I think Avast is a virus :-)


 

CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure.  I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Cristóbal
 

Can’t beat portable versions either.

I have my portable installers in my Google Drive folder and thus am able to access them from either one of my machines. Open and close them as I wish.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 2:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure.  I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Gene
 

If you are a blind person, you may not see the bundling offers in a custom installation because of accessibility problems with the installers.  While you should use the custom installation option, that is no guarantee as a blind person.  And uncheckie, while it sees a lot and should be used, doesn't know about everything. 
 
I would say that, before installing anything free, blind people should ask about the installation on one or more lists of blind computer users.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 4:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure.  I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Tyler Wood
 



On 13-Jul-2018 4:51 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

Thank you so much. You made my day. I had no idea something like this existed.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 



Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

The latest CCleaner does not allow unchecky to do anything. As I say i think they are getting wise and even if you do refuse any other installation, its sets a timer and installs it in the background later on. I wonder if recover is the same as I see that is on the other machine as well.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky ( https://unchecky.com/ ) , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Sadly Google back up and restore was far too crash prone for me to carry on using it. When it was just google drive it was fine. Dropbox is better in thatrespect.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Cristóbal" <cristobalmuli@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 11:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


Can’t beat portable versions either.

I have my portable installers in my Google Drive folder and thus am able to access them from either one of my machines. Open and close them as I wish.



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 2:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)



CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky <https://unchecky.com/> , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel


 

Never had this happen on any of my win7 or 10 units.

Unchecky hasn't had an update in ages.

But if ccleaner is becoming dangerous and virus like, I am going to have to concidder taking it off all my networks, and never using it, I really like to do this from time to time but who knows.

I may have to use a portable one for now its been fine for me.

There are 2 tasks, a skip uac and a ccleaner update task it says its for installing emergency updates to it, but I just hope its not doing this avast thing.

It would be fine if the suite were accessible and working and they listened to users but its not really.

On 7/14/2018 9:02 PM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
The latest CCleaner does not allow unchecky to do anything. As I say i think they are getting wise and even if you do refuse any other installation, its sets a timer and  installs it in the background later on. I wonder if recover is the same as I see that is on the other machine as well.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 10:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky ( https://unchecky.com/ ) , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

~ Richard Dehmel






.


 

I will believe that CCleaner installs Avast after the fact and on its own the first time I encounter it, and not before.

I've got 5 machines in my household, and on 4 of them CCleaner is assiduously kept up to date.   I have not yet had it do anything unexpected and there is no business that would be insane enough to risk alienating a massive user base, and creating a PR nightmare, by "deciding for you" after an installation that something else entirely needs to be installed.

I haven't had a bit of trouble with Google Backup & Sync, either.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Jackie
 

Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of
& attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
I will believe that CCleaner installs Avast after the fact and on its own
the first time I encounter it, and not before.

I've got 5 machines in my household, and on 4 of them CCleaner is
assiduously kept up to date.   I have not yet had it do anything unexpected
and there is no business that would be insane enough to risk alienating a
massive user base, and creating a PR nightmare, by "deciding for you" after
an installation that something else entirely needs to be installed.

I haven't had a bit of trouble with Google Backup & Sync, either.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


 

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:
Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of & attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.  You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek you out.  'Twas ever thus.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Jackie
 

It's absolutely true, Brian V. I know of a certainty that some of us
have tried to engage w/the authors of security software. The results
have been pretty mixed, to say the least, & that's the very polite,
highly edited version, if you understand me.

What can make translation of commands difficult is when a sighted
person says, "click on the gear icon in the upper left corner of the
screen", for example, rather than identifying it by its text label,
i.e., "settings". It's just hard sometimes for blind folks to know
what all these icons look like, &, of course, they change w/various
iterations of a particular program at times. So, there can indeed be a
gap. The other thing that can make it hard is that many times when
fighting malware, we ask folks to boot into safe mode, which is
obviously somewhat problematic for a person requiring access to
assistive technology. Windows 10 has made some strides in this regard,
& there have been some registry hacks in the past to help w/this, but
clearly it's still a problem for a lot of folks.

1 of the things I was thinking about as regards Bleeping Computer is
their music during downloads. I have contacted them, explaining that
this is a violation of accessibility best practices, but, so far as I
know, the practice still continues. It does really amaze me how few
developers know about accessibility guidelines. I recently engaged the
folks who develop a particular WordPress plugin because their software
had become inaccessible when they upgraded versions. The responses I
received were pretty disconcerting, i.e., they said they would
"redraw" the checkbox to make it look like the classic 1, & then they
told me I was just missing features of the previous version because of
plugin conflicts. Uh, well, no. They finally got it right, but only
after I told them that I would really prefer they not reply to me
again, & indeed would find doing so disrespectful, until they read
some WCAG 2.0 materials, for which I provided links. (Yes, I'm aware
of 2.1, but those considerations weren't relevant here). So, it can be
pretty disheartening & an uphill battle, Brian V. 1 thing I think that
really helped when engaging the developers of that particular security
plugin was when a sighted guy jumped in & informed them it was an
accessibility nightmare. So I personally appreciate folks like you &
him who are in the arena helping us.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 12:03 PM, Jackie wrote:


Unfortunately, as much as I like Bleeping Computer, their knowledge of &
attentiveness to issues of disability is pretty slim.
Hardly a shock, really.   The entirety of individuals with disabilities that
need special access to use computers is the proverbial drop in an ocean.
You are not the target demographic of any general purpose computer support
forum.

That being said, it's not the responsibility of random volunteers out there
in cyberspace to presume someone asking a question requires any sort of
consideration for assistive technology, regardless of the type, unless they
identify themselves as such.   Even then, a lot of the questions aren't
directly related to issues of access to begin with.  I expect, and have
every reason to expect, individuals who are blind to be able to "translate
into screen-reader commands" things that are given in point-and-click
nomenclature.  I have to translate in the opposite direction, and it's far
from difficult.

If your question has something to do with accessibility on a general forum
it's not likely to get an answer simply because the number of blind users
who go outside groups such as this one are incredibly small.   Any minority
has to engage the broader world, as the broader world is not going to seek
you out.  'Twas ever thus.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


 

Jackie,

          And you are the perfect example of just the kind of pushing that helps to make the world better.   As a sighted person who came to assistive technology for the blind and the visually impaired relatively late in life, I can say that most of the attitude you get is secondary to ignorance, and the fear of revealing same, and because the thought of accessibility never crossed the developer's mind.   I was a developer for many years (but not for the Windows platform) and if accessibility was considered at all, and it seldom was, it was considered grudgingly and as an afterthought.   That has changed, radically, at the major software makers like Microsoft such that accessibility considerations are "baked in" as new development occurs.

           You are also absolutely correct that it can feel very disheartening and like an endless uphill battle, but someone at some point had to undertake these battles for any given minority that wanted its place at the proverbial table.   In my career I have worked with individuals with brain injuries (I was a cognitive rehab therapist for 6 years before I burned out), visual impairments, and other differences and/or disabilities and to a person I've been telling them that no one else will be advocating for them, at least not reliably, in day to day life so one of the best skills they can develop is to become an effective advocate for themselves.  Effective can, sadly, sometimes be glacially slow, but like water carving a canyon, it's got to start somewhere.

            And, as you clearly realize, recruiting sighted advocates who actually do have a clue about accessibility issues never hurts, either.  One of my roles, when called upon, is to make "sighted friendly" what the issues regarding accessibility are.  A lot of times that's done by demonstrating what happens when a screen reader user is trying to access something that should be incredibly simple (and is, for someone who sees and points and clicks) but is an absolute nightmare when accessed via a screen reader.

            In the end, though, even I realize that what I'm trying to do is raise awareness in the broader world to these issues in a way that the broader world can grasp.  They're never going to come seeking this information on their own, at least not the vast majority of "the broader world," anyway.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Jackie
 

Brian V, I love your new signature! Yeah--I know--who has a life &
still reads those?--but anyway...

There are developers who are beginning to take accessibility
seriously. Microsoft, Apple, even WordPress & drupal have committed to
conformance w/WCAG 2.0 at the AA level. They are, sadly, the
exceptions, & even some of their efforts are pretty spotty, but at
least, as you correctly note, it's now a consideration than it was
before. NVDA is also helping by allowing testers a free screen reader
w/which to test the accessibility of their software, at least on
Windows, though Narrator is also now becoming an acceptable candidate.

Advocacy is still the best tool, but, sadly, many do not know how to
do this effectively. Knowledge, either acquired formally or via
self-education is the best advocacy method, but so many don't wish to
acquire it, or don't know how to get started if they do. The blindness
organizations would do well to put out materials regarding that, but
I've not seen any thus far.

In a previous life I, too, have done work w/the cognitively disabled,
& it is absolutely brutally hard. Fixing hacked websites & infected
computers is a breeze compared to it, & that's not easy work by any
stretch. The 1 real blessing of working w/those who have cognitive
disabilities is that you become almost hyper-aware of the most minimal
progress. & occasionally, there are those breakthroughs that seem
nearly miracuous. But observance of the nearly infinitesimal is, I
think, 1 of the greatest blessing of doing that work, as it carries
over to the rest of life.

Thank you for your work on our behalf.

On 7/14/18, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Jackie,

          And you are the perfect example of just the kind of pushing that
helps to make the world better.   As a sighted person who came to assistive
technology for the blind and the visually impaired relatively late in life,
I can say that most of the attitude you get is secondary to ignorance, and
the fear of revealing same, and because the thought of accessibility never
crossed the developer's mind.   I was a developer for many years (but not
for the Windows platform) and if accessibility was considered at all, and it
seldom was, it was considered grudgingly and as an afterthought.   That has
changed, radically, at the major software makers like Microsoft such that
accessibility considerations are "baked in" as new development occurs.

           You are also absolutely correct that it can feel very
disheartening and like an endless uphill battle, but someone at some point
had to undertake these battles for any given minority that wanted its place
at the proverbial table.   In my career I have worked with individuals with
brain injuries (I was a cognitive rehab therapist for 6 years before I
burned out), visual impairments, and other differences and/or disabilities
and to a person I've been telling them that no one else will be advocating
for them, at least not reliably, in day to day life so one of the best
skills they can develop is to become an effective advocate for themselves.
Effective can, sadly, sometimes be glacially slow, but like water carving a
canyon, it's got to start somewhere.

            And, as you clearly realize, recruiting sighted advocates who
actually do have a clue about accessibility issues never hurts, either.  One
of my roles, when called upon, is to make "sighted friendly" what the issues
regarding accessibility are.  A lot of times that's done by demonstrating
what happens when a screen reader user is trying to access something that
should be incredibly simple (and is, for someone who sees and points and
clicks) but is an absolute nightmare when accessed via a screen reader.

            In the end, though, even I realize that what I'm trying to do is
raise awareness in the broader world to these issues in a way that the
broader world can grasp.  They're never going to come seeking this
information on their own, at least not the vast majority of "the broader
world," anyway.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134

   A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for
all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


 

Hi,
Could anyone please explain how the unchecky utility works to ensure accidentaly installing of unwanted software?
Thanks
ArvindThis message is transmitted on 100% recycled electrons.

On 14 Jul 2018, at 05.42, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

Boxbe This message is eligible for Automatic Cleanup! (gsasner@...) Add cleanup rule | More info
If you are a blind person, you may not see the bundling offers in a custom installation because of accessibility problems with the installers.  While you should use the custom installation option, that is no guarantee as a blind person.  And uncheckie, while it sees a lot and should be used, doesn't know about everything. 
 
I would say that, before installing anything free, blind people should ask about the installation on one or more lists of blind computer users.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 4:51 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure.  I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

By watching when installers are running and comparing the checkboxes presented against a database of "free offer/potentially unwanted program" type material and, if a match is found, automatically unchecking that checkbox.

It is not 100% effective in finding everything, but it's a big help.  It also remains under development, so some of these new "techniques" that it does not yet detect for sneaking stuff in during an installs will eventually be detected in all likelihood.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


David Tanner
 

No, Avast is not a virous.  It is supposedly an anti virous software.  Believe it or not there is a difference.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:42 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

If you are a blind person, you may not see the bundling offers in a custom installation because of accessibility problems with the installers.  While you should use the custom installation option, that is no guarantee as a blind person.  And uncheckie, while it sees a lot and should be used, doesn't know about everything. 

 

I would say that, before installing anything free, blind people should ask about the installation on one or more lists of blind computer users.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 4:51 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)

 

CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure.  I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky, install it, and leave it there to do its job.  It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2.  Never take the "typical" install option.  Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

May as well be a virus, its why I had to quit the dvdvideosoft software and buy my own, all those added programs screwed things up and I had to reformat.

Ironically, the applien stuff while accessible enough is still a bit clunky for me and so I don't use it, I have youtube dl which works, youtube dl-g in fact, its just a pitty version 0.38 is the only accessible well usable version out there.

With the death of a lot of the listentoyoutube sites like listentoyoutube.com youtubetomp3.com etc well.

Anyway, youtube dl-g 038 is what I use now.

Sadly winlame was a good converter, but sadly it doesn't do wav and has a lot of problems in the latest versions.

So my goldwave I have payed for comes in handy.

Ironically I don't use that software for what its meant for either.

Its for ripping cds mostly, converting waves mp3s and flacks and thats about it still I am getting a lot out of my 40 bucks.

Out of all the software I use mostly, goldwave,cdbxp, thunderbird, waterfox, ie, winamp, and youtubedl-g and 7zip, as well as dropbox a lot of the rest exists some comes and goes as I need or don't need it.

On 7/15/2018 2:15 PM, David Tanner wrote:
No, Avast is not a virous. It is supposedly an anti virous software. Believe it or not there is a difference.




From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 5:42 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


If you are a blind person, you may not see the bundling offers in a custom installation because of accessibility problems with the installers. While you should use the custom installation option, that is no guarantee as a blind person. And uncheckie, while it sees a lot and should be used, doesn't know about everything.


I would say that, before installing anything free, blind people should ask about the installation on one or more lists of blind computer users.


Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>

Sent: Friday, July 13, 2018 4:51 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

Subject: Re: [nvda] I think Avast is a virus :-)


CCleaner (Piriform as a whole) is now owned by Avast and "an offer" to install it comes with every CCleaner free install.

If you choose the "typical" installation you'll get it for sure. I tell everyone two things if they want to avoid the installation of software bundled with other software they want:

1. Get Unchecky <https://unchecky.com/> , install it, and leave it there to do its job. It's resource footprint is minuscule.

2. Never take the "typical" install option. Always choose customize, which gives you the full view of what the installer intends to do at each step, including the installation of other bundled software, so that you can make intentional choices.

You do not need to purchase the paid version of CCleaner, or virtually any "free" program, to avoid the loathsome practice of bundling but you do need to NEVER take the "typical" install, at a minimum, and it's really helpful to use Unchecky in case you might happen to miss one of the checkboxes you'd need to uncheck to avoid having something you don't want installed.