Topics

Web Page navigation


willmac@lantic.net
 

Hi,
 
I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.
 
 
Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.
 
Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.
 
Regards,

William


Kenny Dog <hurrikennyandopo@...>
 

Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz


On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:
Hi,
 
I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.
 
 
Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.
 
Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.
 
Regards,

William

-- 
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

The web page is rubbish, no headings to navigate with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: <willmac@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 9:18 AM
Subject: [nvda] Web Page navigation


Hi,

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak
continually on any given item.

The following is the URL
http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys
necessary to enable me to do this.

Regards,

William


willmac@lantic.net
 

Hi Gene,
 
Thanks. I will work on this and see how I manage. First attempts are a bit discouraging.
Am not getting same responses as you suggest.
Regards,
 
William
 
 

------ Original Message ------
From: "Gene New Zealand" <hurrikennyandopo@...>
Sent: 2016/05/12 11:03:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation
Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz


On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:
Hi,
 
I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.
 
 
Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.
 
Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.
 
Regards,

William

-- 
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


Gene
 

If things like headings and the skip blocks of links command don't work, look through the page.  See what you might want to use the find command for.  Itt's helpful and useful when pages have useable headings but all sorts of people design internet pages.  It is important to know how to use the Internet without relying on the kindness of strangers.  The find command control NVDA key f, is one of the most valuable and undertaught and underused commands for effective navigation.
On a newsletter I receive, there are no headinggs.  But article links and descriptions begin immediately after the word placeholder.
I search for place and I then start tabbing through the article links.  I tab instead of down arrow so I won't see all the explanatary text for articles I'm not interested in.  I intentionally looked for something that was repetitive and reliavle that would be in the same place on the page and would reliably take me to just about where articles begin.  I then used the search command when working with the daily newsletter. 
 
You may find something near whatever you want to find on this or other pages.  Also, on many web pages such as newspaper pages, a good way to find a section of the paper is to do a search.  Make sure, in this case and in general, that you are at the top of the page.  Then search for something you know is there from previously looking at the page or for something you think is a good guesss if you want to try not looking at the page.  For example, if the page has and editorials link, searching for edito will take you to it.  You may have to repeat the search by using NVDA key f to get to the right place.  Usually, typing four and sometimes the first five letters of what you are searching for will move you the the word reliably.  There is no need to type long phrases when looking for the kinds of things I am describing.
 
If you watch for patterns, you can save lots of time on some unfamiliar pages by not having to look through them.  Two examples are:
If you are on the home page of a radio station, and all you want to do is listen to the station, most such pages have the word listen in the link.  So, making sure you are at the top of the page, searching and repeating the search, if necessary, will move you to the link.  Most web sites use the word contact in the link for writing to the site.  That's another example.  
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 5:30 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

The web page is rubbish, no headings to navigate with.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: <willmac@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 9:18 AM
Subject: [nvda] Web Page navigation


Hi,

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak
continually on any given item.

The following is the URL
http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys
necessary to enable me to do this.

Regards,

William




Gene
 

Also, on a page like this, the skip blocks of links command may be useful and convenient.  If you are at the top of the page. using it twice on this page takes you to the start of the text that actually begins the news content.  If you look at the page, you will find that you have skipped many links using this very convenient method.  Simply make sure you are at the top of the page and type the letter n twice.  Then start reading or moving down the page in whatever way you want. 
 
Gene

Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 3:18 AM
Subject: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Hi,
 
I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.
 
 
Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.
 
Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.
 
Regards,

William


Gene
 

I don't know what you are searching for so I can't comment speciffically.  If you know what you want to find, then of course, the find command is very useful.  If you aren't sure, it may not be, at least looking in that way.  In this case, you may have to use a method I've described to move to the beginning of articles.  Then if you want to move from article to article. tab through the links. 
 
You will then skip all explanatory text.
 
gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:31 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Hi Gene,
 
Thanks. I will work on this and see how I manage. First attempts are a bit discouraging.
Am not getting same responses as you suggest.
Regards,
 
William
 
 
------ Original Message ------
From: "Gene New Zealand" <hurrikennyandopo@...>
Sent: 2016/05/12 11:03:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation
Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz


On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:
Hi,
 
I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.
 
 
Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.
 
Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.
 
Regards,

William

-- 
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


Bhavya shah
 

hi Gene,
One of the things I have significantly learnt by reading yours and
others postings, is the underrated 'n' command to skip blocks of
links. It has proved extremely useful on pages where I want to read
some text as opposed to navigation abd browsing and exploration, such
as an article, description or something of that sort, and I
particularly use that on pages with no good headings, sections or
thinkable keystrokes to directly press.
I would strongly recommend others to try and make a conscious use of
this command sometimes, and you will realize its potential and the
power it provides.
Thanks.

On 5/12/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I don't know what you are searching for so I can't comment speciffically.
If you know what you want to find, then of course, the find command is very
useful. If you aren't sure, it may not be, at least looking in that way.
In this case, you may have to use a method I've described to move to the
beginning of articles. Then if you want to move from article to article.
tab through the links.

You will then skip all explanatory text.

gene
----- Original Message -----
From: willmac@...
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation


Hi Gene,

Thanks. I will work on this and see how I manage. First attempts are a bit
discouraging.
Am not getting same responses as you suggest.
Regards,

William


------ Original Message ------
From: "Gene New Zealand" <hurrikennyandopo@...>
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: 2016/05/12 11:03:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation
Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you
can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take
you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H
to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a
desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for
you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key
will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you
forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user
manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz



On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:

Hi,

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak
continually on any given item.

The following is the URL
http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys
necessary to enable me to do this.

Regards,

William


--
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material
at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net




--
Warm Regards
Bhavya Shah
Using NVDA (Non Visual Desktop Access) free and open source screen
reader for Microsoft Windows
To download a copy of the free screen reader NVDA, please visit
http://www.nvaccess.org/
Using Google Talkback on Motorolla G second generation Lollipop 5.0.2
Reach me through the following means:
Mobile: +91 7506221750
E-mail id: bhavya.shah125@...
Skype id : bhavya.09


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Yes I was responding to the direct question about using single keys. Strangely some of the other pages on that site are fine, its as if the main page has had its headers stripped out for some weird reason. I'm not a great fan of sites that put read more all over the place as pretty soon you have tabs open all over the place to find simple things out. Why not put a digest on the page to start with.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 1:43 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation


If things like headings and the skip blocks of links command don't work, look through the page. See what you might want to use the find command for. Itt's helpful and useful when pages have useable headings but all sorts of people design internet pages. It is important to know how to use the Internet without relying on the kindness of strangers. The find command control NVDA key f, is one of the most valuable and undertaught and underused commands for effective navigation.
On a newsletter I receive, there are no headinggs. But article links and descriptions begin immediately after the word placeholder.
I search for place and I then start tabbing through the article links. I tab instead of down arrow so I won't see all the explanatary text for articles I'm not interested in. I intentionally looked for something that was repetitive and reliavle that would be in the same place on the page and would reliably take me to just about where articles begin. I then used the search command when working with the daily newsletter.

You may find something near whatever you want to find on this or other pages. Also, on many web pages such as newspaper pages, a good way to find a section of the paper is to do a search. Make sure, in this case and in general, that you are at the top of the page. Then search for something you know is there from previously looking at the page or for something you think is a good guesss if you want to try not looking at the page. For example, if the page has and editorials link, searching for edito will take you to it. You may have to repeat the search by using NVDA key f to get to the right place. Usually, typing four and sometimes the first five letters of what you are searching for will move you the the word reliably. There is no need to type long phrases when looking for the kinds of things I am describing.

If you watch for patterns, you can save lots of time on some unfamiliar pages by not having to look through them. Two examples are:
If you are on the home page of a radio station, and all you want to do is listen to the station, most such pages have the word listen in the link. So, making sure you are at the top of the page, searching and repeating the search, if necessary, will move you to the link. Most web sites use the word contact in the link for writing to the site. That's another example.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 5:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation


The web page is rubbish, no headings to navigate with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: <willmac@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 9:18 AM
Subject: [nvda] Web Page navigation


Hi,

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak
continually on any given item.

The following is the URL
http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys
necessary to enable me to do this.

Regards,

William


Gene
 

It is a copy of a newsletter.  I don't know how many newsletters use the kind of headings that screen-readers can detect.  Nothing has been stripped out.  However the newsletter is written, it doesn't use headers.  And if it did, since most items are links to articles, headings wouldn't help much unless specific departments or articles that repeatedly deal with the same subject from week to week are headings and nothing else.  Having links be headings would be worthless.  You would simply have another way to move through links in that case.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 9:49 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Yes I was responding to the direct question about using single keys.
Strangely some of the other pages on that site are fine, its as if the main
page has had its headers stripped out for some weird reason. I'm not a great
fan of sites that put read more all over the place as pretty soon you have
tabs open all over the place to find simple things out. Why not put a digest
on the page to start with.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 1:43 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation


If things like headings and the skip blocks of links command don't work,
look through the page.  See what you might want to use the find command for.
Itt's helpful and useful when pages have useable headings but all sorts of
people design internet pages.  It is important to know how to use the
Internet without relying on the kindness of strangers.  The find command
control NVDA key f, is one of the most valuable and undertaught and
underused commands for effective navigation.
On a newsletter I receive, there are no headinggs.  But article links and
descriptions begin immediately after the word placeholder.
I search for place and I then start tabbing through the article links.  I
tab instead of down arrow so I won't see all the explanatary text for
articles I'm not interested in.  I intentionally looked for something that
was repetitive and reliavle that would be in the same place on the page and
would reliably take me to just about where articles begin.  I then used the
search command when working with the daily newsletter.

You may find something near whatever you want to find on this or other
pages.  Also, on many web pages such as newspaper pages, a good way to find
a section of the paper is to do a search.  Make sure, in this case and in
general, that you are at the top of the page.  Then search for something you
know is there from previously looking at the page or for something you think
is a good guesss if you want to try not looking at the page.  For example,
if the page has and editorials link, searching for edito will take you to
it.  You may have to repeat the search by using NVDA key f to get to the
right place.  Usually, typing four and sometimes the first five letters of
what you are searching for will move you the the word reliably.  There is no
need to type long phrases when looking for the kinds of things I am
describing.

If you watch for patterns, you can save lots of time on some unfamiliar
pages by not having to look through them.  Two examples are:
If you are on the home page of a radio station, and all you want to do is
listen to the station, most such pages have the word listen in the link.
So, making sure you are at the top of the page, searching and repeating the
search, if necessary, will move you to the link.  Most web sites use the
word contact in the link for writing to the site.  That's another example.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 5:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation


The web page is rubbish, no headings to navigate with.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: <willmac@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 9:18 AM
Subject: [nvda] Web Page navigation


Hi,

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak
continually on any given item.

The following is the URL
http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys
necessary to enable me to do this.

Regards,

William







 

The web page to which the link was provided is unusual in that it is, for all intents and purposes, a page entirely of links to various articles in the newsletter.  The easiest way to see what those are is to to an NDVA+F7 to get an elements list and then go through link by link to listen for the article, or articles, you may wish to read and then activate same.   Virtually every article title link is also followed by a "Read more" link, which simply takes you to the same spot as the main link itself, and there are some really weird link titles that are related to advertising on the page.  Once you've reached the "Front Page" link you know the list of article links is done.  There are no headings or landmarks on this page.

If you select a given article the easiest way to get to the article text itself once the page is loaded is to bring up the elements list again, use headings elements instead of links, and hunt for the title text of the article on that page then activate that.  This lets you skip past all the navigation links and the like.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Gene
 

Saying that is the easiest is a matter of opinion.  Also, using the links list on unfamiliar pages and not using techniques such as I described, doesn't allow you to interact directly with the page.  That doesn't allow for development of the kinds of skills I described and may make difficult pages more difficult to work with.  In my opinion, teaching use of the links list before other direct methods of working with web pages is a real disservice to blind Internet users.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 10:21 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

The web page to which the link was provided is unusual in that it is, for all intents and purposes, a page entirely of links to various articles in the newsletter.  The easiest way to see what those are is to to an NDVA+F7 to get an elements list and then go through link by link to listen for the article, or articles, you may wish to read and then activate same.   Virtually every article title link is also followed by a "Read more" link, which simply takes you to the same spot as the main link itself, and there are some really weird link titles that are related to advertising on the page.  Once you've reached the "Front Page" link you know the list of article links is done.  There are no headings or landmarks on this page.

If you select a given article the easiest way to get to the article text itself once the page is loaded is to bring up the elements list again, use headings elements instead of links, and hunt for the title text of the article on that page then activate that.  This lets you skip past all the navigation links and the like.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

William,

 

I would suggest you press the letter “k” on the main keyboard. This will move from link to link. The first ones will say Facebook and Twitter, etc. keep going until you hear a news topic that you would like to know more about. Then press the down-arrow key to see how the blog begins. If you would like to read more just press the enter key and the full article should open.

 

 

All the best,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 

 

I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails. Try Spam Reader for free now!

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 1:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

 

I don't know what you are searching for so I can't comment speciffically.  If you know what you want to find, then of course, the find command is very useful.  If you aren't sure, it may not be, at least looking in that way.  In this case, you may have to use a method I've described to move to the beginning of articles.  Then if you want to move from article to article. tab through the links. 

 

You will then skip all explanatory text.

 

gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:31 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

 

Hi Gene,

 

Thanks. I will work on this and see how I manage. First attempts are a bit discouraging.

Am not getting same responses as you suggest.

Regards,

 

William

 

 

------ Original Message ------

From: "Gene New Zealand" <hurrikennyandopo@...>

Sent: 2016/05/12 11:03:11 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz

On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:

Hi,

 

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.

 

 

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

 

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.

 

Regards,

William



-- 
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


 

Gene,

           When the format of a given specific webpage is known, and in this case it is known to be nothing more than a list of links to articles, I don't think it's a disservice to anyone who cannot see to state that fact and to tell them that for this particular page using an elements list is the way to go.

           I'm not trying to teach general principles here, but to help someone get through a very specific webpage, and its child pages.

           And, yes, that's my opinion when I have a specific case under discussion, not a "how would one best go about this in the general case of an unfamiliar page."  Even then I'd encourage someone to give the elements list a look to get a quick snapshot regarding what links, headers, or landmarks might or might not be present.  There's more than one way to skin a cat.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Gene
 

I'm trying to do both because so many blind people don't use the Internet eefficiently.  In addition, it is more efficient in this case to use the skip links command as I described and then tab or use the letter k to move from link to link.  The links list doesn't have any way to skip the navigation links. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 11:15 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Gene,

           When the format of a given specific webpage is known, and in this case it is known to be nothing more than a list of links to articles, I don't think it's a disservice to anyone who cannot see to state that fact and to tell them that for this particular page using an elements list is the way to go.

           I'm not trying to teach general principles here, but to help someone get through a very specific webpage, and its child pages.

           And, yes, that's my opinion when I have a specific case under discussion, not a "how would one best go about this in the general case of an unfamiliar page."  Even then I'd encourage someone to give the elements list a look to get a quick snapshot regarding what links, headers, or landmarks might or might not be present.  There's more than one way to skin a cat.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Gene
 

I would think that there is a more efficient way to find the first link to a blog.  Perhaps there is wording on the page immediately before the first post that is reliably on the page whenever you load it.  See my previous message about the search command.
 
Gene 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 10:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

William,

 

I would suggest you press the letter “k” on the main keyboard. This will move from link to link. The first ones will say Facebook and Twitter, etc. keep going until you hear a news topic that you would like to know more about. Then press the down-arrow key to see how the blog begins. If you would like to read more just press the enter key and the full article should open.

 

 

All the best,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 

 

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From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 1:56 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

 

I don't know what you are searching for so I can't comment speciffically.  If you know what you want to find, then of course, the find command is very useful.  If you aren't sure, it may not be, at least looking in that way.  In this case, you may have to use a method I've described to move to the beginning of articles.  Then if you want to move from article to article. tab through the links. 

 

You will then skip all explanatory text.

 

gene

----- Original Message -----

From: willmac@...

Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 7:31 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

 

Hi Gene,

 

Thanks. I will work on this and see how I manage. First attempts are a bit discouraging.

Am not getting same responses as you suggest.

Regards,

 

William

 

 

------ Original Message ------

From: "Gene New Zealand" <hurrikennyandopo@...>

Sent: 2016/05/12 11:03:11 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Hi William

it does not look as though you have many single letter navigation keys you can use even in the news letter.

The letter k will take you to any links in the email. Where the links take you to another web page on the one or 2 I went to you could use the letter H to jump down by headings, k for links and g for graphics. If you are using a desktop pc the nvda key and the down arrow key will read out the page for you. If you are also new to browsing using the alt key + the left arrow key will take you back a page and the alt and right arrow key will take you forwards a page.

This is only if you have been to those pages first.

For other webpages you might be able to use the full list from the user manual this will change from website to website.

The part in the user manual is 6.1. Single Letter Navigation

Gene nz

On 12-May-16 8:18 PM, willmac@... wrote:

Hi,

 

I find it difficult move around in a web page and get NVDA to speak continually on any given item.

 

 

Witch is one of the pages I would like to navigate.

 

Would it be possible for some kind member to list the short-cut keys necessary to enable me to do this.

 

Regards,

William



-- 
Check out my website for nvda tutorials and other blindness related material at http://www.accessibilitycentral.net


 

Gene,

            We've been round this before, and I am 100% with you on teaching the search command.  The fact remains that I can actually see this web page and how strangely its laid out.  The only good text marker before the article links is "Good Morning."  Having to hit NVDA Key+CTRL+F and typing that in is, to me, far more work intensive than bringing up the elements list, which happens to have only 2 links on the list above the first article link.

            There are times when there is data available that makes a specific course of action, in my opinion, preferable to using general techniques.  This is one of those times.

            I am not always in instructor mode and am sometimes in "get the information as quickly as possible" mode.  It's clear that the general format of this webpage will remain static, and I picked what I believe to be the quickest way to access it on a daily basis.  This appears to be something the original poster wants to be able to access routinely, and I responded according to the stated need.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



Gene
 

Since I don't use Facebook, I can't comment on the page and the efficiency of using the k command.  I said I thought there would be a more efficient method but I may be wrong.  But aside from that, it's worth pointing out that when searching, you don't have to type unwieldy strings.  Usually, typing four letters of a word that you are not likely to find often on the web page is sufficient.  At times, typing five lettters is needed to avoid too many results.  In this case, it's very unlikely that either good or morning would appear on the page before that text.  So typing either good or morn should be sufficient.
 
Gene
----- Original Message =----

Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 12:02 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Gene,

            We've been round this before, and I am 100% with you on teaching the search command.  The fact remains that I can actually see this web page and how strangely its laid out.  The only good text marker before the article links is "Good Morning."  Having to hit NVDA Key+CTRL+F and typing that in is, to me, far more work intensive than bringing up the elements list, which happens to have only 2 links on the list above the first article link.

            There are times when there is data available that makes a specific course of action, in my opinion, preferable to using general techniques.  This is one of those times.

            I am not always in instructor mode and am sometimes in "get the information as quickly as possible" mode.  It's clear that the general format of this webpage will remain static, and I picked what I believe to be the quickest way to access it on a daily basis.  This appears to be something the original poster wants to be able to access routinely, and I responded according to the stated need.

Brian
-- 

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts. 
   ~ Henry Rosovsky

    



 

Gene,

          This has nothing at all to do with Facebook.  Another poster mentioned that if you use the 'K' key to jump from link to link on a page you're likely to hear things such as Facebook, Twitter, etc.  In this particular case, even those "regulars" are not present.

           The link that was already pasted is:  http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

           Since you now know that "Good Morning" is a text landmark it's not fair to try to use that as the "let me explore this page with nothing known" technique.  Try to do so and see how unlikely it is to find useful content via search unless you know the actual nature of the day's articles in this newsletter webpage.

Brian


Gene
 

I thought the person was discussing another site.  I was wrong.  I'd have to see his message again to see what was said.  There are references to Facebook and Twitter on the page and I think he was discussing those, not saying that they are not present. 
 
I don't know how you are looking at the page.  In NVDA, and I assume other screen-readers there are six links before material of interest begins.  It is more efficient to simply use the skip links command twice from the top of the page then to use k or tab to move to the first article of interest.  And experimenting with the skip blocks of links commands on different pages and comparing what it does to the headings commands shows that the skip blocks of links command may be a more efficient way to look for something than moving by headings on a number of pages. 
 
If you want to move through links once you are on the first item of interest, tab and k work well.  On some sites with other structures interspersed among links, k might be desired and on other sites, like this one, it doesn't matter because the page is just links and text between many of the links. 
 
Gene

Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 1:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Web Page navigation

Gene,

          This has nothing at all to do with Facebook.  Another poster mentioned that if you use the 'K' key to jump from link to link on a page you're likely to hear things such as Facebook, Twitter, etc.  In this particular case, even those "regulars" are not present.

           The link that was already pasted is:  http://t.digitalnewspaper.co.za/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40fjNSuVTurK7VzhMSOxyzIucXl%2BKsnii1IrXYxuvhTwY%3D

           Since you now know that "Good Morning" is a text landmark it's not fair to try to use that as the "let me explore this page with nothing known" technique.  Try to do so and see how unlikely it is to find useful content via search unless you know the actual nature of the day's articles in this newsletter webpage.

Brian