Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now


Gerardo Corripio
 

Wow thanks for this keystroke! I'm starting to love Chrome as wel! but I didn't grasp what's used for. could you maybe give an example? yes I understanding it's for searching, but not as clearly as I'like. I'm sure this keystroke will become one of my main ones!
El 15/05/2018 a las 01:39 a.m., Chris Norman via Groups.Io escribió:

Hi,

When the downloads window is open you do get the progress sound.


I've been using Chrome as my default browser for a while now, and have just bought a Chromebook to boot. I love both.


One of the coolest shortcuts i've found in Chrome is alt enter: With a page open you navigate to the omnibar (the address bar) and type a search. When you press alt enter it opens what you just searched for in a new tab without you having to close your current web page.


Needless to say I am a Chrome convert.


It also works extremely well with my Mindspace Client, far better than Firefox did when I tried it last (about a month ago). Mindspace involves lots of multilayered sounds and lots of dynamic page creation with JavaScript which Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine handles with ease, far Faster than Firefox's SpiderMonkey I think it's called.


While the above was of course a shameless plug, if you do decide to have a look at Mindspace please be aware that it is pre-alpha, and as such isn't anywhere near complete.


HTH,


Chris


On 15/05/2018 02:01, Kenny wrote:

Thanks for sharing the proper shortcut.


I'm curious why hasn't NVDA been configured to speak these "Actions" when they dynamically appear in Google Chrome? This is the only issue I have with the browser.


You click on a link to download a file and you have no idea the download has started. You have to hit Ctrl+j to bring up the Download Manager to check. Even other Actions aren't spoken automatically by NVDA for the Chrome browser.


Can't that cool NVDA installation progress sound be configured to activate for the download progress for Chrome too?


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shif    t+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny
Sent: 10 May 2018 04:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

Can you please share your tutorial with the list again?

 

I'm hoping you gone over a work around to have the messages being pushed to Chrome's notification bar automatically read by NVDA?

 

Also what is the shortcut key to be placed in the notification bar? The alt+n key combination doesn't seem to work. Thanks.

 

On 5/6/2018 6:21 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi all!

I have been telling people just how great Chrome is for two and a half years.

I am so happy that all of you are finding it to be true.

If anyone needs my text tutorial I wrote on how to use Chrome, and take you through all settings, I will paste it on the list.

I have done this around ten times on all the lists, but you are still finding out for the first time, just how great Chrome is.

Just read works great for just reading an article on the page.

CTRL+J allows you to hear the status of the downloads. Now, CTRL+Shift+O allows you to open the bookmarks manager, and you can arrange them in different folders and back them up.

Chrome is great with Youtube, and streaming media. Chrome is good for a lot other than just simple browsing.

Have a great one, and I am celebrating that you are finally getting used to Chrome!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: juan gonzalez
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 5:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

I use the add on called sound on for navigational sounds.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 9:28 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

Would anyone know if Chrome has sounds? one of the annoyances with current firefox is figuring out when downloads are finished or when a page is refreshing itself, ie you normally hear the ticks  in the old version due to navigational sounds.

Until i find a browser with this function of sound I'm loathe to get a new browser over ff52, but the problem is that I've been reading that some sites now do not support the old versions of Firefox and tell you so when you have things like modal windows whatever they are.

On XP to make Firefox perform even reasonably you need to use a version 45, as after this the actual load up times are hugely slowed, my guess is that the code is made for multi processor  devices, not single core ones.This is also why on xp you might find that Chrome and firefox are similar in page loading times.

 

Things are no pushing ahead so fast on sites that its not uncommon to see the message you browser is unsupported get this or that then you can come back.

To me this is a weird thing for commercial sites to do, as they are, in effect pushing away potential customers, but hey, that is their business.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal E-mail to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:57 AM

Subject: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

 

I may have sent messages in the past in which I expressed a much stronger liking for Firefox than Chrome.  At this point, I've changed my mind and, unless things change over time, as they may as Firefox continues to implement its new internal technical changes, I consider Chrome to be superior for general browsing. I haven't tested it for uses such as streaming or RSS or other uses.  I will therefore only address general browsing and the interface.  Others may want to comment on other aspects I haven't compared.

 

This is a long message, a bit of a review and a bit of discussion of the interface.  I hope those interested in the subject find it useful.

 

If you try Chrome and find it superior for general browsing, you may still not want to use Chrome as your main browser.  There are various considerations.  I'll explain why I changed my mind and what you may want to consider.  You may have other or different considerations as well.

 

The reason I say Chrome is better for general browsing is because it loads pages faster than Firefox.  You may want to compare and see if the difference is important to you.  There is a very noticeable difference.  I hadn't compared Chrome with Firefox for speed on a fast machine.  I compared them on a slow machine running XP perhaps six or eight months ago.  I had expected that, if Chrome was faster, there would have been a noticeable difference, even though the machine was slow.  But there wasn't a difference that amounted to anything.

 

I recently decided to compare on a reasonably fast machine running Windows 7 since many people have said on lists I'm on that Chrome is faster.  There is a very noticeable difference in speed on my Windows 7 machine.  I don't know what the results would have been on a fast XP machine.

 

I haven't used Chrome much but the increase in speed is the reason I say it's better for general browsing.

 

The Chrome interface is different than Firefox or Internet Explorer.  It isn't difficult to learn but it is different.  You will likely want a tutorial or some instructional material.  If you are good at learning by exploring, you may not want or need such material, at least not to use in depth, but you may benefit in early learning by using material.

 

The main things to know in terms of the differences in the interface are that Chrome shows many things as web pages, such as settings and history and there is one menu, which you can open with alt f, that is, hold alt and press f.  Of course, there are submenus and there are also items that open like web pages such as settings.

 

I don't recall if there are classic dialogs that open from the main menu.

But if you work with settings, you need to know that the settings interface doesn't work quite properly in the following way:

It's a web page-like interface but there some controls that don't work as they should.  I tried to activate two buttons today and I couldn't do so in browse mode using NVDA.  I don't know what JAWS does.  I had to manually go into forms mode, and activate the buttons.  I may have had to tab to the button because forms mode may not have been properly calibrated with browse mode in that interface, at least at times.

 

I seem to recall that in another instance, I needed to be in browse mode to activate something but I'd have to experiment more to know if that is the case since I don't have a clear memory of whether that was necessary.

 

There's a very useful settings search feature in settings.

 

One of my main objections to Chrome in the past was that the book marks interface is not nearly as comvenient to work with as Firefox because the search feature in Chrome book marks appears to be inaccessible.  I very recently learned from someone on a list I follow that this problem can be more or less eliminated.  I say more or less because I haven't played with it much, but enough to see that it works well or reasonably well.  I'm hedging because I'd want to play with it more before saying just how well it works.  It' appears to work well from the very little testing I've done.  If you are in the address bar, you can type some or all of what you want to find such as york times or new york times and you can up and down arrow through results.  Some of them will be search results using a search engine but the top results in the list should be from book marks and history.  Try reading the current line after typing to see if that contains the first result.  I haven't played with the feature more than a little and I'm not sure.  But if it works well, this would eliminate what I consider to be an important deficiency. In other words, this feature may make book marks just as easy to use in Chrome as in Firefox.

 

If you use Firefox extensions that you consider important and use them a lot, that may be a consideration in which browser you want to use.  and then, there's just convenience of not learning a new interface and continuing to use the familiar Firefox.  You, of course, can determine questions like that.  It's nice to have pages load a good deal faster, but the importance of speed may vary from user to user.  But if you haven't compared with a hands on test, you may wish to.

 

Browsing is either identical or nearly identical between the browsers because they both use browse mode, or the Virtual PC cursor, which is the JAWS name for the same thing.

 

So you can compare by installing Chrome, and then opening and using some web sites.  Control l moves you to the address bar, just as in Firefox.  I believe when you open Chrome, you are automatically placed on the address bar, but you can check.  If you want to make sure, it takes almost no time to execute control l.

 

I hope those who are interested in this subject find these comments useful.

If people are curious or dissatisfied with Firefox or another browser, they may want to try Chrome.  I haven't used Edge at all so I don't know how Edge compares.

 

Gene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


 

If you use the omnibar (since it's now allowed to be used for entering search criteria for your chosen default search engine, it's no longer the web address edit box) to enter criteria for a search, hitting "ALT+Enter" will cause those results to be opened in a separate tab.

If you just hit Enter they will open in the current tab, knocking out whatever you were already looking at in that tab.

By the way, this is also true in Firefox as well.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

     After all, a democracy based solely on the values of the majority, with no overriding ethical principles and processes, is nothing more than clubhouse democracy, great for those on the inside and a tyranny for those who fail to see eye to eye with the majority.

         ~ Paul Noeldner, May 16, 2007 

 

 


Gene
 

Usually, if you go to the address bar and type an address or a search and open a new page,  it will open in the same window.  Alt enter, according to the message, I haven't tried it, opens the new page in a new window so you now have two Windows opened.  This saves a small amount of time but it makes little difference.  You can accomplish the same thing in any standard Windows browser by using the command control n when you are on a web page, to open a new browser window and opening a page however you want in that window, typing an address, a search, history, a bookmark from the list or using the address bar to find it.  You are in a new browser window so you can do anything you can do in any browser window.
 
Gene. 

----- Original Message -----
In the original message, typing a search is done instead of typing a web address but alt enter should do the same thing, no matter how you open a new web page.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:14 AM
Subject: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

Wow thanks for this keystroke! I'm starting to love Chrome as wel! but I didn't grasp what's used for. could you maybe give an example? yes I understanding it's for searching, but not as clearly as I'like. I'm sure this keystroke will become one of my main ones!
El 15/05/2018 a las 01:39 a.m., Chris Norman via Groups.Io escribió:

Hi,

When the downloads window is open you do get the progress sound.


I've been using Chrome as my default browser for a while now, and have just bought a Chromebook to boot. I love both.


One of the coolest shortcuts i've found in Chrome is alt enter: With a page open you navigate to the omnibar (the address bar) and type a search. When you press alt enter it opens what you just searched for in a new tab without you having to close your current web page.


Needless to say I am a Chrome convert.


It also works extremely well with my Mindspace Client, far better than Firefox did when I tried it last (about a month ago). Mindspace involves lots of multilayered sounds and lots of dynamic page creation with JavaScript which Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine handles with ease, far Faster than Firefox's SpiderMonkey I think it's called.


While the above was of course a shameless plug, if you do decide to have a look at Mindspace please be aware that it is pre-alpha, and as such isn't anywhere near complete.


HTH,


Chris


On 15/05/2018 02:01, Kenny wrote:

Thanks for sharing the proper shortcut.


I'm curious why hasn't NVDA been configured to speak these "Actions" when they dynamically appear in Google Chrome? This is the only issue I have with the browser.


You click on a link to download a file and you have no idea the download has started. You have to hit Ctrl+j to bring up the Download Manager to check. Even other Actions aren't spoken automatically by NVDA for the Chrome browser.


Can't that cool NVDA installation progress sound be configured to activate for the download progress for Chrome too?


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shif    t+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny
Sent: 10 May 2018 04:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

Can you please share your tutorial with the list again?

 

I'm hoping you gone over a work around to have the messages being pushed to Chrome's notification bar automatically read by NVDA?

 

Also what is the shortcut key to be placed in the notification bar? The alt+n key combination doesn't seem to work. Thanks.

 

On 5/6/2018 6:21 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi all!

I have been telling people just how great Chrome is for two and a half years.

I am so happy that all of you are finding it to be true.

If anyone needs my text tutorial I wrote on how to use Chrome, and take you through all settings, I will paste it on the list.

I have done this around ten times on all the lists, but you are still finding out for the first time, just how great Chrome is.

Just read works great for just reading an article on the page.

CTRL+J allows you to hear the status of the downloads. Now, CTRL+Shift+O allows you to open the bookmarks manager, and you can arrange them in different folders and back them up.

Chrome is great with Youtube, and streaming media. Chrome is good for a lot other than just simple browsing.

Have a great one, and I am celebrating that you are finally getting used to Chrome!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: juan gonzalez
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 5:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

I use the add on called sound on for navigational sounds.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 9:28 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

Would anyone know if Chrome has sounds? one of the annoyances with current firefox is figuring out when downloads are finished or when a page is refreshing itself, ie you normally hear the ticks  in the old version due to navigational sounds.

Until i find a browser with this function of sound I'm loathe to get a new browser over ff52, but the problem is that I've been reading that some sites now do not support the old versions of Firefox and tell you so when you have things like modal windows whatever they are.

On XP to make Firefox perform even reasonably you need to use a version 45, as after this the actual load up times are hugely slowed, my guess is that the code is made for multi processor  devices, not single core ones.This is also why on xp you might find that Chrome and firefox are similar in page loading times.

 

Things are no pushing ahead so fast on sites that its not uncommon to see the message you browser is unsupported get this or that then you can come back.

To me this is a weird thing for commercial sites to do, as they are, in effect pushing away potential customers, but hey, that is their business.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal E-mail to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:57 AM

Subject: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

 

I may have sent messages in the past in which I expressed a much stronger liking for Firefox than Chrome.  At this point, I've changed my mind and, unless things change over time, as they may as Firefox continues to implement its new internal technical changes, I consider Chrome to be superior for general browsing. I haven't tested it for uses such as streaming or RSS or other uses.  I will therefore only address general browsing and the interface.  Others may want to comment on other aspects I haven't compared.

 

This is a long message, a bit of a review and a bit of discussion of the interface.  I hope those interested in the subject find it useful.

 

If you try Chrome and find it superior for general browsing, you may still not want to use Chrome as your main browser.  There are various considerations.  I'll explain why I changed my mind and what you may want to consider.  You may have other or different considerations as well.

 

The reason I say Chrome is better for general browsing is because it loads pages faster than Firefox.  You may want to compare and see if the difference is important to you.  There is a very noticeable difference.  I hadn't compared Chrome with Firefox for speed on a fast machine.  I compared them on a slow machine running XP perhaps six or eight months ago.  I had expected that, if Chrome was faster, there would have been a noticeable difference, even though the machine was slow.  But there wasn't a difference that amounted to anything.

 

I recently decided to compare on a reasonably fast machine running Windows 7 since many people have said on lists I'm on that Chrome is faster.  There is a very noticeable difference in speed on my Windows 7 machine.  I don't know what the results would have been on a fast XP machine.

 

I haven't used Chrome much but the increase in speed is the reason I say it's better for general browsing.

 

The Chrome interface is different than Firefox or Internet Explorer.  It isn't difficult to learn but it is different.  You will likely want a tutorial or some instructional material.  If you are good at learning by exploring, you may not want or need such material, at least not to use in depth, but you may benefit in early learning by using material.

 

The main things to know in terms of the differences in the interface are that Chrome shows many things as web pages, such as settings and history and there is one menu, which you can open with alt f, that is, hold alt and press f.  Of course, there are submenus and there are also items that open like web pages such as settings.

 

I don't recall if there are classic dialogs that open from the main menu.

But if you work with settings, you need to know that the settings interface doesn't work quite properly in the following way:

It's a web page-like interface but there some controls that don't work as they should.  I tried to activate two buttons today and I couldn't do so in browse mode using NVDA.  I don't know what JAWS does.  I had to manually go into forms mode, and activate the buttons.  I may have had to tab to the button because forms mode may not have been properly calibrated with browse mode in that interface, at least at times.

 

I seem to recall that in another instance, I needed to be in browse mode to activate something but I'd have to experiment more to know if that is the case since I don't have a clear memory of whether that was necessary.

 

There's a very useful settings search feature in settings.

 

One of my main objections to Chrome in the past was that the book marks interface is not nearly as comvenient to work with as Firefox because the search feature in Chrome book marks appears to be inaccessible.  I very recently learned from someone on a list I follow that this problem can be more or less eliminated.  I say more or less because I haven't played with it much, but enough to see that it works well or reasonably well.  I'm hedging because I'd want to play with it more before saying just how well it works.  It' appears to work well from the very little testing I've done.  If you are in the address bar, you can type some or all of what you want to find such as york times or new york times and you can up and down arrow through results.  Some of them will be search results using a search engine but the top results in the list should be from book marks and history.  Try reading the current line after typing to see if that contains the first result.  I haven't played with the feature more than a little and I'm not sure.  But if it works well, this would eliminate what I consider to be an important deficiency. In other words, this feature may make book marks just as easy to use in Chrome as in Firefox.

 

If you use Firefox extensions that you consider important and use them a lot, that may be a consideration in which browser you want to use.  and then, there's just convenience of not learning a new interface and continuing to use the familiar Firefox.  You, of course, can determine questions like that.  It's nice to have pages load a good deal faster, but the importance of speed may vary from user to user.  But if you haven't compared with a hands on test, you may wish to.

 

Browsing is either identical or nearly identical between the browsers because they both use browse mode, or the Virtual PC cursor, which is the JAWS name for the same thing.

 

So you can compare by installing Chrome, and then opening and using some web sites.  Control l moves you to the address bar, just as in Firefox.  I believe when you open Chrome, you are automatically placed on the address bar, but you can check.  If you want to make sure, it takes almost no time to execute control l.

 

I hope those who are interested in this subject find these comments useful.

If people are curious or dissatisfied with Firefox or another browser, they may want to try Chrome.  I haven't used Edge at all so I don't know how Edge compares.

 

Gene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


Gerardo Corripio
 

OH OK thanks for the clarification! I'll definitely give it a go!


El 15/05/2018 a las 08:26 a.m., Brian Vogel escribió:
If you use the omnibar (since it's now allowed to be used for entering search criteria for your chosen default search engine, it's no longer the web address edit box) to enter criteria for a search, hitting "ALT+Enter" will cause those results to be opened in a separate tab.

If you just hit Enter they will open in the current tab, knocking out whatever you were already looking at in that tab.

By the way, this is also true in Firefox as well.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

     After all, a democracy based solely on the values of the majority, with no overriding ethical principles and processes, is nothing more than clubhouse democracy, great for those on the inside and a tyranny for those who fail to see eye to eye with the majority.

         ~ Paul Noeldner, May 16, 2007 

 

 


-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


 

It saves as much time as you do web searches. Me: I do them lots, so it saves me a ton of time.

You are right though, you can (for the sake of an extra keystroke) open a new tab with control t (new windows oepn slower) and then do your search.

HTH,

CHris

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 2:34 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Usually, if you go to the address bar and type an address or a search and open a new page,  it will open in the same window.  Alt enter, according to the message, I haven't tried it, opens the new page in a new window so you now have two Windows opened.  This saves a small amount of time but it makes little difference.  You can accomplish the same thing in any standard Windows browser by using the command control n when you are on a web page, to open a new browser window and opening a page however you want in that window, typing an address, a search, history, a bookmark from the list or using the address bar to find it.  You are in a new browser window so you can do anything you can do in any browser window.
 
Gene. 
----- Original Message -----
In the original message, typing a search is done instead of typing a web address but alt enter should do the same thing, no matter how you open a new web page.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:14 AM
Subject: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

Wow thanks for this keystroke! I'm starting to love Chrome as wel! but I didn't grasp what's used for. could you maybe give an example? yes I understanding it's for searching, but not as clearly as I'like. I'm sure this keystroke will become one of my main ones!
El 15/05/2018 a las 01:39 a.m., Chris Norman via Groups.Io escribió:

Hi,

When the downloads window is open you do get the progress sound.


I've been using Chrome as my default browser for a while now, and have just bought a Chromebook to boot. I love both.


One of the coolest shortcuts i've found in Chrome is alt enter: With a page open you navigate to the omnibar (the address bar) and type a search. When you press alt enter it opens what you just searched for in a new tab without you having to close your current web page.


Needless to say I am a Chrome convert.


It also works extremely well with my Mindspace Client, far better than Firefox did when I tried it last (about a month ago). Mindspace involves lots of multilayered sounds and lots of dynamic page creation with JavaScript which Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine handles with ease, far Faster than Firefox's SpiderMonkey I think it's called.


While the above was of course a shameless plug, if you do decide to have a look at Mindspace please be aware that it is pre-alpha, and as such isn't anywhere near complete.


HTH,


Chris


On 15/05/2018 02:01, Kenny wrote:

Thanks for sharing the proper shortcut.


I'm curious why hasn't NVDA been configured to speak these "Actions" when they dynamically appear in Google Chrome? This is the only issue I have with the browser.


You click on a link to download a file and you have no idea the download has started. You have to hit Ctrl+j to bring up the Download Manager to check. Even other Actions aren't spoken automatically by NVDA for the Chrome browser.


Can't that cool NVDA installation progress sound be configured to activate for the download progress for Chrome too?


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shif    t+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny
Sent: 10 May 2018 04:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

Can you please share your tutorial with the list again?

 

I'm hoping you gone over a work around to have the messages being pushed to Chrome's notification bar automatically read by NVDA?

 

Also what is the shortcut key to be placed in the notification bar? The alt+n key combination doesn't seem to work. Thanks.

 

On 5/6/2018 6:21 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi all!

I have been telling people just how great Chrome is for two and a half years.

I am so happy that all of you are finding it to be true.

If anyone needs my text tutorial I wrote on how to use Chrome, and take you through all settings, I will paste it on the list.

I have done this around ten times on all the lists, but you are still finding out for the first time, just how great Chrome is.

Just read works great for just reading an article on the page.

CTRL+J allows you to hear the status of the downloads. Now, CTRL+Shift+O allows you to open the bookmarks manager, and you can arrange them in different folders and back them up.

Chrome is great with Youtube, and streaming media. Chrome is good for a lot other than just simple browsing.

Have a great one, and I am celebrating that you are finally getting used to Chrome!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: juan gonzalez
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 5:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

I use the add on called sound on for navigational sounds.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 9:28 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

Would anyone know if Chrome has sounds? one of the annoyances with current firefox is figuring out when downloads are finished or when a page is refreshing itself, ie you normally hear the ticks  in the old version due to navigational sounds.

Until i find a browser with this function of sound I'm loathe to get a new browser over ff52, but the problem is that I've been reading that some sites now do not support the old versions of Firefox and tell you so when you have things like modal windows whatever they are.

On XP to make Firefox perform even reasonably you need to use a version 45, as after this the actual load up times are hugely slowed, my guess is that the code is made for multi processor  devices, not single core ones.This is also why on xp you might find that Chrome and firefox are similar in page loading times.

 

Things are no pushing ahead so fast on sites that its not uncommon to see the message you browser is unsupported get this or that then you can come back.

To me this is a weird thing for commercial sites to do, as they are, in effect pushing away potential customers, but hey, that is their business.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal E-mail to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:57 AM

Subject: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

 

I may have sent messages in the past in which I expressed a much stronger liking for Firefox than Chrome.  At this point, I've changed my mind and, unless things change over time, as they may as Firefox continues to implement its new internal technical changes, I consider Chrome to be superior for general browsing. I haven't tested it for uses such as streaming or RSS or other uses.  I will therefore only address general browsing and the interface.  Others may want to comment on other aspects I haven't compared.

 

This is a long message, a bit of a review and a bit of discussion of the interface.  I hope those interested in the subject find it useful.

 

If you try Chrome and find it superior for general browsing, you may still not want to use Chrome as your main browser.  There are various considerations.  I'll explain why I changed my mind and what you may want to consider.  You may have other or different considerations as well.

 

The reason I say Chrome is better for general browsing is because it loads pages faster than Firefox.  You may want to compare and see if the difference is important to you.  There is a very noticeable difference.  I hadn't compared Chrome with Firefox for speed on a fast machine.  I compared them on a slow machine running XP perhaps six or eight months ago.  I had expected that, if Chrome was faster, there would have been a noticeable difference, even though the machine was slow.  But there wasn't a difference that amounted to anything.

 

I recently decided to compare on a reasonably fast machine running Windows 7 since many people have said on lists I'm on that Chrome is faster.  There is a very noticeable difference in speed on my Windows 7 machine.  I don't know what the results would have been on a fast XP machine.

 

I haven't used Chrome much but the increase in speed is the reason I say it's better for general browsing.

 

The Chrome interface is different than Firefox or Internet Explorer.  It isn't difficult to learn but it is different.  You will likely want a tutorial or some instructional material.  If you are good at learning by exploring, you may not want or need such material, at least not to use in depth, but you may benefit in early learning by using material.

 

The main things to know in terms of the differences in the interface are that Chrome shows many things as web pages, such as settings and history and there is one menu, which you can open with alt f, that is, hold alt and press f.  Of course, there are submenus and there are also items that open like web pages such as settings.

 

I don't recall if there are classic dialogs that open from the main menu.

But if you work with settings, you need to know that the settings interface doesn't work quite properly in the following way:

It's a web page-like interface but there some controls that don't work as they should.  I tried to activate two buttons today and I couldn't do so in browse mode using NVDA.  I don't know what JAWS does.  I had to manually go into forms mode, and activate the buttons.  I may have had to tab to the button because forms mode may not have been properly calibrated with browse mode in that interface, at least at times.

 

I seem to recall that in another instance, I needed to be in browse mode to activate something but I'd have to experiment more to know if that is the case since I don't have a clear memory of whether that was necessary.

 

There's a very useful settings search feature in settings.

 

One of my main objections to Chrome in the past was that the book marks interface is not nearly as comvenient to work with as Firefox because the search feature in Chrome book marks appears to be inaccessible.  I very recently learned from someone on a list I follow that this problem can be more or less eliminated.  I say more or less because I haven't played with it much, but enough to see that it works well or reasonably well.  I'm hedging because I'd want to play with it more before saying just how well it works.  It' appears to work well from the very little testing I've done.  If you are in the address bar, you can type some or all of what you want to find such as york times or new york times and you can up and down arrow through results.  Some of them will be search results using a search engine but the top results in the list should be from book marks and history.  Try reading the current line after typing to see if that contains the first result.  I haven't played with the feature more than a little and I'm not sure.  But if it works well, this would eliminate what I consider to be an important deficiency. In other words, this feature may make book marks just as easy to use in Chrome as in Firefox.

 

If you use Firefox extensions that you consider important and use them a lot, that may be a consideration in which browser you want to use.  and then, there's just convenience of not learning a new interface and continuing to use the familiar Firefox.  You, of course, can determine questions like that.  It's nice to have pages load a good deal faster, but the importance of speed may vary from user to user.  But if you haven't compared with a hands on test, you may wish to.

 

Browsing is either identical or nearly identical between the browsers because they both use browse mode, or the Virtual PC cursor, which is the JAWS name for the same thing.

 

So you can compare by installing Chrome, and then opening and using some web sites.  Control l moves you to the address bar, just as in Firefox.  I believe when you open Chrome, you are automatically placed on the address bar, but you can check.  If you want to make sure, it takes almost no time to execute control l.

 

I hope those who are interested in this subject find these comments useful.

If people are curious or dissatisfied with Firefox or another browser, they may want to try Chrome.  I haven't used Edge at all so I don't know how Edge compares.

 

Gene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird




--

Take care,

Chris Norman


Gene
 

Perhaps the time difference depends on what opens when you open a new window.  If you use control n, does your home page open?  What about control t?  I'm not sure what happens.  If the home page opens, then using control n and control t may take longer, especially in today's environment where most pages are so complex and present so much advertising.  I have about:blank open so for me, I don't think there is any meaningful difference.  I hadn't thought about what opens if you use control n or t.  Does the home page open then?
 
Gene

Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:29 AM
Subject: Re: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

It saves as much time as you do web searches. Me: I do them lots, so it saves me a ton of time.

You are right though, you can (for the sake of an extra keystroke) open a new tab with control t (new windows oepn slower) and then do your search.

HTH,

CHris

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 2:34 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Usually, if you go to the address bar and type an address or a search and open a new page,  it will open in the same window.  Alt enter, according to the message, I haven't tried it, opens the new page in a new window so you now have two Windows opened.  This saves a small amount of time but it makes little difference.  You can accomplish the same thing in any standard Windows browser by using the command control n when you are on a web page, to open a new browser window and opening a page however you want in that window, typing an address, a search, history, a bookmark from the list or using the address bar to find it.  You are in a new browser window so you can do anything you can do in any browser window.
 
Gene. 
----- Original Message -----
In the original message, typing a search is done instead of typing a web address but alt enter should do the same thing, no matter how you open a new web page.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:14 AM
Subject: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

Wow thanks for this keystroke! I'm starting to love Chrome as wel! but I didn't grasp what's used for. could you maybe give an example? yes I understanding it's for searching, but not as clearly as I'like. I'm sure this keystroke will become one of my main ones!
El 15/05/2018 a las 01:39 a.m., Chris Norman via Groups.Io escribió:

Hi,

When the downloads window is open you do get the progress sound.


I've been using Chrome as my default browser for a while now, and have just bought a Chromebook to boot. I love both.


One of the coolest shortcuts i've found in Chrome is alt enter: With a page open you navigate to the omnibar (the address bar) and type a search. When you press alt enter it opens what you just searched for in a new tab without you having to close your current web page.


Needless to say I am a Chrome convert.


It also works extremely well with my Mindspace Client, far better than Firefox did when I tried it last (about a month ago). Mindspace involves lots of multilayered sounds and lots of dynamic page creation with JavaScript which Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine handles with ease, far Faster than Firefox's SpiderMonkey I think it's called.


While the above was of course a shameless plug, if you do decide to have a look at Mindspace please be aware that it is pre-alpha, and as such isn't anywhere near complete.


HTH,


Chris


On 15/05/2018 02:01, Kenny wrote:

Thanks for sharing the proper shortcut.


I'm curious why hasn't NVDA been configured to speak these "Actions" when they dynamically appear in Google Chrome? This is the only issue I have with the browser.


You click on a link to download a file and you have no idea the download has started. You have to hit Ctrl+j to bring up the Download Manager to check. Even other Actions aren't spoken automatically by NVDA for the Chrome browser.


Can't that cool NVDA installation progress sound be configured to activate for the download progress for Chrome too?


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shif    t+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny
Sent: 10 May 2018 04:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

Can you please share your tutorial with the list again?

 

I'm hoping you gone over a work around to have the messages being pushed to Chrome's notification bar automatically read by NVDA?

 

Also what is the shortcut key to be placed in the notification bar? The alt+n key combination doesn't seem to work. Thanks.

 

On 5/6/2018 6:21 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi all!

I have been telling people just how great Chrome is for two and a half years.

I am so happy that all of you are finding it to be true.

If anyone needs my text tutorial I wrote on how to use Chrome, and take you through all settings, I will paste it on the list.

I have done this around ten times on all the lists, but you are still finding out for the first time, just how great Chrome is.

Just read works great for just reading an article on the page.

CTRL+J allows you to hear the status of the downloads. Now, CTRL+Shift+O allows you to open the bookmarks manager, and you can arrange them in different folders and back them up.

Chrome is great with Youtube, and streaming media. Chrome is good for a lot other than just simple browsing.

Have a great one, and I am celebrating that you are finally getting used to Chrome!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: juan gonzalez
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 5:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

I use the add on called sound on for navigational sounds.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 9:28 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

Would anyone know if Chrome has sounds? one of the annoyances with current firefox is figuring out when downloads are finished or when a page is refreshing itself, ie you normally hear the ticks  in the old version due to navigational sounds.

Until i find a browser with this function of sound I'm loathe to get a new browser over ff52, but the problem is that I've been reading that some sites now do not support the old versions of Firefox and tell you so when you have things like modal windows whatever they are.

On XP to make Firefox perform even reasonably you need to use a version 45, as after this the actual load up times are hugely slowed, my guess is that the code is made for multi processor  devices, not single core ones.This is also why on xp you might find that Chrome and firefox are similar in page loading times.

 

Things are no pushing ahead so fast on sites that its not uncommon to see the message you browser is unsupported get this or that then you can come back.

To me this is a weird thing for commercial sites to do, as they are, in effect pushing away potential customers, but hey, that is their business.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal E-mail to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:57 AM

Subject: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

 

I may have sent messages in the past in which I expressed a much stronger liking for Firefox than Chrome.  At this point, I've changed my mind and, unless things change over time, as they may as Firefox continues to implement its new internal technical changes, I consider Chrome to be superior for general browsing. I haven't tested it for uses such as streaming or RSS or other uses.  I will therefore only address general browsing and the interface.  Others may want to comment on other aspects I haven't compared.

 

This is a long message, a bit of a review and a bit of discussion of the interface.  I hope those interested in the subject find it useful.

 

If you try Chrome and find it superior for general browsing, you may still not want to use Chrome as your main browser.  There are various considerations.  I'll explain why I changed my mind and what you may want to consider.  You may have other or different considerations as well.

 

The reason I say Chrome is better for general browsing is because it loads pages faster than Firefox.  You may want to compare and see if the difference is important to you.  There is a very noticeable difference.  I hadn't compared Chrome with Firefox for speed on a fast machine.  I compared them on a slow machine running XP perhaps six or eight months ago.  I had expected that, if Chrome was faster, there would have been a noticeable difference, even though the machine was slow.  But there wasn't a difference that amounted to anything.

 

I recently decided to compare on a reasonably fast machine running Windows 7 since many people have said on lists I'm on that Chrome is faster.  There is a very noticeable difference in speed on my Windows 7 machine.  I don't know what the results would have been on a fast XP machine.

 

I haven't used Chrome much but the increase in speed is the reason I say it's better for general browsing.

 

The Chrome interface is different than Firefox or Internet Explorer.  It isn't difficult to learn but it is different.  You will likely want a tutorial or some instructional material.  If you are good at learning by exploring, you may not want or need such material, at least not to use in depth, but you may benefit in early learning by using material.

 

The main things to know in terms of the differences in the interface are that Chrome shows many things as web pages, such as settings and history and there is one menu, which you can open with alt f, that is, hold alt and press f.  Of course, there are submenus and there are also items that open like web pages such as settings.

 

I don't recall if there are classic dialogs that open from the main menu.

But if you work with settings, you need to know that the settings interface doesn't work quite properly in the following way:

It's a web page-like interface but there some controls that don't work as they should.  I tried to activate two buttons today and I couldn't do so in browse mode using NVDA.  I don't know what JAWS does.  I had to manually go into forms mode, and activate the buttons.  I may have had to tab to the button because forms mode may not have been properly calibrated with browse mode in that interface, at least at times.

 

I seem to recall that in another instance, I needed to be in browse mode to activate something but I'd have to experiment more to know if that is the case since I don't have a clear memory of whether that was necessary.

 

There's a very useful settings search feature in settings.

 

One of my main objections to Chrome in the past was that the book marks interface is not nearly as comvenient to work with as Firefox because the search feature in Chrome book marks appears to be inaccessible.  I very recently learned from someone on a list I follow that this problem can be more or less eliminated.  I say more or less because I haven't played with it much, but enough to see that it works well or reasonably well.  I'm hedging because I'd want to play with it more before saying just how well it works.  It' appears to work well from the very little testing I've done.  If you are in the address bar, you can type some or all of what you want to find such as york times or new york times and you can up and down arrow through results.  Some of them will be search results using a search engine but the top results in the list should be from book marks and history.  Try reading the current line after typing to see if that contains the first result.  I haven't played with the feature more than a little and I'm not sure.  But if it works well, this would eliminate what I consider to be an important deficiency. In other words, this feature may make book marks just as easy to use in Chrome as in Firefox.

 

If you use Firefox extensions that you consider important and use them a lot, that may be a consideration in which browser you want to use.  and then, there's just convenience of not learning a new interface and continuing to use the familiar Firefox.  You, of course, can determine questions like that.  It's nice to have pages load a good deal faster, but the importance of speed may vary from user to user.  But if you haven't compared with a hands on test, you may wish to.

 

Browsing is either identical or nearly identical between the browsers because they both use browse mode, or the Virtual PC cursor, which is the JAWS name for the same thing.

 

So you can compare by installing Chrome, and then opening and using some web sites.  Control l moves you to the address bar, just as in Firefox.  I believe when you open Chrome, you are automatically placed on the address bar, but you can check.  If you want to make sure, it takes almost no time to execute control l.

 

I hope those who are interested in this subject find these comments useful.

If people are curious or dissatisfied with Firefox or another browser, they may want to try Chrome.  I haven't used Edge at all so I don't know how Edge compares.

 

Gene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird




--

Take care,

Chris Norman


 

You can configure what you want to happen when you open a new tab.

I'm basing my (mostly assumption) on the idea that to create a new window a whole window object has to be created and registered with the OS.

Certainly on my desktop - which isn't the fastest thing in the world - a new tab is quicker to load, and has the added benefit that you can use control and the number keys to focus the tab at that position. Not something you can do with new windows, unless you really like alt tab.

HTH,

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 4:47 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Perhaps the time difference depends on what opens when you open a new window.  If you use control n, does your home page open?  What about control t?  I'm not sure what happens.  If the home page opens, then using control n and control t may take longer, especially in today's environment where most pages are so complex and present so much advertising.  I have about:blank open so for me, I don't think there is any meaningful difference.  I hadn't thought about what opens if you use control n or t.  Does the home page open then?
 
Gene

Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:29 AM
Subject: Re: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

It saves as much time as you do web searches. Me: I do them lots, so it saves me a ton of time.

You are right though, you can (for the sake of an extra keystroke) open a new tab with control t (new windows oepn slower) and then do your search.

HTH,

CHris

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 2:34 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Usually, if you go to the address bar and type an address or a search and open a new page,  it will open in the same window.  Alt enter, according to the message, I haven't tried it, opens the new page in a new window so you now have two Windows opened.  This saves a small amount of time but it makes little difference.  You can accomplish the same thing in any standard Windows browser by using the command control n when you are on a web page, to open a new browser window and opening a page however you want in that window, typing an address, a search, history, a bookmark from the list or using the address bar to find it.  You are in a new browser window so you can do anything you can do in any browser window.
 
Gene. 
----- Original Message -----
In the original message, typing a search is done instead of typing a web address but alt enter should do the same thing, no matter how you open a new web page.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:14 AM
Subject: Alt+Enter? Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

Wow thanks for this keystroke! I'm starting to love Chrome as wel! but I didn't grasp what's used for. could you maybe give an example? yes I understanding it's for searching, but not as clearly as I'like. I'm sure this keystroke will become one of my main ones!
El 15/05/2018 a las 01:39 a.m., Chris Norman via Groups.Io escribió:

Hi,

When the downloads window is open you do get the progress sound.


I've been using Chrome as my default browser for a while now, and have just bought a Chromebook to boot. I love both.


One of the coolest shortcuts i've found in Chrome is alt enter: With a page open you navigate to the omnibar (the address bar) and type a search. When you press alt enter it opens what you just searched for in a new tab without you having to close your current web page.


Needless to say I am a Chrome convert.


It also works extremely well with my Mindspace Client, far better than Firefox did when I tried it last (about a month ago). Mindspace involves lots of multilayered sounds and lots of dynamic page creation with JavaScript which Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine handles with ease, far Faster than Firefox's SpiderMonkey I think it's called.


While the above was of course a shameless plug, if you do decide to have a look at Mindspace please be aware that it is pre-alpha, and as such isn't anywhere near complete.


HTH,


Chris


On 15/05/2018 02:01, Kenny wrote:

Thanks for sharing the proper shortcut.


I'm curious why hasn't NVDA been configured to speak these "Actions" when they dynamically appear in Google Chrome? This is the only issue I have with the browser.


You click on a link to download a file and you have no idea the download has started. You have to hit Ctrl+j to bring up the Download Manager to check. Even other Actions aren't spoken automatically by NVDA for the Chrome browser.


Can't that cool NVDA installation progress sound be configured to activate for the download progress for Chrome too?


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shif    t+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenny
Sent: 10 May 2018 04:31
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

Can you please share your tutorial with the list again?

 

I'm hoping you gone over a work around to have the messages being pushed to Chrome's notification bar automatically read by NVDA?

 

Also what is the shortcut key to be placed in the notification bar? The alt+n key combination doesn't seem to work. Thanks.

 

On 5/6/2018 6:21 PM, David Moore wrote:

Hi all!

I have been telling people just how great Chrome is for two and a half years.

I am so happy that all of you are finding it to be true.

If anyone needs my text tutorial I wrote on how to use Chrome, and take you through all settings, I will paste it on the list.

I have done this around ten times on all the lists, but you are still finding out for the first time, just how great Chrome is.

Just read works great for just reading an article on the page.

CTRL+J allows you to hear the status of the downloads. Now, CTRL+Shift+O allows you to open the bookmarks manager, and you can arrange them in different folders and back them up.

Chrome is great with Youtube, and streaming media. Chrome is good for a lot other than just simple browsing.

Have a great one, and I am celebrating that you are finally getting used to Chrome!

David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: juan gonzalez
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 5:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it muchmore now

 

I use the add on called sound on for navigational sounds.

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io

Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 9:28 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

Would anyone know if Chrome has sounds? one of the annoyances with current firefox is figuring out when downloads are finished or when a page is refreshing itself, ie you normally hear the ticks  in the old version due to navigational sounds.

Until i find a browser with this function of sound I'm loathe to get a new browser over ff52, but the problem is that I've been reading that some sites now do not support the old versions of Firefox and tell you so when you have things like modal windows whatever they are.

On XP to make Firefox perform even reasonably you need to use a version 45, as after this the actual load up times are hugely slowed, my guess is that the code is made for multi processor  devices, not single core ones.This is also why on xp you might find that Chrome and firefox are similar in page loading times.

 

Things are no pushing ahead so fast on sites that its not uncommon to see the message you browser is unsupported get this or that then you can come back.

To me this is a weird thing for commercial sites to do, as they are, in effect pushing away potential customers, but hey, that is their business.

Brian

 

bglists@...

Sent via blueyonder.

Please address personal E-mail to:-

briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'

in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>

To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2018 10:57 AM

Subject: [nvda] I've largely changed my mind about Chrome, I like it much more now

 

 

I may have sent messages in the past in which I expressed a much stronger liking for Firefox than Chrome.  At this point, I've changed my mind and, unless things change over time, as they may as Firefox continues to implement its new internal technical changes, I consider Chrome to be superior for general browsing. I haven't tested it for uses such as streaming or RSS or other uses.  I will therefore only address general browsing and the interface.  Others may want to comment on other aspects I haven't compared.

 

This is a long message, a bit of a review and a bit of discussion of the interface.  I hope those interested in the subject find it useful.

 

If you try Chrome and find it superior for general browsing, you may still not want to use Chrome as your main browser.  There are various considerations.  I'll explain why I changed my mind and what you may want to consider.  You may have other or different considerations as well.

 

The reason I say Chrome is better for general browsing is because it loads pages faster than Firefox.  You may want to compare and see if the difference is important to you.  There is a very noticeable difference.  I hadn't compared Chrome with Firefox for speed on a fast machine.  I compared them on a slow machine running XP perhaps six or eight months ago.  I had expected that, if Chrome was faster, there would have been a noticeable difference, even though the machine was slow.  But there wasn't a difference that amounted to anything.

 

I recently decided to compare on a reasonably fast machine running Windows 7 since many people have said on lists I'm on that Chrome is faster.  There is a very noticeable difference in speed on my Windows 7 machine.  I don't know what the results would have been on a fast XP machine.

 

I haven't used Chrome much but the increase in speed is the reason I say it's better for general browsing.

 

The Chrome interface is different than Firefox or Internet Explorer.  It isn't difficult to learn but it is different.  You will likely want a tutorial or some instructional material.  If you are good at learning by exploring, you may not want or need such material, at least not to use in depth, but you may benefit in early learning by using material.

 

The main things to know in terms of the differences in the interface are that Chrome shows many things as web pages, such as settings and history and there is one menu, which you can open with alt f, that is, hold alt and press f.  Of course, there are submenus and there are also items that open like web pages such as settings.

 

I don't recall if there are classic dialogs that open from the main menu.

But if you work with settings, you need to know that the settings interface doesn't work quite properly in the following way:

It's a web page-like interface but there some controls that don't work as they should.  I tried to activate two buttons today and I couldn't do so in browse mode using NVDA.  I don't know what JAWS does.  I had to manually go into forms mode, and activate the buttons.  I may have had to tab to the button because forms mode may not have been properly calibrated with browse mode in that interface, at least at times.

 

I seem to recall that in another instance, I needed to be in browse mode to activate something but I'd have to experiment more to know if that is the case since I don't have a clear memory of whether that was necessary.

 

There's a very useful settings search feature in settings.

 

One of my main objections to Chrome in the past was that the book marks interface is not nearly as comvenient to work with as Firefox because the search feature in Chrome book marks appears to be inaccessible.  I very recently learned from someone on a list I follow that this problem can be more or less eliminated.  I say more or less because I haven't played with it much, but enough to see that it works well or reasonably well.  I'm hedging because I'd want to play with it more before saying just how well it works.  It' appears to work well from the very little testing I've done.  If you are in the address bar, you can type some or all of what you want to find such as york times or new york times and you can up and down arrow through results.  Some of them will be search results using a search engine but the top results in the list should be from book marks and history.  Try reading the current line after typing to see if that contains the first result.  I haven't played with the feature more than a little and I'm not sure.  But if it works well, this would eliminate what I consider to be an important deficiency. In other words, this feature may make book marks just as easy to use in Chrome as in Firefox.

 

If you use Firefox extensions that you consider important and use them a lot, that may be a consideration in which browser you want to use.  and then, there's just convenience of not learning a new interface and continuing to use the familiar Firefox.  You, of course, can determine questions like that.  It's nice to have pages load a good deal faster, but the importance of speed may vary from user to user.  But if you haven't compared with a hands on test, you may wish to.

 

Browsing is either identical or nearly identical between the browsers because they both use browse mode, or the Virtual PC cursor, which is the JAWS name for the same thing.

 

So you can compare by installing Chrome, and then opening and using some web sites.  Control l moves you to the address bar, just as in Firefox.  I believe when you open Chrome, you are automatically placed on the address bar, but you can check.  If you want to make sure, it takes almost no time to execute control l.

 

I hope those who are interested in this subject find these comments useful.

If people are curious or dissatisfied with Firefox or another browser, they may want to try Chrome.  I haven't used Edge at all so I don't know how Edge compares.

 

Gene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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Take care,

Chris Norman




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Take care,

Chris Norman