Topics

O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis


Mallard
 

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie


 

Hmmm.

Firstly, I would make a post at forum.audiogames.net in the offtopic room.

Here are a list of links from the dosbox site with screen readers in them

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/OSW111.ZIP

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/kdm11508.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/ksgdemo.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/oldgames.7z

note the file in this big zip file shey may want is called old humanware software.

Weather she can read the keynote manuals in there is well who knows.

The mastertouch folder should have a history and instructional manuals on well synths.

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/vedemo.zip

Now as for histories.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader)

https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/courses/soco/projects/2005-06/accessibility/firstwave.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_reader

https://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw050207

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_mvO6EQ0tM

http://maccessibility.net/2011/02/10/blind-faith-a-decade-of-apple-accessibility

http://chrishofstader.com/screen-reader-failure-innovation-deterioration-despair/

https://www.coursera.org/lecture/disability-awareness/screen-reader-demonstration-BfDgt

Those are just some of a list off google searches on screen reader history I found in like 2 minutes.

Now, your friend is welcome to email me, but I don't know everything,

I came from the 80s which is probably as far back as it goes though there was some work in the 70s.

There were a lot of readers out.

I would contact the major blind organisations to see about getting a history of screen readers, there will be archives somewhere.

For my part I have sent this message at my local foundation tech list and the dolphin list.

There are still some old timers like myself, not many of us now though but still a few from the 80s.

I know histories started from the 60s the first synths were made in the 30s.

Most screen readers were for dos, I don't know every one of them though.

About 10 years back before all the groups changed round it was easier to contact some of these groups.

If your friend can wade through the oldgames.7z file and are able to read the key*.txt files in the keysoft folder and the hw*.txt files in the mastertouch folder then she should get some idea of some of the keynote synths.

Technically if you payed me some cash, I do have a lot of old manuals about, but I'm not shipping the physical coppies to itily for nothing.

Email me offlist if you need more information.

On 9/26/2018 8:15 PM, Mallard wrote:
Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie



Mallard
 

Wow, Shaun!


This is better than an encyclopedia!


Thanks trillions!


I'm passing on this message immediately.


Grazie on her behalf!

Ciao,

Ollie

Il 26/09/2018 13:06, Shaun Everiss ha scritto:
Hmmm.

Firstly, I would make a post at forum.audiogames.net in the offtopic room.

Here are a list of links from the dosbox site with screen readers in them

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/OSW111.ZIP

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/kdm11508.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/ksgdemo.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/oldgames.7z

note the file in this big zip file shey may want is called old humanware software.

Weather she can read the keynote manuals in there is well who knows.

The mastertouch folder should have a history and instructional manuals on well synths.

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/vedemo.zip

Now as for histories.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader)

https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/courses/soco/projects/2005-06/accessibility/firstwave.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_reader

https://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw050207

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_mvO6EQ0tM

http://maccessibility.net/2011/02/10/blind-faith-a-decade-of-apple-accessibility

http://chrishofstader.com/screen-reader-failure-innovation-deterioration-despair/

https://www.coursera.org/lecture/disability-awareness/screen-reader-demonstration-BfDgt

Those are just some of a list off google searches on screen reader history I found in like 2 minutes.

Now, your friend is welcome to email me, but I don't know everything,

I came from the 80s which is probably as far back as it goes though there was some work in the 70s.

There were a lot of readers out.

I would contact the major blind organisations to see about getting a history of screen readers, there will be archives somewhere.

For my part I have sent this message at my local foundation tech list and the dolphin list.

There are still some old timers like myself, not many of us now though but still a few from the 80s.

I know histories started from the 60s the first synths were made in the 30s.

Most screen readers were for dos, I don't know every one of them though.

About 10 years back before all the groups changed round it was easier to contact some of these groups.

If your friend can wade through the oldgames.7z file and are able to read the key*.txt files in the keysoft folder and the hw*.txt files in the mastertouch folder then she should get some idea of some of the keynote synths.

Technically if you payed me some cash, I do have a lot of old manuals about, but I'm not shipping the physical coppies to itily for nothing.

Email me offlist if you need more information.


On 9/26/2018 8:15 PM, Mallard wrote:
Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie





Ervin, Glenn
 

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie


 

Hi,
Please tell your friend to interview the following people: Travis Siegal (who is a member of this list I believe and familiar with Window Bridge), Ted Henter (JAWS creator), Doug Gefrey (Window-Eyes and Vocal Eyes), Marc Mulcahy (various projects), Matt Campbell (System Access), Eric Damery (Vfo/Vispero), Doug Lee (scripting), Mick (NV Access), Jeff Bishop (Microsoft and advocacy leadership), and if your friend wants to, me (NVDA and latest developments).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ervin, Glenn" <glenn.ervin@...
To: "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date sent: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 14:36:12 +0000
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie


ely.r@...
 

Joseph,
Let me see what I can find over the coming weekend. Might you ask if he/she
intends to include prescreen reader programs like talking word processors
that greatly precede the screen reader. My dissertation was done on the
effects that one such created by DEC had on experienced writers. Seems it
would be important to at least refer to such as background.

Since I am writing, thank you so much for your work on NVDA. I monitor the
list and am amazed at how quickly you and others respond to issues. Having
been a screen reader user since VocalEyes in the DOS days, when one just had
to wait for the next major release, it is great to have a view of the inner
workings of the process.
Rick

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 10:48 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for
her thesis

Hi,
Please tell your friend to interview the following people: Travis Siegal
(who is a member of this list I believe and familiar with Window Bridge),
Ted Henter (JAWS creator), Doug Gefrey (Window-Eyes and Vocal Eyes), Marc
Mulcahy (various projects), Matt Campbell (System Access), Eric Damery
(Vfo/Vispero), Doug Lee (scripting), Mick (NV Access), Jeff Bishop
(Microsoft and advocacy leadership), and if your friend wants to, me (NVDA
and latest developments).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ervin, Glenn" <glenn.ervin@...
To: "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io Date sent: Wed, 26 Sep 2018
14:36:12 +0000
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for
her thesis

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her
thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of
asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history
and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation
that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie


Mallard
 

Thanks Joseph, I'll pass on your message as well.


I think she knows English well enough; she could definitely interview these people (including you; it would be great to have your experience in a dissertation in Italy).


The first screen reader I ever used was Window Bridge, which I really loved. Pity nobody took it up after David passed out so suddenly...


Ciao,

Ollie

Il 26/09/2018 16:48, Joseph Lee ha scritto:
Hi,
Please tell your friend to interview the following people: Travis Siegal (who is a member of this list I believe and familiar with Window Bridge), Ted Henter (JAWS creator), Doug Gefrey (Window-Eyes and Vocal Eyes), Marc Mulcahy (various projects), Matt Campbell (System Access), Eric Damery (Vfo/Vispero), Doug Lee (scripting), Mick (NV Access), Jeff Bishop (Microsoft and advocacy leadership), and if your friend wants to, me (NVDA and latest developments).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ervin, Glenn" <glenn.ervin@...
To: "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date sent: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 14:36:12 +0000
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T.  This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie









Mallard
 

Thank you too.


My friend is in Italy, but she knows English well enough, so finding people and organisations shouldn't be a problem.


Ciao,

Ollie

Il 26/09/2018 16:36, Ervin, Glenn ha scritto:
Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie





Susan Gerhart
 

Try these podcasts with episodes interviwing pioneers:

Eyes On Success, Tech Doctor, Blind Cool Tech, Accessible World

American Printing House for Blind goes way back as does the CSUN
Annual Conference and Jim Thatcher at IBM Austin

That's a great thesis topic!

Susan G
blog: AsYourWorldChanges.wordpress.com


Mallard
 

People,


You're all fantastic! Thanks... I agree, Susan. it's a great topic.


Ciao,

Ollie

Il 26/09/2018 18:58, Susan Gerhart ha scritto:
Try these podcasts with episodes interviwing pioneers:

Eyes On Success, Tech Doctor, Blind Cool Tech, Accessible World

American Printing House for Blind goes way back as does the CSUN
Annual Conference and Jim Thatcher at IBM Austin

That's a great thesis topic!

Susan G
blog: AsYourWorldChanges.wordpress.com



Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I'd also suggest Jonathan Mosen, contact him via mosen consulting. He has been involved with lots of projects and also has a good knowledge about voice over on apple and other platforms.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joseph Lee" <@joslee>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis


Hi,
Please tell your friend to interview the following people: Travis Siegal (who is a member of this list I believe and familiar with Window Bridge), Ted Henter (JAWS creator), Doug Gefrey (Window-Eyes and Vocal Eyes), Marc Mulcahy (various projects), Matt Campbell (System Access), Eric Damery (Vfo/Vispero), Doug Lee (scripting), Mick (NV Access), Jeff Bishop (Microsoft and advocacy leadership), and if your friend wants to, me (NVDA and latest developments).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ervin, Glenn" <glenn.ervin@...
To: "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date sent: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 14:36:12 +0000
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie








 

Hello good links I am going to save this email.

can you please email me off list?

I need the list info so I can get on the dolphin support email list

On 9/26/2018 4:06 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Hmmm.

Firstly, I would make a post at forum.audiogames.net in the offtopic room.

Here are a list of links from the dosbox site with screen readers in them

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/OSW111.ZIP

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/kdm11508.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/ksgdemo.zip

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/oldgames.7z

note the file in this big zip file shey may want is called old humanware software.

Weather she can read the keynote manuals in there is well who knows.

The mastertouch folder should have a history and instructional manuals on well synths.

http://batsupport.com/unsupported/dosbox/vedemo.zip

Now as for histories.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAWS_(screen_reader)

https://cs.stanford.edu/people/eroberts/courses/soco/projects/2005-06/accessibility/firstwave.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screen_reader

https://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw050207

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_mvO6EQ0tM

http://maccessibility.net/2011/02/10/blind-faith-a-decade-of-apple-accessibility

http://chrishofstader.com/screen-reader-failure-innovation-deterioration-despair/

https://www.coursera.org/lecture/disability-awareness/screen-reader-demonstration-BfDgt

Those are just some of a list off google searches on screen reader history I found in like 2 minutes.

Now, your friend is welcome to email me, but I don't know everything,

I came from the 80s which is probably as far back as it goes though there was some work in the 70s.

There were a lot of readers out.

I would contact the major blind organisations to see about getting a history of screen readers, there will be archives somewhere.

For my part I have sent this message at my local foundation tech list and the dolphin list.

There are still some old timers like myself, not many of us now though but still a few from the 80s.

I know histories started from the 60s the first synths were made in the 30s.

Most screen readers were for dos, I don't know every one of them though.

About 10 years back before all the groups changed round it was easier to contact some of these groups.

If your friend can wade through the oldgames.7z file and are able to read the key*.txt files in the keysoft folder and the hw*.txt files in the mastertouch folder then she should get some idea of some of the keynote synths.

Technically if you payed me some cash, I do have a lot of old manuals about, but I'm not shipping the physical coppies to itily for nothing.

Email me offlist if you need more information.


On 9/26/2018 8:15 PM, Mallard wrote:
Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie




--
check out my song on youtube
https://youtu.be/YeWgx2LRu7Y


Mallard
 

Thanks Brian.


Ciao,
Ollie

Il 26/09/2018 20:59, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io ha scritto:
I'd also suggest Jonathan Mosen, contact him via mosen consulting. He has been involved with lots of projects and also has a good knowledge about voice over on apple and other platforms.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Joseph Lee" <@joslee>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis


Hi,
Please tell your friend to interview the following people: Travis Siegal (who is a member of this list I believe and familiar with Window Bridge), Ted Henter (JAWS creator), Doug Gefrey (Window-Eyes and Vocal Eyes), Marc Mulcahy (various projects), Matt Campbell (System Access), Eric Damery (Vfo/Vispero), Doug Lee (scripting), Mick (NV Access), Jeff Bishop (Microsoft and advocacy leadership), and if your friend wants to, me (NVDA and latest developments).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ervin, Glenn" <glenn.ervin@...
To: "nvda@nvda.groups.io" <nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date sent: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 14:36:12 +0000
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T.  This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie











Ervin, Glenn
 

Yeah, what was that synth that was used in the old movie War Games?
Was that not really a synth, or was it a Hollywood created sound of a synthesizer?
And what was the model of that computer the kid used?
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Susan Gerhart
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 11:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Try these podcasts with episodes interviwing pioneers:

Eyes On Success, Tech Doctor, Blind Cool Tech, Accessible World

American Printing House for Blind goes way back as does the CSUN Annual Conference and Jim Thatcher at IBM Austin

That's a great thesis topic!

Susan G
blog: AsYourWorldChanges.wordpress.com


 

Probably an echo or something from an old amiga.

On 9/28/2018 2:38 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Yeah, what was that synth that was used in the old movie War Games?
Was that not really a synth, or was it a Hollywood created sound of a synthesizer?
And what was the model of that computer the kid used?
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Susan Gerhart
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 11:58 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Try these podcasts with episodes interviwing pioneers:

Eyes On Success, Tech Doctor, Blind Cool Tech, Accessible World

American Printing House for Blind goes way back as does the CSUN Annual Conference and Jim Thatcher at IBM Austin

That's a great thesis topic!

Susan G
blog: AsYourWorldChanges.wordpress.com





Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

No, they go back further than dos.  The comodore 64 ran cp/m, and it had a screen reader too, so screen reading packages didn't start with dos.

On 9/26/2018 10:36 AM, Ervin, Glenn wrote:
Well, they go back as far as DOS, there's a lot of brands.
Try the NFB, they should have a historical perspective.
Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mallard
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for her thesis

Hello all,

Please, forgive this O.T. This is the only list I'm on, so I thought of asking here.

A friend of mine, her ein Italy, has been assigned a thesis on the history and evolution of screen readers for Windows.

She doesn't seem to find any suitable material.

Would anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some documentation that might help her?

I know the request is a bit vague, but that's all I ahve for now.

Thanks in advance.

Ciao,
Ollie





Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

On 9/26/2018 12:24 PM, Mallard wrote:
The first screen reader I ever used was Window Bridge, which I really loved. Pity nobody took it up after David passed out so suddenly...
Actually, I tried.  I bought the rights to the windowbridge source code, but UPS lost the pc as it was being shipped from Canada to me here in the U.S.  His brother did send me cds with as much material as he could find before sending the computer, but unfortunately, since he wasn't a programmer, he missed some vital libraries required for the proper compile of windowbridge, and since the ocmputer was lost, I was never able to do anything with it.  Quite a shame really, since I personally thought it was an excellent product, and was very happy to have gotten the rights to it.


Sky Mundell
 

And just to add to this, Window Bridge, was the first screen reader to ever
come out for windows. It came out around June of 1992. In the beginning,
their were about 10 windows products, which today, has been reduced today.
The 10 windows products that you saw in the market were:
Window Bridge
Syntha Voice, released on June 1992. Now gone.
Out Spoken for the mac and windows, Berkley systems, Alva access group,
released in 1994, now gone.

Dolphin Hal, now called Supernova
Yourdolphin.com

Screen power, Telussensory, now gone.
Artic Winvision, also gone.
ASAW, also gone.
JAWS
www.freedomscientific.com
Released January 20, 1995 First developed for DOS in 1989. Created by
Henter-Joyce, which became Freedom Scientific in 2000, which became
VFO-group in 2015.
Window-Eyes, now gone as of May 15, 2017.
Release date: October 16, 1995, until May 15, 2017.
Started out as Vocal-Eyes for DOS on February 15, 1990, Which was a year
before I was born on that same day. created by GW Micro. Vocal-Eyes was the
top DOS screen reader. Then, in 1995, GW Micro released Window-Eyes on
Monday, October 16, 1995. On January 14, GW Micro and Microsoft released a
version of Window-Eyes free with office. This version worked with Office
2010 or up, and it came with two voices. Allowed you to purchase DecTalk,
Eloquence, Vocalizer, etc. Then, on May 1, GW Micro and AI Squared merged.
Then, on June 14, AI was acquired by VFO.

System Access:
Released date: 2005.
www.serotek.com
NVDA:
www.nvaccess.com
Release date: April 2006.
Developer: NV Access
I hope these notes help your friend with the history. Thanks, Sky.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis
Siegel
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 2:00 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for
her thesis



On 9/26/2018 12:24 PM, Mallard wrote:
The first screen reader I ever used was Window Bridge, which I really
loved. Pity nobody took it up after David passed out so suddenly...
Actually, I tried.  I bought the rights to the windowbridge source code,
but UPS lost the pc as it was being shipped from Canada to me here in
the U.S.  His brother did send me cds with as much material as he could
find before sending the computer, but unfortunately, since he wasn't a
programmer, he missed some vital libraries required for the proper
compile of windowbridge, and since the ocmputer was lost, I was never
able to do anything with it.  Quite a shame really, since I personally
thought it was an excellent product, and was very happy to have gotten
the rights to it.


Kevin Cussick
 

good post, I remember window bridge I remember loading the floppy's into the machine oho the days.

On 28/09/2018 22:20, Sky Mundell wrote:
And just to add to this, Window Bridge, was the first screen reader to ever
come out for windows. It came out around June of 1992. In the beginning,
their were about 10 windows products, which today, has been reduced today.
The 10 windows products that you saw in the market were:
Window Bridge
Syntha Voice, released on June 1992. Now gone.
Out Spoken for the mac and windows, Berkley systems, Alva access group,
released in 1994, now gone.
Dolphin Hal, now called Supernova
Yourdolphin.com
Screen power, Telussensory, now gone.
Artic Winvision, also gone.
ASAW, also gone.
JAWS
www.freedomscientific.com
Released January 20, 1995 First developed for DOS in 1989. Created by
Henter-Joyce, which became Freedom Scientific in 2000, which became
VFO-group in 2015.
Window-Eyes, now gone as of May 15, 2017.
Release date: October 16, 1995, until May 15, 2017.
Started out as Vocal-Eyes for DOS on February 15, 1990, Which was a year
before I was born on that same day. created by GW Micro. Vocal-Eyes was the
top DOS screen reader. Then, in 1995, GW Micro released Window-Eyes on
Monday, October 16, 1995. On January 14, GW Micro and Microsoft released a
version of Window-Eyes free with office. This version worked with Office
2010 or up, and it came with two voices. Allowed you to purchase DecTalk,
Eloquence, Vocalizer, etc. Then, on May 1, GW Micro and AI Squared merged.
Then, on June 14, AI was acquired by VFO.
System Access:
Released date: 2005.
www.serotek.com
NVDA:
www.nvaccess.com
Release date: April 2006.
Developer: NV Access
I hope these notes help your friend with the history. Thanks, Sky.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis
Siegel
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 2:00 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for
her thesis
On 9/26/2018 12:24 PM, Mallard wrote:
The first screen reader I ever used was Window Bridge, which I really
loved. Pity nobody took it up after David passed out so suddenly...
Actually, I tried.  I bought the rights to the windowbridge source code,
but UPS lost the pc as it was being shipped from Canada to me here in
the U.S.  His brother did send me cds with as much material as he could
find before sending the computer, but unfortunately, since he wasn't a
programmer, he missed some vital libraries required for the proper
compile of windowbridge, and since the ocmputer was lost, I was never
able to do anything with it.  Quite a shame really, since I personally
thought it was an excellent product, and was very happy to have gotten
the rights to it.


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

You forgot asap for windows which was released sometime in the 90s, though I don't know when, and with a quick search, couldn't find any details on it.

On 9/28/2018 5:20 PM, Sky Mundell wrote:
And just to add to this, Window Bridge, was the first screen reader to ever
come out for windows. It came out around June of 1992. In the beginning,
their were about 10 windows products, which today, has been reduced today.
The 10 windows products that you saw in the market were:
Window Bridge
Syntha Voice, released on June 1992. Now gone.
Out Spoken for the mac and windows, Berkley systems, Alva access group,
released in 1994, now gone.

Dolphin Hal, now called Supernova
Yourdolphin.com

Screen power, Telussensory, now gone.
Artic Winvision, also gone.
ASAW, also gone.
JAWS
www.freedomscientific.com
Released January 20, 1995 First developed for DOS in 1989. Created by
Henter-Joyce, which became Freedom Scientific in 2000, which became
VFO-group in 2015.
Window-Eyes, now gone as of May 15, 2017.
Release date: October 16, 1995, until May 15, 2017.
Started out as Vocal-Eyes for DOS on February 15, 1990, Which was a year
before I was born on that same day. created by GW Micro. Vocal-Eyes was the
top DOS screen reader. Then, in 1995, GW Micro released Window-Eyes on
Monday, October 16, 1995. On January 14, GW Micro and Microsoft released a
version of Window-Eyes free with office. This version worked with Office
2010 or up, and it came with two voices. Allowed you to purchase DecTalk,
Eloquence, Vocalizer, etc. Then, on May 1, GW Micro and AI Squared merged.
Then, on June 14, AI was acquired by VFO.

System Access:
Released date: 2005.
www.serotek.com
NVDA:
www.nvaccess.com
Release date: April 2006.
Developer: NV Access
I hope these notes help your friend with the history. Thanks, Sky.
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Travis
Siegel
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 2:00 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] O.T.: A friend needs info on screen readers history for
her thesis



On 9/26/2018 12:24 PM, Mallard wrote:
The first screen reader I ever used was Window Bridge, which I really
loved. Pity nobody took it up after David passed out so suddenly...
Actually, I tried.  I bought the rights to the windowbridge source code,
but UPS lost the pc as it was being shipped from Canada to me here in
the U.S.  His brother did send me cds with as much material as he could
find before sending the computer, but unfortunately, since he wasn't a
programmer, he missed some vital libraries required for the proper
compile of windowbridge, and since the ocmputer was lost, I was never
able to do anything with it.  Quite a shame really, since I personally
thought it was an excellent product, and was very happy to have gotten
the rights to it.