Firefox ESR


Andrea Sherry
 

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad


Antony Stone
 

"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
I don't know, maybe if we all waited then cosmic rays would write all our
software for us. Of course it might take a while.

- Ron Minnich, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

Not all software.  All software that you use in an environment where it comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.  There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

> What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
>
> Andrea

--
I don't know, maybe if we all waited then cosmic rays would write all our
software for us. Of course it might take a while.

 - Ron Minnich, Los Alamos National Laboratory

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Andrea Sherry
 

Thanks for that.

Andrea

On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad


Antony Stone
 

What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

Not all software. All software that you use in an environment where it
comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
else's fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error. Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then.  Extended Support releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently.  The extended support release receives all security updates but the program itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release. 
 
The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall. 
 
Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released before these changes took place.  Those who want to try the new versions, in particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are released.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
> "ESR" means Extended Support Release.
>
> Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
> promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.
>
> There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:
>
> a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
> latest one
>
> or
>
> b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
> update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
> which you are happy with.
>
> Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities are
> discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
> fault.
>
> So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
> (which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
> before that version becomes unsupported.
>
> The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects have
> ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
>
>> What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
>>
>> Andrea

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad



John Isige
 

Quite a lot really. For example, most machines that do heavy audio or video work are generally recommended to be dedicated machines that don't connect to a network. You could set up a gaming machine like that, put whatever games on it and then run them. Basically you either upgrade everything by downloading stuff and putting it on a drive that you connect to the machine, or only allow the machine to be connected to the internet at specific times, e.g. to download updates.


I could do quite a lot on my current machine with no internet, read, listen to music, learn an instrument, program, you get the idea. I'll grant you, chunks of the stuff that allow me to do that stuff without internet came from the internet to begin with. But it's not like you need to be connected 24/7 in order to do meaningful things with a machine.

On 2/21/2018 18:51, Antony Stone wrote:
What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

Not all software. All software that you use in an environment where it
comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
else's fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea


Gene
 

Openbook is one example.  Winamp, if you don't use it for files that might be malicious from untrustworthy sources such as certain untrustworthy web sites.  I use Winamp to play safe files, mainly things I've recorded myself or digitized myself or that come from known trusted sources.  MP3 Direct cut, a recording program is another example.
 
Depending on how you use your word processor program, that may not need to be upgraded.  If it no longer receives security upgrades, my understanding is that if you disable things that might allow malicious code to run, such as if your program runs macros automatically, that you can use it safely.  Of course, if you need to use newer file types, you won't be able to do that.  You might be able to read them, but not alter them and save them in the same file type. 
 
I would think that if I thought about programs, I could think of many more but I can't just now.  Others may want to give examples but what I've said gives various examples of some programs that you can use even if they may not receive security updates.
 
I've seen complaints about the latest version of Winamp in terms of stability.  It would normally be a good idea to use the newest version if you are playing files you aren't very confident in.  But there are times when an older version of a program is superior.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

> Not all software.  All software that you use in an environment where it
> comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
> There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR
>
>
> "ESR" means Extended Support Release.
>
> Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
> promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.
>
> There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
> unless:
>
> a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
> latest one
>
> or
>
> b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
> to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
> between which you are happy with.
>
> Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities
> are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
> else's fault.
>
> So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
> (which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
> before that version becomes unsupported.
>
> The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects
> have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
> Release.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
> > What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
> >
> > Andrea

--
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error.  Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

That all makes perfect sense to me.

 

I’m using Office 2010 on this Windows 10 machine. Quite old, but it is what I have and it still works well. I no longer use IE and I keep Firefox up to date. My girlfriend uses Chrome. Internet browsers of course should be updated.

 

I do have the last version of winamp. 5.666 or something like that. I was having some trouble with the older version initially installed on this machine, and the last build of Winamp is recommended to Windows 10 users, for two or three reasons that I read about at the time but can’t currently remember. It works pretty well here for music and is pretty stable, only I can’t create the silly incredibly large playlists I used to on XP without Windows freaking out. I think that’s more of a Win 10 than a Winamp issue though. It thinks winamp has crashed because it won’t “respond” while adding a myriad folders to a playlist. One just has to adapt. J

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 8:18 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

 

Openbook is one example.  Winamp, if you don't use it for files that might be malicious from untrustworthy sources such as certain untrustworthy web sites.  I use Winamp to play safe files, mainly things I've recorded myself or digitized myself or that come from known trusted sources.  MP3 Direct cut, a recording program is another example.

 

Depending on how you use your word processor program, that may not need to be upgraded.  If it no longer receives security upgrades, my understanding is that if you disable things that might allow malicious code to run, such as if your program runs macros automatically, that you can use it safely.  Of course, if you need to use newer file types, you won't be able to do that.  You might be able to read them, but not alter them and save them in the same file type. 

 

I would think that if I thought about programs, I could think of many more but I can't just now.  Others may want to give examples but what I've said gives various examples of some programs that you can use even if they may not receive security updates.

 

I've seen complaints about the latest version of Winamp in terms of stability.  It would normally be a good idea to use the newest version if you are playing files you aren't very confident in.  But there are times when an older version of a program is superior.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:51 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

 

What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

> Not all software.  All software that you use in an environment where it
> comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
> There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR
>
>
> "ESR" means Extended Support Release.
>
> Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
> promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.
>
> There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
> unless:
>
> a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
> latest one
>
> or
>
> b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
> to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
> between which you are happy with.
>
> Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities
> are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
> else's fault.
>
> So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
> (which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
> before that version becomes unsupported.
>
> The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects
> have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
> Release.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
> > What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
> >
> > Andrea

--
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error.  Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

This brings me to the question – what sort of issues are users of Firefox 58 and NVDA experiencing? I know that other major screen-reader does not work with any of the new FF versions, but nVDA does – seemingly quite well in fact.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

 

This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then.  Extended Support releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently.  The extended support release receives all security updates but the program itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release. 

 

The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall. 

 

Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released before these changes took place.  Those who want to try the new versions, in particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are released.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR

 

Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
> "ESR" means Extended Support Release.
>
> Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
> promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.
>
> There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:
>
> a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
> latest one
>
> or
>
> b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
> update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
> which you are happy with.
>
> Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities are
> discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
> fault.
>
> So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
> (which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
> before that version becomes unsupported.
>
> The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects have
> ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
>
>> What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?
>>
>> Andrea

--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad


 

esr is extended support release.
for example: firefox 52esr recieves security updates of firefox 52 until 61.
but regular versions be updated in at least 6weeks and maybe some
people dont want to miss previous features or dont like new features
and changes of updates.

On 2/22/18, JM Casey <crystallogic@ca.inter.net> wrote:
This brings me to the question – what sort of issues are users of Firefox 58
and NVDA experiencing? I know that other major screen-reader does not work
with any of the new FF versions, but nVDA does – seemingly quite well in
fact.







From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then. Extended Support
releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and
other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently.
The extended support release receives all security updates but the program
itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release.



The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall.



Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair
performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web
sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use
the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released
before these changes took place. Those who want to try the new versions, in
particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding
problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are
released.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Andrea Sherry <mailto:sherryan@wideband.net.au>

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means
they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR
version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad





--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes but its the esr which the last update has slowed down for staarting for some reason.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "zahra" <nasrinkhaksar3@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 4:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


esr is extended support release.
for example: firefox 52esr recieves security updates of firefox 52 until 61.
but regular versions be updated in at least 6weeks and maybe some
people dont want to miss previous features or dont like new features
and changes of updates.

On 2/22/18, JM Casey <crystallogic@ca.inter.net> wrote:
This brings me to the question – what sort of issues are users of Firefox 58
and NVDA experiencing? I know that other major screen-reader does not work
with any of the new FF versions, but nVDA does – seemingly quite well in
fact.







From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then. Extended Support
releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and
other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently.
The extended support release receives all security updates but the program
itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release.



The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall.



Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair
performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web
sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use
the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released
before these changes took place. Those who want to try the new versions, in
particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding
problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are
released.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Andrea Sherry <mailto:sherryan@wideband.net.au>

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means
they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR
version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad






--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

My only moans ar the download dialogue is not read and you cannot have navigational sounds any more.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "JM Casey" <crystallogic@ca.inter.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 3:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


This brings me to the question – what sort of issues are users of Firefox 58 and NVDA experiencing? I know that other major screen-reader does not work with any of the new FF versions, but nVDA does – seemingly quite well in fact.







From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then. Extended Support releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently. The extended support release receives all security updates but the program itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release.



The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall.



Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released before these changes took place. Those who want to try the new versions, in particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are released.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Andrea Sherry <mailto:sherryan@wideband.net.au>

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad


 

i have sometimes slowness in 52.6 which i tested and think its because
of spectre bug fix.
i read that fixing spectre makes slowness in some programs, but did
not read anything about effect of fixing spectre in firefox until now.

On 2/22/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
My only moans ar the download dialogue is not read and you cannot have
navigational sounds any more.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "JM Casey" <crystallogic@ca.inter.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 3:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


This brings me to the question – what sort of issues are users of Firefox 58

and NVDA experiencing? I know that other major screen-reader does not work
with any of the new FF versions, but nVDA does – seemingly quite well in
fact.







From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 21, 2018 7:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



This isn't just something Mozilla does every now and then. Extended Support

releases may be used by anyone but they are intended for businesses and
other institutions that don't want the program to be upgraded frequently.
The extended support release receives all security updates but the program
itself doesn't upgrade for one year after release.



The next ESR release will be this summer sometime in June, as I recall.



Because of all the changes being made in firefox now that may impair
performance for blind users and interfere with accessibility of some web
sites, those who don't want to use the new versions are instructed to use
the current ESR version which is version 52 of the program and was released

before these changes took place. Those who want to try the new versions, in

particular those who want to try new versions and send feedback regarding
problems and progress are encouraged to try the new versions as they are
released.



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Andrea Sherry <mailto:sherryan@wideband.net.au>

Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:40 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR



Thanks for that.

Andrea


On 22/02/2018 10:11 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means
they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want

to
update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between
which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are
discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody else's
fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR
version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have
ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:

What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start
from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad










--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I think the only reason I'd update firefox now is if the new version handled pages in the future better, or had a feature I needed to have.
I'm not saying never, but I do feel that we need to be a little less gung ho at accepting every update offered to us, since we are a minority user group, often rough edges for many can spell unusability for us, and for those using the system for earning a living this is bad news.
Take the recent Skype thread as a for instance. all the sysadmins went ahead and many blind users were at a a stroke unable to do their work.
That kind of inaccessibility as with firefox 57 is, in my view unacceptable at any level by any company.
It simply should have been part of routine testing.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

Not all software. All software that you use in an environment where it
comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software. If security vulnerabilities
are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
else's fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox. Not all projects
have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error. Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


 

Well skype7 works for me right now.

And when it dies, I just won't use skype anymore I suppose.

With firefox, I will never download it ever again.

Waterfox will handle itself till june as it is and after that aparently it will continue as its own opensource mozilla port aparently.

Even if it doesn't one hopes that it stays securely updated or at least is not deleted since I will be using it from now on.

June this year is when all old firefox extentions will die  with the new firefox but who knows.

To be honest, I hardly use skype.

I use it for the nvda group, and if push comes to shove, I can get out of nvda group.

Calling is its own problem.

I guess my next thing will to get an iphone or something and run things off whats app maybe skype but well.

On 22/02/2018 11:04 p.m., Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
I think the only reason I'd update firefox now is if the new version handled pages  in the future better, or had a feature I needed to have.
I'm not saying never, but I do feel that we need to be a little less gung ho at accepting every update offered to us, since we are a minority user group, often rough edges for many can spell unusability for us, and for those using the system for earning a living this is bad news.
Take the recent Skype thread as a for instance. all the sysadmins went ahead and many blind users were at a  a stroke unable to do their work.
That kind of  inaccessibility as with firefox 57 is, in my view unacceptable at any level by any company.
It simply should have been part of routine testing.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


What software does not run in such an environment?

I can only think of machines without a network connection, and that's hardly
useful these days (secure, agreed, but what can they do?).


Antony.

On Thursday 22 February 2018 at 00:39:12, Gene wrote:

Not all software.  All software that you use in an environment where it
comes into contact with possibly malicious content such as browsers.
There is lots of software that you don't need to upgrade.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:11 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Firefox ESR


"ESR" means Extended Support Release.

Every now and then, a Firefox release is labeled as ESR, and it means they
promise to support it for longer than the other in-between releases.

There is no reason to switch from a standard release to an ESR release
unless:

a) you like always running the latest release, and the ESR release is the
latest one

or

b) you are currently running a no-longer-supported release, you don't want
to update to the latest release, but there's an ESR release somewhere in
between which you are happy with.

Basically, do not run unsupported software.  If security vulnerabilities
are discovered, you may well run into problems and they will be nobody
else's fault.

So, either run a recent (supported) standard version, or run an ESR version
(which may be older, but has support for longer), but either way, update
before that version becomes unsupported.

The above is true for all software, not just Firefox.  Not all projects
have ESR versions, but many do - some are known as LTR - Long Term
Release.


Antony.

On Wednesday 21 February 2018 at 23:58:42, Andrea Sherry wrote:
What is this? Is it necessary to use instead of regular Firefox?

Andrea
--
+++ Divide By Cucumber Error.  Please Reinstall Universe And Reboot +++

                                                  Please reply to the list;
                                                        please *don't* CC me.