the new nod32 9.0?


erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

Hi,  I was recently asked to look at the new nod32 version 9 to see whether it would be safe to upgrade.  The install was a nightmare!  I powered through it, but the tap key could not focus any onscreen elements during the install and there were no alt key nemonics.  F5 properly brought up the advanced settings window but nothing in either the main or advanced windows could get focus with the tab, and NVDA reported unknown repeatedly when new windows open and close.  Is this the general experience of nvda with Nod32 9, or is there something in my setup that might be causing it?

They make a big splash about working with jaws if you look at the downloads page, but jaws is a dying art and the sooner the better in my view.  In any case, most features should be pretty accessible if they designed it properly no matter which screen reader is in use and so I was a bit dismayed to see what's happening.  I'm running windows seven still in case that makes a difference.

Best,

Erik Burggraaf
Freelance jack of many trades!  Visit my website:
Also check out my website for inclusion to the android platform for persons with sensery, physical or cognitive disabilities:


Roger Stewart
 

Yes, your experience is correct. If you check the ESET site, they clearly say not to use version 9 if you are using a screen reader but to stick with Version 8 for now. 

Roger











On 7/18/2016 4:43 PM, erik burggraaf wrote:
Hi,  I was recently asked to look at the new nod32 version 9 to see whether it would be safe to upgrade.  The install was a nightmare!  I powered through it, but the tap key could not focus any onscreen elements during the install and there were no alt key nemonics.  F5 properly brought up the advanced settings window but nothing in either the main or advanced windows could get focus with the tab, and NVDA reported unknown repeatedly when new windows open and close.  Is this the general experience of nvda with Nod32 9, or is there something in my setup that might be causing it?

They make a big splash about working with jaws if you look at the downloads page, but jaws is a dying art and the sooner the better in my view.  In any case, most features should be pretty accessible if they designed it properly no matter which screen reader is in use and so I was a bit dismayed to see what's happening.  I'm running windows seven still in case that makes a difference.

Best,

Erik Burggraaf
Freelance jack of many trades!  Visit my website:
Also check out my website for inclusion to the android platform for persons with sensery, physical or cognitive disabilities:



Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

I still find it intensely insulting that we are seen as an afterthought. If you are developing software you surely want it to be fixed when its launched not have to fiddle about downdating it until some clueless programmerhas fixed it. Shades of Microsoft attitude.
It surely is not rocket science if they already have a version which has the fixes in it to impliment any new version using the knowledge gained, is it?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Roger Stewart" <paganus2@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, July 18, 2016 11:59 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new nod32 9.0?


Yes, your experience is correct. If you check the ESET site, they
clearly say not to use version 9 if you are using a screen reader but to
stick with Version 8 for now.

Roger











On 7/18/2016 4:43 PM, erik burggraaf wrote:
Hi, I was recently asked to look at the new nod32 version 9 to see
whether it would be safe to upgrade. The install was a nightmare! I
powered through it, but the tap key could not focus any onscreen
elements during the install and there were no alt key nemonics. F5
properly brought up the advanced settings window but nothing in either
the main or advanced windows could get focus with the tab, and NVDA
reported unknown repeatedly when new windows open and close. Is this
the general experience of nvda with Nod32 9, or is there something in
my setup that might be causing it?

They make a big splash about working with jaws if you look at the
downloads page, but jaws is a dying art and the sooner the better in
my view. In any case, most features should be pretty accessible if
they designed it properly no matter which screen reader is in use and
so I was a bit dismayed to see what's happening. I'm running windows
seven still in case that makes a difference.

Best,

Erik Burggraaf
Freelance jack of many trades! Visit my website:
http://www.theoutofworkbum.work
Also check out my website for inclusion to the android platform for
persons with sensery, physical or cognitive disabilities:
http://www.inclusiveandroid.com



 

I agree. Accessibility, even for an antivirus software which is critically needed for Windows users, is not being given a priority. Personally I don't use Nod32, so can't comment on my own experience of using it with NVDA.

As a solution, as mentioned in this thread use either version 8 of Nod32 or use another av (though finding one that's accessible, and at the same time rated highly on lab tests and received positive reviews is going to be a pain).


 

And you guys critisise me for using msse.
But yeah I agree with the poster, security cool but the most secure is usually not the most accessible and that says something about hte industry.
Its bad, it sucks, its accessible, its good, its secure its not how do they expect the disabled to use their software.
Answer so many buy they don't give a stuff anymore so we have to use substandard software.

On 20/07/2016 12:32 a.m., Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
I agree. Accessibility, even for an antivirus software which is critically needed for Windows users, is not being given a priority. Personally I don't use Nod32, so can't comment on my own experience of using it with NVDA.

As a solution, as mentioned in this thread use either version 8 of Nod32 or use another av (though finding one that's accessible, and at the same time rated highly on lab tests and received positive reviews is going to be a pain).


 

I wonder, for these antivirus software companies...how much money is invested in accessibility.


 

You know, I am sure they know about it I am sure most of the major ones do.
They are happy to let jaws in, surely all they need to do is let other libraries for readers in or use standard controls but its not just antivirus, while we are a lot better, a lot of makers don't code for access or even know till they are told.
Thing is with a lot of these, they are so protected by forms, capchas and the like some don't even have direct mail addresses that contacting is hard enough and the message may never reach its target anyway.
Its why I have just given up on it now.
I'd like it to change but hmmm.
Its a pitty you couldn't get an antivirus based on 1 or several good engines with an accessible low power low false positive rate interface and let it wrip similar to having an accessible windows shell of whatever you want and just load a kernal under it its just not going to happen.

On 20/07/2016 12:10 p.m., Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
I wonder, for these antivirus software companies...how much money is invested in accessibility.


 

Exactly. These manufacturers may have accessibility in mind, but they never make it a priority due to the small number of customers that are visually impaired. In my view, no matter how small the number of visually impaired users are, their right to use the software cannot be ignored.


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Incidentally does anyone know of an anti virus which is portable and at least reasonably secure?
The issue is that I have a pc which is well out of range of any fast internet connection, and connection via the mobile network costs a lot, so it would be really nice to be able to update a portable one say on the stick and take it to that site and run it over the machine.
Many people plug in sticks who may or may not have viruses and I really need to keep it checked.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Supanut Leepaisomboon" <supanut2000@outlook.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 1:32 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new nod32 9.0?


I agree. Accessibility, even for an antivirus software which is critically needed for Windows users, is not being given a priority. Personally I don't use Nod32, so can't comment on my own experience of using it with NVDA.

As a solution, as mentioned in this thread use either version 8 of Nod32 or use another av (though finding one that's accessible, and at the same time rated highly on lab tests and received positive reviews is going to be a pain).


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Its all down to training of programmers and the lack of forced accessibility in programming environments. It should be impossible to write code that is inaccessible for screen displays by now.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new nod32 9.0?


And you guys critisise me for using msse.
But yeah I agree with the poster, security cool but the most secure is usually not the most accessible and that says something about hte industry.
Its bad, it sucks, its accessible, its good, its secure its not how do they expect the disabled to use their software.
Answer so many buy they don't give a stuff anymore so we have to use substandard software.



On 20/07/2016 12:32 a.m., Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
I agree. Accessibility, even for an antivirus software which is critically needed for Windows users, is not being given a priority. Personally I don't use Nod32, so can't comment on my own experience of using it with NVDA.

As a solution, as mentioned in this thread use either version 8 of Nod32 or use another av (though finding one that's accessible, and at the same time rated highly on lab tests and received positive reviews is going to be a pain).


Carlos
 

Hello:
    I guess I know the answer to my question.  But! I will ask it anyway.
    There are a number of blind programmers/developers out and about.  Why have they not been able to create a blind friendly anti-virus program?  If it is a money issue?  Why not seek funds from groups who will donate to worthy projects?  Why don't blind developer/programmers offer their expertise and knowledge to the anti-virus developers?
    I know that they are not good.  But, I've seen some open source anti-virus projects.  So, it is possible to try and work on an anti-virus project without requiring too much funding!
    I do hope that at some point these issues will be dealt with so that this topic would not come up so often on this list!

On 7/20/2016 12:38 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
Exactly. These manufacturers may have accessibility in mind, but they never make it a priority due to the small number of customers that are visually impaired. In my view, no matter how small the number of visually impaired users are, their right to use the software cannot be ignored.

-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


Gene
 

it takes a lot of continued work and resources to create such a program and have it be properly effective.  Why should blind programmers recreate the wheel.  Many programs, while they may not be fully accessible, are useable.  it's unfortunate that as programs come out with new versions, those that are accessible often become less or inaccessible but while that is occurring, some are becoming more accessible, at times because the developers are working on accessibility for the program.  I would much much rather have a commercial program that I can see reviewed, which is made by a corporation who does it for their business, then have some amateur programmers make their own program. 
 
And to add weight to my argument, one such program, I believe its open source, is clam.  It is poorly reviewed and I wouldn't use it. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message  -----

From: Carlos
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 9:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new nod32 9.0?

Hello:
    I guess I know the answer to my question.  But! I will ask it anyway.
    There are a number of blind programmers/developers out and about.  Why have they not been able to create a blind friendly anti-virus program?  If it is a money issue?  Why not seek funds from groups who will donate to worthy projects?  Why don't blind developer/programmers offer their expertise and knowledge to the anti-virus developers?
    I know that they are not good.  But, I've seen some open source anti-virus projects.  So, it is possible to try and work on an anti-virus project without requiring too much funding!
    I do hope that at some point these issues will be dealt with so that this topic would not come up so often on this list!

On 7/20/2016 12:38 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
Exactly. These manufacturers may have accessibility in mind, but they never make it a priority due to the small number of customers that are visually impaired. In my view, no matter how small the number of visually impaired users are, their right to use the software cannot be ignored.

-- 
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@...


Kevin Huber
 

Hi Gene:

I totally agree with you.
Kevin Huber

On 7/20/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
it takes a lot of continued work and resources to create such a program and
have it be properly effective. Why should blind programmers recreate the
wheel. Many programs, while they may not be fully accessible, are useable.
it's unfortunate that as programs come out with new versions, those that are
accessible often become less or inaccessible but while that is occurring,
some are becoming more accessible, at times because the developers are
working on accessibility for the program. I would much much rather have a
commercial program that I can see reviewed, which is made by a corporation
who does it for their business, then have some amateur programmers make
their own program.

And to add weight to my argument, one such program, I believe its open
source, is clam. It is poorly reviewed and I wouldn't use it.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Carlos
Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2016 9:44 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] the new nod32 9.0?


Hello:
I guess I know the answer to my question. But! I will ask it anyway.
There are a number of blind programmers/developers out and about. Why
have they not been able to create a blind friendly anti-virus program? If
it is a money issue? Why not seek funds from groups who will donate to
worthy projects? Why don't blind developer/programmers offer their
expertise and knowledge to the anti-virus developers?
I know that they are not good. But, I've seen some open source
anti-virus projects. So, it is possible to try and work on an anti-virus
project without requiring too much funding!
I do hope that at some point these issues will be dealt with so that
this topic would not come up so often on this list!


On 7/20/2016 12:38 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Exactly. These manufacturers may have accessibility in mind, but they
never make it a priority due to the small number of customers that are
visually impaired. In my view, no matter how small the number of visually
impaired users are, their right to use the software cannot be ignored.



--
Carlos Gonzalez - Los Angeles, CA. - gmjc341961@gmail.com