Topics

Softwares to compose music for the blind


Marco Oros
 

Hi!

I don't know, if I've asked It, but I would like to compose music, also enter It to the notes. What is good software for the blind, used with NVDA for this purpose?

Thank You.

Marco


Sarah k Alawami
 

Muse score works well,.

On September 13, 2018 05:52:04 "Marco Oros" <marco.oros93@...> wrote:

Hi!

I don't know, if I've asked It, but I would like to compose music, also
enter It to the notes. What is good software for the blind, used with
NVDA for this purpose?

Thank You.

Marco



Damien Garwood
 

Hi there,
It depends what you want to do.
If you want to work with MIDI to compose and produce music, then I can recommend QWS for basic work, or Reaper if you need a more advanced DAW.
On the other hand, if you want to work with printing scores and so on, then I'm afraid I'll have to let somebody else answer that.
Hope that helps.
Cheers,
Damien.

On 13/09/2018 01:51 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
Hi!
I don't know, if I've asked It, but I would like to compose music, also enter It to the notes. What is good software for the blind, used with NVDA for this purpose?
Thank You.
Marco


Giles Turnbull
 

I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles


Fernando Apan
 

Good morning.

I can offer you various pieces in braille format that are ready to be embossed, but that's the problem, because you prefer those midi files, right?

There is a software called Braille music editor which might help you with what you're needing.

Cheers.


Fernando Apan.



El 13/09/2018 a las 08:33 a.m., Giles Turnbull escribió:
I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I guess reaper feeds into this too. Sadly even the audio editing side of this is completely foxing me at the moment, the sound device keeps vanishing and I'm running out of free days, almost ready to throw in the towel.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fernando Apan" <ferapan@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 2:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Softwares to compose music for the blind


Good morning.

I can offer you various pieces in braille format that are ready to be
embossed, but that's the problem, because you prefer those midi files,
right?

There is a software called Braille music editor which might help you
with what you're needing.

Cheers.


Fernando Apan.



El 13/09/2018 a las 08:33 a.m., Giles Turnbull escribió:
I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the score
as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of those
pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes in
Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just this
morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles


Lenron
 

Even once your 60 days are up you can still use it. It just gives you
the notification about purchasing after that.

On 9/13/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
I guess reaper feeds into this too. Sadly even the audio editing side of
this is completely foxing me at the moment, the sound device keeps vanishing

and I'm running out of free days, almost ready to throw in the towel.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Fernando Apan" <ferapan@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 2:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Softwares to compose music for the blind


Good morning.

I can offer you various pieces in braille format that are ready to be
embossed, but that's the problem, because you prefer those midi files,
right?

There is a software called Braille music editor which might help you
with what you're needing.

Cheers.


Fernando Apan.



El 13/09/2018 a las 08:33 a.m., Giles Turnbull escribió:
I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the score
as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of those
pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes in
Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just this
morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles






--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762


Jackie
 

HI, Marco. I recommend you consider subscribing to the Midimag-ex list at:
midimag-ex-subscribe@...
& ask what folks use over there. There's a wide mix of both
professional & amateur musicians, so you can get views from many
perspectives.

Anyone else who'd like to join is also welcome. Feel free to contact
me privately if you have questions or require assistance.

On 9/13/18, Lenron <lenron93@...> wrote:
Even once your 60 days are up you can still use it. It just gives you
the notification about purchasing after that.

On 9/13/18, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists=blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
I guess reaper feeds into this too. Sadly even the audio editing side of
this is completely foxing me at the moment, the sound device keeps
vanishing

and I'm running out of free days, almost ready to throw in the towel.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Fernando Apan" <ferapan@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 2:42 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Softwares to compose music for the blind


Good morning.

I can offer you various pieces in braille format that are ready to be
embossed, but that's the problem, because you prefer those midi files,
right?

There is a software called Braille music editor which might help you
with what you're needing.

Cheers.


Fernando Apan.



El 13/09/2018 a las 08:33 a.m., Giles Turnbull escribió:
I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the score
as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of those
pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes in
Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just this
morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles






--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762



--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Marco Oros
 

I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC.

Can I use QWS also?


Jackie
 

It does have a virtual keyboard, though it's pretty hard to use that
w/any degree of precision.

On 9/13/18, Marco Oros <marco.oros93@...> wrote:
I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC.

Can I use QWS also?




--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


Arno Schuh
 

Hi,

Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too:
http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm
I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF.

Yours sincerely

Arno

Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull <giles.turnbull@...>:

I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the
score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of
those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes
in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just
this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles


Jackie
 

Well, there's always ABC, about which you can find out more here:
http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/doc/ABCtut.html

On 9/13/18, Arno Schuh <@menschomat> wrote:
Hi,

Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too:
http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm
I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF.

Yours sincerely

Arno

Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull
<giles.turnbull@...>:

I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the
score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of
those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes
in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just
this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles





--
Remember! Friends Help Friends Be Cybersafe
Jackie McBride
Helping Cybercrime Victims 1 Person at a Time
https://brighter-vision.com


John Isige
 

I missed the beginning of this, but if you're looking for stuff that does notation, MuseScore can at least read it, rather you can read it with it, and some work was done on making adding notation accessible, but I haven't messed with any of it. Here's the main MuseScore page.


https://musescore.org/en


Here's the accessibility stuff for writing notation.


https://accessiblemusicnotation.wordpress.com/2017/06/17/new-accessibility-work-on-musescore/

On 9/13/2018 18:49, Jackie wrote:
Well, there's always ABC, about which you can find out more here:
http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/doc/ABCtut.html

On 9/13/18, Arno Schuh <@menschomat> wrote:
Hi,

Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too:
http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm
I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF.

Yours sincerely

Arno

Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull
<giles.turnbull@...>:

I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the
score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of
those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes
in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just
this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles





Sarah k Alawami
 

The stuff for writing notiatin is I think a bit old as they did update the key sig stuff and a lot more to work wiht nvda.

Take care

On 13 Sep 2018, at 17:52, John Isige wrote:

I missed the beginning of this, but if you're looking for stuff that does notation, MuseScore can at least read it, rather you can read it with it, and some work was done on making adding notation accessible, but I haven't messed with any of it. Here's the main MuseScore page.

https://musescore.org/en

Here's the accessibility stuff for writing notation.

https://accessiblemusicnotation.wordpress.com/2017/06/17/new-accessibility-work-on-musescore/

On 9/13/2018 18:49, Jackie wrote: > Well, there's always ABC, about which you can find out more here: > http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/doc/ABCtut.html > > On 9/13/18, Arno Schuh arno.schuh@... wrote: >> Hi, >> >> Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too: >> http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm >> I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF. >> >> Yours sincerely >> >> Arno >> >> Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull >> giles.turnbull@...: >> >>> I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my >>> sighted >>> days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the >>> score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much >>> of >>> those pieces. >>> >>> I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is >>> any >>> way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could >>> somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords >>> with >>> three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to >>> figure >>> them out by listening to a recording. >>> >>> I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text >>> from >>> which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less >>> important >>> for me since I can remember how the pieces sound. >>> >>> It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes >>> in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just >>> this morning! >>> >>> Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille >>> music) >>> >>> Giles >>> >>> >> >> >> >> >> >


John Isige
 

OK, where's the updated stuff then?

On 9/14/2018 11:46, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
The stuff for writing notiatin is I think a bit old as they did update the key sig stuff and a lot more to work wiht nvda.

Take care

On 13 Sep 2018, at 17:52, John Isige wrote:

I missed the beginning of this, but if you're looking for stuff that does notation, MuseScore can at least read it, rather you can read it with it, and some work was done on making adding notation accessible, but I haven't messed with any of it. Here's the main MuseScore page.


https://musescore.org/en


Here's the accessibility stuff for writing notation.


https://accessiblemusicnotation.wordpress.com/2017/06/17/new-accessibility-work-on-musescore/


On 9/13/2018 18:49, Jackie wrote:
Well, there's always ABC, about which you can find out more here:
http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/doc/ABCtut.html

On 9/13/18, Arno Schuh <@menschomat> wrote:
Hi,

Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too:
http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm
I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF.

Yours sincerely

Arno

Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull
<giles.turnbull@...>:

I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my sighted
days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the
score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much of
those pieces.

I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is any
way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could
somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords with
three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to figure
them out by listening to a recording.

I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text from
which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less important
for me since I can remember how the pieces sound.

It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three notes
in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just
this morning!

Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille music)

Giles






Sarah k Alawami
 

Not sure. I know it was discussed some months ago on this list. For example they said the key sig is not accessible. It is now and ther were some other things. I don't remember as I was no using a windows machine at the time, still am not except when I have t.

On 14 Sep 2018, at 10:39, John Isige wrote:

OK, where's the updated stuff then?

On 9/14/2018 11:46, Sarah k Alawami wrote: > The stuff for writing notiatin is I think a bit old as they did > update the key sig stuff and a lot more to work wiht nvda. > > Take care > > On 13 Sep 2018, at 17:52, John Isige wrote: > >> I missed the beginning of this, but if you're looking for stuff that >> does notation, MuseScore can at least read it, rather you can read >> it with it, and some work was done on making adding notation >> accessible, but I haven't messed with any of it. Here's the main >> MuseScore page. >> >> >> https://musescore.org/en >> >> >> Here's the accessibility stuff for writing notation. >> >> >> https://accessiblemusicnotation.wordpress.com/2017/06/17/new-accessibility-work-on-musescore/ >> >> >> On 9/13/2018 18:49, Jackie wrote: >>> Well, there's always ABC, about which you can find out more here: >>> http://trillian.mit.edu/~jc/music/abc/doc/ABCtut.html >>> >>> On 9/13/18, Arno Schuh arno.schuh@... wrote: >>>> Hi, >>>> >>>> Dancing Dots has afaIk. OCR for scores, too: >>>> http://www.dancingdots.com/main/index.htm >>>> I suppose the software to scan scores also is able to scan PDF. >>>> >>>> Yours sincerely >>>> >>>> Arno >>>> >>>> Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2018 15:33 schrieb Giles Turnbull >>>> giles.turnbull@...: >>>> >>>>> I have a sort-of similar question. I used to play piano in my >>>>> sighted >>>>> days but mever memorised any of the music, prefering to read the >>>>> score as I played. Now I can't read a score I can't remember much >>>>> of >>>>> those pieces. >>>>> >>>>> I have PDF scores of a lot of piano music and wonder if there is >>>>> any >>>>> way that something like Muse Score could open a PDF and I could >>>>> somehow figure out what notes are where? I'm thinking of chords >>>>> with >>>>> three or more notes across both hands, my ear being unable to >>>>> figure >>>>> them out by listening to a recording. >>>>> >>>>> I'd love a means of converting a PDF or a midi file into a text >>>>> from >>>>> which I can determine the notes ... the durations are less >>>>> important >>>>> for me since I can remember how the pieces sound. >>>>> >>>>> It's funny, I just asked a sighted friend for help with three >>>>> notes >>>>> in Chopin's first ballade which I was struggling to remember just >>>>> this morning! >>>>> >>>>> Thanks for any ideas (and no, I never learned to read Braille >>>>> music) >>>>> >>>>> Giles >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> >>> >> >> >> > > >


Marco Oros
 

OK.

I'll return back to this discussion.

QWS is very good, I have a little Midi keyboard, because I would like to compose music outside My home.

But, another question is for You and It is related to this thing, what is difference between Audio and Midi and where to use first and second and what are Your best recommendations?

Because I would like to write article about It.

Dňa 13. 9. 2018 o 23:43 Jackie napísal(a):

It does have a virtual keyboard, though it's pretty hard to use that
w/any degree of precision.

On 9/13/18, Marco Oros <marco.oros93@...> wrote:
I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC.

Can I use QWS also?





Damien Garwood
 

Hi Marco,
Audio is generally a recording, in terms of a computer represented in digital form, and reproducing roughly the same output regardless of equipment.
MIDI is a specification (Musical instrument digital interface) that describes how to communicate with digital musical instruments. The related files are simply instruction files containing several MIDI messages that are played through an instrument. This means that the output from said files depends very heavily on the equipment used to play it. Windows comes with its own MIDI synthesiser called Microsoft GS Wavetable which is based off of the Roland Virtual Sound Canvas, but with fewer instruments and effects. Usually, you will want to render a MIDI file into an appropriate audio format for people to be able to hear it how you imagine it to be heard. MIDI files are generally used for the composition process. They are the basis for converting the music to audio, or indeed a print score.
Hope this answers a few questions.
Cheers,
Damien.

On 03/10/2018 09:40 PM, Marco Oros wrote:
OK.
I'll return back to this discussion.
QWS is very good, I have a little Midi keyboard, because I would like to compose music outside My home.
But, another question is for You and It is related to this thing, what is difference between Audio and Midi and where to use first and second and what are Your best recommendations?
Because I would like to write article about It.
Dňa 13. 9. 2018 o 23:43 Jackie napísal(a):
It does have a virtual keyboard, though it's pretty hard to use that
w/any degree of precision.

On 9/13/18, Marco Oros <marco.oros93@...> wrote:
I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC.

Can I use QWS also?





Sarah k Alawami
 

Midi is simply 0's and 1,s tt is on and off with other instructions for a computer to ender. Audio is the wave form that you can see on a consoul or an editor, that you cannot edit and speed up and slow down as it is not a coputer language, but bits and bytes on a cd or in an mp3. I guess look it up in wikipedia if you want. A beter explenation.

On 3 Oct 2018, at 13:40, Marco Oros wrote:

OK.

I'll return back to this discussion.

QWS is very good, I have a little Midi keyboard, because I would like to compose music outside My home.

But, another question is for You and It is related to this thing, what is difference between Audio and Midi and where to use first and second and what are Your best recommendations?

Because I would like to write article about It.

Dňa 13. 9. 2018 o 23:43 Jackie napísal(a): > It does have a virtual keyboard, though it's pretty hard to use that > w/any degree of precision. > > On 9/13/18, Marco Oros marco.oros93@... wrote: >> I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC. >> >> Can I use QWS also? >> >> >> >> >> >


Felix G.
 

Hi!
The following article provides the basic data you are looking for:
https://www.rolandcorp.com.au/blog/midi-vs-audio
That being said, we should probably not let this thread go further
astray, except to mention that I usually don't even attempt to write
articles while I'm still in the basic definitions phase of researching
something. :)
Best,
Felix
Am Do., 4. Okt. 2018 um 01:18 Uhr schrieb Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@...>:


Midi is simply 0's and 1,s tt is on and off with other instructions for
a computer to ender. Audio is the wave form that you can see on a
consoul or an editor, that you cannot edit and speed up and slow down as
it is not a coputer language, but bits and bytes on a cd or in an mp3.
I guess look it up in wikipedia if you want. A beter explenation.

On 3 Oct 2018, at 13:40, Marco Oros wrote:

OK.

I'll return back to this discussion.

QWS is very good, I have a little Midi keyboard, because I would like
to compose music outside My home.

But, another question is for You and It is related to this thing, what
is difference between Audio and Midi and where to use first and second
and what are Your best recommendations?

Because I would like to write article about It.

Dňa 13. 9. 2018 o 23:43 Jackie napísal(a):
It does have a virtual keyboard, though it's pretty hard to use that
w/any degree of precision.

On 9/13/18, Marco Oros <marco.oros93@...> wrote:
I haven't any MIDI device connected to My PC.

Can I use QWS also?