Virtual Recorder


Jolene Cardenas
 

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.


David Moore
 

Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore

-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.


Gene
 

Are you receiving my messages?  I gave the link many hours ago.
 
Gene
----- Original Messages -----
Sent: Saturday, May 28, 2016 11:16 PM
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.



Gene
 

You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice.  When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card.  The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways.  You can also record from just a virtual device.  the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option.  This option has other names as well.  If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays.  It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows.  Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card. 

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports.   If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in.  If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.
 
When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix.  But you are not recording using your sound card. 
 
If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.
 
But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays.  But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader.  The screen-reader will be recorded as well. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.






David Moore
 

Hi Gene,
Please explain this further. I had no idea about all of this. Could you please explain all three options and when you use which one. I keep it on both, because it records JAWS and my voice through a built in mike so I can do tutorials. When do you use the first and third choice. Also, what is the difference between a virtual device and your sound card. Could you give some examples of virtual devices, and why is the program called, virtual recorder? What you said makes this program more important than I thought. Thanks a lot. I like to learn, so I will enjoy what you have to say.
 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice.  When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card.  The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways.  You can also record from just a virtual device.  the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option.  This option has other names as well.  If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays.  It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows.  Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card. 

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports.   If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in.  If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.
 
When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix.  But you are not recording using your sound card. 
 
If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.
 
But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays.  But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader.  The screen-reader will be recorded as well. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.






Gene
 

Your sound card has different settings such as line-in and microphone.  If you set the sound card to a source, that is what you would be recording with it.  If you set it to microphone, you would only record the microphone.  Your sound card may not have a line-in setting.  Many laptops don't have line in jacks and you need to use another sound card, such as a USB external sound card to get a line-in jack. 
 
Virtual device doesn't use your sound card.  Windows 7 and higher has something that can do what I described using the virtual device setting.  I don't have the technical knowledge to discuss it further to any extent.  The point is that it will record anything you hear through your sound card but your sound card is not what is being recorded from.  I should add that I don't know if you can record things your sound card isn't set to play.  But the point is that when you use virtual device as the setting, you can directly record your screen-reader.  The microphone doesn't have to be used.  You can record an Internet stream.  You can record music and you speking using a microphone at the same time.  I haven't played with it enough to go into detail about how you might turn off the internal microphone so that you would only record your screen-reader and, for example, and Internet stream.  Others who have used this feature or the same feature in another program may be able to provide much more information. 
 
I'm not sure where using the both setting would be an advantage. 
I haven't used virtual device and other options in the program enough to discuss how to get desired results as to what sources are recorded.  Perhaps all sources are recorded when using virtual device and you can't change them.  In that case, if you want to record an internet stream, and not record the internal microphone, you might have to stop the microphone from functioning by plugging a plug into the microphone jack with nothing connected to it.  But I'm speculating and just providing an example of how you might get around the problem.  It is not necessarily the only or best way. 
 
Also, XP users should know that the virtual device method can't be used in that version of Windows.  The program can be used to record from the sound card but XP doesn't support the virtual device method of recording.
 
Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 1:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hi Gene,
Please explain this further. I had no idea about all of this. Could you please explain all three options and when you use which one. I keep it on both, because it records JAWS and my voice through a built in mike so I can do tutorials. When do you use the first and third choice. Also, what is the difference between a virtual device and your sound card. Could you give some examples of virtual devices, and why is the program called, virtual recorder? What you said makes this program more important than I thought. Thanks a lot. I like to learn, so I will enjoy what you have to say.
 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice.  When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card.  The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways.  You can also record from just a virtual device.  the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option.  This option has other names as well.  If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays.  It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows.  Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card. 

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports.   If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in.  If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.
 
When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix.  But you are not recording using your sound card. 
 
If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.
 
But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays.  But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader.  The screen-reader will be recorded as well. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.






Brian's Mail list account
 

The point usually is that if you have any input selected and its monitor is on you will record it, however the big thing about virtual recorder is that it can record from the output so to speak as well as the input, thus any codec capable of sending sound to the output is recorded. Its called virtual because there is often not this option in the sound card software at all, however as the audio is indeed there, then it can be recorded. as was mentioned earlier its an all or nothing recorder in that all inputs and the streamed content are recorded when what you hear is selected. If other inputs are enabled with monitor then they too get recorded, so you need to be a bit careful.
Not tried it but one assumes if the line in is enabled and you have a hardware mixer in use and enable that input to monitor, Virtual record will also record that along with the system sounds and the screenreader, so you can do m demos.
I've recently found that it will work with that cheap but good quality little usb box sold under many names that has phono sockets aand auto volume setting so very good quality recordings can be made easily without overloading.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 8:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


Your sound card has different settings such as line-in and microphone. If you set the sound card to a source, that is what you would be recording with it. If you set it to microphone, you would only record the microphone. Your sound card may not have a line-in setting. Many laptops don't have line in jacks and you need to use another sound card, such as a USB external sound card to get a line-in jack.

Virtual device doesn't use your sound card. Windows 7 and higher has something that can do what I described using the virtual device setting. I don't have the technical knowledge to discuss it further to any extent. The point is that it will record anything you hear through your sound card but your sound card is not what is being recorded from. I should add that I don't know if you can record things your sound card isn't set to play. But the point is that when you use virtual device as the setting, you can directly record your screen-reader. The microphone doesn't have to be used. You can record an Internet stream. You can record music and you speking using a microphone at the same time. I haven't played with it enough to go into detail about how you might turn off the internal microphone so that you would only record your screen-reader and, for example, and Internet stream. Others who have used this feature or the same feature in another program may be able to provide much more information.

I'm not sure where using the both setting would be an advantage.
I haven't used virtual device and other options in the program enough to discuss how to get desired results as to what sources are recorded. Perhaps all sources are recorded when using virtual device and you can't change them. In that case, if you want to record an internet stream, and not record the internal microphone, you might have to stop the microphone from functioning by plugging a plug into the microphone jack with nothing connected to it. But I'm speculating and just providing an example of how you might get around the problem. It is not necessarily the only or best way.

Also, XP users should know that the virtual device method can't be used in that version of Windows. The program can be used to record from the sound card but XP doesn't support the virtual device method of recording.

Gene
From: David Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 1:51 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


Hi Gene,
Please explain this further. I had no idea about all of this. Could you please explain all three options and when you use which one. I keep it on both, because it records JAWS and my voice through a built in mike so I can do tutorials. When do you use the first and third choice. Also, what is the difference between a virtual device and your sound card. Could you give some examples of virtual devices, and why is the program called, virtual recorder? What you said makes this program more important than I thought. Thanks a lot. I like to learn, so I will enjoy what you have to say.


From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:13 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice. When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card. The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways. You can also record from just a virtual device. the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option. This option has other names as well. If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays. It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows. Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card.

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports. If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in. If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.

When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix. But you are not recording using your sound card.

If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.

But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays. But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader. The screen-reader will be recorded as well.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: David Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.


David Moore
 

Hi Gene,
Thank you so much. When I set it to a virtual device, it records everything I hear from my computer, but nothing picked up by the built in mike. When I set it to both, that is when Virtual recorder records everything I hear from the computer, and everything picked up by the built in mike as well. Setting it to sound card just records what is picked up by my built in mike, and that is all. The built in mike must not be a virtual device while everything you hear must be. This is really interesting.
Thanks Gene.
 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 3:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
Your sound card has different settings such as line-in and microphone.  If you set the sound card to a source, that is what you would be recording with it.  If you set it to microphone, you would only record the microphone.  Your sound card may not have a line-in setting.  Many laptops don't have line in jacks and you need to use another sound card, such as a USB external sound card to get a line-in jack. 
 
Virtual device doesn't use your sound card.  Windows 7 and higher has something that can do what I described using the virtual device setting.  I don't have the technical knowledge to discuss it further to any extent.  The point is that it will record anything you hear through your sound card but your sound card is not what is being recorded from.  I should add that I don't know if you can record things your sound card isn't set to play.  But the point is that when you use virtual device as the setting, you can directly record your screen-reader.  The microphone doesn't have to be used.  You can record an Internet stream.  You can record music and you speking using a microphone at the same time.  I haven't played with it enough to go into detail about how you might turn off the internal microphone so that you would only record your screen-reader and, for example, and Internet stream.  Others who have used this feature or the same feature in another program may be able to provide much more information. 
 
I'm not sure where using the both setting would be an advantage. 
I haven't used virtual device and other options in the program enough to discuss how to get desired results as to what sources are recorded.  Perhaps all sources are recorded when using virtual device and you can't change them.  In that case, if you want to record an internet stream, and not record the internal microphone, you might have to stop the microphone from functioning by plugging a plug into the microphone jack with nothing connected to it.  But I'm speculating and just providing an example of how you might get around the problem.  It is not necessarily the only or best way. 
 
Also, XP users should know that the virtual device method can't be used in that version of Windows.  The program can be used to record from the sound card but XP doesn't support the virtual device method of recording.
 
Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 1:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
Hi Gene,
Please explain this further. I had no idea about all of this. Could you please explain all three options and when you use which one. I keep it on both, because it records JAWS and my voice through a built in mike so I can do tutorials. When do you use the first and third choice. Also, what is the difference between a virtual device and your sound card. Could you give some examples of virtual devices, and why is the program called, virtual recorder? What you said makes this program more important than I thought. Thanks a lot. I like to learn, so I will enjoy what you have to say.
 
 
From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice.  When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card.  The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways.  You can also record from just a virtual device.  the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option.  This option has other names as well.  If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays.  It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows.  Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card. 

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports.   If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in.  If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.
 
When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix.  But you are not recording using your sound card. 
 
If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.
 
But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays.  But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader.  The screen-reader will be recorded as well. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder
 
Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.






Jolene Cardenas
 

hello everyone,

Thank you for your responses about this program.

I had installed it last night on my Windows 10-based laptop and had to
make some minor adjustments in the Enhancements menu in the Advanced
tab because the audiorecording from my sound card, RealTech High
Definition Audio Device, was coming out sounding real funny.
Just so you folks would know: I use my RealTech High Definition Audio
Device for both playback and recording.
The only thing I don't like is that Virtual Recorder records through
it in mono instead of in stereo.
How can I make adjustments to my RealTech High Definition Audio Device
in order to make it record in stereo?
Thanks in advance for your recommendations, and have a good day.

aloha,

Jolene.


Brian's Mail list account
 

Well I don't really use it for that, I would use a real sound recorder/editor which as the full range of adjustments.
I only really use it for recording the unrecordable streams.
I suspect if its a laptop it may well have no stereo mode in any case. I found that my old Dell seems to, but its burried in the hardware settings for the sound card.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jolene Cardenas" <joe.haiku@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 8:53 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


hello everyone,

Thank you for your responses about this program.

I had installed it last night on my Windows 10-based laptop and had to
make some minor adjustments in the Enhancements menu in the Advanced
tab because the audiorecording from my sound card, RealTech High
Definition Audio Device, was coming out sounding real funny.
Just so you folks would know: I use my RealTech High Definition Audio
Device for both playback and recording.
The only thing I don't like is that Virtual Recorder records through
it in mono instead of in stereo.
How can I make adjustments to my RealTech High Definition Audio Device
in order to make it record in stereo?
Thanks in advance for your recommendations, and have a good day.

aloha,

Jolene.


Brian's Mail list account
 

Berhinger seems to be the one most are advertising.

As regards the both setting, yes, that is right, its not vertual, but I notice that on some hardware, the monitor of a selected input can be recorded when not in both, but not on all machines, so I guess this points to the monitor function in some cases being hardware in the card, and in others software,whch is why one gets latency on some cards but not on others presumably.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian's Mail list account" <bglists@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 9:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


The point usually is that if you have any input selected and its monitor is on you will record it, however the big thing about virtual recorder is that it can record from the output so to speak as well as the input, thus any codec capable of sending sound to the output is recorded. Its called virtual because there is often not this option in the sound card software at all, however as the audio is indeed there, then it can be recorded. as was mentioned earlier its an all or nothing recorder in that all inputs and the streamed content are recorded when what you hear is selected. If other inputs are enabled with monitor then they too get recorded, so you need to be a bit careful.
Not tried it but one assumes if the line in is enabled and you have a hardware mixer in use and enable that input to monitor, Virtual record will also record that along with the system sounds and the screenreader, so you can do m demos.
I've recently found that it will work with that cheap but good quality little usb box sold under many names that has phono sockets aand auto volume setting so very good quality recordings can be made easily without overloading.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 8:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


Your sound card has different settings such as line-in and microphone. If you set the sound card to a source, that is what you would be recording with it. If you set it to microphone, you would only record the microphone. Your sound card may not have a line-in setting. Many laptops don't have line in jacks and you need to use another sound card, such as a USB external sound card to get a line-in jack.

Virtual device doesn't use your sound card. Windows 7 and higher has something that can do what I described using the virtual device setting. I don't have the technical knowledge to discuss it further to any extent. The point is that it will record anything you hear through your sound card but your sound card is not what is being recorded from. I should add that I don't know if you can record things your sound card isn't set to play. But the point is that when you use virtual device as the setting, you can directly record your screen-reader. The microphone doesn't have to be used. You can record an Internet stream. You can record music and you speking using a microphone at the same time. I haven't played with it enough to go into detail about how you might turn off the internal microphone so that you would only record your screen-reader and, for example, and Internet stream. Others who have used this feature or the same feature in another program may be able to provide much more information.

I'm not sure where using the both setting would be an advantage.
I haven't used virtual device and other options in the program enough to discuss how to get desired results as to what sources are recorded. Perhaps all sources are recorded when using virtual device and you can't change them. In that case, if you want to record an internet stream, and not record the internal microphone, you might have to stop the microphone from functioning by plugging a plug into the microphone jack with nothing connected to it. But I'm speculating and just providing an example of how you might get around the problem. It is not necessarily the only or best way.

Also, XP users should know that the virtual device method can't be used in that version of Windows. The program can be used to record from the sound card but XP doesn't support the virtual device method of recording.

Gene
From: David Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 1:51 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


Hi Gene,
Please explain this further. I had no idea about all of this. Could you please explain all three options and when you use which one. I keep it on both, because it records JAWS and my voice through a built in mike so I can do tutorials. When do you use the first and third choice. Also, what is the difference between a virtual device and your sound card. Could you give some examples of virtual devices, and why is the program called, virtual recorder? What you said makes this program more important than I thought. Thanks a lot. I like to learn, so I will enjoy what you have to say.


From: Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 2:13 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

You keep saying the choice is between your sound card and your voice. When you record your voice, you are recording using the microphone input of your sound card. The real advantages of this program are that it allows you to record from both a virtual device and a sound card simultaneously so you can mix things in more ways. You can also record from just a virtual device. the virtual device ability allows you to record things such as Internet Streams even if your sound card doesn't support the What You Hear or Stereo Mix option. This option has other names as well. If your sound card supports it, you can record anything your sound card plays. It has become increasingly difficult to find sound cards that support StereoMix in later versions of Windows. Virtual Device gives you another way to do the same thing and may save you a good deal of fooling around and may save you the need to purchahse another sound card.

In other words, when you record from your soundcard, you can record whatever sources your sound card supports. If you set your sound card to line in, you can record line-in. If you set your sound card recording source to Microphone, you can record using your Microphone etc.

When using the virtual device setting, you can record as though your sound card supports stereo mix. But you are not recording using your sound card.

If this is difficult to understand, I'll attempt to explain it further but more people might be interested in the program and might realize more ways in which it can be used if they understand this distinction.

But one example is that if you want to record an Internet stream and your sound card doesn't support stereo Mix, you can use the virtual device setting to record the stream as it plays. But if you do, you can't do things such as use a screen-reader. The screen-reader will be recorded as well.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: David Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hi Jolene,
I have the link for the virtual recorder, that I will put below. It will
work on your Windows PC. A good friend, gave me this web site done by a guy
named Carlos nazario. The site, when brought up, just says files, and there
are a number of programs you can download from this site. Press H for
heading until you hear virtual recorder installer, or the next heading says
virtual recorder portable. I pressed enter on the virtual recorder installer
and installed it to my computer. After you install it, tab to settings and
set up a shortcut command for pause and some other tasks you will want
virtual recorder to do. It is very accessible. You will tab to a record
button and just press it to record. Now, there is a list that you must pick
a recording choice from. You can record what comes from the sound card, both
the sound card and your voice, , or just your voice. The top choice is the
first one and so on. Here is the link, and let me know if you have any
questions. Here is the link.
http://opopanax.net/download/
Take care.
David Moore


-----Original Message-----
From: Jolene Cardenas
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 12:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

I just did a Google search on "Virtual Recorder," which someone had
recommended for us Windows 10 users who're searching for a sound
recorder that'll work with both Windows 10 and NVDA.
Here's a few of the links I discovered:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ix.com.android.VirtualRecorder&hl=en

http://virtual-recorder.soft112.com/

One appears to be for Android phones, and the other one appears to be
some kind of stand-alone device, but I think some of us is looking for
one for PC's if such a software exists.

Then when I did a search for "Virtual Audio Recorder," I got this link:

http://www.virtualaudiorecorder.com/

So my question is this: Is it called Virtual Recorder, Virtual Audio
Recorder, or something else?

Please be specific, because even when one word of the software name is
off, a person will get the wrong information!

Thank you.

aloha,

Jolene.









Gene
 

I suspect the program is set to record in monaural.  That isn't the default, as I recall, but make sure the recording parameters are set to create a stereo file.  I have never seen settings in sound cards for recording in monaural or stereo.  The only settings I've seen have been in recording programs.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 2:53 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

hello everyone,

Thank you for your responses about this program.

I had installed it last night on my Windows 10-based laptop and had to
make some minor adjustments in the Enhancements menu in the Advanced
tab because the audiorecording from my sound card, RealTech High
Definition Audio Device, was coming out sounding real funny.
Just so you folks would know: I use my RealTech High Definition Audio
Device for both playback and recording.
The only thing I don't like is that Virtual Recorder records through
it in mono instead of in stereo.
How can I make adjustments to my RealTech High Definition Audio Device
in order to make it record in stereo?
Thanks in advance for your recommendations, and have a good day.

aloha,

Jolene.



Gene
 

The program does have settings to adjust such things as monaural and stereo and other recording parameters such as the bit rate.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 4:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Well I don't really use it for that, I would use a real sound
recorder/editor which as the full range of adjustments.
 I only really use it for recording the unrecordable streams.
 I suspect if its a laptop it may well have no stereo mode in any case. I
found that my old Dell seems to, but its burried in the hardware settings
for the sound card.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jolene Cardenas" <joe.haiku@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 8:53 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder


> hello everyone,
>
> Thank you for your responses about this program.
>
> I had installed it last night on my Windows 10-based laptop and had to
> make some minor adjustments in the Enhancements menu in the Advanced
> tab because the audiorecording from my sound card, RealTech High
> Definition Audio Device, was coming out sounding real funny.
> Just so you folks would know: I use my RealTech High Definition Audio
> Device for both playback and recording.
> The only thing I don't like is that Virtual Recorder records through
> it in mono instead of in stereo.
> How can I make adjustments to my RealTech High Definition Audio Device
> in order to make it record in stereo?
> Thanks in advance for your recommendations, and have a good day.
>
> aloha,
>
> Jolene.
>
>
>




Jolene Cardenas
 

Hello there,

Brian, when I had my Dell laptop (which was a Windows 7-based system),
it recorded everything in stereo, but when I got this Asus laptop, it
records everything in mono in Virtual Recorder.
I'm beginning to think that perhaps some brands of laptop are built
for stereo recording, while others aren't.
I could be wrong, though.
Perhaps I should try Berhinger out to see if it would do for me what
Virtual Recorder won't do.

And Gene, I tried recording sound with Virtual Recorder in both stereo
and mono formats, and both recordings came out in mono.
Sounds to me like I may have to invest in a pair of microphones in
order to record sound in stereo!
Thanks so much for your feedback, though.

aloha,

Jolene.


Gene
 

it isn't clear what you did.  Did you only record using a microphone?  Many laptops have monaural microphone recording jacks.  If you recorded something like an Internet Stream you hear in stereo, you should get a stereo recording. 
 
Your sound card may only record a microphone monaurally and purchasing microphones alone may not solve the problem because there is a good chance the jack you plug the microphone into now is a monaural jack.
You may well have to purchase an external USB sound card and make sure it has a stereo microphone jack. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, May 30, 2016 7:38 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Virtual Recorder

Hello there,

Brian, when I had my Dell laptop (which was a Windows 7-based system),
it recorded everything in stereo, but when I got this Asus laptop, it
records everything in mono in Virtual Recorder.
I'm beginning to think that perhaps some brands of laptop are built
for stereo recording, while others aren't.
I could be wrong, though.
Perhaps I should try Berhinger out to see if it would do for me what
Virtual Recorder won't do.

And Gene, I tried recording sound with Virtual Recorder in both stereo
and mono formats, and both recordings came out in mono.
Sounds to me like I may have to invest in a pair of microphones in
order to record sound in stereo!
Thanks so much for your feedback, though.

aloha,

Jolene.