Hello


Ashley Breger <ashbreger@...>
 

Sent from my iPhone hi,
My name is Ashley Breger and I’m interested in NVDA as I am transitioning from Window-Eyes and I think the commands may be fairly similar?
Am I correct in my thinking?
Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Ashley Breger


Antony Stone
 

You can find the commands for NVDA starting at section 4.6 of
https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/userGuide.html

Sections 3 and 4 of that document will help you with installing and starting
NVDA.

You might also find the following article helpful:

https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/Switching-from-Window-Eyes-to-
NVDA


Antony.

On Monday 28 May 2018 at 11:41:21, Ashley Breger via Groups.Io wrote:

Sent from my iPhone hi,
My name is Ashley Breger and I’m interested in NVDA as I am transitioning
from Window-Eyes and I think the commands may be fairly similar? Am I
correct in my thinking?
Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Ashley Breger
--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

Learning some often used commands is important but if you want to use features of NVDA such as screen review and mouse actions, you would likely be far better served by a tutorial explaining such things as object navigation, screen review, and document review.  Object navigation isn't used in NVDA and, while screen review is similar to using the Window-eyes mouse cursor movement and review means of navigation, it isn't the same in terms of commands.  You also need to know how to switch review modes. 
 
For using NVDA with applications where you do everything directly in the application, screen-readers in general are similar.  That's because most commands in that context are Windows commands or program commands. 
 
I'm not sure now what tutorials are current.  I used to recommend Joseph Lee's tutorial, but it isn't clear to me if it is now current.  You may want to use the manual, at least to an extent at this point, but my observation and experience is that most people much prefer and learn better using tutorials than typical manuals.  It may be that the manual would be a good way to review or to learn once you get to a certain advanced level.
 
The manual or the quick commands reference might be a good way to learn basic commands since you are already an experienced screen-reader user.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, May 28, 2018 6:33 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Hello

You can find the commands for NVDA starting at section 4.6 of
https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/userGuide.html

Sections 3 and 4 of that document will help you with installing and starting
NVDA.

You might also find the following article helpful:

https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/Switching-from-Window-Eyes-to-
NVDA


Antony.

On Monday 28 May 2018 at 11:41:21, Ashley Breger via Groups.Io wrote:

> Sent from my iPhone hi,
> My name is Ashley Breger and I’m interested in NVDA as I am transitioning
> from Window-Eyes and I think the commands may be fairly similar? Am I
> correct in my thinking?
> Any help would be greatly appreciated,
> Ashley Breger

--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.




Brandon Cross <bcross3286@...>
 

I'd say for just starting out, learn the commands you need for every day use, then transition to new things as and when you need them, or if you are curious, sooner. Becoming familiar with the review cursor and object nav in NVDA are good skills to have, because they can help you gain some extra usability out of apps that aren't the best accessibility wise, and, even the ones that are, you will find that not everything is in the tab index, and things will be hidden from screen readers that are perfectly visible to sighted users. An example of which is the save dialog in reaper, not the render one, but to save a project, that dialog has a bunch of options you never see unless you use object navigation, and some of them are quite useful, such as copying new media into the project folder, what options to use to convert media, such as format / encoding, etc. Screen review is good for trying to figure out what's going on with an app, say, if its not showing anything at all to the screen reader. You switch to the screen review mode, then use the review keys to see if you can get anything. Sometimes you will, sometimes not.


Brian's Mail list account
 

What somebody told me was this, a relative of the person starting on nvda downloaded the latest Joseph tutorials and put them in folders on a ram stick, which enabled the use to use one off the many ram stick audio players at cheap prices these days to actually move about the articles using folder or file level navigation.
This seemed to be very much appreciated. I think we all need a computer literate helper at times to do this sort of simple, but not obvious thing.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 28, 2018 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Hello


Learning some often used commands is important but if you want to use features of NVDA such as screen review and mouse actions, you would likely be far better served by a tutorial explaining such things as object navigation, screen review, and document review. Object navigation isn't used in NVDA and, while screen review is similar to using the Window-eyes mouse cursor movement and review means of navigation, it isn't the same in terms of commands. You also need to know how to switch review modes.

For using NVDA with applications where you do everything directly in the application, screen-readers in general are similar. That's because most commands in that context are Windows commands or program commands.

I'm not sure now what tutorials are current. I used to recommend Joseph Lee's tutorial, but it isn't clear to me if it is now current. You may want to use the manual, at least to an extent at this point, but my observation and experience is that most people much prefer and learn better using tutorials than typical manuals. It may be that the manual would be a good way to review or to learn once you get to a certain advanced level.

The manual or the quick commands reference might be a good way to learn basic commands since you are already an experienced screen-reader user.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, May 28, 2018 6:33 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Hello


You can find the commands for NVDA starting at section 4.6 of
https://www.nvaccess.org/files/nvda/documentation/userGuide.html

Sections 3 and 4 of that document will help you with installing and starting
NVDA.

You might also find the following article helpful:

https://github.com/nvaccess/nvda-community/wiki/Switching-from-Window-Eyes-to-
NVDA


Antony.

On Monday 28 May 2018 at 11:41:21, Ashley Breger via Groups.Io wrote:

Sent from my iPhone hi,
My name is Ashley Breger and I’m interested in NVDA as I am transitioning
from Window-Eyes and I think the commands may be fairly similar? Am I
correct in my thinking?
Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Ashley Breger
--
If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it,
we'd be so simple that we couldn't.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.