arrow onto text with a different font, the name of the
font will be announced.
The document formatting options are organized into groups. You can
configure reporting of:
• Font
• Font name
• Font size
• Font attributes
• Emphasis
• Style
• Colors
• Document information
• Comments
• Editor revisions
• Spelling errors
• Pages and spacing
• Page numbers
• Line numbers
• Line indentation reporting (Off, Speech, Tones, Both Speech and Tones)
• Paragraph indentation (e.g. hanging indent, first line indent)
• Line spacing (single, double, etc.)
• Alignment
• Table information
• Tables
• Row/column headers
• Cell coordinates
• Cell borders [(Off, Styles, Both Colors and Styles)
• Elements
• Headings
• Links
• Lists
• Block quotes
• Landmarks
• Frames
• Clickable
To toggle these settings from anywhere, please assign custom gestures
using the Input Gestures dialog.
Report formatting changes after the cursor
If enabled, this setting tells NVDA to try and detect all the
formatting changes on a line as it reports it, even if doing this may
slow down NVDA's performance.
By default, NVDA will detect the formatting at the position of the
System caret / Review Cursor, and in some instances may detect
formatting on the rest of the line, only if it is not going to cause a
performance decrease.
Enable this option while proof reading documents in applications such
as WordPad, where formatting is important.
Line indentation reporting
This option allows you to configure how indentation at the beginning
of lines is reported. The Report line indentation with combo box has
four options.
• Off: NVDA will not treat indentation specially.
• Speech: If speech is selected, when the amount of indentation
changes, NVDA will say something like "twelve space" or "four tab."
• Tones: If Tones is selected, when the amount of indentation
changes, tones indicate the amount of change in indent. The tone will
increase in pitch every space, and for a tab, it will increase in
pitch the equivalent of 4 spaces.
• Both Speech and Tones: This option reads indentation using both of
the above methods.
11.1.15. Windows 10 OCR Settings
The settings in this category allow you to configure Windows 10 OCR.
This category contains the following options:
Recognition language
This combo box allows you to choose the language to be used for text
recognition.
11.1.16. Advanced Settings
Warning! The settings in this category are for advanced users and may
cause NVDA to not function correctly if configured in the wrong way.
Only make changes to these settings if you are sure you know what you
are doing or if you have been specifically instructed to by an NVDA
developer.
Making changes to advanced settings
In order to make changes to the advanced settings, the controls must
be enabled by confirming, with the checkbox, that you understand the
risks of modifying these settings
Restoring the default settings
The button restores the default values for the settings, even if the
confirmation checkbox is not ticked. After changing settings you may
wish to revert to the default values. This may also be the case if you
are unsure if the settings have been changed.
Enable loading custom code from Developer Scratchpad Directory
When developing add-ons for NVDA, it is useful to be able to test code
as you are writing it. This option when enabled, allows NVDA to load
custom appModules, globalPlugins, brailleDisplayDrivers and
synthDrivers, from a special developer scratchpad directory in your
NVDA user configuration directory. Previously NVDA would load custom
code directly from the user configuration directory, with no way of
disabling this. This option is off by default, ensuring that no
untested code is ever run in NVDA with out the user's explicit
knowledge. If you wish to distribute custom code to others, you should
package it as an NVDA add-on.
Open Developer Scratchpad Directory
This button opens the directory where you can place custom code while
developing it. This button is only enabled if NVDA is configured to
enable loading custom code from the Developer Scratchpad Directory.
Use UI automation to access Microsoft Word document controls when available
When this option is enabled, NVDA will try to use the Microsoft UI
Automation accessibility api in order to fetch information from
Microsoft Word document controls. This includes in Microsoft Word
itself, and also the Microsoft Outlook message viewer and composer.
For the most recent versions of Microsoft Office 2016/365 running on
windows 10, UI Automation support is complete enough to provide access
to Microsoft Word documents almost equal to NVDA's existing Microsoft
Word support, with the added advantage that responsiveness is majorly
increased. However, There may be some information which is either not
exposed, or exposed incorrectly in some versions of Microsoft Office,
which means this UI automation support cannot always be relied upon.
We still do not recommend that the majority of users turn this on by
default, though we do welcome users of Office 2016/365 to test this
feature and provide feedback.
Use UI Automation to access the Windows Console when available
When this option is enabled, NVDA will use a new, work in progress
version of its support for Windows Console which takes advantage of
accessibility improvements made by Microsoft. This feature is highly
experimental and is still incomplete, so its use is not yet
recommended. However, once completed, it is anticipated that this new
support will become the default, improving NVDA's performance and
stability in Windows command consoles.
Speak passwords in UIA consoles
This setting controls whether characters are spoken by speak typed
characters or speak typed words in situations where the screen does
not update (such as password entry) in the Windows Console with UI
automation support enabled. For security purposes, this setting should
be left disabled. However, you may wish to enable it if you experience
performance issues or instability with typed character and/or word
reporting while using NVDA's new experimental console support.
Automatically set system focus to focusable elements in Browse Mode
Key: NVDA+8
Enabled by default, this option allows you to choose if the system
focus should automatically be set to elements that can take the system
focus (links, form fields, etc.) when navigating content with the
browse mode caret. If enabled, this represents default behavior of
NVDA as of version 2019.1 and before. Disabling this option will not
automatically focus focusable elements when they are selected with the
browse mode caret. This might result in faster browsing experience and
better responsiveness in browse mode. The focus will yet be updated to
the particular element when interacting with it (e.g. pressing a
button, checking a check box). This functionality is experimental as
of NVDA 2019.2.
Caret move timeout (in MS)
This option allows you to configure the number of milliseconds NVDA
will wait for the caret (insertion point) to move in editable text
controls. If you find that NVDA seems to be incorrectly tracking the
caret E.g. it seems to be always one character behind or is repeating
lines, then you may wish to try increasing this value.
Debug logging categories
The checkboxes in this list allow you to enable specific categories of
debug messages in NVDA's log. Logging these messages can resort in
decreased performance and large log files. Only turn one of these on
if specifically instructed to by an NVDA developer e.g. when debugging
why a braille display driver is not functioning correctly.
11.2. miscellaneous Settings
Besides the NVDA Settings dialog, The Preferences sub-menu of the NVDA
Menu contains several other items which are outlined below.
11.2.1. Speech dictionaries
The speech dictionaries menu (found in the Preferences menu) contains
dialogs that allow you to manage the way NVDA pronounces particular
words or phrases. There are currently three different types of speech
dictionaries. They are:
• Default: rules in this dictionary affect all speech in NVDA.
• Voice: rules in this dictionary affect speech for the synthesizer
voice currently being used.
• Temporary: rules in this dictionary affect all speech in NVDA, but
only for the current session. These rules are temporary and will be
lost if NVDA is restarted.
You need to assign custom gestures using the Input Gestures dialog if
you wish to open any of these dictionary dialogs from anywhere.
All dictionary dialogs contain a list of rules which will be used for
processing the speech. The dialog also contains Add, Edit and Remove
buttons.
To add a new rule to the dictionary, press the Add button, and fill in
the fields in the dialog box that appears and then press Ok. You will
then see your new rule in the list of rules. However, to make sure
your rule is actually saved, make sure to press Ok to exit the
dictionary dialog completely once you have finished adding/editing
rules.
The rules for NVDA's speech dictionaries allow you to change one
string of characters into another. For example, you could create a
rule which causes NVDA to say the word "frog" instead of "bird"
whenever the word "bird" is encountered. In the Add rule dialog, the
easiest way to do this is to type the word bird in the Pattern field,
and the word frog in the Replacement field. You may also want to type
a description of the rule in the Comment field (something like:
changes bird to frog).
NVDA's speech dictionaries however are much more powerful than simple
word replacement. The Add rule dialog also contains a checkbox to say
whether or not you want the rule to be case sensitive (meaning that
NVDA should care whether the characters are uppercase or lowercase.
NVDA ignores case by default).
Finally, a set of radio buttons allows you to tell NVDA whether your
pattern should match anywhere, should only match if it is a complete
word or should be treated as a "Regular expression". Setting the
pattern to match as a whole word means that the replacement will only
be made if the pattern does not occur as part of a larger word; i.e. a
character other than an alphanumeric character or an underscore (or no
character at all) comes both immediately before and after the pattern.
Thus, using the earlier example of replacing the word "bird" with
"frog", if you were to make this a whole word replacement, it would
not match "birds" or "bluebird".
A regular expression is a pattern containing special symbols that
allow you to match on more than one character at a time, or match on
just numbers, or just letters, as a few examples. Regular expressions
are not covered in this user guide, but there are many tutorials on
the web which can provide you with more information.
11.2.2. Punctuation/symbol pronunciation
This dialog allows you to change the way punctuation and other symbols
are pronounced, as well as the symbol level at which they are spoken.
The language for which symbol pronunciation is being edited will be
shown in the dialog's title. Note that this dialog respects the "Trust
voice's language for processing symbols and characters" option found
in the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog; i.e. it uses the
voice language rather than the NVDA global language setting when this
option is enabled.
To change a symbol, first select it in the Symbols list. You can
filter the symbols by entering the symbol or a part of the symbol's
replacement into the Filter by edit box.
• The Replacement field allows you to change the text that should be
spoken in place of this symbol.
• Using the Level field, you can adjust the lowest symbol level at
which this symbol should be spoken.
• The Send actual symbol to synthesizer field specifies when the
symbol itself (in contrast to its replacement) should be sent to the
synthesizer. This is useful if the symbol causes the synthesizer to
pause or change the inflection of the voice. For example, a comma
causes the synthesizer to pause. There are three options:
• never: Never send the actual symbol to the synthesizer.
• always: Always send the actual symbol to the synthesizer.
• only below symbols' level: Send the actual symbol only if the
configured speech symbol level is lower than the level set for this
symbol. For example, you might use this so that a symbol will have
its replacement spoken at higher levels without pausing, while still
being indicated with a pause at lower levels.
You can add new symbols by pressing the Add button. In the dialog that
appears, enter the symbol and press the OK button. Then, change the
fields for the new symbol as you would for other symbols.
You can remove a symbol you previously added by pressing the Remove button.
When you are finished, press the OK button to save your changes or the
Cancel button to discard them.
11.2.3. Input Gestures
In this dialog, you can customize the input gestures (keys on the
keyboard, buttons on a braille display, etc.) for NVDA commands.
Only commands that are applicable immediately before the dialog is
opened are shown. For example, if you want to customize commands
related to browse mode, you should open the Input Gestures dialog
while you are in browse mode.
The tree in this dialog lists all of the applicable NVDA commands
grouped by category. You can filter them by entering one or more words
from the command's name into the Filter by edit box in any order. Any
gestures associated with a command are listed beneath the command.
To add an input gesture to a command, select the command and press the
Add button. Then, perform the input gesture you wish to associate;
e.g. press a key on the keyboard or a button on a braille display.
Often, a gesture can be interpreted in more than one way. For example,
if you pressed a key on the keyboard, you may wish it to be specific
to the current keyboard layout (e.g. desktop or laptop) or you may
wish it to apply for all layouts. In this case, a menu will appear
allowing you to select the desired option.
To remove a gesture from a command, select the gesture and press the
Remove button.
When you are finished making changes, press the OK button to save them
or the Cancel button to discard them.
11.3. Saving and Reloading the configuration
By default NVDA will automatically save your settings on exit. Note,
however, that this option can be changed under the general options in
the preferences menu. To save the settings manually at any time,
choose the Save configuration item in the NVDA menu.
If you ever make a mistake with your settings and need to revert back
to the saved settings, choose the "revert to saved configuration" item
in the NVDA menu. You can also reset your settings to their original
factory defaults by choosing Reset Configuration To Factory Defaults,
which is also found in the NVDA menu.
The following NVDA key commands are also useful:
Name
Desktop key
Laptop key
Description
Save configuration
NVDA+control+c
NVDA+control+c
Saves your current configuration so that it is not lost when you exit NVDA
Revert configuration
NVDA+control+r
NVDA+control+r
Pressing once resets your configuration to when you last saved it.
Pressing three times will reset it back to factory defaults.
11.4. Configuration Profiles
Sometimes, you may wish to have different settings for different
situations. For example, you may wish to have reporting of indentation
enabled while you are editing or reporting of font attributes enabled
while you are proofreading. NVDA allows you to do this using
configuration profiles.
A configuration profile contains only those settings which are changed
while the profile is being edited. Most settings can be changed in
configuration profiles except for those in the General category of the
NVDA Settings dialog, which apply to the entirety of NVDA.
Configuration profiles can be manually activated either from a dialog
or using custom added gestures. They can also be activated
automatically due to triggers such as switching to a particular
application.
11.4.1. Basic Management
You manage configuration profiles by selecting "Configuration
profiles" in the NVDA menu. You can also do this using a key command:
• NVDA+control+p: Show the Configuration Profiles dialog.
The first control in this dialog is the profile list from which you
can select one of the available profiles. When you open the dialog,
the profile you are currently editing is selected. Additional
information is also shown for active profiles, indicating whether they
are manually activated, triggered and/or being edited.
To rename or delete a profile, press the Rename or Delete buttons,
respectively.
Press the Close button to close the dialog.
11.4.2. Creating a Profile
To create a profile, press the New button.
In the New Profile dialog, you can enter a name for the profile. You
can also select how this profile should be used. If you only want to
use this profile manually, select Manual activation, which is the
default. Otherwise, select a trigger which should automatically
activate this profile. For convenience, if you haven't entered a name
for the profile, selecting a trigger will fill in the name
accordingly. See below for more information about triggers.
Pressing OK will create the profile and close the Configuration
Profiles dialog so you can edit it.
11.4.3. Manual Activation
You can manually activate a profile by selecting a profile and
pressing the Manual activate button. Once activated, other profiles
can still be activated due to triggers, but any settings in the
manually activated profile will override them. For example, if a
profile is triggered for the current application and reporting of
links is enabled in that profile but disabled it in the manually
activated profile, links will not be reported. However, if you have
changed the voice in the triggered profile but have never changed it
in the manually activated profile, the voice from the triggered
profile will be used. Any settings you change will be saved in the
manually activated profile. To deactivate a manually activated
profile, select it in the Configuration Profiles dialog and press the
Manual deactivate button.
11.4.4. Triggers
Pressing the Triggers button in the Configuration Profiles dialog
allows you to change the profiles which should be automatically
activated for various triggers.
The Triggers list shows the available triggers, which are as follows:
• Current application: Triggered when you switch to the current application.
• Say all: Triggered while reading with the say all command.
To change the profile which should be automatically activated for a
trigger, select the trigger and then select the desired profile from
the Profile list. You can select "(normal configuration)" if you don't
want a profile to be used.
Press the Close button to return to the Configuration Profiles dialog.
11.4.5. Editing a Profile
If you have manually activated a profile, any settings you change will
be saved to that profile. Otherwise, any settings you change will be
saved to the most recently triggered profile. For example, if you have
associated a profile with the Notepad application and you switch to
Notepad, any changed settings will be saved to that profile. Finally,
if there is neither a manually activated nor a triggered profile, any
settings you change will be saved to your normal configuration.
To edit the profile associated with say all, you must manually
activate that profile.
11.4.6. Temporarily Disabling Triggers
Sometimes, it is useful to temporarily disable all triggers. For
example, you might wish to edit a manually activated profile or your
normal configuration without triggered profiles interfering. You can
do this by checking the Temporarily disable all triggers checkbox in
the Configuration Profiles dialog.
To toggle disabling triggers from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
11.4.7. Activating a profile using input gestures
For every profile you add, you are able to assign one or more input
gestures to activate it. By default, configuration profiles do not
have input gestures assigned. You can add gestures to activate a
profile using the Input Gestures dialog. Every profile has its own
entry under the configuration profiles category. When you rename a
profile, any gesture you added previously will still be available.
Removing a profile will automatically delete the gestures associated
with it.
11.5. Location of Configuration files
Portable versions of NVDA store all settings and add-ons in a
directory called userConfig, found in the NVDA directory.
Installed versions of NVDA store all settings and add-ons in a special
NVDA directory located in your Windows user profile. This means that
each user on the system can have their own NVDA settings. To get to
your settings directory for an installed version of NVDA, on the start
menu you can go to programs -> NVDA -> explore user configuration
directory.
Settings for NVDA when running on the logon or UAC screens are stored
in the systemConfig directory in NVDA's installation directory.
Usually, this configuration should not be touched. To change NVDA's
configuration on the logon/UAC screens, configure NVDA as you wish
while logged into Windows, save the configuration, and then press the
"Use currently saved settings on the logon and other secure screens"
button in the General category of the NVDA Settings dialog.
12. Extra Tools
12.1. Log Viewer
The log viewer, found under Tools in the NVDA menu, allows you to view
all the logging output that has occurred up until now from when you
last started NVDA. Using NVDA+F1 will open the log viewer and display
developer information about the current navigator object.
Apart from reading the content, you can also Save a copy of the log
file, or refresh the viewer so that it shows the most recent output
since the Log viewer was opened. These actions are available under the
viewer's Log menu.
12.2. Speech Viewer
For sighted software developers or people demoing NVDA to sighted
audiences, a floating window is available that allows you to view all
the text that NVDA is currently speaking.
To enable the speech viewer, check the "Speech Viewer" menu item under
Tools in the NVDA menu. Uncheck the menu item to disable it.
The speech viewer window contains a check box labeled "Show speech
viewer on startup". If this is checked, the speech viewer will open
when NVDA is started. The speech viewer window will always attempt to
re-open with the same dimensions and location as when it was closed.
While the speech viewer is enabled, it constantly updates to show you
the most current text being spoken. However, if you click or focus
inside the viewer, NVDA will temporarily stop updating the text, so
that you are able to easily select or copy the existing content.
To toggle the speech viewer from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
12.3. Add-ons Manager
The Add-ons Manager, accessed by selecting Manage add-ons under Tools
in the NVDA menu, allows you to install, uninstall, enable and disable
add-on packages for NVDA. These packages are provided by the community
and contain custom code that may add or change features in NVDA or
even provide support for extra Braille displays or speech
synthesizers.
The Add-ons Manager contains a list that displays all the add-ons
currently installed in your NVDA user configuration. Package name,
status, version and author are shown for each add-on, though further
information such as a description and URL can be viewed by selecting
the add-on and pressing the About add-on button. If there is help
available for the selected add-on, you can access it by pressing the
Add-on help button.
To browse and download available add-ons online, press the Get add-ons
button. This button opens the NVDA Add-ons page. If NVDA is installed
and running on your system, you can open the add-on directly from the
browser to begin the installation process as described below.
Otherwise, save the add-on package and follow the instructions below.
To install an Add-on you previously obtained, press the Install
button. This will allow you to browse for an add-on package
(.nvda-addon file) somewhere on your computer or on a network. Once
you press Open, the installation process will begin.
When an add-on is being installed, NVDA will first ask you to confirm
that you really wish to install the add-on. As the functionality of
add-ons is unrestricted inside NVDA, which in theory could include
accessing your personal data or even the entire system if NVDA is an
installed copy, it is very important to only install add-ons from
sources you trust. Once the add-on is installed, NVDA must be
restarted for the add-on to start running. Until you do, a status of
"install" will show for that add-on in the list.
To remove an add-on, select the add-on from the list and press the
Remove button. NVDA will ask if you really wish to do this. As with
installing, NVDA must be restarted for the add-on to be fully
removed. Until you do, a status of "remove" will be shown for that
add-on in the list.
To disable an add-on, press the "disable" button. To enable a
previously disabled add-on, press the "enable" button. You can disable
an add-on if the add-on status indicates it is "enabled", or enable
it if the add-on is "disabled". For each press of the enable/disable
button, add-on status changes to indicate what will happen when NVDA
restarts. If the add-on was previously "disabled", a status will show
"enabled after restart". If the add-on was previously "enabled", a
status will show "disabled after restart" Just like when you install
or remove add-ons, you need to restart NVDA in order for changes to
take effect.
The manager also has a Close button to close the dialog. If you have
installed, removed or changed the status of an add-on, NVDA will first
ask you if you wish to restart so that your changes can take effect.
Some older add-ons may no longer be compatible with the version of
NVDA that you have. When using an older version of NVDA, some new
add-ons may not be compatible either. Attempting to install an
incompatible add-on will result in an error explaining why the add-on
is considered incompatible. To inspect these incompatible add-ons, you
can use the "view incompatible add-ons" button to launch the
incompatible add-ons manager.
To access the Add-ons Manager from anywhere, please assign a custom
gesture using the Input Gestures dialog.
12.4. Incompatible Add-ons Manager
The Incompatible Add-ons Manager, which can be accessed via the "view
incompatible add-ons" buttons in the Add-on manager, allows you to
inspect any incompatible add-ons, and the reason they are considered
incompatible. Add-ons are considered incompatible when they have not
been updated to work with significant changes to NVDA, or when they
rely on a feature not available in the version of NVDA you are using.
The Incompatible add-ons manager has a short message to explain its
purpose as well as the version of NVDA. The incompatible add-ons are
presented in a list with the following columns:
1. Package, the name of the add-on
2. Version, the version of the add-on
3. Incompatible reason, an explanation of why the addon is considered
incompatible
The Incompatible add-ons manager also has an "About add-on..." button.
This opens will let you know the full details of the add-on, which is
helpful when contacting the add-on author.
12.5. Python Console
The NVDA Python console, found under Tools in the NVDA menu, is a
development tool which is useful for debugging, general inspection of
NVDA internals or inspection of the accessibility hierarchy of an
application. For more information, please see the NVDA Developer
Guide.
12.6. Reload plugins
This item, once activated, reloads app modules and global plugins
without restarting NVDA, which can be useful for developers.
13. Supported Speech Synthesizers
This section contains information about the speech synthesizers
supported by NVDA. For an even more extensive list of free and
commercial synthesizers that you can purchase and download for use
with NVDA, please see extra voices page.
13.1. eSpeak NG
The eSpeak NG synthesizer is built directly into NVDA and does not
require any other special drivers or components to be installed. NVDA
starts using eSpeak NG by default. As this synthesizer is built into
NVDA, this is a great choice for when running NVDA off a USB thumb
drive on other systems.
Each voice that comes with eSpeak NG speaks a different language.
There are over 43 different languages supported by eSpeak NG.
There are also many variants which can be chosen to alter the sound of
the voice.
13.2. Microsoft Speech API version 4 (SAPI 4)
SAPI 4 is an older Microsoft standard for software speech
synthesizers. NVDA still supports this for users who already have SAPI
4 synthesizers installed. However, Microsoft no longer support this
and needed components are no longer available from Microsoft.
When using this synthesizer with NVDA, the available voices (accessed
from the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog or by the Synth
Settings Ring) will contain all the voices from all the installed SAPI
4 engines found on your system.
13.3. Microsoft Speech API version 5 (SAPI 5)
SAPI 5 is a Microsoft standard for software speech synthesizers. Many
speech synthesizers that comply with this standard may be purchased or
downloaded for free from various companies and websites, though your
system will probably already come with at least one SAPI 5 voice
preinstalled. When using this synthesizer with NVDA, the available
voices (accessed from the Speech category of the NVDA Settings dialog
or by the Synth Settings Ring) will contain all the voices from all
the installed SAPI 5 engines found on your system.
13.4. Microsoft Speech Platform
The Microsoft Speech Platform provides voices for many languages which
are normally used in the development of server-based speech
applications. These voices can also be used with NVDA.
To use these voices, you will need to install two components:
• Microsoft Speech Platform - Runtime (Version 11) , x86:
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27225
• Microsoft Speech Platform - Runtime Languages (Version 11):
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27224
• This page includes many files for both speech recognition and
text-to-speech. Choose the files containing the TTS data for the
desired languages/voices. For example, the file
MSSpeech_TTS_en-US_ZiraPro.msi is a U.S. English voice.
13.5. Windows OneCore Voices
Windows 10 includes new voices known as "OneCore" or "mobile" voices.
Voices are provided for many languages, and they are more responsive
than the Microsoft voices available using Microsoft Speech API version
5.
Please see this Microsoft article for a list of available voices and
instructions to install them:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/22797/windows-10-narrator-tts-voices
Please note that the faster rates available with Narrator are not
currently available with NVDA. Also, the speed you select in the
Windows Settings affects the rate set in NVDA. These are issues we
cannot resolve without changes to Windows. We are hopeful that these
will be addressed in a future Windows update.
13.6. Audiologic Tts3
This is a commercial speech synthesizer specifically for the Italian
language. You must have the synthesizer installed on your system in
order for it to be used with NVDA. For more information, please visit
the Audiologic website at www.audiologic.it.
This synthesizer does not support spelling functionality.
14. Supported Braille Displays
This section contains information about the Braille displays supported by NVDA.
14.1. Displays supporting automatic detection in the background
NVDA has the ability to detect many braille displays in the background
automatically, either via USB or bluetooth. This behavior is achieved
by selecting the Automatic option as the preferred braille display
from NVDA's Braille Settings dialog. This option is selected by
default.
The following displays support this automatic detection functionality.
• Handy Tech displays
• Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit braille displays
• HumanWare Brailliant BI/B series
• HumanWare BrailleNote
• SuperBraille
• Optelec ALVA 6 series
• HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
• Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
14.2. Freedom Scientific Focus/PAC Mate Series
All Focus and PAC Mate displays from Freedom Scientific are supported
when connected via USB or bluetooth. You will need the Freedom
Scientific braille display drivers installed on your system. If you do
not have them already, you can obtain them from
http://www2.freedomscientific.com/downloads/focus-40-blue/focus-40-14-blue-downloads.asp.
Although this page only mentions the Focus Blue display, the drivers
support all Freedom Scientific Focus and Pacmate displays.
By default, NVDA can automatically detect and connect to these
displays either via USB or bluetooth. However, when configuring the
display, you can explicitly select "USB" or "Bluetooth" ports to
restrict the connection type to be used. This might be useful if you
want to connect the focus display to NVDA using bluetooth, but still
be able to charge it using USB power from your computer. NVDA's
automatic braille display detection will also recognize the display on
USB or Bluetooth.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
topRouting1 (first cell on display)
Scroll braille display forward
topRouting20/40/80 (last cell on display)
Scroll braille display back
leftAdvanceBar
Scroll braille display forward
rightAdvanceBar
Toggle braille tethered to
leftGDFButton+rightGDFButton
Toggle left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelPress
Move back using left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelUp
Move forward using left wiz wheel action
leftWizWheelDown
Toggle right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelPress
Move back using right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelUp
Move forward using right wiz wheel action
rightWizWheelDown
Route to braille cell
routing
shift+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2
tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot5
upArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1
downArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4
control+leftArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2
control+rightArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot5
leftArrow
brailleSpaceBar+dot3
rightArrow key
brailleSpaceBar+dot6
home key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3
end key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot6
control+home key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot3
control+end key
brailleSpaceBar+dot4+dot5+dot6
alt key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3+dot4
alt+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5
alt+shift+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6
windows+tab key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot3+dot4
escape key
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot5
windows key
brailleSpaceBar+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6
space key
brailleSpaceBar
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6
Report Current Line
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot4
NVDA menu
brailleSpaceBar+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5
For newer Focus models that contain rocker bar keys (focus 40, focus
80 and focus blue):
Name
Key
Move braille display to previous line
leftRockerBarUp, rightRockerBarUp
Move braille display to next line
leftRockerBarDown, rightRockerBarDown
For Focus 80 only:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
leftBumperBarUp, rightBumperBarUp
Scroll braille display forward
leftBumperBarDown, rightBumperBarDown
14.3. Optelec ALVA 6 series/protocol converter
Both the ALVA BC640 and BC680 displays from Optelec are supported when
connected via USB or bluetooth. Alternatively, you can connect an
older Optelec display, such as a Braille Voyager, using a protocol
converter supplied by Optelec. You do not need any specific drivers to
be installed to use these displays. Just plug in the display and
configure NVDA to use it.
Note: NVDA might be unable to use an ALVA BC6 display over Bluetooth
when it is paired using the ALVA Bluetooth utility. When you have
paired your device using this utility and NVDA is unable to detect
your device, we recommend you to pair your ALVA display the regular
way using the Windows Bluetooth settings.
Note: while some of these displays do have a braille keyboard, they
handle translation from braille to text themselves by default. This
means that NVDA's braille input system is not in use in the default
situation (i.e. the input braille table setting has no effect). For
ALVA displays with recent firmware, it is possible to disable this HID
keyboard simulation using an input gesture.
Following are key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please see
the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys can
be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
t1, etouch1
Move braille display to previous line
t2
Move to current focus
t3
Move braille display to next line
t4
Scroll braille display forward
t5, etouch3
Route to braille cell
routing
Report text formatting under braille cell
secondary routing
Toggle HID keyboard simulation
t1+spEnter
Move to top line in review
t1+t2
Move to bottom line in review
t4+t5
Toggle braille tethered to
t1+t3
Report title
etouch2
Report status bar
etouch4
shift+tab key
sp1
alt key
sp2, alt
escape key
sp3
tab key
sp4
upArrow key
spUp
downArrow key
spDown
leftArrow key
spLeft
rightArrow key
spRight
enter key
spEnter, enter
Report date/time
sp2+sp3
NVDA Menu
sp1+sp3
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
sp1+sp4
windows+b key (focus system tray)
sp3+sp4
windows key
sp1+sp2, windows
alt+tab key
sp2+sp4
control+home key
t3+spUp
control+end key
t3+spDown
home key
t3+spLeft
end key
t3+spRight
control key
control
14.4. Handy Tech Displays
NVDA supports most displays from Handy Tech when connected via USB,
serial port or bluetooth. For older USB displays, you will need to
install the USB drivers from Handy Tech on your system.
The following displays are not supported out of the box, but can be
used via Handy Tech's universal driver and NVDA add-on:
• Braillino
• Bookworm
• Modular displays with firmware version 1.13 or lower. Please note
that the firmware of this displays can be updated.
Following are the key assignments for Handy Tech displays with NVDA.
Please see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these
keys can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left, up, b3
Scroll braille display forward
right, down, b6
Move braille display to previous line
b4
Move braille display to next line
b5
Route to braille cell
routing
shift+tab key
esc, left triple action key up+down
alt key
b2+b4+b5
escape key
b4+b6
tab key
enter, right triple action key up+down
enter key
esc+enter, left+right triple action key up+down, joystickAction
upArrow key
joystickUp
downArrow key
joystickDown
leftArrow key
joystickLeft
rightArrow key
joystickRight
NVDA Menu
b2+b4+b5+b6
Toggle braille tethered to
b2
Toggle the braille cursor
b1
Toggle focus context presentation
b7
Toggle braille input
space+b1+b3+b4 (space+capital B)
14.5. MDV Lilli
The Lilli braille display available from MDV is supported. You do not
need any specific drivers to be installed to use this display. Just
plug in the display and configure NVDA to use it.
This display does not support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display backward
LF
Scroll braille display forward
RG
Move braille display to previous line
UP
Move braille display to next line
DN
Route to braille cell
route
shift+tab key
SLF
tab key
SRG
alt+tab key
SDN
alt+shift+tab key
SUP
14.6. Baum/Humanware/APH/Orbit Braille Displays
Several Baum, HumanWare, APH and Orbit displays are supported when
connected via USB, bluetooth or serial. These include:
• Baum: SuperVario, PocketVario, VarioUltra, Pronto!, SuperVario2, Vario 340
• HumanWare: Brailliant, BrailleConnect, Brailliant2
• APH: Refreshabraille
• Orbit: Orbit Reader 20
Some other displays manufactured by Baum may also work, though this
has not been tested.
If connecting via USB to displays which do not use HID, you must first
install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer. The VarioUltra
and Pronto! use HID. The Refreshabraille and Orbit Reader 20 can use
HID if configured appropriately.
The USB serial mode of the Orbit Reader 20 is currently only supported
in Windows 10. USB HID should generally be used instead.
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see your display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
d2
Scroll braille display forward
d5
Move braille display to previous line
d1
Move braille display to next line
d3
Route to braille cell
routing
For displays which have a joystick:
Name
Key
upArrow key
up
downArrow key
down
leftArrow key
left
rightArrow key
right
enter key
select
14.7. hedo ProfiLine USB
The hedo ProfiLine USB from hedo Reha-Technik is supported. You must
first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
This display does not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
K1
Scroll braille display forward
K3
Move braille display to previous line
B2
Move braille display to next line
B5
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
K2
Say all
B6
14.8. hedo MobilLine USB
The hedo MobilLine USB from hedo Reha-Technik is supported. You must
first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
This display does not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
K1
Scroll braille display forward
K3
Move braille display to previous line
B2
Move braille display to next line
B5
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
K2
Say all
B6
14.9. HumanWare Brailliant BI/B Series / BrailleNote Touch
The Brailliant BI and B series of displays from HumanWare, including
the BI 14, BI 32, BI 40 and B 80, are supported when connected via USB
or bluetooth. If connecting via USB with the protocol set to
HumanWare, you must first install the USB drivers provided by the
manufacturer. USB drivers are not required if the protocol is set to
OpenBraille.
The BrailleNote Touch is also supported, and does not require any
drivers to be installed.
Following are the key assignments for the Brailliant BI/B and
BrailleNote touch displays with NVDA. Please see the display's
documentation for descriptions of where these keys can be found.
14.9.1. Key assignments for All models
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
down
Route to braille cell
routing
Toggle braille tethered to
up+down
upArrow key
space+dot1
downArrow key
space+dot4
leftArrow key
space+dot3
rightArrow key
space+dot6
shift+tab key
space+dot1+dot3
tab key
space+dot4+dot6
alt key
space+dot1+dot3+dot4 (space+m)
escape key
space+dot1+dot5 (space+e)
enter key
dot8
windows key
space+dot3+dot4
alt+tab key
space+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+t)
NVDA Menu
space+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+n)
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
space+dot1+dot4+dot5 (space+d)
Say all
space+dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6
14.9.2. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 32, BI 40 and B 80
Name
Key
NVDA Menu
c1+c3+c4+c5 (command n)
windows+d key (minimize all applications)
c1+c4+c5 (command d)
Say all
c1+c2+c3+c4+c5+c6
14.9.3. Key assignments for Brailliant BI 14
Name
Key
up arrow key
joystick up
down arrow key
joystick down
left arrow key
joystick left
right arrow key
joystick right
enter key
joystick action
14.10. HIMS Braille Sense/Braille EDGE/Smart Beetle/Sync Braille Series
NVDA supports Braille Sense, Braille EDGE, Smart Beetle and Sync
Braille displays from Hims when connected via USB or bluetooth. If
connecting via USB, you will need to install the USB drivers from HIMS
on your system. You can download these from here:
http://www.himsintl.com/upload/HIMS_USB_Driver_v25.zip
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Route to braille cell
routing
Scroll braille display back
leftSideScrollUp, rightSideScrollUp, leftSideScroll
Scroll braille display forward
leftSideScrollDown, rightSideScrollDown, rightSideScroll
Move braille display to previous line
leftSideScrollUp+rightSideScrollUp
Move braille display to next line
leftSideScrollDown+rightSideScrollDown
Move to previous line in review
rightSideUpArrow
Move to next line in review
rightSideDownArrow
Move to previous character in review
rightSideLeftArrow
Move to next character in review
rightSideRightArrow
Move to current focus
leftSideScrollUp+leftSideScrollDown,
rightSideScrollUp+rightSideScrollDown, leftSideScroll+rightSideScroll
control key
smartbeetle:f1, brailleedge:f3
windows key
f7, smartbeetle:f2
alt key
dot1+dot3+dot4+space, f2, smartbeetle:f3, brailleedge:f4
shift key
f5
insert key
dot2+dot4+space, f6
applications key
dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+space, f8
capsLock key
dot1+dot3+dot6+space
tab key
dot4+dot5+space, f3, brailleedge:f2
shift+alt+tab key
f2+f3+f1
alt+tab key
f2+f3
shift+tab key
dot1+dot2+space
end key
dot4+dot6+space
control+end key
dot4+dot5+dot6+space
home key
dot1+dot3+space, smartbeetle:f4
control+home key
dot1+dot2+dot3+space
alt+f4 key
dot1+dot3+dot5+dot6+space
leftArrow key
dot3+space, leftSideLeftArrow
control+shift+leftArrow key
dot2+dot8+space+f1
control+leftArrow key
dot2+space
shift+alt+leftArrow key
dot2+dot7+f1
alt+leftArrow key
dot2+dot7
rightArrow key
dot6+space, leftSideRightArrow
control+shift+rightArrow key
dot5+dot8+space+f1
control+rightArrow key
dot5+space
shift+alt+rightArrow key
dot5+dot7+f1
alt+rightArrow key
dot5+dot7
pageUp key
dot1+dot2+dot6+space
control+pageUp key
dot1+dot2+dot6+dot8+space
upArrow key
dot1+space, leftSideUpArrow
control+shift+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot8+space+f1
control+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+space
shift+alt+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot7+f1
alt+upArrow key
dot2+dot3+dot7
shift+upArrow key
leftSideScrollDown+space
pageDown key
dot3+dot4+dot5+space
control+pageDown key
dot3+dot4+dot5+dot8+space
downArrow key
dot4+space, leftSideDownArrow
control+shift+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot8+space+f1
control+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+space
shift+alt+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot7+f1
alt+downArrow key
dot5+dot6+dot7
shift+downArrow key
space+rightSideScrollDown
escape key
dot1+dot5+space, f4, brailleedge:f1
delete key
dot1+dot3+dot5+space, dot1+dot4+dot5+space
f1 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+space
f3 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot8
f4 key
dot7+f3
windows+b key
dot1+dot2+f1
windows+d key
dot1+dot4+dot5+f1
control+insert key
smartbeetle:f1+rightSideScroll
alt+insert key
smartbeetle:f3+rightSideScroll
14.11. Seika Braille Displays
The Seika Version 3, 4 and 5 (40 cells) and Seika80 (80 cells) braille
displays from Nippon Telesoft are supported. You can find more
information about these displays at http://www.seika-braille.com/. You
must first install the USB drivers provided by the manufacturer.
These displays do not yet support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for this display with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
b3
Move braille display to next line
b4
Toggle braille tethered to
b5
Say all
b6
tab
b1
shift+tab
b2
alt+tab
b1+b2
NVDA Menu
left+right
Route to braille cell
routing
14.12. Papenmeier BRAILLEX Newer Models
The following Braille displays are supported:
• BRAILLEX EL 40c, EL 80c, EL 20c, EL 60c (USB)
• BRAILLEX EL 40s, EL 80s, EL 2d80s, EL 70s, EL 66s (USB)
• BRAILLEX Trio (USB and bluetooth)
• BRAILLEX Live 20, BRAILLEX Live and BRAILLEX Live Plus (USB and bluetooth)
These displays do not support NVDA's automatic background braille
display detection functionality.
If BrxCom is installed, NVDA will use BrxCom. BrxCom is a tool that
allows keyboard input from the braille display to function
independently from a screen reader. Keyboard input is possible with
the Trio and BRAILLEX Live models.
Most devices have an Easy Access Bar (EAB) that allows intuitive and
fast operation. The EAB can be moved in four directions where
generally each direction has two switches. The C and Live series are
the only exceptions to this rule.
The c-series and some other displays have two routing rows whereby the
upper row is used to report formatting information. Holding one of the
upper routing keys and pressing the EAB on c-series devices emulates
the second switch state. The live series displays have one routing row
only and the EAB has one step per direction. The second step may be
emulated by pressing one of the routing keys and pressing the EAB in
the corresponding direction. Pressing and holding the up, down, right
and left keys (or EAB) causes the corresponding action to be repeated.
Generally, the following keys are available on these braille displays:
Name
Key
l1
Left front key
l2
Left rear key
r1
Right front key
r2
Right rear key
up
1 Step up
up2
2 Steps up
left
1 Step left
left2
2 Steps left
right
1 Step right
right2
2 Steps right
dn
1 Step down
dn2
2 Steps down
Following are the Papenmeier command assignments for NVDA:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Route to braille cell
routing
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Report title
l1+up
Report Status Bar
l2+down
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to previous object
left2
Move to next object
right2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing row
The Trio model has four additional keys which are in front of the
braille keyboard. These are (ordered from left to right):
• left thumb key (lt)
• space
• space
• right thumb key (rt)
Currently, the right thumb key is not in use. The inner keys are both
mapped to space.
Name
Key
escape key
space with dot 7
upArrow key
space with dot 2
leftArrow key
space with dot 1
rightArrow key
space with dot 4
downArrow
space with dot 5
control key
lt+dot2
alt key
lt+dot3
control+escape key
space with dot 1 2 3 4 5 6
tab key
space with dot 3 7
14.13. Papenmeier Braille BRAILLEX Older Models
The following Braille displays are supported:
• BRAILLEX EL 80, EL 2D-80, EL 40 P
• BRAILLEX Tiny, 2D Screen
Note that these displays can only be connected via a serial port. Due
to this, these displays do not support NVDA's automatic background
braille display detection functionality. You should select the port to
which the display is connected after you have chosen this driver in
the Select Braille Display dialog.
Some of these devices have an Easy Access Bar (EAB) that allows
intuitive and fast operation. The EAB can be moved in four directions
where generally each direction has two switches. Pressing and holding
the up, down, right and left keys (or EAB) causes the corresponding
action to be repeated. Older devices do not have an EAB; front keys
are used instead.
Generally, the following keys are available on braille displays:
Name
Key
l1
Left front key
l2
Left rear key
r1
Right front key
r2
Right rear key
up
1 Step up
up2
2 Steps up
left
1 Step left
left2
2 Steps left
right
1 Step right
right2
2 Steps right
dn
1 Step down
dn2
2 Steps down
Following are the Papenmeier command assignments for NVDA:
Devices with EAB:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Route to braille cell
routing
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Report title
l1up
Report Status Bar
l2down
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to next object
right2
Move to previous object
left2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
BRAILLEX Tiny:
Name
Key
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to previous line
up
Move braille display to next line
dn
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Move to containing object
r1+up
Move to first contained object
r1+dn
Move to previous object
r1+left
Move to next object
r1+right
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
Report title
l1+up
Report status bar
l2+down
BRAILLEX 2D Screen:
Name
Key
Report current character in review
l1
Activate current navigator object
l2
Toggle braille tethered to
r2
Report text formatting under braille cell
upper routing strip
Move braille display to previous line
up
Scroll braille display back
left
Scroll braille display forward
right
Move braille display to next line
dn
Move to next object
left2
Move to containing object
up2
Move to first contained object
dn2
Move to previous object
right2
14.14. HumanWare BrailleNote
NVDA supports the BrailleNote notetakers from Humanware when acting as
a display terminal for a screen reader. The following models are
supported:
• BrailleNote Classic (serial connection only)
• BrailleNote PK (Serial and bluetooth connections)
• BrailleNote MPower (Serial and bluetooth connections)
• BrailleNote Apex (USB and Bluetooth connections)
For BrailleNote Touch, please refer to the Brailliant BI Series /
BrailleNote Touch section.
Except for BrailleNote PK, both braille (BT) and QWERTY (QT) keyboards
are supported. For BrailleNote QT, PC keyboard emulation isn't
supported. You can also enter braille dots using the QT keyboard.
Please check the braille terminal section of the BrailleNote manual
guide for details.
If your device supports more than one type of connection, when
connecting your BrailleNote to NVDA, you must set the braille terminal
port in braille terminal options. Please check the BrailleNote manual
for details. In NVDA, you may also need to set the port in the Select
Braille Display dialog. If you are connecting via USB or bluetooth,
you can set the port to "Automatic", "USB" or "Bluetooth", depending
on the available choices. If connecting using a legacy serial port (or
a USB to serial converter) or if none of the previous options appear,
you must explicitly choose the communication port to be used from the
list of hardware ports.
Before connecting your BrailleNote Apex using its USB client
interface, you must install the drivers provided by HumanWare.
On the BrailleNote Apex BT, you can use the scroll wheel located
between dots 1 and 4 for various NVDA commands. The wheel consists of
four directional dots, a center click button, and a wheel that spins
clockwise or counterclockwise.
Following are the BrailleNote command assignments for NVDA. Please
check your BrailleNote's documentation to find where these keys are
located.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
back
Scroll braille display forward
advance
Move braille display to previous line
previous
Move braille display to next line
next
Route to braille cell
routing
NvDA menu
space+dot1+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+n)
Toggle braille tethered to
previous+next
Up arrow key
space+dot1
Down arrow key
space+dot4
Left Arrow key
space+dot3
Right arrow key
space+dot6
Page up key
space+dot1+dot3
Page down key
space+dot4+dot6
Home key
space+dot1+dot2
End key
space+dot4+dot5
Control+home keys
space+dot1+dot2+dot3
Control+end keys
space+dot4+dot5+dot6
Space key
space
Enter
space+dot8
Backspace
space+dot7
Tab key
space+dot2+dot3+dot4+dot5 (space+t)
Shift+tab keys
space+dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6
Windows key
space+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6 (space+w)
Alt key
space+dot1+dot3+dot4 (space+m)
Toggle input help
space+dot2+dot3+dot6 (space+lower h)
Following are commands assigned to BrailleNote QT when it is not in
braille input mode.
Name
Key
NvDA menu
read+n
Up arrow key
upArrow
Down arrow key
downArrow
Left Arrow key
leftArrow|
Right arrow key
rightArrow
Page up key
function+upArrow
Page down key
function+downArrow
Home key
function+leftArrow
End key
function+rightArrow
Control+home keys
read+t
Control+end keys
read+b
Enter key
enter
Backspace key
backspace
Tab key
tab
Shift+tab keys
shift+tab
Windows key
read+w
Alt key
read+m
Toggle input help
read+1
Following are commands assigned to the scroll wheel:
Name
Key
Up arrow key
upArrow
Down arrow key
downArrow
Left Arrow key
leftArrow
Right arrow key
rightArrow
Enter key
center button
Tab key
scroll wheel clockwise
Shift+tab keys
scroll wheel counterclockwise
14.15. EcoBraille
NVDA supports EcoBraille displays from ONCE. The following models are
supported:
• EcoBraille 20
• EcoBraille 40
• EcoBraille 80
• EcoBraille Plus
In NVDA, you can set the serial port to which the display is connected
in the Select Braille Display dialog. These displays do not support
NVDA's automatic background braille display detection functionality.
Following are the key assignments for EcoBraille displays. Please see
the EcoBraille documentation for descriptions of where these keys can
be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
T2
Scroll braille display forward
T4
Move braille display to previous line
T1
Move braille display to next line
T5
Route to braille cell
Routing
Activate current navigator object
T3
Switch to next review mode
F1
Move to containing object
F2
Switch to previous review mode
F3
Move to previous object
F4
Report current object
F5
Move to next object
F6
Move to focus object
F7
Move to first contained object
F8
Move System focus or caret to current review position
F9
Report review cursor location
F0
Toggle braille tethered to
A
14.16. SuperBraille
The SuperBraille device, mostly available in Taiwan, can be connected
to by either USB or serial. As the SuperBraille does not have any
physical typing keys or scrolling buttons, all input must be performed
via a standard computer keyboard. Due to this, and to maintain
compatibility with other screen readers in Taiwan, two key bindings
for scrolling the braille display have been provided:
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
numpadMinus
Scroll braille display forward
numpadPlus
14.17. Eurobraille Esys/Esytime/Iris displays
The Esys, Esytime and Iris displays from Eurobraille are supported by
NVDA. Esys and Esytime-Evo devices are supported when connected via
USB or bluetooth. Older Esytime devices only support USB. Iris
displays can only be connected via a serial port. Therefore, for these
displays, you should select the port to which the display is connected
after you have chosen this driver in the Braille Settings dialog.
Iris and Esys displays have a braille keyboard with 10 keys. Of the
two keys placed like a space bar, the left key is corresponding to the
backspace key and the right key to the space key.
Following are the key assignments for these displays with NVDA. Please
see the display's documentation for descriptions of where these keys
can be found.
Name
Key
Scroll braille display back
switch1-6left, l1
Scroll braille display forward
switch1-6Right, l8
Move to current focus
switch1-6Left+switch1-6Right, l1+l8
Route to braille cell
routing
Report text formatting under braille cell
doubleRouting
Move to previous line in review
joystick1Up
Move to next line in review
joystick1Down
Move to previous character in review
joystick1Left
Move to next character in review
joystick1Right
Switch to previous review mode
joystick1Left+joystick1Up
Switch to next review mode
joystick1Right+joystick1Down
Erase the last entered braille cell or character
backSpace
Translate any braille input and press the enter key
backSpace+space
insert key
dot3+dot5+space, l7
delete key
dot3+dot6+space
home key
dot1+dot2+dot3+space, joystick2Left+joystick2Up
end key
dot4+dot5+dot6+space, joystick2Right+joystick2Down
leftArrow key
dot2+space, joystick2Left, leftArrow
rightArrow key
dot5+space, joystick2Right, rightArrow
upArrow key
dot1+space, joystick2Up, upArrow
downArrow key
dot6+space, joystick2Down, downArrow
enter key
joystick2Center
pageUp key
dot1+dot3+space
pageDown key
dot4+dot6+space
numpad1 key
dot1+dot6+backspace
numpad2 key
dot1+dot2+dot6+backspace
numpad3 key
dot1+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpad4 key
dot1+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad5 key
dot1+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad6 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpad7 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad8 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpad9 key
dot2+dot4+dot6+backspace
numpadInsert key
dot3+dot4+dot5+dot6+backspace
numpadDecimal key
dot2+backspace
numpadDivide key
dot3+dot4+backspace
numpadMultiply key
dot3+dot5+backspace
numpadMinus key
dot3+dot6+backspace
numpadPlus key
dot2+dot3+dot5+backspace
numpadEnter key
dot3+dot4+dot5+backspace
escape key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+space, l2
tab key
dot2+dot5+dot6+space, l3
shift+tab key
dot2+dot3+dot5+space
printScreen key
dot1+dot3+dot4+dot6+space
pause key
dot1+dot4+space
applications key
dot5+dot6+backspace
f1 key
dot1+backspace
f2 key
dot1+dot2+backspace
f3 key
dot1+dot4+backspace
f4 key
dot1+dot4+dot5+backspace
f5 key
dot1+dot5+backspace
f6 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+backspace
f7 key
dot1+dot2+dot4+dot5+backspace
f8 key
dot1+dot2+dot5+backspace
f9 key
dot2+dot4+backspace
f10 key
dot2+dot4+dot5+backspace
f11 key
dot1+dot3+backspace
f12 key
dot1+dot2+dot3+backspace
windows key
dot1+dot2+dot3+dot4+backspace
capsLock key
dot7+backspace, dot8+backspace
numLock key
dot3+backspace, dot6+backspace
shift key
dot7+space, l4
Toggle shift key
dot1+dot7+space, dot4+dot7+space
control key
dot7+dot8+space, l5
Toggle control key
dot1+dot7+dot8+space, dot4+dot7+dot8+space
alt key
dot8+space, l6
Toggle alt key
dot1+dot8+space, dot4+dot8+space
ToggleHID keyboard input simulation
esytime):l1+joystick1Down, esytime):l8+joystick1Down
14.18. BRLTTY
BRLTTY is a separate program which can be used to support many more
braille displays. In order to use this, you need to install BRLTTY for
Windows. You should download and install the latest installer package,
which will be named, for example, brltty-win-4.2-2.exe. When
configuring the display and port to use, be sure to pay close
attention to the instructions, especially if you are using a USB
display and already have the manufacturer's drivers installed.
For displays which have a braille keyboard, BRLTTY currently handles
braille input itself. Therefore, NVDA's braille input table setting is
not relevant.
BRLTYY is not involved in NVDA's automatic background braille display
detection functionality.
Following are the BRLTTY command assignments for NVDA. Please see the
BRLTTY key binding lists for information about how BRLTTY commands are
mapped to controls on braille displays.
Name
BRLTTY command
Scroll braille display back
fwinlt (go left one window)
Scroll braille display forward
fwinrt (go right one window)
Move braille display to previous line
lnup (go up one line)
Move braille display to next line
lndn (go down one line)
Route to braille cell
route (bring cursor to character)
15. Advanced Topics
15.1. Command Line Options
NVDA can accept one or more additional options when it starts which
alter its behavior. You can pass as many options as you need. These
options can be passed when starting from a shortcut (in the shortcut
properties), from the Run dialog (Start Menu -> Run or Windows+r) or
from a Windows command console. Options should be separated from the
name of NVDA's executable file and from other options by spaces. For
example, the Desktop shortcut that NVDA creates during installation
has the -r option, which tells NVDA to close the currently running
copy before starting the new one. Another useful option is
--disable-addons, which tells NVDA to suspend all running add-ons.
This allows you to determine whether a problem is caused by an add-on
and to recover from serious problems caused by add-ons.
As an example, you can exit the currently running copy of NVDA by
entering the following in the Run dialog:
nvda -q
Some of the command line options have a short and a long version,
while some of them have only a long version. For those which have a
short version, you can combine them like this:
nvda -rm
This will exit the currently running copy of NVDA and will start a new
copy with startup sounds disabled, etc.
nvda -rm --disable-addons
Same as above, but with add-ons disabled
Some of the command line options accept additional parameters; e.g.
how detailed the logging should be or the path to the user
configuration directory. Those parameters should be placed after the
option, separated from the option by a space when using the short
version or an equals sign (=) when using the long version; e.g.:
nvda -l 10
Tells NVDA to start with log level set to debug
nvda --log-file=c:\nvda.log
Tells NVDA to write its log to c:\nvda.log
nvda --log-level=20 -f c:\nvda.log
Tells NVDA to start with log level set to info and to write its log to
c:\nvda.log
Following are the command line options for NVDA:
Short
Long
Description
-h
--help
show command line help and exit
-q
--quit
Quit already running copy of NVDA
-r
--replace
Quit already running copy of NVDA and start this one
-k
--check-running
Report whether NVDA is running via the exit code; 0 if running, 1 if not running
-f LOGFILENAME
--log-file=LOGFILENAME
The file where log messages should be written to
-l LOGLEVEL
--log-level=LOGLEVEL
The lowest level of message logged (debug 10, input/output 12, debug
warning 15, info 20, warning 30, error 40, critical 50, disabled 100),
default is warning
-c CONFIGPATH
--config-path=CONFIGPATH
The path where all settings for NVDA are stored
-m
--minimal
No sounds, no interface, no start message, etc.
-s
--secure
Secure mode (disables Python console and logging features, used often
in secure screens)
None
--disable-addons
Addons will have no effect
None
--debug-logging
Enable debug level logging just for this run. This setting will
override any other log level ( --loglevel, -l) argument given,
including no logging option.
None
--no-logging
Disable logging altogether while using NVDA. This setting can be
overwritten if a log level ( --loglevel, -l) is specified from command
line or if debug logging is turned on.
None
--no-sr-flag
Don't change the global system screen reader flag
None
--install
Installs NVDA (starting the newly installed copy)
None
--install-silent
Silently installs NVDA (does not start the newly installed copy)
None
--enable-start-on-logon=True|False
When installing, enable NVDA's start on the logon screen
None
--create-portable
Creates a portable copy of NVDA (starting the newly created copy).
Requires --portable-path to be specified
None
--create-portable-silent
Creates a portable copy of NVDA (does not start the newly installed
copy). Requires --portable-path to be specified
None
--portable-path=PORTABLEPATH
The path where a portable copy will be created
15.2. System Wide Parameters
NVDA allows some values to be set in the system registry which alter
the system wide behavior of NVDA. These values are stored in the
registry under one of the following keys:
• 32-bit system: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\nvda"
• 64-bit system: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\nvda"
The following values can be set under this registry key:
Name
Type
Possible values
Description
configInLocalAppData
DWORD
0 (default) to disable, 1 to enable
If enabled, stores the NVDA user configuration in the local
application data instead of the roaming application data
serviceDebug
DWORD
0 (default) to disable, 1 to enable
If enabled, disables secure mode on windows secure desktops, allowing
the use of the Python console and Log viewer. Due to several major
security implications, the use of this option is strongly discouraged
16. Further Information
If you require further information or assistance regarding NVDA,
please visit the NVDA web site at http://www.nvaccess.org/. Here, you
can find additional documentation, as well as technical support and
community resources. This site also provides information and resources
concerning NVDA development. . good luck
help.questions? www.nvaccess.org there you can email the makers of
NVDA with with your question. injoy the worlds screenreader NVDA!

On 12/17/19, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:
Hi Troy,

You can find both the Commands quick reference (straight list of commands
and keys) and the User Guide (has more detail) from NVDA's help menu.
Press NVDA+n to open the NVDA menu, then H for help. The NVDA key will be
either INSERT or CAPS LOCK, depending on how you set it up.

As you are coming from Jaws, another document you might be interested in,
is the guide to Switching from Jaws to NVDA, which you can find here:
https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/SwitchingFromJawsToNVDA

As for your specific question, in Desktop keyboard layout, NVDA uses
NVDA+up arrow to read the current line, but that is the up arrow key
itself, not the 8 on the number pad. Note that you can set the NVDA
modifier key and whether NVDA uses desktop or laptop keyboard layout
independently of each other). In laptop keyboard layout, the keystroke to
read the current line is NVDA+L. Similarly the keystroke to read from the
current point onwards is NVDA+down arrow in desktop keyboard layout and
NVDA+A in laptop keyboard layout.

If you are interested in learning NVDA from scratch, we do have "Basic
Training for NVDA" available. You might find that you do already know a
lot of it, so work through the switching from Jaws to NVDA guide first and
see how you feel after that. If you are interested in Basic Training for
NVDA, it is available from our shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 2:06 PM Troy Burnham <troyburnham34@...>
wrote:

Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now
switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands
are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with
NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with
jaws.

Thanks.

Troy




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Web: www.nvaccess.org
Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/
User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess <https://twitter.com/NVAccess>




Re: key commands for NVDA?

Gene
 

As a practical matter, though technically his isn't what is happening, in the desktop layout, pressing 8 on the numpad will read the current line if you are in object navigation mode most of the time.  I much prefer this method of reading the current line than a command that requires two keys that aren't necessarily convenient to use in one command, that is, NVDA key up arrow.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 9:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] key commands for NVDA?

Hi Troy,

You can find both the Commands quick reference (straight list of commands and keys) and the User Guide (has more detail) from NVDA's help menu.  Press NVDA+n to open the NVDA menu, then H for help.  The NVDA key will be either INSERT or CAPS LOCK, depending on how you set it up.

As you are coming from Jaws, another document you might be interested in, is the guide to Switching from Jaws to NVDA, which you can find here: https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/SwitchingFromJawsToNVDA

As for your specific question, in Desktop keyboard layout, NVDA uses NVDA+up arrow to read the current line, but that is the up arrow key itself, not the 8 on the number pad.  Note that you can set the NVDA modifier key and whether NVDA uses desktop or laptop keyboard layout independently of each other).  In laptop keyboard layout, the keystroke to read the current line is NVDA+L.  Similarly the keystroke to read from the current point onwards is NVDA+down arrow in desktop keyboard layout and NVDA+A in laptop keyboard layout.

If you are interested in learning NVDA from scratch, we do have "Basic Training for NVDA" available.  You might find that you do already know a lot of it, so work through the switching from Jaws to NVDA guide first and see how you feel after that.  If you are interested in Basic Training for NVDA, it is available from our shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 2:06 PM Troy Burnham <troyburnham34@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now
switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands
are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with
NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with jaws.

Thanks.

Troy






--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: key commands for NVDA?

Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Troy,

You can find both the Commands quick reference (straight list of commands and keys) and the User Guide (has more detail) from NVDA's help menu.  Press NVDA+n to open the NVDA menu, then H for help.  The NVDA key will be either INSERT or CAPS LOCK, depending on how you set it up.

As you are coming from Jaws, another document you might be interested in, is the guide to Switching from Jaws to NVDA, which you can find here: https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/SwitchingFromJawsToNVDA

As for your specific question, in Desktop keyboard layout, NVDA uses NVDA+up arrow to read the current line, but that is the up arrow key itself, not the 8 on the number pad.  Note that you can set the NVDA modifier key and whether NVDA uses desktop or laptop keyboard layout independently of each other).  In laptop keyboard layout, the keystroke to read the current line is NVDA+L.  Similarly the keystroke to read from the current point onwards is NVDA+down arrow in desktop keyboard layout and NVDA+A in laptop keyboard layout.

If you are interested in learning NVDA from scratch, we do have "Basic Training for NVDA" available.  You might find that you do already know a lot of it, so work through the switching from Jaws to NVDA guide first and see how you feel after that.  If you are interested in Basic Training for NVDA, it is available from our shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 2:06 PM Troy Burnham <troyburnham34@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now
switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands
are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with
NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with jaws.

Thanks.

Troy






--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Re: key commands for NVDA?

Chikodinaka mr. Oguledo
 

hello go to nvaccess.org if you have NVDA on your pc. hit contral n go too
user guide or in the next email I will help you out

On 12/17/19, Troy Burnham <troyburnham34@...> wrote:
Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now
switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands
are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with
NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with
jaws.

Thanks.

Troy





Re: key commands for NVDA?

Sascha Cowley
 

There is a "commands quick reference" document that comes with NVDA. You can access it by opening the NVDA menu, then "Help" then "Commands Quick Reference" (NVDA+n, H, Q).

On 18/12/2019 14:06, Troy Burnham wrote:
Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with jaws.

Thanks.

Troy



key commands for NVDA?

Troy Burnham
 

Hi all,

Where might I find a list of key commands used with NVDA? I'm just now switching to NVDA from jaws, and I understand that a lot of the commands are the same but for example when I hit insert-8 on the number pad with NVDA loaded it doesn't seem to read the current line like it does with jaws.

Thanks.

Troy


Re: Interesting issue with Desktop version of Facebook and Microsoft Edge Dev

Jimmy Vonderlinden
 

havent found one myself. Same thing happens when encountering quoted tweets when using edge. Must be an edge thing, as I don't experience it with firefox. I'm still messing around and will update if I do find one


Re: How to copy previous spoken message by NVDA without speech history addon

Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

You can enable the speech viewer. Then, perform the task which causes the utterance you want to copy. Go back to the speech viewer and copy the resulting output.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 3:21 PM Mr. Wong Chi Wai, William <cwwong.pro@...> wrote:
Hello,

I would like to know, if without the addon speech history.

How can one copy the previous spoken message by NVDA?

Especially there are items not able to be copied via current review cursor.

Thanks,

William







--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
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by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
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attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
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You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


How to copy previous spoken message by NVDA without speech history addon

Mr. Wong Chi Wai, William <cwwong.pro@...>
 

Hello,

I would like to know, if without the addon speech history.

How can one copy the previous spoken message by NVDA?

Especially there are items not able to be copied via current review cursor.

Thanks,

William


issues with zoom and menus and text chat

Stephen
 

Hi there.
When typing in text chat, and I try using the arrows to review what I've just typed before pressing enter, the text isn't spoken.
Similarly, if I click edit personal note, none of what I type is able to be reviewed with the arrow keys.
Is anyone else having the issue using the latest version of NVDA and Zoom?
Cheers.


Re: Strange possible bug with the latest veta of Nvda.

Kevin Cussick
 

Olga already has done this. but just as recently as last week or maybe the week before I was able to change voices. no this is down to Nvda.

On 17/12/2019 04:14, Quentin Christensen wrote:
It is likely because in our alpha (and now beta) versions, we have updated NVDA to use Python 3 rather than Python 2.  For the most part, you don't need to understand too much about programming, except in general, that is a needed step, I noted a couple of the reasons in our In-Process blog a few weeks ago: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/in-process-29th-november/
Basically, it means that all add-ons also need to be updated to Python 3.  Joseph has done a fantastic amount of work with many add-ons and add-on developers to help them, and he has also collated the status of all of the main official add-ons here: https://addons.nvda-project.org/addons/nvdapy3.en.html
So, what I'd recommend, is contacting the developer of the RH Voice to advise them and request they update their NVDA add-on to Python 3.
regards
Quentin.
On Sat, Dec 14, 2019 at 9:21 AM Kevin Cussick via Groups.Io <the.big.white.shepherd=googlemail.com@groups.io <mailto:googlemail.com@groups.io>> wrote:
Hi all,   I us RH voice,   I have all the voices for English installed,
  I only use Scottish Alan,   but for some reason I tried to change
one
of the voices still using RH voice,   but it will not let me change
from
Alan to one of the other voices.   I can say it used to work so not
sure
why it is not changing now.   it does the same with the beta and alpha,
  any chance of some of the devs trying this or if someone is using
the
same sinth as me maybe they can try this it used to work so not sure
when it changed.
--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager
Web: www.nvaccess.org <http://www.nvaccess.org/>
Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/
User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess <https://twitter.com/NVAccess>