Speech recognition and deaf-blind


John J. Boyer
 

Is anyone using Dragon Naturaly speaking or another speech recognition
program. It has been suggested that with such a program people who
aren't good typists could talk to me.

Thanks,

--
John J. Boyer; President,
AbilitiesSoft, Inc.
Email: john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org
Website: http://www.abilitiessoft.org
Status: 501(C)(3) Nonprofit
Location: Madison, Wisconsin USA
Mission: To develop softwares and provide STEM services for people with
disabilities which are available at no cost.


Rob
 

John J. Boyer <john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org> wrote:
Is anyone using Dragon Naturaly speaking or another speech recognition
program. It has been suggested that with such a program people who
aren't good typists could talk to me.
I thought about that. However, a lot of these desktop recognition programs require you to "train" them to recognize your voice.
What I would suggest is trying some of the dictation software on a smartphone. What program you use depends on which platform you have--Android or Ios.
Unfortunately, I haven't gotten much beyond this possibility, myself. I think it would work though, if you are a little patient.


 

John,

            One of my earliest clients, though not deaf-blind, was legally blind with a significant speech atypicality secondary to cerebral palsy.  That was about 4 years ago now, and we used Dragon Naturally Speaking.  I was absolutely floored at how well it recognized his speech without any use of the training scripts at all.  We did eventually do some, but even doing those is fairly short work with an assistant feeding you the lines into your ear.  This is, perhaps, a half an hour or so of time if you go through all of them, and after that the recognition levels are just incredibly good.

            It looks like Nuance doesn't actually do true trial versions anymore, but they offer a 30-day money back guarantee on any of the versions of Dragon Naturally Speaking.  If you know you'd like to try it and have the time to put in the work to trying to get to know the software those 30-days should be enough for a go/no-go decision.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Jack Zimmerman <jackzip65@...>
 

Hello John and List! I had tried using the free IOS version of that program, at one time but really wasn't very imressed with it at all. Either that or just don't know how to talk right! A possibility! When I looked that was the only one they had. Perhaps the paid ver_not would be better. I am also a deaf blind person! Completely braille reliant! So something like this would be a boon to me also but It would need to be some type of mobile application for when I'm oot and aboot!
My best to All!!

Jack and Becky
Sent from our iPod touch

On Aug 14, 2016, at 4:09 PM, John J. Boyer <john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org> wrote:

Is anyone using Dragon Naturaly speaking or another speech recognition
program. It has been suggested that with such a program people who
aren't good typists could talk to me.

Thanks,

--
John J. Boyer; President,
AbilitiesSoft, Inc.
Email: john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org
Website: http://www.abilitiessoft.org
Status: 501(C)(3) Nonprofit
Location: Madison, Wisconsin USA
Mission: To develop softwares and provide STEM services for people with
disabilities which are available at no cost.




Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

I saw a note on here that a development of nvda with ability to use that software might be being considered.
I was quite impressed by the way 10 seems to, out of the box understand speech, but whether its good enough to use to type stuff i Have not tried.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "John J. Boyer" <john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 14, 2016 10:09 PM
Subject: [nvda] Speech recognition and deaf-blind


Is anyone using Dragon Naturaly speaking or another speech recognition
program. It has been suggested that with such a program people who
aren't good typists could talk to me.

Thanks,

--
John J. Boyer; President,
AbilitiesSoft, Inc.
Email: john.boyer@abilitiessoft.org
Website: http://www.abilitiessoft.org
Status: 501(C)(3) Nonprofit
Location: Madison, Wisconsin USA
Mission: To develop softwares and provide STEM services for people with
disabilities which are available at no cost.



Babcock LDPVI
 

Hello:

I am trialling the accessibility and "voice typing" functions available in Google Docs at the moment. Google Docs is the free online office provided by Google to anyone with a Google Account. 

Their voice typing function is only available if you use the Chrome browser. 

I have never had to train the voice typing function but I have in the past few months used it extensively and it is about 90% accuracy. 

Google Docs is very accessible with NVDA which is a great help. 

I am not deaf or blind myself but I work as part of a team of advisory teachers who support young people with visual impairments in schools.

Thanks, 


 

Just a general note:   speech recognition technology has vastly improved over just the last several years and continues to do so.

I dabbled in speech recognition when it was a new thing and found it almost useless.  Now Google Voice automatically creates a transcript of my incoming voicemail messages and, particularly for the sound quality involved via phone, does a very decent job.  I haven't tried the Windows 10 built-in speech recognition, but would certainly recommend playing with that.

Dragon Naturally Speaking is a great product but certainly not alone out there in its basic speech recognition/speech-to-text arena anymore.

Speech recognition requires some getting used to no matter how good it may be, particularly making sure you mute your microphone when something else interferes with the work you're doing.  That, or turning off the function entirely.  When you're dictating a document it can be rather amusing to see what gets in there when the spouse, kids, or coworkers give you a holler for whatever and you respond, having forgotten to turn speech recognition off.  One could change amusing to frustrating and the same applies.
--
Brian

I worry a lot. . . I worry that no matter how cynical you become it's never enough to keep up.

         ~ Trudy, in Jane Wagner's "Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe"

    



Pranav Lal
 

Hi John and all,

Desktop speech-recognition systems namely Dragon from Nuance and Windows
speech-recognition from Microsoft are not speaker independent. They have come
close to it though training does help in my experience. In my experience, Dragon
is more accurate so try that. You should have a good quality microphone for best
results.

Pranav