Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on


 

I use feeds all the time because everything comes straight to me, rather than me having to browse. Best part is, I can combine sources into one huge RSS feed. As for the twitter clients, Twitter will be shutting down third party support in August.


Brian's Mail list account
 

Not strictly true, they are going to charge an arm and a leg for every user that third party clients has. I guess its academic as it amounts to the same thing in the end. Are twitter feeling the pinch in their profits?
Poor dears. Bout time some other platform had a look in.
Not that I care too much found the whole thing a terribly time wasting thing a couple of years ago now.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 2:57 PM
Subject: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on


I use feeds all the time because everything comes straight to me, rather than me having to browse. Best part is, I can combine sources into one huge RSS feed. As for the twitter clients, Twitter will be shutting down third party support in August.


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much, though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the change.


Ervin, Glenn
 

Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.


Gene
 

Most people won't pay, regardless and only those who pay may get more confidentiality. 
 
I haven't looked into this, but I think this is being done to discourage people from using third party clients, which, I suspect, don't show advertising.  So I doubt a paid service is coming and I suspect this is just to cause more people to receive ads.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:33 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service.  FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.








 

Well someone on one of my forums has allready got one of those change pititions to twitter to stop breaking it for the blind.

Since I know these things are only feel good things and non binding I am unsure what the point is.

I did sign it but then I sign everything but bar all the extra spam I doubt things will change.

On 5/22/2018 4:11 AM, Travis Siegel wrote:
This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much, though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the change.



.


 

I don't know as a user if I would want to pay to post tweats or own facebook.

As a business sure maybe that would be fine.

But as a user I don't know.

I don't use either service enough to concidder paying for it.

I don't use wordpress enough to warrent me paying for it.

On 5/22/2018 4:33 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.






Ervin, Glenn
 

I heard a news story that stated that FB might start charging.
It might be a choice, where one gets to do more with it if you pay.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 4:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

I don't know as a user if I would want to pay to post tweats or own
facebook.

As a business sure maybe that would be fine.

But as a user I don't know.

I don't use either service enough to concidder paying for it.

I don't use wordpress enough to warrent me paying for it.




On 5/22/2018 4:33 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.







 

Adds make the world work.

I'd like adds, like maybe for my local stores things relivent to my country.

Like on radio or tv, things I can look through maybe.

The issue is addware, porn, stuff that gets in the way and those damn popups.

I subscribe to newsletters and promos from my stores, I read local adds on websites in new zealand for things, I may check those out later.

On 5/22/2018 6:05 AM, Gene wrote:
Most people won't pay, regardless and only those who pay may get more confidentiality.

I haven't looked into this, but I think this is being done to discourage people from using third party clients, which, I suspect, don't show advertising. So I doubt a paid service is coming and I suspect this is just to cause more people to receive ads.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:33 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on


Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools. It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now. As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape. I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked. After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates. It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts. I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.








 

Wordpress does that for pro sites and a few things but not basic services.

I have to work to get it to not do that now but yeah its all going that way.

On 5/22/2018 9:27 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
I heard a news story that stated that FB might start charging.
It might be a choice, where one gets to do more with it if you pay.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 4:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

I don't know as a user if I would want to pay to post tweats or own
facebook.

As a business sure maybe that would be fine.

But as a user I don't know.

I don't use either service enough to concidder paying for it.

I don't use wordpress enough to warrent me paying for it.




On 5/22/2018 4:33 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.










Sarah k Alawami
 

Ther eis no such thing as a free lunch. I hap over 100 dollars a month for  my podcast and that's for 3 or 4 separate  survices just to keep the thign running. I'm willing to do it to. It's better than the free option any day.

On May 21, 2018, at 2:33 PM, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@...> wrote:

Wordpress does that for pro sites and a few things but not basic services.

I have to work to get it to not do that now but yeah its all going that way.




On 5/22/2018 9:27 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
I heard a news story that stated that FB might start charging.
It might be a choice, where one gets to do more with it if you pay.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 4:24 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

I don't know as a user if I would want to pay to post tweats or own
facebook.

As a business sure maybe that would be fine.

But as a user I don't know.

I don't use either service enough to concidder paying for it.

I don't use wordpress enough to warrent me paying for it.




On 5/22/2018 4:33 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools.  It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now.  As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape.  I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked.  After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates.  It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts.  I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.
















Brian's Mail list account
 

This is th4e second time this has occurred, of course, they did say they would delay it for consultation but really the blind are the smallest part of it. Its everyone else they want to come back to their web site or their own app. Its very similar to what the BBC did with the tv I player some times ago, removing all the metadata needed to construct the off browser experience, so the companies making third party access tools had to resort to screen scraping which as you can imagine besides being slower is also going to mean a new version every time the web site is changed in any way.
As far as I can tell from what the various twitter campaigns say is that Twitter never intended the api to be use to avoid paid for adverts and content, as this is how they keep the platform free for the public.
They have mooted a paid for service with no adverts, but also from reading between the lines they can detect ad blockers and won't let you use the site with one turned on, if not now but eventually.
Looking at it selfishly from their revenue point of view, I suppose they have to make money somehow and with the possibility that in the states the loss of net neutrality possibly meaning sites be paying carriers to not delay their packets, they are just minding their backs. as always the undesired result of poorer access for disabled is just collateral damage.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on


Well someone on one of my forums has allready got one of those change pititions to twitter to stop breaking it for the blind.

Since I know these things are only feel good things and non binding I am unsure what the point is.

I did sign it but then I sign everything but bar all the extra spam I doubt things will change.





On 5/22/2018 4:11 AM, Travis Siegel wrote:
This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK tools. It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much, though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for quite some time now. As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape. I didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it isn't surprising that the questions were being asked. After all, every company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients simply not being able to get realtime updates. It appears more digging is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the announcement than actual facts. I suspect truthful information will slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the change.



.


Brian's Mail list account
 

I go back a long way. Indeed back to the days of Prestel, which I used to edit on under the Micronet system.
So many services were not free. The way it worked was by pages with red cost amounts in one corner with a warning prior to going to one.
of course as you were subscribed to the system, they could take the extra money and pass it on to the page owners.
Telesoftware was one thing, but also some closed user groups and online games also incurred charges either on a timed basis or cost per page.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:24 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on


I don't know as a user if I would want to pay to post tweats or own facebook.

As a business sure maybe that would be fine.

But as a user I don't know.

I don't use either service enough to concidder paying for it.

I don't use wordpress enough to warrent me paying for it.




On 5/22/2018 4:33 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Also, we may have more confidentiality with a paid service. FaceBook may eventually choose this model because when we have a free service, the only method of the company making money is allowing data mining.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 11:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on

This link:
https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
talks about why they are discontinuing support for one of their SDK
tools. It will still continue to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
won't be contributing to it anymore.
On the link:
https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
you can get details on exactly what they're charging for, and how much,
though it's not laid out in a straightforward method, you need to select
the various features, and their level to see what the fees are.
It actually looks like twitter has been targeting fee based services for
quite some time now. As far back as 2010, twitter was charging for
access to historical data for researchers, commercial developers who
wanted back history, and the like, so this isn't anything new. Last
march, twitter had run a series of surveys, asking if users would be
willing to pay for different components of the twitter landscape. I
didn't find anything breaking down what those responses were, but it
isn't surprising that the questions were being asked. After all, every
company has a need to make money, or they won't remain a company for
very long.
But, as far as the impending charging for access goes:
https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
seems to indicate that the fees for a standard twitter client aren't
trivial, and seems to contradict what I read earlier about clients
simply not being able to get realtime updates. It appears more digging
is necessary.
Apparently, twitter is trying to herd users into using official twitter
clients only, (or the web site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
is true or not, since there seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
announcement than actual facts. I suspect truthful information will
slowly filter it's way into the general populous over the next few
months, then we'll know for sure what the deal is, but for now, just
keep using the client of your choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if
it breaks) ... before spreading possibly untrue information about the
change.







Laurie Mehta
 

Hi Brian and others,
Quoting Brian from his post (below)
"Looking at it selfishly from their revenue point of view, I suppose they have to make money somehow"

Indeed they do. Apart from the fact that it is a for-profit company, they have obligations such as employee salaries, facility and product maintenance, and stuff like that to pay for with the money that ads brings in. (smile)
-LM

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 5/21/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 21, 2018, 11:13 PM

This is th4e second time this has occurred,
of course, they did say they
would delay it for consultation but
really the blind are the  smallest part
of it. Its everyone else they want to
come back to their web site or their
own app. Its very similar to what the
BBC did with the tv I player some
times ago, removing all the metadata
needed to construct the off browser
experience, so the companies making
third party access tools had to resort
to screen scraping which as you can
imagine besides being slower is also
going to mean a new version every time
the web site is changed in any way.
As far as I can tell from what the
various twitter campaigns say is that
Twitter never intended the api to be
use to avoid paid for adverts and
content, as this is how they keep the
platform free for the public.
They have mooted a paid for service
with no adverts, but also from reading
between the lines they can detect ad
blockers and won't let you use the site
with one turned on, if not now but
eventually.
Looking at it selfishly from their
revenue point of view, I suppose they
have to make money somehow and with the
possibility that in the states the
loss of net neutrality  possibly
meaning sites be paying carriers to not
delay their packets, they are just
minding their backs. as always the
undesired result  of poorer access
for disabled is just collateral damage.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@...,
putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients.
Re: Read Feeds add-on


> Well someone on one of my forums
has allready got one of those change
> pititions to twitter to stop
breaking it for the blind.
>
> Since I know these things are only
feel good things and non binding I am
> unsure what the point is.
>
> I did sign it but then I sign
everything but bar all the extra spam I
> doubt things will change.
>
>
>
>
>
> On 5/22/2018 4:11 AM, Travis
Siegel wrote:
>> This link:
>> https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
>> talks about why they are
discontinuing support for one of their SDK
>> tools. It will still continue
to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
>> won't be contributing to it
anymore.
>> On the link:
>> https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
>> you can get details on exactly
what they're charging for, and how much,
>> though it's not laid out in a
straightforward method, you need to select
>> the various features, and
their level to see what the fees are.
>> It actually looks like twitter
has been targeting fee based services for
>> quite some time now. As far
back as 2010, twitter was charging for access
>> to historical data for
researchers, commercial developers who wanted back
>> history, and the like, so this
isn't anything new. Last march, twitter
>> had run a series of surveys,
asking if users would be willing to pay for
>> different components of the
twitter landscape. I didn't find anything
>> breaking down what those
responses were, but it isn't surprising that the
>> questions were being asked.
After all, every company has a need to make
>> money, or they won't remain a
company for very long.
>> But, as far as the impending
charging for access goes:
>> https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
>> seems to indicate that the
fees for a standard twitter client aren't
>> trivial, and seems to
contradict what I read earlier about clients simply
>> not being able to get realtime
updates. It appears more digging is
>> necessary.
>> Apparently, twitter is trying
to herd users into using official twitter
>> clients only, (or the web
site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
>> is true or not, since there
seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
>> announcement than actual
facts. I suspect truthful information will
>> slowly filter it's way into
the general populous over the next few
>> months, then we'll know for
sure what the deal is, but for now, just keep
>> using the client of your
choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if it
>> breaks) ... before spreading
possibly untrue information about the
>> change.
>>
>>
>>
>> .
>>
>
>
>
>


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I aggree. After all, they do have to make a living.

On 5/22/2018 5:41 PM, Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Brian and others,
Quoting Brian from his post (below)
"Looking at it selfishly from their revenue point of view, I suppose they have to make money somehow"

Indeed they do. Apart from the fact that it is a for-profit company, they have obligations such as employee salaries, facility and product maintenance, and stuff like that to pay for with the money that ads brings in. (smile)
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 5/21/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients. Re: Read Feeds add-on
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 21, 2018, 11:13 PM
This is th4e second time this has occurred,
of course, they did say they
would delay it for consultation but
really the blind are the  smallest part
of it. Its everyone else they want to
come back to their web site or their
own app. Its very similar to what the
BBC did with the tv I player some
times ago, removing all the metadata
needed to construct the off browser
experience, so the companies making
third party access tools had to resort
to screen scraping which as you can
imagine besides being slower is also
going to mean a new version every time
the web site is changed in any way.
As far as I can tell from what the
various twitter campaigns say is that
Twitter never intended the api to be
use to avoid paid for adverts and
content, as this is how they keep the
platform free for the public.
They have mooted a paid for service
with no adverts, but also from reading
between the lines they can detect ad
blockers and won't let you use the site
with one turned on, if not now but
eventually.
Looking at it selfishly from their
revenue point of view, I suppose they
have to make money somehow and with the
possibility that in the states the
loss of net neutrality  possibly
meaning sites be paying carriers to not
delay their packets, they are just
minding their backs. as always the
undesired result  of poorer access
for disabled is just collateral damage.
Brian
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@...,
putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Twitter clients.
Re: Read Feeds add-on

> Well someone on one of my forums
has allready got one of those change
> pititions to twitter to stop
breaking it for the blind.
>
> Since I know these things are only
feel good things and non binding I am
> unsure what the point is.
>
> I did sign it but then I sign
everything but bar all the extra spam I
> doubt things will change.
>
>
>
>
>
> On 5/22/2018 4:11 AM, Travis
Siegel wrote:
>> This link:
>> https://blog.twitter.com/developer/en_us/topics/tools/2018/discontinuing-support-for-twitter-kit-sdk.html
>> talks about why they are
discontinuing support for one of their SDK
>> tools. It will still continue
to work, it's just hat twitter themselves
>> won't be contributing to it
anymore.
>> On the link:
>> https://developer.twitter.com/en/pricing.html
>> you can get details on exactly
what they're charging for, and how much,
>> though it's not laid out in a
straightforward method, you need to select
>> the various features, and
their level to see what the fees are.
>> It actually looks like twitter
has been targeting fee based services for
>> quite some time now. As far
back as 2010, twitter was charging for access
>> to historical data for
researchers, commercial developers who wanted back
>> history, and the like, so this
isn't anything new. Last march, twitter
>> had run a series of surveys,
asking if users would be willing to pay for
>> different components of the
twitter landscape. I didn't find anything
>> breaking down what those
responses were, but it isn't surprising that the
>> questions were being asked.
After all, every company has a need to make
>> money, or they won't remain a
company for very long.
>> But, as far as the impending
charging for access goes:
>> https://www.xda-developers.com/twitter-new-api-third-party-clients/
>> seems to indicate that the
fees for a standard twitter client aren't
>> trivial, and seems to
contradict what I read earlier about clients simply
>> not being able to get realtime
updates. It appears more digging is
>> necessary.
>> Apparently, twitter is trying
to herd users into using official twitter
>> clients only, (or the web
site), but as of now, I can't say whether this
>> is true or not, since there
seems to be more knee jerk reactions to the
>> announcement than actual
facts. I suspect truthful information will
>> slowly filter it's way into
the general populous over the next few
>> months, then we'll know for
sure what the deal is, but for now, just keep
>> using the client of your
choice, and wait until it breaks ... (if it
>> breaks) ... before spreading
possibly untrue information about the
>> change.
>>
>>
>>
>> .
>>
>
>
>
>


 

I looked at the second post in the thread. As long as I get to use desktop clients and not have to use the website, I can work with a minimal experience. What really boggles my mind is when people figure out that these free services, that have targeted ads on them, also data mine. How the hell do you think you were getting the service for free, silly? Personally, I'd rather a company data mine me than me having to pay out of my own pocket to use any kind of social media. Nothing is worth it that much, social media wise. Besides, I can shut down ads and spam. I can't ensure that a service will continue to be worth it unless I invest my wallet into it. But maybe that's why I was like, how is this news? Refering to FaceBook, Grindr, and otherwise. I thought they were doing this all along and people were just now figuring something out that I learned over five years ago when I signed up for the service. Finally, if a company actually does steal sensitive information, there is always a way I can exact revenge.