Is NVDA colourblind?


Giles Turnbull
 

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one, ❤️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, ♥, as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I ♥ NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


Gene
 

The default dictionary reads items when you are reading in a way that doesn't go letter by letter.  You generally wouldn't want letter by letter reading to have the dictionary do anything, you read letter by letter to see exactly what is on the page, character by character. 
 
Also, I doubt the default dictionary sees an item in full unless it is only one character when reading by character.  If you have told the dictionary to pronounce data as datuh, with a short a, moving character by character wouldn't present the full word to the speech dictionary.  That is my assumption.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 3:07 PM
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one, ❤️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, ♥, as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I ♥ NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


 

It's not that NVDA is colorblind, but that the emoji database is ridden with anachronisms.  See:

https://emojipedia.org/heavy-black-heart/     and    https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/2764/heavyblackheart 

Which, while heavy, is absolutely not black.  It seems that NVDA is reading the terminology that was approved way back in 1993 when this emoji was officially approved, and that the naming was never changed even though the graphic that goes with it certainly has.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

It's also worth noting that "heavy black heart" was approved when most emoji were presented in monochrome on many devices, too.

It would be interesting to see how many names assigned during the monochrome emoji period bear little resemblance to what they look like in beautiful living color today.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Mohamed
 

Actually, I don't think NVDA ever had an emoji dictionary, so any pronunciation oddity is probably the fault of the synthesizer. Though there is an emoji symbols dictionary floating around the web, and that does use somewhat outdated emoji definitions. I personally use a modified version of that dictionary, adding emojis as I find them.


On 7/15/2018 7:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
It's not that NVDA is colorblind, but that the emoji database is ridden with anachronisms.  See:

https://emojipedia.org/heavy-black-heart/     and    https://www.emojibase.com/emoji/2764/heavyblackheart 

Which, while heavy, is absolutely not black.  It seems that NVDA is reading the terminology that was approved way back in 1993 when this emoji was officially approved, and that the naming was never changed even though the graphic that goes with it certainly has.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 



Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I’ve wondered this too.  Heavy Black Heart is how it is pronounced on Android phones as well.  On the iPhone though, I believe it says correctly, Red Heart.

 

So it could be a speech synth thing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: 15 July 2018 21:07
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one, ️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, , as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


Jonathan COHN
 

The emoji system is defined as the names our screen readers often read and then it is up to the font creators to display a symbol that represents the definition. A few years back, it became possible to add colors / tints to at least person emoji so that they would be more multi-cultural. I don't know if that is what happens with the hearts too, in that one can apply a shade to heavy black heart to change its visual meaning. Another feature that is possible with emoji is to have more than one at a specific position, and I would not be surprised if screen readers have  difficulty indicating these overloads.  What happens if you ask for the text attributes of the heart?

Best Wishes,

Jonathan Cohn

 


Ervin, Glenn
 

Jaws says that too.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 3:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one, ️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, ♥, as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I ♥ NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 11:32 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Jaws says that too.
No surprise there, either.  Regardless of the circuitous route that's taken to get there, it appears that the default behavior is to consult the official emoji descriptions unless some exception code has been added that overrides it.  Since this thing was officially titled as "heavy black heart" that's what it gets announced as.

They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me.   I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Rob Hudson
 

Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me. I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.

Why is that, if I may ask. I am indifferent to them but I can't see them. They just waste space to me.


Gene
 

There is no better way to encourage people not to learn to express themselves effectively verbally and in writing than by substituting codes and pictures for words.  The written word was one of the greatest achievements of civilization.  Now, it is being degraded and supplanted by images and representations. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:09 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 11:32 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Jaws says that too.
No surprise there, either.  Regardless of the circuitous route that's taken to get there, it appears that the default behavior is to consult the official emoji descriptions unless some exception code has been added that overrides it.  Since this thing was officially titled as "heavy black heart" that's what it gets announced as.

They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me.   I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Ervin, Glenn
 

I feel too like emoticons are a regression of language.  It also has caused a lack of accuracy with regard to controlling devices, since manufacturers want to make all their customers happy, by attempting to not use English for labeling controls, and as a result, nobody can use the controls.

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

And language has evolved from that time.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

There is no better way to encourage people not to learn to express themselves effectively verbally and in writing than by substituting codes and pictures for words.  The written word was one of the greatest achievements of civilization.  Now, it is being degraded and supplanted by images and representations. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:09 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 11:32 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Jaws says that too.

No surprise there, either.  Regardless of the circuitous route that's taken to get there, it appears that the default behavior is to consult the official emoji descriptions unless some exception code has been added that overrides it.  Since this thing was officially titled as "heavy black heart" that's what it gets announced as.

They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me.   I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:05 PM, Gene wrote:
There is no better way to encourage people not to learn to express themselves effectively verbally and in writing than by substituting codes and pictures for words.  The written word was one of the greatest achievements of civilization.  Now, it is being degraded and supplanted by images and representations. 
Which, in essence, was what I attempted to say privately in a response to Rob Hudson and applaud you for saying here.

There are rare exceptions, irony and certain satire being among them, where one may express oneself perfectly yet the reader does not pick up on the intent.  In the vast majority of other cases, the writer should be able to express himself or herself such that the intent in the message is quite clear without the addition of little pictures or character codes to elucidate.  That many do just that, but then choose to include a stream of extraneous emoji/emoticons that adds nothing to the conversation is infuriating to me (and, yes, I am allowed to feel that way - I do keep it to myself except in metaconversations about the phenomena like this one).

What's interesting is that even emoji now have a coded language associated with them, most of which I know nothing about.  Who would have thought, though, that the eggplant emoji would become a coded reference to the male genitalia?   There are entire communication sequences that get carried out entirely in emoji for those who know and understand the emoji code.  I'm fine with that, as one should write (and, yes, it is a form of writing) for one's intended audience.

Perhaps a big part of the problem is because the writer knows neither precisely what they want to say nor to whom they're trying to say it.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.
Well, there was a time when using icons/glyphs in an attempt to create a "universal language" for things like road signs was accompanied for quite a few years with a small "label" for lack of a better word beneath it in the local language saying what it meant.  The same thing was true, but to a far lesser extent, on keyboards.  Those attempts have, by and large, met with great success.

On electronic devices, however, the convention of presenting icons and text as the default has really fallen by the wayside.  The first thing I do when setting up a device for myself is to make sure that icons and text, not just icons, are presented.   No one can possibly keep in mind what all the various icons mean, particularly for functions you might touch once every 10 years, if that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Cristóbal
 

Latin alphabet is nothing more than another form of picture writing. It’s just what we know.

Image/picture writing has existed in advanced cultures in one form or another since forever. Egyptian hieroglyphics, Nahuatl picture writing and you can even consider the Chinese/Japonese form of writing to be image based.

I’m not an emoji fan, but it’s really just another example of everything old is new again.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

I feel too like emoticons are a regression of language.  It also has caused a lack of accuracy with regard to controlling devices, since manufacturers want to make all their customers happy, by attempting to not use English for labeling controls, and as a result, nobody can use the controls.

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

And language has evolved from that time.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

There is no better way to encourage people not to learn to express themselves effectively verbally and in writing than by substituting codes and pictures for words.  The written word was one of the greatest achievements of civilization.  Now, it is being degraded and supplanted by images and representations. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:09 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 11:32 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Jaws says that too.

No surprise there, either.  Regardless of the circuitous route that's taken to get there, it appears that the default behavior is to consult the official emoji descriptions unless some exception code has been added that overrides it.  Since this thing was officially titled as "heavy black heart" that's what it gets announced as.

They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me.   I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Ervin, Glenn
 

My drivers have had a hard time trying to figure out the controls in my latest work car because of all the hieroglyphics.

Makes for an interesting if not frustrating situation.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:18 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

Well, there was a time when using icons/glyphs in an attempt to create a "universal language" for things like road signs was accompanied for quite a few years with a small "label" for lack of a better word beneath it in the local language saying what it meant.  The same thing was true, but to a far lesser extent, on keyboards.  Those attempts have, by and large, met with great success.

On electronic devices, however, the convention of presenting icons and text as the default has really fallen by the wayside.  The first thing I do when setting up a device for myself is to make sure that icons and text, not just icons, are presented.   No one can possibly keep in mind what all the various icons mean, particularly for functions you might touch once every 10 years, if that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Gene
 

Pictures representing ideas or objects is not at all the same as symbols representing sounds that are combined to form words.  A picture of a fish representing the ocean is completely different than a symbolic method of writing the sounds in a language that make up the word "ocean."
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Cristóbal
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

Latin alphabet is nothing more than another form of picture writing. It’s just what we know.

Image/picture writing has existed in advanced cultures in one form or another since forever. Egyptian hieroglyphics, Nahuatl picture writing and you can even consider the Chinese/Japonese form of writing to be image based.

I’m not an emoji fan, but it’s really just another example of everything old is new again.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 10:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

I feel too like emoticons are a regression of language.  It also has caused a lack of accuracy with regard to controlling devices, since manufacturers want to make all their customers happy, by attempting to not use English for labeling controls, and as a result, nobody can use the controls.

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

And language has evolved from that time.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 12:05 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

There is no better way to encourage people not to learn to express themselves effectively verbally and in writing than by substituting codes and pictures for words.  The written word was one of the greatest achievements of civilization.  Now, it is being degraded and supplanted by images and representations. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2018 11:09 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 11:32 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

Jaws says that too.

No surprise there, either.  Regardless of the circuitous route that's taken to get there, it appears that the default behavior is to consult the official emoji descriptions unless some exception code has been added that overrides it.  Since this thing was officially titled as "heavy black heart" that's what it gets announced as.

They actually need to update those emoji descriptions, but I'm not holding my breath on that after seeing what a great number of them are named that bears virtually no resemblance to what they look like to me.   I'm biased, though, because I really, really dislike both emoji and emoticons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:40 PM, Gene wrote:
Pictures representing ideas or objects is not at all the same as symbols representing sounds that are combined to form words.  A picture of a fish representing the ocean is completely different than a symbolic method of writing the sounds in a language that make up the word "ocean."
Only if you're worried about the method, not the concept that is communicated itself.

There are many written (as in with letters) forms of the word, "ocean," but it is not the arbitrary representation of the concept that is the important part.  Even pictographic languages such as hieroglyphics had exact spoken equivalents for the glyphs.

Language is a symbol system to carry human communicative content.   Sign language is every bit as much a language as any other yet has no written component (and, believe me, many have tried to think of one that would work).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel

 

 


Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

It isn’t the screen reader at all, it’s the synth.  Eloquence says it from Code Factory as well.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ervin, Glenn
Sent: 16 July 2018 16:32
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Jaws says that too.

Glenn

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 3:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

Hello all,

I'm curious whether NVDA is colour blind. I have noticed this with two emoticons now, both of them involving hearts.

This one,
️, is spoken as "heavy black heart" and this one, , as "black heart"

Having consulted sighted friends I have now described them as red heart in my NVDA default dictionary, but is this an NVDA glitch? I initially assumed it was a Facebook glitch because it was only there where I noticed the first one, but today I am reading a poetry book with one poem that is titled I
NY in both the PDF and the text file I coppied the text into.

When I move word by word or use read line or say all I hear what I have programmed into the dictionary, but if I go character by character then I hear the black heart version.

I do currently have Chris Leo's Emoticons addin enabled, but didn't when I first heard the heavy black heart emoticon. The addin has not changed anything about the description of heavy black heart and I suspect it wouldn't change anything about the black heart if I uninstalled the addin.

Most of the time I don't care enough to check with a sighted person whether the emoticon that is described does indeed resample what NVDA describes it as, but with things like a black heart, which to me implied love in a sad situation such as after a death, it can be rather unsettling to learn that the emoticon is not as described. It was exactly that situation where I discovered the incorrect description. One of my friends used waht NVDA described to me as a heavy black heart and, when I asked whether the black heart was an indication of sadness, she told me that it was in fact a red heart.

Giles
 


Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

This is just another case of blind people crying because language doesn’t suit what they want.  We should try to adapt to the real world, rather than complain about language which evolves.

 

So often do I hear on Facebook for example that blind people whinge because sighted people don’t describe images they post on Facebook, and Facebook doesn’t always have alt text for them.

 

Well there are plenty of tools on iOS and Android to tell us roughly what those pictures are.

 

When blind people didn’t know they existed, they didn’t cry about it, now suddenly, because they know an image is there, they complain that all sighted people should write up their images.

 

In this case, my sympathies are with the sighted people, and we come across as a load of moaners.

 

And yes, I am totally blind.

 

Back to Emoji, if you don’t like them, turn them off.

 

End of rant.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 16 July 2018 18:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA colourblind?

 

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:

I refer to emoticons and such labeling as hieroglyphics.

Well, there was a time when using icons/glyphs in an attempt to create a "universal language" for things like road signs was accompanied for quite a few years with a small "label" for lack of a better word beneath it in the local language saying what it meant.  The same thing was true, but to a far lesser extent, on keyboards.  Those attempts have, by and large, met with great success.

On electronic devices, however, the convention of presenting icons and text as the default has really fallen by the wayside.  The first thing I do when setting up a device for myself is to make sure that icons and text, not just icons, are presented.   No one can possibly keep in mind what all the various icons mean, particularly for functions you might touch once every 10 years, if that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A little kindness from person to person is better than a vast love for all humankind.

           ~ Richard Dehmel