[SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux


Ervin, Glenn
 

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or sudo –s.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows, it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes, like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to attack.


Brandon Cross <bcross3286@...>
 

I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken. This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it? Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.


 

hello.
i wished to use linux,
but if it was exactly the same with windows!
i realy hate terminal,
i even cant use cmd on windows and prefer wizard and gui interface
that i can have my selection, rather than memorizing hundreds of
codes!
if i could install nvda and other softwares which i use on windows, in linux,
and i could do installation of softwares and other usual tasks without
terminal and command line,
certainly i said goodbye to windows and migrate to linux.
but unfortunately,
i believe that linux is not user friendly and becomes not, at least
for many years!

On 5/23/18, Brandon Cross <bcross3286@gmail.com> wrote:
I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken.
This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it
for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type
one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it?
Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even
though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each
and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root
status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like
it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines
or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh
its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone
inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe
they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.
--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Simone Dal Maso
 

Hello,
using linux without command line is quite a nonsense, and perhaps a bit stupid.
If you want a really friendly operative system with gui, you have 2 choices: Windows, or MacOs.
NVDA *never* will run on linux.
Or perhaps with an emulator called Wine it can run, but it is quite unuseful since there are no windows operative system to read.
Linux has its screen reader that is Orca, but is not on my opinion robust like NVDA.

Il 23/05/2018 10:44, zahra ha scritto:
hello.
i wished to use linux,
but if it was exactly the same with windows!
i realy hate terminal,
i even cant use cmd on windows and prefer wizard and gui interface
that i can have my selection, rather than memorizing hundreds of
codes!
if i could install nvda and other softwares which i use on windows, in linux,
and i could do installation of softwares and other usual tasks without
terminal and command line,
certainly i said goodbye to windows and migrate to linux.
but unfortunately,
i believe that linux is not user friendly and becomes not, at least
for many years!
On 5/23/18, Brandon Cross <bcross3286@gmail.com> wrote:
I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken.
This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it
for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type
one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it?
Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even
though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each
and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root
status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like
it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines
or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh
its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone
inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe
they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.


Ervin, Glenn
 

My Linux computers go nowhere outside the home, and I have an up-to-date firewall in my up-to-date router, so I think unless one is in coffee shops with it, you can remove all such things.

I turn off the password at log-in too.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 12:33 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken. This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it? Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.


Ervin, Glenn
 

You will do Internet and eMail with the GUI in Linux.
If there was more command-line options in Windows, I would do that more too, but you can do almost everything in the GUI in Linux.
I choose to do some things in the CLI in Linux because it is available that way, not because that is the only way to do it.
For example, I think one can do the Chirp HAM radio software in the CLI in Linux, but it works so well in the GUI, I do it that way.
Same with eMail and Internet.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of zahra
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:44 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

hello.
i wished to use linux,
but if it was exactly the same with windows!
i realy hate terminal,
i even cant use cmd on windows and prefer wizard and gui interface
that i can have my selection, rather than memorizing hundreds of
codes!
if i could install nvda and other softwares which i use on windows, in linux,
and i could do installation of softwares and other usual tasks without
terminal and command line,
certainly i said goodbye to windows and migrate to linux.
but unfortunately,
i believe that linux is not user friendly and becomes not, at least
for many years!

On 5/23/18, Brandon Cross <bcross3286@gmail.com> wrote:
I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken.
This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it
for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type
one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it?
Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even
though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each
and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root
status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like
it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines
or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh
its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone
inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe
they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.

--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


 

My dad's business workstation has a local password.

A few of my friends have ms or local passwords.

For me a home user its always faster to not bother with an extra home desktop password.

Ofcause this means I can't use things like remote desktop or some network sharing options but with security being so stupid these days and with a lot of firewalls and security software especially with systems, its easier to either use a flash drive for x or directly download x on the systems effected.

Even using cloud services can be a problem.

As sometimes I need to allow a program in cloud storage through to the account which is being used to install it even though the installer will shortly there after be deleted.

On 5/24/2018 2:16 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
My Linux computers go nowhere outside the home, and I have an up-to-date firewall in my up-to-date router, so I think unless one is in coffee shops with it, you can remove all such things.
I turn off the password at log-in too.
Glenn


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 12:33 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

I'm sorry, but if that's the impression you have, you are much mistaken. This is not only advisable, it can be dangerous. Stop and think about it for a second. Why would they make an operating system where you had to type one command before any other command you type? Doesn't make sense, does it? Also, remember that you are authenticating each time you do this, even though it may be set up so that you don't need to use your password each and every time, which ever command you use with sudo gets elevated to root status. A little reading will tell you all you need to know. I don't like it when people spread information that could harm other people's machines or harm them in some way, accidentally is one thing, but if you just say oh its ok, you're being intentionally ignorant. Then, what happens if someone inexperienced comes along and sees this and tries it, maybe nothing, maybe they type sudo rm -rf * from the root directory, then bye bye machine.


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

I'm sorry, this really shouldn't be here, but typing sudo before every command is *not* necessary.  As I said before, the only time the sudo command is needed is when you're running a system command.  General programs, (which most are), does not require a sudo command.  Sudo is only used when you're configuring the system, or doing something that requires root access, which is generally only when you're changing configuration files, or installing programs to the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin directories.  There are very few reasons to use sudo, and if you're using it before every command, then you're using it incorrectly.


On 5/22/2018 3:08 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or sudo –s.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows, it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes, like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to attack.



Virus-free. www.avast.com


 

hi james.
i am waiting for your help in skype.
thanks so much for your assistance and God bless you!

On 5/24/18, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com> wrote:
I'm sorry, this really shouldn't be here, but typing sudo before every
command is *not* necessary.  As I said before, the only time the sudo
command is needed is when you're running a system command.  General
programs, (which most are), does not require a sudo command.  Sudo is
only used when you're configuring the system, or doing something that
requires root access, which is generally only when you're changing
configuration files, or installing programs to the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin
directories. There are very few reasons to use sudo, and if you're using
it before every command, then you're using it incorrectly.


On 5/22/2018 3:08 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no
more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option
that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you
need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or
sudo –s.

Glenn

*From:*nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] *On Behalf Of
*Brandon Cross
*Sent:* Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is
seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to
write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su
into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes
with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an
administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and
only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows,
it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes,
like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to
administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to
attack.



--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Ervin, Glenn
 

Any web search on Linux and any specific CLI commands will give you results with sudo in front of them.

And if one posts to a Linux list with a problem with a command and one submits the command they did without the sudo, someone will tell them to use sudo.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis Siegel
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

I'm sorry, this really shouldn't be here, but typing sudo before every command is *not* necessary.  As I said before, the only time the sudo command is needed is when you're running a system command.  General programs, (which most are), does not require a sudo command.  Sudo is only used when you're configuring the system, or doing something that requires root access, which is generally only when you're changing configuration files, or installing programs to the /usr/bin or /usr/sbin directories.  There are very few reasons to use sudo, and if you're using it before every command, then you're using it incorrectly.

 

On 5/22/2018 3:08 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Well, it is only open while I have the terminal open, and it is no more dangerous than using the windows “run as administrator” option that is in the applications menu.

Also, that is not messed up, anytime you type a command in Linux, you need to type sudo in front of it, unless you unlock it with sudo su or sudo –s.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brandon Cross
Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [SUSPECTED SPAM] Re: [nvda] About Linux

 

Well, if you have to type sudo before each command, something is seriously messed up with your file permissions, you should be able to write anywhere in your own home directory. Also, telling someone to su into root is just downright dangerous, you could make sweeping changes with one command that could break the entire machine. Sudo is an administrative thing, it elevates your priveleges to do a command, and only that command, think of it like the secure UAC thing in windows, it elevates that program to administrative level until it finishes, like installers. Having programs permanently elevated to administrative level is dangerous, as it leaves the computer open to attack.

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com