accessible money


Kerryn Gunness <k_gunness@...>
 


hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 


Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

We have what I think is a really good system here in Canada. Coins for small denominations (up to two dollars), and $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 bills. The new bills are made of a kind of plasticised paper that can still tear but doesn’t wrinkle easily and is somewhat water-resistant. The bills have tactile markings on them, that resemble full braille cells. You can detect the denomination by counting the number of cells on the bill. This works better, I think, than putting braille numbers on bills, because a single dot could easily be rubbed out, but the impression of a full cell usually remains intact.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: June 8, 2018 9:06 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks

 



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Gene
 

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Jaffar Sidek <jaffar.sidek10@...>
 

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!

On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Andy
 


In 2008 the Federal courts ruled that the U. S. Treasury Dept. had to make currency accessible. They have diddled around for years, with study after study, and still no accessible money. They just don't want to do it, and are hoping that people will use credit and devit cards, etc.
Andy
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!
On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Holger Fiallo <hfiallo@...>
 

Do we need it? Now that we have apps that can tell us what is what?  Just asking.
 

From: Andy
Sent: Friday, June 8, 2018 10:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 
In 2008 the Federal courts ruled that the U. S. Treasury Dept. had to make currency accessible. They have diddled around for years, with study after study, and still no accessible money. They just don't want to do it, and are hoping that people will use credit and devit cards, etc.
Andy
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Jaffar Sidek
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!
On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 


On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Andy
 


We must remember that not everyone has a smart phone.
 
Andy
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:37 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Do we need it? Now that we have apps that can tell us what is what?  Just asking.
 
From: Andy
Sent: Friday, June 8, 2018 10:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 
In 2008 the Federal courts ruled that the U. S. Treasury Dept. had to make currency accessible. They have diddled around for years, with study after study, and still no accessible money. They just don't want to do it, and are hoping that people will use credit and devit cards, etc.
Andy
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Jaffar Sidek
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!
On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Ron Canazzi
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money
 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 


On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Ron Canazzi
 

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Jaffar Sidek <jaffar.sidek10@...>
 

Which just goes to show that money is legal tender.  If you don't have it, it's tough!  Cheers!


On 6/9/2018 8:02 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Ron Canazzi
 

Well at least we got the money identifiers a few years ago.  That's probably about the best we in the US can expect.



On 6/8/2018 11:27 PM, Andy wrote:
In 2008 the Federal courts ruled that the U. S. Treasury Dept. had to make currency accessible. They have diddled around for years, with study after study, and still no accessible money. They just don't want to do it, and are hoping that people will use credit and devit cards, etc.
Andy
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!
On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Antony Stone
 

Sweden has become largely cash-free during the past few years (ironically
enough, partly encouraged by a redesign of the banknotes, which instead of
accepting the change, people to a large extent simply stopped using them
completely).

There are many shops, restaurants and bars with signs saying "no cash" or "we
do not take cash" - they only take payment by card.


Antony.

On Saturday 09 June 2018 at 14:02:37, Ron Canazzi wrote:

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins. They could
be differently shaped for ease of accessibility. As far as the
jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.
So this may become a moot point anyway. For example, we are getting a
group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area
that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long
there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.

On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done.
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your
denominations. Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but
coins? If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going
to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a
nickel back. If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm
owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive
a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes. People
aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their
pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes.
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn. The
penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty,
assuming you never have a higher denomination.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Ron Canazzi <mailto:aa2vm@...>
*Sent:* Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all
coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.
Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with
coinage. The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently
rimmed and of different sizes and weights. In the United States, we
like our paper money. There was great resistance to any change for
large denominations than quarters. However in a smaller country like
Trinidad, you might have less resistance. Good luck.

On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind
or visually impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that
be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in
terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
--
"Black holes are where God divided by zero."

- Steven Wright

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Kevin <kleeva5@...>
 

Seems like a keen idea!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Saturday, June 9, 2018 6:50 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Sweden has become largely cash-free during the past few years (ironically

enough, partly encouraged by a redesign of the banknotes, which instead of

accepting the change, people to a large extent simply stopped using them

completely).

 

There are many shops, restaurants and bars with signs saying "no cash" or "we

do not take cash" - they only take payment by card.

 

 

Antony.

 

On Saturday 09 June 2018 at 14:02:37, Ron Canazzi wrote:

 

> Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could

> be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the

> jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.

> So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a

> group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area

> that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long

> there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.

>

> On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:

> > It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done.

> > I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your

> > denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but

> > coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going

> > to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a

> > nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm

> > owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive

> > a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People

> > aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their

> > pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes.

> > and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The

> > penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty,

> > assuming you never have a higher denomination.

> > Gene

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > *From:* Ron Canazzi <mailto:aa2vm@...>

> > *Sent:* Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

> > *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

> > *Subject:* Re: [nvda] accessible money

> >

> > Hi Kerryn,

> >

> >

> > If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all

> > coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.

> > Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with

> > coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently

> > rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we

> > like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for

> > large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like

> > Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

> >

> > On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

> >> hi

> >> we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind

> >> or visually  impaired persons

> >> what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that

> >> be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in

> >> terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

> >> thanks

 

--

"Black holes are where God divided by zero."

 

- Steven Wright

 

                                                   Please reply to the list;

                                                         please *don't* CC me.

 

 

 


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

I think physical cash money will be around for a very long time yet. Even though it’s true some places are trying to go cash-free, I still see places both here in Canada and in the uS that are cash only. They just prefer it that way, and they have their reasons. I’m mostly for the progress of technology and convenience but I, too, prefer cash for a lot of things. But, I guess we will see how things go. I understand that some countries have already mostly made a transition to being cash-free, so maybe, indeed, it is only a matter of time.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: June 9, 2018 8:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 

 

I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 

 

and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks

 



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Plus, you can’t always rely on having the apps or devices handy, or being able to use them. I travel to the uS fairly regularly to play or attend music gigs. The atmosphere is often rather busy and loud and using a phone becomes highly impractical. I’d say accessible money is something the uS really needs, and I am surprised that, with the ADA in full effect nowadays and being used for leverage in many cases, this hasn’t happened yet. From my own personal Canadian perspective, the $1 bills especially are a huge problem.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andy
Sent: June 9, 2018 12:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

We must remember that not everyone has a smart phone.

 

Andy

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:37 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Do we need it? Now that we have apps that can tell us what is what?  Just asking.

 

From: Andy

Sent: Friday, June 8, 2018 10:27 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

In 2008 the Federal courts ruled that the U. S. Treasury Dept. had to make currency accessible. They have diddled around for years, with study after study, and still no accessible money. They just don't want to do it, and are hoping that people will use credit and devit cards, etc.

Andy

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Jaffar Sidek

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Hi.  I am in a rather unique position because i get to experience both sides of money, accessible and inaccessible.  Here in Singapore, we have currency notes of different sizes and made of different materials.  $2, $5 and $10 are of different sizes and are made of plastic, $2 being the smallest and $10 being the biggest size of this sub group.  Then there

is the group of $50, $100, $500 and $1000 currency notes.  These are made of tough paper, again of different sizes.  It is easy to tell the diference between one denomination from the other once you get use to it.  On the other hand, I am married to a Filipina, and The Philippines Peso notes are all of the same size, no matter which currency, so i need guidance on that score when I am back in the philippines with wife and family.  Cheers!

On 6/9/2018 11:03 AM, Gene wrote:

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 

 

I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 

 

and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Ron Canazzi

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks

 



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

 


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

When I order things like pizza or a sandwich from places like Dominos, I use cash. I don't think too many people are writing checks anymore because now they can pay bills online. I still pay my rent by check but we do have the option to pay it online here if we choose to.



On 6/9/2018 11:19 AM, JM Casey wrote:

I think physical cash money will be around for a very long time yet. Even though it’s true some places are trying to go cash-free, I still see places both here in Canada and in the uS that are cash only. They just prefer it that way, and they have their reasons. I’m mostly for the progress of technology and convenience but I, too, prefer cash for a lot of things. But, I guess we will see how things go. I understand that some countries have already mostly made a transition to being cash-free, so maybe, indeed, it is only a matter of time.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: June 9, 2018 8:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 

 

I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 

 

and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Ron Canazzi

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

 

Hi Kerryn,

 

If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.

 

 

On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks

 



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"



-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Gene
 

But using that argument, making money accessible when it may not be around much longer can be argued to be spending a good deal of money to correct a problem that may not exist so it shouldn't be done.  After all, it would be hard to justify making a building wheelchair accessible if that building were likely to be torn down in two years and it wasn't providing an essential service.
 
Paper money is so much more convenient than coins, that that is why it was adopted in the first place.  Accessibility is a worthy goal, but if accessibility is done at the expense of what is generally a much better system of doing something for people in general, it's a pyric victory.  Even if you win, the public resentment and ridicule will create enormous ill will toward the recipients and set the whole cause of acceptance and integration back significantly.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2018 7:02 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done. 
 
I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes. 
 
and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
hi
we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons
what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
thanks
 

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


 

And what if the banks go down.

Actually I can think of another reason, I was traveling with my dad on a holiday to australia, its not far from here its not third world its not  to bad its a western country.

We had enough cash between us but my dad had some issues with one of his credit cards, he had told the local bank I think it was westpack he was going to australia and was assured it would be fine, westpack being an australian bank so didn't need to take precautions you take in other parts of the world.

He got to the machines, and tried to pay, and then tried again, nothing.

He got to the banked and they said his account was compromised.

It took us a huge toll call to ring up the local branch in nz to talk to their managers over there to transfer rights over.

So electronic cash isn't really an option when traveling and in markets and with street people you need cash.

Now with your mobile phone previded you don't drop it, get it locked in a shop by mistake, stolen, or anything else that would have all your data stolen your bank direct app of choice may be able to scale global for you with nfc.

But as for cash, I do have a identifier however I usually keep 20 dollar notes, they are easier to handle than moving 50 dollars out, there are ways to identify them but usually I get a trusted friend to handle my cash or just run 20 and 10 dollar notes.

20 50 10 1 and 2 dollar coins are marked for access.

Having extra coins would be a weight to be honest.

I had a wallet split for having to many coins.

On 6/10/2018 6:19 AM, JM Casey wrote:
I think physical cash money will be around for a very long time yet. Even though it’s true some places are trying to go cash-free, I still see places both here in Canada and in the uS that are cash only. They just prefer it that way, and they have their reasons. I’m mostly for the progress of technology and convenience but I, too, prefer cash for a lot of things. But, I guess we will see how things go. I understand that some countries have already mostly made a transition to being cash-free, so maybe, indeed, it is only a matter of time.




From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: June 9, 2018 8:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money


Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins. They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility. As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more. So this may become a moot point anyway. For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done.


I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations. Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins? If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back. If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes. People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes.


and think of all the different coins you would have to learn. The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination.


Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Ron Canazzi <mailto:aa2vm@...>

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money


Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do. Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage. The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights. In the United States, we like our paper money. There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters. However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance. Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks






Gene
 

With the continued and increasing vulnerability of essential services in societies to disruption by hackers, private or national, it is the height of foolhardiness to rush headlong into more reliance on computerizing things to the extent you are describing.  If I had my way, I would not allow any more computerization of essential services until effective and credible protections are known to be in place. 
 
Mostly eliminating actual money in this environment is dangerous and foolish and so typical of our suicidal societies.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 09, 2018 8:50 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money

Sweden has become largely cash-free during the past few years (ironically
enough, partly encouraged by a redesign of the banknotes, which instead of
accepting the change, people to a large extent simply stopped using them
completely).

There are many shops, restaurants and bars with signs saying "no cash" or "we
do not take cash" - they only take payment by card.


Antony.

On Saturday 09 June 2018 at 14:02:37, Ron Canazzi wrote:

> Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins.  They could
> be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the
> jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.
> So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a
> group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area
> that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long
> there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.
>
> On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:
> > It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done.
> > I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your
> > denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but
> > coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going
> > to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a
> > nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm
> > owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive
> > a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People
> > aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their
> > pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes.
> > and think of all the different coins you would have to learn.  The
> > penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty,
> > assuming you never have a higher denomination.
> > Gene
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > *From:* Ron Canazzi <mailto:aa2vm@...>
> > *Sent:* Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM
> > *To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
> > *Subject:* Re: [nvda] accessible money
> >
> > Hi Kerryn,
> >
> >
> > If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all
> > coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.
> > Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with
> > coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently
> > rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we
> > like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for
> > large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like
> > Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.
> >
> > On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:
> >> hi
> >> we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind
> >> or visually  impaired persons
> >> what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that
> >> be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in
> >> terms of technology, tack tile immages etc
> >> thanks

--
"Black holes are where God divided by zero."

 - Steven Wright

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Sean,


In 2013 Mom went to Target to do some Christmas shopping. When she went to pay for the things, she found out that her information had been stolen. She had to end up getting a new card. I was fortunate not to have that happen to me because I did my shopping at Best Buy. That was when I got a boom box.


Rosemarie

On 6/9/2018 1:50 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
And what if the banks go down.

Actually I can think of another reason, I was traveling with my dad on a holiday to australia, its not far from here its not third world its not  to bad its a western country.

We had enough cash between us but my dad had some issues with one of his credit cards, he had told the local bank I think it was westpack he was going to australia and was assured it would be fine, westpack being an australian bank so didn't need to take precautions you take in other parts of the world.

He got to the machines, and tried to pay, and then tried again, nothing.

He got to the banked and they said his account was compromised.

It took us a huge toll call to ring up the local branch in nz to talk to their managers over there to transfer rights over.

So electronic cash isn't really an option when traveling and in markets and with street people you need cash.

Now with your mobile phone previded you don't drop it, get it locked in a shop by mistake, stolen, or anything else that would have all your data stolen your bank direct app of choice may be able to scale global for you with nfc.

But as for cash, I do have a identifier however I usually keep 20 dollar notes, they are easier to handle than moving 50 dollars out, there are ways to identify them but usually I get a trusted friend to handle my cash or just run 20 and 10 dollar notes.

20 50 10 1 and 2 dollar coins are marked for access.

Having extra coins would be a weight to be honest.

I had a wallet split for having to many coins.




On 6/10/2018 6:19 AM, JM Casey wrote:
I think physical cash money will be around for a very long time yet. Even though it’s true some places are trying to go cash-free, I still see places both here in Canada and in the uS that are cash only. They just prefer it that way, and they have their reasons. I’m mostly for the progress of technology and convenience but I, too, prefer cash for a lot of things. But, I guess we will see how things go. I understand that some countries have already mostly made a transition to being cash-free, so maybe, indeed, it is only a matter of time.




From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Ron Canazzi
Sent: June 9, 2018 8:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money


Well, we wouldn't have to learn any more than 5 more coins. They could be differently shaped for ease of accessibility.  As far as the jingling, to be honest, less and less people use real money any more.  So this may become a moot point anyway.  For example, we are getting a group of Starbucks's restaurants locally in the Buffalo, New York area that will accept nothing but credit or debit cards. So I wonder how long there will actually be any so called legal tender any more anyway.



On 6/8/2018 11:03 PM, Gene wrote:

It isn't reasonable to ask that switching to coins be done.


I'll use American denominations in examples since I don't know your denominations.  Who is going to be willing to carry nothing but coins?  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin, I'm not going to want to get four coins for dollars and two quarters, a dime and a nickel back.  If I pay for something with a ten dollar coin and I'm owed eight dollars and twenty cents, I am not going to want to receive a five dollar coin, three one dollar coins and two dimes.  People aren't going to walk around with lots of heavy coins jingling in their pockets and wearing out the material in their clothes.


and think of all the different coins you would have to learn. The penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar, five dollar, ten, twenty, fifty, assuming you never have a higher denomination.


Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Ron Canazzi <mailto:aa2vm@...>

Sent: Friday, June 08, 2018 8:05 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] accessible money


Hi Kerryn,


If you can convince the powers that be in Trinidad to switch to all coinage rather than paper money, that would be the ideal thing to do.  Most blind people here in the United States have no difficulty with coinage.  The pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters are all differently rimmed and of different sizes and weights.  In the United States, we like our paper money.  There was great resistance to any change for large denominations than quarters.  However in a smaller country like Trinidad, you might have less resistance.  Good luck.



On 6/8/2018 8:29 PM, Kerryn Gunness via Groups.Io wrote:

hi

we in trinidad would like to make our money accessible to our blind or visually  impaired persons

what guidelines we should work with as to approach the powers that be, in our meeting on tuesday 12th june, in having this done, in terms of technology, tack tile immages etc

thanks