NVDA AND APPLE


Christo Vorster
 

Hi list

 

While talking to someone regarding the use of NVDA, the question cam up whether NVDA would function with Apple Macintosh. I have my doubts, but no reason for it, probably just very little outside the Apple family works with Macintosh.

 

Please inform me?

 

Regards

 

Christo Vorster (also from South Africa)


 

Christo,

          That depends on how, exactly, you define "would function with an Apple Macintosh."  I do not know of a version of NVDA that is designed to run under OS X proper (much like JAWS, ZoomText [if you want the Reader-Magnifier version], and Window Eyes).  However, if one installs a virtual Windows environment on a Mac you can run Windows-based software on the machine and be able to "flip-flop" easily between the virtual Windows environment and native OS X environment via Mission Control.

          Wine is one of the most commonly used virtual Windows environments, there are many others, and there's even WineBottler which allows you to tuck Windows applications into the OS X environment.

Brian


erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

Hello,

NVDA requires an instalation of windows.  There are several ways to install windows on a mac.  The two most common are to use the bootcamp system which apple supplies free for this very purpose, or to purchase and install VMware fusion.  I want to run linux on my mac as well as windows and I enjoy the high level of integration offered by fusion.  Thus, the expense has been worth it for me.

In order to make the most of NVDA on a mac, you will want to disable the expos`e keys and the launchpad keys.  You will also wish to install karabiner keyboard manager on your mac so that you can add the number pad functionality to the mac keyboard for use with NVDA as well  as pass through the caps lock key to windows so that NVDA can use it as a modifier.

I have abandoned all commercial windows screen reading products in favour of NVDA for the limitted times when I need to use windows.  It works very well.

Best,

Erik Burggraaf


On Apr 20, 2016, at 9:41 AM, Christo Vorster <christo.vorster@...> wrote:

Hi list
 
While talking to someone regarding the use of NVDA, the question cam up whether NVDA would function with Apple Macintosh. I have my doubts, but no reason for it, probably just very little outside the Apple family works with Macintosh.
 
Please inform me?
 
Regards
 
Christo Vorster (also from South Africa)


 

If you got a Mac, there's no need for NVDA. Apple's VoiceOver should work just fine; it worked amazingly on an iPhone, so on a Mac it should work good too. Plus by default VoiceOver supports over 20 languages for its synth.


christopher hallsworth <challsworth2@...>
 

Yeah it’s amazing. Of course there are problems, but all software has problems right? I’m a full time Mac user and can get on with it very happily despite the problems.

On 20 Apr 2016, at 16:57, Supanut Leepaisomboon <supanut2000@outlook.com> wrote:

If you got a Mac, there's no need for NVDA. Apple's VoiceOver should work just fine; it worked amazingly on an iPhone, so on a Mac it should work good too. Plus by default VoiceOver supports over 20 languages for its synth.


Christo Vorster
 

Hi Brian

 

Thanks. That helps a lot

 

Regards

 

Christo

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 20 April 2016 4:27 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA AND APPLE

 

Christo,

          That depends on how, exactly, you define "would function with an Apple Macintosh."  I do not know of a version of NVDA that is designed to run under OS X proper (much like JAWS, ZoomText [if you want the Reader-Magnifier version], and Window Eyes).  However, if one installs a virtual Windows environment on a Mac you can run Windows-based software on the machine and be able to "flip-flop" easily between the virtual Windows environment and native OS X environment via Mission Control.

          Wine is one of the most commonly used virtual Windows environments, there are many others, and there's even WineBottler which allows you to tuck Windows applications into the OS X environment.

Brian