accessibility training is important too.


 

In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------------


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this person is blind, push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what blindness means or is just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel. Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial" <topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------------


 

Well sorry to say, unless you have a real problem, you are essentially talking to a drone, probably sourced out of india, once it transfers up to level2 or 3 you get a real person.

The drones are fine for simple tasks, authorising systems, booking things, resetting things, reformatting things, anything more complex, ie doesn't have a manual to go with it, they usually pass on to someone, if it warrents it, they send out a drone to fix it, it may be a real person but it could also be a random unit drone or otherwise on standbuy.

I have had one of them trash one of my broadband units without trying.

Usually as long as it doesn't get me trouble I try to fix it.

Its a lot better now I use a pure data line, they are more stable and hardly anything goes wrong.

On 6/24/2018 9:30 PM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my  internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel. Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial" <topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------------






 

On the phone, I can get to a level 2 person. I just haven't quite figured out how to make them transfer me through text chat. I thought about calling them through IP Relay, but then, I am hung up on if I do that.


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Odd that the tech guy didn't seem to "listen" to a word you were saying.
Some people are like that. I would definitely use whatever steps are
available to give Microsoft feedback about this call. I'm used to the
sighted computer users' language usage for the most part, but there
inevitably comes a point when I, too, would have to explain that no, I'm not
using a mouse; never have and probably never will, and would be pretty damn
annoyed if they kept talking at me as though I were, in fact, using a mouse
anyway. I don't usually bother saying a word when I'm on the phone with my
ISP tech support line, but would expect something different/more
knowledgeable about such things from that Microsoft help desk.

About Microsoft Word, I usually turn all auto features off. No auto-correct,
no auto-format, etc. They never seem to do what I want and if they do
something I don't like I'm not always aware until the last moment. So, I
prefer to make my own mistakes. My big thing with the shift key is that I
sometimes hold it down for a fraction of a second too long, so the first two
letters of proper nouns and the beginnings of sentences are occasionally
capitalised.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Kingett
Sent: June 23, 2018 7:51 PM
To: games_access@lists.igda.org; Top tech editorial <topdot@gmail.com>;
main@TechTalk.groups.io; nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability
answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when
interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating
disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------
------


brian <sackriderbrian45@...>
 

I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider

On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my  internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel. Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial" <topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------------





JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------






Jackie
 

Those folks generally are just a bunch of script readers. They can't
go past it because they don't have the knowledge (& sometimes
wherewithal) to go further.

On 6/24/18, JM Casey <crystallogic@ca.inter.net> wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's
always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs
to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that
if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it
so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------











--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


 

Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.

On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------








.


Jackie
 

They don't. But I gotta tell you--those in-built product webservers
scare me, because built w/security in mind they were not.

On 6/24/18, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> wrote:
Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read
the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control
panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in
the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.




On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's
always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs
to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that
is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she
can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are
forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so
I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that
if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How
do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it
so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it
out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not
even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------









.



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


 

Well thats true, but you don't need to remote into them.

True I could use my printer having a password on it but to be honest the external part is secured by my cloud hp account for eprint, the wireless extender I have is secured by a password it made me setup.

I think it would be an older device that had these issues.

Most servers are to get the system up and running anything secured is handled elsewhere.

On 6/25/2018 10:39 AM, Jackie wrote:
They don't. But I gotta tell you--those in-built product webservers
scare me, because built w/security in mind they were not.

On 6/24/18, Shaun Everiss <sm.everiss@gmail.com> wrote:
Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read
the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control
panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in
the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.




On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's
always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs
to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that
is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she
can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are
forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so
I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that
if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How
do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it
so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it
out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not
even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------







.



Gene
 

A lot of the robots in tech support don't know much.  Low level tech support is a low pay, low status job and with the rise of artificial intelligence, I think they may be one of the first such service jobs to be supplanted by robots, since those who currently fill such positions largely perform as robots now, as many of the messages in this thread demonstrate. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 5:37 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read
the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control
panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in
the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.




On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
> Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's always
> the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
> blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs to
> be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
> she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
> see!
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
> Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.
>
>       I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
> who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
> can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
> connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
> that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
> chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
> I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
> they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
> hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
> for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
> light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
> business working in tech support.
>
> Brian Sackrider
>
>
> On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
>> Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
>> internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
>> things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
>> a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
>> function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
>> though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
>> them any parameter they wish to know about.
>> There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
>> person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
>> do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
>> blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
>> Rocket science it is not.
>> Brian
>>
>> bglists@...
>> Sent via blueyonder.
>> Please address personal E-mail to:-
>> briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
>> in the display name field.
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
>> <kingettr@...>
>> To: <games_access@...>; "Top tech editorial"
>> <topdot@...>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
>> Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
>> Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.
>>
>>
>>> In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
>>> disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
>>> disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
>>> especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
>>> share widely.
>>>
>>> https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
>>> -------------
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> .
>




Jackie
 

May as well. Probly have a more intelligent conversation w/a robot.

On 6/24/18, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A lot of the robots in tech support don't know much. Low level tech support
is a low pay, low status job and with the rise of artificial intelligence, I
think they may be one of the first such service jobs to be supplanted by
robots, since those who currently fill such positions largely perform as
robots now, as many of the messages in this thread demonstrate.

Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 5:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read
the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control
panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in
the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.




On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's
always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs
to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that
is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she
can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast. They are
forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well. I told them that I am blind so
I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are. With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me. I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window. They even said that after I told them that I was blind that
if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x. How
do
they think that I will know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it
so
hard to understand what blind is. I guess I will have to just spell it
out
for them. I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not
even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind, push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------









.





--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Sean,

That sounds as bad as what Verizon did to me one time. The guy asked me if I could see the blue screen and I told him I'm blind and don't have sighted help all the time. Sometimes I wonder if they even know their own product.

Rosemarie

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 3:37 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

Well I was talking to asus on trying to fix a busted extender, sir, read the serial number on the side.

Um I am blind, is it anywhere else, no!

Um.

I have had techs not know their own internal control panel.

For my printer, please read the id and serial number from the control panel, I can't see this, well you need to read from the configuration in the control panel.

By this time I found it on the internal web server, is it this?

Yes, good thing I can access the web server then.

The guy goes, what server?

You'd think they didn't know their products sometimes.




On 6/25/2018 7:01 AM, JM Casey wrote:
Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's
always the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem?
Is it blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a
call needs to be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she
can see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast. They are
forigners who can't speak or undrstand englih well. I told them that
I am blind so I can't tell you if their are lights on or what color
they are. With att's connect tech they would not even stay on the
phone with me. I told them that if you don't then you can't ask me
anything as I could not read the chat window. They even said that
after I told them that I was blind that if I wanted to end the session
that I should just click on the red x. How do they think that I will
know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so hard to
understand what blind is. I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them. I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not
even light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that
is a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who
cannot function without knowing what a light is doing on a router,
even though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can
read them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind, push to level 2 or whatever its called. these
people do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-----
-
-------------









.


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Ah yes--the lights. the lights. Ive gotten asked about the lights on the
modem too. Just goes to show thesepeople are clueless to what's going on.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of JM Casey
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:01 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------






Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,

I don't think they ever will get it. The joke is on them because they're
totally clueless to what blind is.

Rosemarie

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of brian
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 11:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do
they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------






Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes a friend of mine is very good in his mind but finds words on the phone hard and this often does get people in support not wanting to engage with him on the phone. He is not stupid, just not as eloquent. its a tough one, in theory typed stuff should have the same procedures in place as the voice call system does. However this is getting a little off topic now.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:11 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


On the phone, I can get to a level 2 person. I just haven't quite figured out how to make them transfer me through text chat. I thought about calling them through IP Relay, but then, I am hung up on if I do that.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Indeed I get those on Virgin Media. they seem to be in Malaysia. Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "brian" <sackriderbrian45@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 7:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast. They are forigners who can't speak or undrstand englih well. I told them that I am blind so I can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are. With att's connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me. I told them that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the chat window. They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x. How do they think that I will know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so hard to understand what blind is. I guess I will have to just spell it out for them. I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this person is blind, push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what blindness means or is just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel. Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett" <kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial" <topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using disability language when interacting with a disabled customer, especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2-------------------






Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Maybe we need to have an army of girlfriends we can share for this case. :-)
Actually, I'd imagine a nice real time camera view for their end might be nice, they go left, up down there, I can see the lights now.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "JM Casey" <crystallogic@ca.inter.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 8:01 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


Oh, the lights. Always the lights. Every time I talk to the ISP, it's always
the first thing they ask: "Are all the lights on on the modem? Is it
blinking?" It's gotten hilarious by this point. Now whenever a call needs to
be made to the ISP, I ask my girlfriend to do it. The problem with that is:
she hates talking to these people on the phone more than I do, and she can
see!

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: June 24, 2018 2:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast. They are forigners
who can't speak or undrstand englih well. I told them that I am blind so I
can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are. With att's
connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me. I told them
that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the
chat window. They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if
I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x. How do
they think that I will know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so
hard to understand what blind is. I guess I will have to just spell it out
for them. I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even
light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no
business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind, push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
-------------






Ervin, Glenn
 

My cable company & ISP has problems with using captchas that don't work as far as the audio part. I have suggested using a simple math problem in words, like
What is three plus one?
But they haven't changed. One of their pages don't even offer an audio challenge, and like I mentioned, the ones it does offer, don't work, that is, no audio comes, and the download file is a recording of a long phrase, and they said that is from someone attacking the page or something like that.
The workers seem to understand a person using a screenreader, in fact, one told me that they had an employee who uses a screenreader, and they did not realize that captchas would be a problem for her.
All that, and yet they still have not fixed the captcha problem.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of brian
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 1:43 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.

    I have incountered this with both Att and Comcast.  They are forigners who can't speak or undrstand englih well.  I told them that I am blind so I can't tell you if their are lights on or what color they are.  With att's connect tech they would not even stay on the phone with me.  I told them that if you don't then you can't ask me anything as I could not read the chat window.  They even said that after I told them that I was blind that if I wanted to end the session that I should just click on the red x.  How do they think that I will  know whear the red x is if I can't see? Why is it so hard to understand what blind is.  I guess I will have to just spell it out for them.  I am totally blind that means that I can't see anything not even light or any shadows. If they can't comprehend that then they have no business working in tech support.

Brian Sackrider


On 6/24/2018 5:30 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
Yes indeed. I do find it almost ridiculous that, for example my
internet company have me flagged as blind, and generally help me with
things that they screw up, rather than un screwing them up, if that is
a word, but also continue to put me through to the people who cannot
function without knowing what a light is doing on a router, even
though I'm deep inside the control panel of said router and can read
them any parameter they wish to know about.
There should just be a one line addition to their script. If this
person is blind,  push to level 2 or whatever its called. these people
do exist, but often the person at the start is unaware of what
blindness means or is  just thick. I'm sorry but that is what I feel.
Rocket science it is not.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
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----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Kingett"
<kingettr@gmail.com>
To: <games_access@lists.igda.org>; "Top tech editorial"
<topdot@gmail.com>; <main@TechTalk.groups.io>; <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, June 24, 2018 12:51 AM
Subject: [nvda] accessibility training is important too.


In this post, I detail an experience talking to Microsoft's
disability answer desk and talk about the importance of using
disability language when interacting with a disabled customer,
especially if you are operating disability support. Feel free to
share widely.

https://medium.com/p/a0d8aead2659?source=user_profile---------2------
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