setting up the people app on windows 10


Bobby <bvinton@...>
 

I am thinking of switching from thunder bird to the mail app on windows 10 how ever I was was wondering how to import all my contacts from thunder bird to the mail app on windows 10. Pleese help


 

Bobby,

         There are a couple of variables to involved in answering your question.

         Windows 10 has an app separate from, but closely allied with, the mail app called "People."  It acts as the address book.

         I use Gmail and access it via IMAP on several different e-mail clients, including the Win10 mail app.  The Win10 mail app has automatically synchronized my existing contacts in my gmail account that I use as my Microsoft account ID to my People app as well as those from the specific gmail account that I'm actually accessing via the mail app.

         If you have always created your contacts in your local address book under Thunderbird, which is quite likely, you can always export those contacts then import them via the web interface for the e-mail account you've been using.  From there the People app will synchronize them automatically for any account that is in the mail & people apps.  I have yet to find good documentation on doing an import from, for instance, a comma separated list or excel spreadsheet of e-mail addresses straight into the People app.  It seems to presume you'll be using a modern e-mail client that synchronizes both messages and contacts with the server.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



David Moore
 

Hi Brian,
This is how it worked for me. It took me a few hours to figure this out LOL! When I imported my Gmail accounts into the mail app, those contacts automatically imported into the people app. Really, the mail, people, and the calendar apps all work together. Take care, guys!
 

Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 3:01 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] setting up the people app on windows 10
 

Bobby,

         There are a couple of variables to involved in answering your question.

         Windows 10 has an app separate from, but closely allied with, the mail app called "People."  It acts as the address book.

         I use Gmail and access it via IMAP on several different e-mail clients, including the Win10 mail app.  The Win10 mail app has automatically synchronized my existing contacts in my gmail account that I use as my Microsoft account ID to my People app as well as those from the specific gmail account that I'm actually accessing via the mail app.

         If you have always created your contacts in your local address book under Thunderbird, which is quite likely, you can always export those contacts then import them via the web interface for the e-mail account you've been using.  From there the People app will synchronize them automatically for any account that is in the mail & people apps.  I have yet to find good documentation on doing an import from, for instance, a comma separated list or excel spreadsheet of e-mail addresses straight into the People app.  It seems to presume you'll be using a modern e-mail client that synchronizes both messages and contacts with the server.

Brian
--

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts.
  ~ Henry Rosovsky

   

 


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

So it sounds a bit like a cut down versionof Outlook then, rather than Outlook Express which I'm using now. Tell me, is all of this in the win 10 you get if you let a windows machine updat to 10 then add classic shell as it seems mine has been.
I have to say that I find Windows 10 aannoying since it stops you doing normal stuff like copying files from one folder to another, then when you go and look you find that there are messsages which nvda did not alert one to asking if you want to do this and can it go into some other mode in order to do it. If you say yes, it then seems to go off and mess about for ages then falls over with a message you do not have permission to (insert task as needed)
When a 10 machine has just one person on it and when you are admin, in my view it should let you in to everything wherever it is no matter what. Stupid.
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
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----- Original Message -----
From: "David Moore" <jesusloves1966@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 09, 2016 2:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] setting up the people app on windows 10


Hi Brian,
This is how it worked for me. It took me a few hours to figure this out LOL! When I imported my Gmail accounts into the mail app, those contacts automatically imported into the people app. Really, the mail, people, and the calendar apps all work together. Take care, guys!

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, May 8, 2016 3:01 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] setting up the people app on windows 10

Bobby,

There are a couple of variables to involved in answering your question.

Windows 10 has an app separate from, but closely allied with, the mail app called "People." It acts as the address book.

I use Gmail and access it via IMAP on several different e-mail clients, including the Win10 mail app. The Win10 mail app has automatically synchronized my existing contacts in my gmail account that I use as my Microsoft account ID to my People app as well as those from the specific gmail account that I'm actually accessing via the mail app.

If you have always created your contacts in your local address book under Thunderbird, which is quite likely, you can always export those contacts then import them via the web interface for the e-mail account you've been using. From there the People app will synchronize them automatically for any account that is in the mail & people apps. I have yet to find good documentation on doing an import from, for instance, a comma separated list or excel spreadsheet of e-mail addresses straight into the People app. It seems to presume you'll be using a modern e-mail client that synchronizes both messages and contacts with the server.

Brian
--


Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts.
~ Henry Rosovsky


 

Brian Gaff wrote:  "when you are admin, in my view it should let you in to everything wherever it is no matter what. Stupid."

 Not that I don't agree with you but this hasn't been the default behavior since the introduction of User Account Control (UAC).  I've routinely turned it down a notch or two or off so that a number of the "Do you really want to do this?" type nags don't appear.

There's nothing distinctive about this in Windows 10, absolutely nothing.  File Explorer (formerly Winows Explorer) and its attendant functions and warnings look and act exactly like they have since Windows 7.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



 

One big caution on the "automatic import" of contacts for the People app is this only works if your e-mail client was set up (or capable of) using the contacts associated with your e-mail account and syncing them.

There are a number of e-mail clients that don't work that way, and when I was last setting up Thunderbird it didn't work that way.  Just a few days ago I had to tweak a client's Thunderbird setup because the e-mail account she had been using through an ISP no longer exists, and she was terrified that all her contacts were going to go when that account went.  They didn't, though, because her contacts (or, perhaps, addresses - I can't remember which terminology Tbird uses) are stored local to Tbird and are not synced with her e-mail accounts.  Since I'm the one who installed Tbird for her several years ago and I know I didn't change any defaults related to how contacts/addresses are handled, it appears that they are managed locally.

When that's the case, you need to make certain to export from your e-mail client and import via the web interface to the contacts for the given e-mail account you're going to be adding to the mail app, and, by extension, the People and Calendar apps.  Whether you do this prior to adding it or after will be irrelevant because as soon as those contacts are imported into the contacts list maintained by your email server they will sync with the People app.

I hasten to add this is also likely only applicable to IMAP access, though I'm not 100% certain on that.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

I never want my email address book stored online by any email system, as this is far too hackable as Yahoo and BT found out.
Remember a person has all day every day to hack into your online address book but if its on your own computer and its off part of the time nobody can get at it. as I do not use any other devices that are not pcs, I can easily simply swap the files between them on the local network.
Everyone goes on about how convinient this synchronising is, but is it really worth the worry to the average person?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 09, 2016 3:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] setting up the people app on windows 10


One big caution on the "automatic import" of contacts for the People app is this only works if your e-mail client was set up (or capable of) using the contacts associated with your e-mail account and syncing them.

There are a number of e-mail clients that don't work that way, and when I was last setting up Thunderbird it didn't work that way. Just a few days ago I had to tweak a client's Thunderbird setup because the e-mail account she had been using through an ISP no longer exists, and she was terrified that all her contacts were going to go when that account went. They didn't, though, because her contacts (or, perhaps, addresses - I can't remember which terminology Tbird uses) are stored local to Tbird and are not synced with her e-mail accounts. Since I'm the one who installed Tbird for her several years ago and I know I didn't change any defaults related to how contacts/addresses are handled, it appears that they are managed locally.

When that's the case, you need to make certain to export from your e-mail client and import via the web interface to the contacts for the given e-mail account you're going to be adding to the mail app, and, by extension, the People and Calendar apps. Whether you do this prior to adding it or after will be irrelevant because as soon as those contacts are imported into the contacts list maintained by your email server they will sync with the People app.

I hasten to add this is also likely only applicable to IMAP access, though I'm not 100% certain on that.

Brian
--
Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts.
~ Henry Rosovsky


 

Mr. Gaff, most average people don't worry about this, period.  The security in place in any commercial data center is far more robust than what's on your own local machine and hackers target those, too.

What is anyone going to do with your, or my, or anyone's contacts list that requires any real worry?  If people want random e-mail addresses these are so readily available by so many means that worrying about their acquisition is a complete waste of time.  You simply can't stop it.

The world has moved away from POP because IMAP and synchronization is incredibly important in today's mobile world.  That trend isn't going to reverse.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



 

Its not, but to be honest it doesn't matter anymore now days, just about everything you interact with will have some of your info stored online.
So if some of it is, then it may all as well be stored, if some of it is hacked from a system, well it may as well be all of it.
Its the age we live in.
Also most don't go round with 1 device alone, syncing is good for example if you have several devices and lets face it a fair number of us do.
The words security and privacy are changing, they were created pre net and don't mean what they used to mean.
Till real world/net laws equalise they will continue to change and even when they do they still may.
Its a different way of handling things.

On 10/05/2016 3:00 a.m., Brian's Mail list account wrote:
I never want my email address book stored online by any email system, as
this is far too hackable as Yahoo and BT found out.
Remember a person has all day every day to hack into your online
address book but if its on your own computer and its off part of the
time nobody can get at it. as I do not use any other devices that are
not pcs, I can easily simply swap the files between them on the local
network.
Everyone goes on about how convinient this synchronising is, but is it
really worth the worry to the average person?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 09, 2016 3:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] setting up the people app on windows 10


One big caution on the "automatic import" of contacts for the People app
is this only works if your e-mail client was set up (or capable of)
using the contacts associated with your e-mail account and syncing them.

There are a number of e-mail clients that don't work that way, and when
I was last setting up Thunderbird it didn't work that way. Just a few
days ago I had to tweak a client's Thunderbird setup because the e-mail
account she had been using through an ISP no longer exists, and she was
terrified that all her contacts were going to go when that account went.
They didn't, though, because her contacts (or, perhaps, addresses - I
can't remember which terminology Tbird uses) are stored local to Tbird
and are not synced with her e-mail accounts. Since I'm the one who
installed Tbird for her several years ago and I know I didn't change any
defaults related to how contacts/addresses are handled, it appears that
they are managed locally.

When that's the case, you need to make certain to export from your
e-mail client and import via the web interface to the contacts for the
given e-mail account you're going to be adding to the mail app, and, by
extension, the People and Calendar apps. Whether you do this prior to
adding it or after will be irrelevant because as soon as those contacts
are imported into the contacts list maintained by your email server they
will sync with the People app.

I hasten to add this is also likely only applicable to IMAP access,
though I'm not 100% certain on that.

Brian


 

Well to be honest I agree, my view is that especially now that governments want backdoors for various things into your devices and digital accounts they can, but then security of all things are their issues and yeah they get hacked to.
Some of us may rebel but even I am going to have to bite the bullet one day, at least for the units I use and for the rest I am unsure, for my personal unit I may try to hack my way into something so that things work in a round about way.
But really who knows how long all the little patches will work just to make 10 as close to what I am using now.

On 10/05/2016 3:15 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
Mr. Gaff, most average people don't worry about this, period. The security in place in any commercial data center is far more robust than what's on your own local machine and hackers target those, too.

What is anyone going to do with your, or my, or anyone's contacts list that requires any real worry? If people want random e-mail addresses these are so readily available by so many means that worrying about their acquisition is a complete waste of time. You simply can't stop it.

The world has moved away from POP because IMAP and synchronization is incredibly important in today's mobile world. That trend isn't going to reverse.

Brian
--
Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts.
~ Henry Rosovsky