Yahoo password


Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....


 

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
Yahoo accessibility help is useless....





Gene
 

Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>



 

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.

On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
the first edit field from the top of the page. If it isn't the right one,
you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to something that
is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
because they don't know or use these methods. I am not assuming my
suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
Yahoo accessibility help is useless....






Gene
 

Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Gene
 

This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Gary Bowers <gdbowers@...>
 

Melissa ,

You are absolutely correct.

You answered the question in a way that allowed anyone to use any preferred additional navigational skills.

You gave them the roadmap.

Gary

Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:59 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't know this person very well so I don't know their level of understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home
page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you
get to the right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is
an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the
letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.
If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get
there just as you can with the letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in,
you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for
what you think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to
something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may
not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste
an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these
methods. I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it.
The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....






 

Thanks, but Gene is still right in the fact that people really should learn the keystrokes to navigate webpages. It is that whole give a man a fish or teach him how to fish kind of thing. I get his frustration, But I just was not expecting to perpetuate it
I don't recall Hadley having a course on using the Internet. But, I do think that freedom scientific has a tutorial for this sort of thing. It has been years since I took it though so I have no idea if it is still there. I think it was called go surf or something.

Melissa
Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 26, 2016, at 10:33 PM, Gary Bowers <gdbowers@swbell.net> wrote:

Melissa ,

You are absolutely correct.

You answered the question in a way that allowed anyone to use any preferred additional navigational skills.

You gave them the roadmap.

Gary

Gary
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:59 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't know this person very well so I don't know their level of understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home
page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you
get to the right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is
an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the
letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.
If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get
there just as you can with the letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in,
you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for
what you think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to
something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may
not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste
an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these
methods. I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it.
The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....





Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Melissa,


Yes, Hadley does have a course on learning how to use the internet. Freedom Scientific has a good tutorial on that too.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 9:46 PM, Melissa wrote:
Thanks, but Gene is still right in the fact that people really should learn the keystrokes to navigate webpages. It is that whole give a man a fish or teach him how to fish kind of thing. I get his frustration, But I just was not expecting to perpetuate it
I don't recall Hadley having a course on using the Internet. But, I do think that freedom scientific has a tutorial for this sort of thing. It has been years since I took it though so I have no idea if it is still there. I think it was called go surf or something.

Melissa
Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 26, 2016, at 10:33 PM, Gary Bowers <gdbowers@swbell.net> wrote:

Melissa ,

You are absolutely correct.

You answered the question in a way that allowed anyone to use any preferred additional navigational skills.

You gave them the roadmap.

Gary

Gary
-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:59 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't know this person very well so I don't know their level of understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and the time spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home
page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you
get to the right one? or if you know the field you are looking for is
an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the
letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.
If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get
there just as you can with the letter f.

If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in,
you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for
what you think might be correct. If you are talking about moving to
something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may
not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste
an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these
methods. I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password


What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@yahoo.com, then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page, you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata=yahoo.com.br@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.

Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.

How can I do it in the web site?

I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it.
The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....




Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,


Yes, Hadley School for the Blind does have a great course on using the internet. I took the course years ago but I understand it's a bit different now so I might brush up on it too.


Rosemarie




On 9/26/2016 5:15 PM, Gene wrote:
This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





Gene
 

I'm quite sure I saw a Hadley course discussed on one or more lists.  This was a good while ago.  It might be useful for those who know about it to verify that my memory is correct and perhaps to discuss the course. 
 
I don't think you perpetuated anything.  I wrote my first message because I wondered why you didn't mention quick navigation keys in your description.  Later, I wanted to discuss the inefficiency of not using such keys.  it wasn't particularly because of what you do, but because I have  no idea how many other people might be following the thread and I have no idea what they do or know.  But since we have discussed this now, those following the thread are well aware of our views and that is one of the points of the list, to inform through discussion and disagreements.
 
I appreciate you understanding my position and the exchange served a good purpose. 
 
The course you are discussing from Freedom Scientific is called Surf's Up.  I have no idea how it compares with the hadley course.  I looked at a small amount of it a number of years ago and my objection to the part I looked at is that it introduced such things as the links list and used such things extensively very early in the course when I strongly believe that people should be dealing with web pages and not with artificial structures for their early learning.  I don't want to discourage those who don't want to or can't take the Hadley course from using the Freedom Scientific material but if the Hadley course teaches more in the way I believe is superior, I hope that those with a choice seriously consider the hadley course.   
 
Also, for those who are interested, awhile ago, I made a zip file available for the early part of my tutorial, separated from the rest.  This early part teaches basic web page navigation and some people may want to use it.  it was created before NVDA existed so I don't cover NVDA commands but the concepts may be useful.
 
Read the introduction before working with the tutorial.  Also, keep in mind that the tutorial was done before such features as automatically entering and leaving forms mode were available.  So, depending on how you move through forms, entering and leaving forms mode, as I demonstrate, may not be necessary.  It may be automatic.  Also, these are very old web pages and may bear little or no resemblance to the current pages.  They are still good for teaching but the current pages may be quite different and may have more structures such as headings. 
 
You may download the tutorial excerpt here:
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 11:46 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Thanks, but Gene is still right in the fact that people really should learn the keystrokes to navigate webpages. It is that whole give a man a fish or teach him how to fish kind of thing. I get his frustration, But I just was not expecting to perpetuate it
I don't recall Hadley having a course on using the Internet. But, I do think that freedom scientific has a tutorial for this sort of thing. It has been years since I took it though so I have no idea if it is still there. I think it was called go surf or something.

Melissa
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 26, 2016, at 10:33 PM, Gary Bowers <gdbowers@...> wrote:
>
> Melissa ,
>
> You are absolutely correct.
>
> You answered the question in a way that allowed anyone to use any preferred additional navigational skills.
>
> You gave them the roadmap.
>
> Gary
>
> Gary
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:59 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
> I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I learn the site better.
> Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't know this person very well so I don't know their level of understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
> I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with one letter navigation.
> Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.
>
>
>
>> On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
>> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home
>> page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you
>> get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is
>> an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the
>> letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.
>> If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get
>> there just as you can with the letter f.
>>
>> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in,
>> you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for
>> what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to
>> something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may
>> not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste
>> an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these
>> methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
>> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>>
>> Gene
>> ----- Original Message -----
>>
>> From: Melissa
>> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
>> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>>
>>
>> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
>> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
>> where it asks you to sign in.
>> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
>> enter in your password.
>> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
>> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
>> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
>> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
>> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
>> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>>
>> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
>> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>>
>>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>>
>>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>>
>>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it.
>>> The Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>
>




Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

I agree with you that one must know how to navigate using shortcuts like "h", "e", "b", "k", etc.

But, in my case, I am not wasting my time for lack of knowledge of hoe o use NVDA, but because the mess Yahoo Mail is.

Sign in is not the problem. I am trying to change my password, so it's clear that I am already logged in.

In Yahoo Mail, even activate a menu option is tricky. The menu is composed of buttons, so I can arrive at it with "b". But there is no option to change password, even on the configuration link on the Help menu.



Em 26/09/2016 18:36, Gene escreveu:

Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>




Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

Really, edit fields normally have a description that NVDA announces.

But, here in Brazil we have many sites that don't do this job.

What we have to do, as you said, is to use NVDA+SPACE to change for the browse mode and use arrows keys to investigate what information is being asked for.

This is not a problem when the user knows how to use the screen reader efficiently, but is annoying.

That shows us how far we are of a really accessible web design.

Yahoo Mail is especially difficult to use. They say that they are using widgets instead of tags, but that is a fallacy, because buttons, check boxes, links are all there and the use of the page with a screen reader becomes stressing, to say the least.

Em 26/09/2016 20:10, Gene escreveu:

Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Gene
 

I occasionally used the Yahoo site years ago, long before the modern site interface.  We'll see what kinds of responses you get. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 6:21 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

I agree with you that one must know how to navigate using shortcuts like "h", "e", "b", "k", etc.

But, in my case, I am not wasting my time for lack of knowledge of hoe o use NVDA, but because the mess Yahoo Mail is.

Sign in is not the problem. I am trying to change my password, so it's clear that I am already logged in.

In Yahoo Mail, even activate a menu option is tricky. The menu is composed of buttons, so I can arrive at it with "b". But there is no option to change password, even on the configuration link on the Help menu.



Em 26/09/2016 18:36, Gene escreveu:
Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field, your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one, you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the letter f. 
 
If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7 point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.  But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
where it asks you to sign in.
It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
enter in your password.
Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
only have the account to use yahoo groups.

On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
<wsautodidata@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>
> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>
> How can I do it in the web site?
>
> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>
>
>
>
>




Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

It's true.

All of us develop our own strategies to navigate web pages.

If the page is well designed, there will be no correct or wrong way to do things, but only those ways that each person think are the best.


Em 26/09/2016 20:41, Rosemarie Chavarria escreveu:

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





Gene
 

I suspect that in The United States, especially among sites that aren't among the most popularly used by blind people, that the problem you are describing also often exists.  And since NVDA is used by the international community, your comments make an even stronger case for my impression that good Internet instruction is likely far too uncommon.  The kind of skills you are discussing should be taught.  You never know when you'll need them.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 6:38 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

Really, edit fields normally have a description that NVDA announces.

But, here in Brazil we have many sites that don't do this job.

What we have to do, as you said, is to use NVDA+SPACE to change for the browse mode and use arrows keys to investigate what information is being asked for.

This is not a problem when the user knows how to use the screen reader efficiently, but is annoying.

That shows us how far we are of a really accessible web design.

Yahoo Mail is especially difficult to use. They say that they are using widgets instead of tags, but that is a fallacy, because buttons, check boxes, links are all there and the use of the page with a screen reader becomes stressing, to say the least.

Em 26/09/2016 20:10, Gene escreveu:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>




Walmir Schultz <wsautodidata@...>
 

Hi, Gene,

Work efficiently within a web page is not a problem to me.

I even buy and sell shares and other types of investments in home brokers and the shortcuts for the tags are well documented in my brain...

If the site changes entirely, it will be only a question of learning the new structure and in no time I will be navigating rapidly again.

You are right in the fact that people must know the keystrokes to navigate web pages, but Yahoo Mail is one of those rare cases we are in front of a problem of pure lack of accessibility.
I suggest you to enter in Yahoo Mail (if you don't' have an e-mail there, create one) and after try to change the password.
Then tell me how you did it. Only this will answer my original question...
Try and see if you can do it...
                                   
Best regards.
Walmir

PS: Thanks, Thunderbird.

Em 26/09/2016 21:15, Gene escreveu:

This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>





Gene
 

I was commenting on your other comments, but we'll see if someone can tell you how this is done, if it can be done by a blind person.  I used to have an account for e-mail groups on Yahoo but something seems to have happened to the account.  It appears my e-mail address is no longer recognized.  I'll play around a bit more but I doubt I'll get another account.  Of course, you could get sighted assistance or, maybe, Yahoo will help blind peple if an individual asks for help. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 7:20 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,

Work efficiently within a web page is not a problem to me.

I even buy and sell shares and other types of investments in home brokers and the shortcuts for the tags are well documented in my brain...

If the site changes entirely, it will be only a question of learning the new structure and in no time I will be navigating rapidly again.

You are right in the fact that people must know the keystrokes to navigate web pages, but Yahoo Mail is one of those rare cases we are in front of a problem of pure lack of accessibility.
I suggest you to enter in Yahoo Mail (if you don't' have an e-mail there, create one) and after try to change the password.
Then tell me how you did it. Only this will answer my original question...
Try and see if you can do it...
                                   
Best regards.
Walmir

PS: Thanks, Thunderbird.

Em 26/09/2016 21:15, Gene escreveu:
This is a rather long message but it may have information some will find useful. 
 
I may, but if I do, it's because I have no idea how many people may be following a thread.  Someone may explain why they do something and others may find the explanation convincing and not try other approaches.  but if they see someone vigorously presenting another method, they may continue to consider it.  I have strong feelings on this subject.  I have seen, for about fifteen years, since I started looking at how blind people use the Internet, a lot of blind people doing things very inefficiently and having needless problems finding things on web sites.  I see how small changes in a web site cause many blind people to be unable to use it.  for example, one wegb site changed a download link to a download button and, on another list, people would say they could no longer download using the site.  Things may be changing.  Perhaps there is better instructional material available these days.  But, for example, when I go to a radio station site, I don't look around the site if I only want to listen to the audio stream.  I search, from the top of the site for the word live since so many sites have a link that uses the word live.  When I want to contact someone at a site, I search for the word contact.  I'm not saying people shouldn't look at sites in detail.  There are times when I do because I either can't find what I want in my usual ways or because I want to learn about whatever the site is offering and discussing.  And, of course, people are free to do whatever they want, regardless of my opinion.  But I save an enormous amount of time by using efficient navigation.  I don't know what is available these days from free resources such as the Hadley School or how much need there is for this but perhaps information on the NVDA site should include a tutorial for using the Internet effectively.  I don't want to rewrite my tutorial to modernize it but I've offered it to anyone who wants to use it as a basis for their work. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
I didn't just think about this.  I produced a tutorial many years ago that emphasized, more than anything else, effective Internet navigation.  The editorial may still be useful but it would have to be updated to discuss newer features in screen-readers. 
But effective Internet use is one of my special interests.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

Hi, Gene,


I can see why Melissa did what she did. I do the same thing when I'm on an unfamiliar site until I learn how to navigate it. I don't mean any offense by this but at times you do act like an irritated school master. Maybe you don't mean to do that but that's how it comes across. When I'm on the vons.com site and I want to choose a delivery time after placing my grocery order, I hit control end and arrow up until I find the time I want to choose. Then I hit enter to select the time. When I'm signing in to place the order, I do use H to go to the sign-in page. I down-arrow once to get to the edit field to type in my email address. My whole point is this. We all do things differently.


Rosemarie

On 9/26/2016 4:10 PM, Gene wrote:
Fields are usually announced and there may be a description that is read either when you get to the edit field or immediately above it or other fields as well.  If a field or the text immediately above it says login user name or e-mail address or something similar, unless you think you are on the wrong page or that there may be more than one place to log in to different parts of the site or different pages for logging into different parts of the site, not using efficient navigation does nothing but waste time.  If you move to a field and want more information, up and/or down arrowing around the field will often satisfy the user whether the proper field is being worked with. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Melissa
Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password

I know the one letter navigation keys, but I didn't think to put those
in the list of what I did to change my password. I don't fully trust
sites I'm not all that aquainted with so when I'm investigating I
first go down line by line with the arrow keys. Yes, that is
time-consuming, but I feel comfortable doing things that way until I
learn the site better.
Plus, there are a lot of "clickable" tags so I felt it safer to just
arrow down incase I missed something. I found what I needed right away
so I admit to not looking around and experimenting more. I also don't
know this person very well so I don't know their level of
understanding for commands and thought just a straight listing of what
I did, minus keystrokes, was okay.
I thought it was helping and I wasn't expecting a lecture about my
methods to quickly get something done on a website I'm not familiar
with and just stating exactly what I did. If you don't know what to
search for, some sites use login, sign in, log off or sign out, and
the time  spent typing in possibilities to search for arrowing down
could've gotten to the same place. Normally login options for sites
are near the top so I didn't feel I needed to try and skip around with
one letter navigation.
Sorry if I sound defensive about this. I normally use many of the
keystrokes for one letter navigation in webpages and just on my
computer itself and your response just rubbed me the wrong way.



On 9/26/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> Why can't you simply issue the command f when at the top of the home page to
> move to the first form field and repeat the search until you get to the
> right one?  or if you know the field you are looking for is an edit field,
> your screen-reader may have a command such as the letter e to move you to
> the first edit field from the top of the page.  If it isn't the right one,
> you can repeat the command until you get there just as you can with the
> letter f.
>
> If you are looking for a link you have to follow that might sign in, you can
> use the search command from the top of the page and search for what you
> think might be correct.  If you are talking about moving to something that
> is almost at the rtop of the page, these methods may not matter but my7
> point is that a lot of blind Internet users waste an enormous amount of time
> because they don't know or use these methods.  I am not assuming my
> suggestions are the best for what we are discussing on this specific page.
> But they will save people a lot of time if generally practiced.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Melissa
> Sent: Monday, September 26, 2016 4:22 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Yahoo password
>
>
> What you need to do is go near the top of the home page of yahoo.com
> and then work your way down the mass of links/options until you get to
> where it asks you to sign in.
> It will first ask for your username, you@..., then hit next and
> enter in your password.
> Once you login, and start at the beginning of the page,  you can hit H
> for headings to get to the list of options you can edit, like profile,
> mail, and stuff like that. I only messed around enough to change my
> password and I did that a while ago so I can't really offer a step by
> step guide on how to change your password. I don't use yahoo mail and
> only have the account to use yahoo groups.
>
> On 9/26/16, Walmir Schultz via Groups.io
> <wsautodidata@...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I use Thunderbird to read my e-mail.
>>
>> Now Yahoo is warning about the need to change passwords.
>>
>> How can I do it in the web site?
>>
>> I navigated on the page for hours and did not find where to do it. The
>> Yahoo accessibility help is useless....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>