Highbernating windows 10


farhan israk
 

How to highbernate windows 10 1803?


Sarah k Alawami
 

Try looking when you hit alt f4 from the desk top. Thereshould be a hybernate function. If it is not there tab to shut down from the start menu If not, I can't remember the command line thing to run from the run dialogue.

Take care

On 29 Dec 2018, at 11:22, farhan israk wrote:

How to highbernate windows 10 1803?


Bryan Mckinnish
 

Hi.
You if you have to enter the command line command, press windows x and go to command prompt admin.
Then type the following:
powercfg -h on
I think this also turns on quick startup.
Hth.
Bryan Mckinnish

On 12/29/2018 2:39 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Try looking when you hit alt f4 from the desk top. Thereshould be a hybernate function. If it is not there tab to shut down from the start menu If not, I can't remember the command line thing to run from the run dialogue.

Take care

On 29 Dec 2018, at 11:22, farhan israk wrote:

How to highbernate windows 10 1803?



Isaac <bigikemusic@...>
 


yes, it also resumes quick startup

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2018 3:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10

Hi.
You if you have to enter the command line command, press windows x and go to command prompt admin.
Then type the following:
powercfg -h on
I think this also turns on quick startup.
Hth.
Bryan Mckinnish

On 12/29/2018 2:39 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Try looking when you hit alt f4 from the desk top. Thereshould be a hybernate function. If it is not there tab to shut down from the start menu If not, I can't remember the command line thing to run from the run dialogue.

Take care

On 29 Dec 2018, at 11:22, farhan israk wrote:

How to highbernate windows 10 1803?



Richard Wells
 

The command option to enable hibernation is: powercfg -h on and powercfg -h off to disable it.

On 12/29/2018 1:39 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Try looking when you hit alt f4 from the desk top. Thereshould be a hybernate function. If it is not there tab to shut down from the start menu If not, I can't remember the command line thing to run from the run dialogue.

Take care

On 29 Dec 2018, at 11:22, farhan israk wrote:

How to highbernate windows 10 1803?


 

One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, Choose what the power button does link, activating the Change settings that are currently unavailable link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the Turn on Fast Startup (recommended) checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Kwork
 

Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, Choose what the power button does link, activating the Change settings that are currently unavailable link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the Turn on Fast Startup (recommended) checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:03 PM, Kwork wrote:
why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?
There are a couple of reasons, the last of which is the most important:

1.  When one does a "shut down" on a system, what meaning does that generally carry?  Most people think shut off/down, completely, and starting from scratch when it is powered up again.  Fast startup directly violates that concept.

2.  It seems to me that it is completely backward that Restart causes a complete shutdown, sets a timer, and fires up the system from scratch while Shut Down does not.

3.  Fast Startup is a special form of Hibernation.  Under normal Hibernation both the operating system state and all user states are written out to disk and reloaded when the system is powered up again.  Fast Startup causes only the operating system state to be written out to disk in a special hibernation file and that is reloaded when the system is powered up again.  As this state gets written out, over, and over and over again over a span of days, weeks, and months there will be corruptions that occur in the hibernation file.  Almost invariably, at some point, a collection of little corruptions form a confluence where the entire system becomes unstable when it is restarted.  I have witnessed this on two occasions myself, and the behaviors displayed were so bizarre that I simply could not figure out what the cause was, initially.  Eventually, after a forced Restart rather that Shutdown/Power Up cycle, everything went back to normal.

I just cannot see how a few seconds to a minute or two of time saved at system start time is worth having to deal with the probability of this sort of problem.  All the more so if a system has an SSD as the OS drive rather than an HDD.  I would far rather have a complete, fresh, start where Windows 10 is loaded again from disk as it is when Restart is used than to have it come back from hibernation again and again.  This is all the more so since I do not power down my system frequently, preferring to allow Windows 10 to have the "inactive hours" to do the updates I delay it from doing if they get configured during active hours and require a system restart.

When I shut down a system I intend, and absolutely want, it to shut down.  I do not want it to hibernate the OS state.  If I want hibernation I will intentionally choose it, and I want the user state(s) to be saved, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,

 

I actually prefer not to have fast startup enabled. I'd rather wait a few extra minutes and know the computer is starting from scratch.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2018 8:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10

 

On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:03 PM, Kwork wrote:

why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

There are a couple of reasons, the last of which is the most important:

1.  When one does a "shut down" on a system, what meaning does that generally carry?  Most people think shut off/down, completely, and starting from scratch when it is powered up again.  Fast startup directly violates that concept.

2.  It seems to me that it is completely backward that Restart causes a complete shutdown, sets a timer, and fires up the system from scratch while Shut Down does not.

3.  Fast Startup is a special form of Hibernation.  Under normal Hibernation both the operating system state and all user states are written out to disk and reloaded when the system is powered up again.  Fast Startup causes only the operating system state to be written out to disk in a special hibernation file and that is reloaded when the system is powered up again.  As this state gets written out, over, and over and over again over a span of days, weeks, and months there will be corruptions that occur in the hibernation file.  Almost invariably, at some point, a collection of little corruptions form a confluence where the entire system becomes unstable when it is restarted.  I have witnessed this on two occasions myself, and the behaviors displayed were so bizarre that I simply could not figure out what the cause was, initially.  Eventually, after a forced Restart rather that Shutdown/Power Up cycle, everything went back to normal.

I just cannot see how a few seconds to a minute or two of time saved at system start time is worth having to deal with the probability of this sort of problem.  All the more so if a system has an SSD as the OS drive rather than an HDD.  I would far rather have a complete, fresh, start where Windows 10 is loaded again from disk as it is when Restart is used than to have it come back from hibernation again and again.  This is all the more so since I do not power down my system frequently, preferring to allow Windows 10 to have the "inactive hours" to do the updates I delay it from doing if they get configured during active hours and require a system restart.

When I shut down a system I intend, and absolutely want, it to shut down.  I do not want it to hibernate the OS state.  If I want hibernation I will intentionally choose it, and I want the user state(s) to be saved, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Richard Wells
 

Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down. When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to shut down.

On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:

Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, Choose what the power button does link, activating the Change settings that are currently unavailable link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the Turn on Fast Startup (recommended) checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Lino Morales
 

So Bryan do you recommend not using fast startup with a regular ole optical drive which I have? I have it disabled and have had no problems when I need to restart. I have my PC sleep after 20 MINS every night.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 30, 2018 11:15:35 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10
 
On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:03 PM, Kwork wrote:
why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?
There are a couple of reasons, the last of which is the most important:

1.  When one does a "shut down" on a system, what meaning does that generally carry?  Most people think shut off/down, completely, and starting from scratch when it is powered up again.  Fast startup directly violates that concept.

2.  It seems to me that it is completely backward that Restart causes a complete shutdown, sets a timer, and fires up the system from scratch while Shut Down does not.

3.  Fast Startup is a special form of Hibernation.  Under normal Hibernation both the operating system state and all user states are written out to disk and reloaded when the system is powered up again.  Fast Startup causes only the operating system state to be written out to disk in a special hibernation file and that is reloaded when the system is powered up again.  As this state gets written out, over, and over and over again over a span of days, weeks, and months there will be corruptions that occur in the hibernation file.  Almost invariably, at some point, a collection of little corruptions form a confluence where the entire system becomes unstable when it is restarted.  I have witnessed this on two occasions myself, and the behaviors displayed were so bizarre that I simply could not figure out what the cause was, initially.  Eventually, after a forced Restart rather that Shutdown/Power Up cycle, everything went back to normal.

I just cannot see how a few seconds to a minute or two of time saved at system start time is worth having to deal with the probability of this sort of problem.  All the more so if a system has an SSD as the OS drive rather than an HDD.  I would far rather have a complete, fresh, start where Windows 10 is loaded again from disk as it is when Restart is used than to have it come back from hibernation again and again.  This is all the more so since I do not power down my system frequently, preferring to allow Windows 10 to have the "inactive hours" to do the updates I delay it from doing if they get configured during active hours and require a system restart.

When I shut down a system I intend, and absolutely want, it to shut down.  I do not want it to hibernate the OS state.  If I want hibernation I will intentionally choose it, and I want the user state(s) to be saved, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

Lino,

           Having or not having an optical drive (DVD/CD) really has no bearing on it since you are booting either from a HDD or SSD [unless you have a very idiosyncratic system the like of which I've never encountered].  In any case, I recommend that Fast Startup be turned off, period, for reasons I mentioned earlier.  

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

Yeah and things can screw up at times.

Saying that if you are on the go, you probably want to leave this on.

On 1/1/2019 3:58 AM, Richard Wells wrote:
Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down. When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to shut down.

On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:

Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, /Choose what the power button does/ link, activating the /Change settings that are currently unavailable/ link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the /Turn on Fast Startup (recommended)/ checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep./*

          ~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/


Gene
 

I would say that if you understand what fast startup does, its alright to have it on.  Unless you understand it, you should have it off.  Microsoft is getting too cute with this feature.  Sleep should be sleep and hibernate should be hibernate.  Fast shutdown really isn't a shutdown and calling something it isn't leads to confusion and improper understanding and misleading thinking.  Shutdown is shutdown and that should be it.  If Microsoft wants to promote sleep, then they should actively do so, but not by creating an almost identical feature and calling it something else to get people to use it and not understand what it is and what it does if not used properly.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, December 31, 2018 1:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10

Yeah and things can screw up at times.

Saying that if you are on the go, you probably want to leave this on.



On 1/1/2019 3:58 AM, Richard Wells wrote:
> Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down
> your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down.
> When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state
> instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to
> shut down.
>
> On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:
>>
>> Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be
>> checked?
>>
>> Travis
>>
>> On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
>>> One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, /Choose
>>> what the power button does/ link, activating the /Change settings
>>> that are currently unavailable/ link, then checking/unchecking the
>>> Hibernate checkbox.
>>>
>>> While you're in there uncheck the /Turn on Fast Startup
>>> (recommended)/ checkbox.
>>>
>>> I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at
>>> the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
>>> --
>>>
>>> Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763
>>>
>>> */A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the
>>> need for illusion is deep./*
>>>
>>>           ~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/
>>>
>>
>
>
>
>



 

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 02:40 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Saying that if you are on the go, you probably want to leave this [Fast Startup] on.
I disagree.  When I'm "on the go" if it will be hours and hours before I fire up again I use Hibernate.  If it will be within an hour or two I use Sleep, which wakes much faster than Fast Startup does.

It's amazing how little power is consumed these days by the Sleep state.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


David Moore
 

Yes!

I keep my computers asleep by shutting the lid for three or four days.

Then, I just do a restart!

I have done that for years, and never had a problem.

Actually, when I used to shut my computers off a lot, I had more problems, and the hard drive did not last as long!

David Moore

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, December 31, 2018 3:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10

 

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 02:40 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:

Saying that if you are on the go, you probably want to leave this [Fast Startup] on.

I disagree.  When I'm "on the go" if it will be hours and hours before I fire up again I use Hibernate.  If it will be within an hour or two I use Sleep, which wakes much faster than Fast Startup does.

It's amazing how little power is consumed these days by the Sleep state.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 


 

Well I don't think having fast startup on a desktop is a good idea as such unless you need it.

Its also safer to have the system startup properly sometimes it can to lead to interesting things.

On the older box we have one of them, the user always hybernates his box.

If its left in a certain state for to long things don't work well till you restart it.

With units having flash drives you really don't need fast startup at all.

If you needed the system on quickly, quicker than normal, well maybe.

Or if you used a hard drive and such then sure I could see merrit in this.

But There have been situations where I can turn on a system and its in a mangled state till I restart it or hard power it.

Or reformat it because its stuck weirdly.

Its easier if its not going to do that to me.

On 1/1/2019 8:50 AM, Gene wrote:
I would say that if you understand what fast startup does, its alright to have it on. Unless you understand it, you should have it off. Microsoft is getting too cute with this feature. Sleep should be sleep and hibernate should be hibernate. Fast shutdown really isn't a shutdown and calling something it isn't leads to confusion and improper understanding and misleading thinking. Shutdown is shutdown and that should be it. If Microsoft wants to promote sleep, then they should actively do so, but not by creating an almost identical feature and calling it something else to get people to use it and not understand what it is and what it does if not used properly.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: Monday, December 31, 2018 1:40 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Highbernating windows 10


Yeah and things can screw up at times.

Saying that if you are on the go, you probably want to leave this on.



On 1/1/2019 3:58 AM, Richard Wells wrote:
Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down
your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down.
When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state
instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to
shut down.

On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:
Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be
checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, /Choose
what the power button does/ link, activating the /Change settings
that are currently unavailable/ link, then checking/unchecking the
Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the /Turn on Fast Startup
(recommended)/ checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at
the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the
need for illusion is deep./*

~ Saul Bellow, /To Jerusalem and Back/




Kwork
 

Thank you Brian. That does explain things clearly, and gives me a lesson in what fast start really is. Off to make sure it's disabled.

Travis

On 12/30/2018 9:15 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sun, Dec 30, 2018 at 10:03 PM, Kwork wrote:
why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?
There are a couple of reasons, the last of which is the most important:

1.  When one does a "shut down" on a system, what meaning does that generally carry?  Most people think shut off/down, completely, and starting from scratch when it is powered up again.  Fast startup directly violates that concept.

2.  It seems to me that it is completely backward that Restart causes a complete shutdown, sets a timer, and fires up the system from scratch while Shut Down does not.

3.  Fast Startup is a special form of Hibernation.  Under normal Hibernation both the operating system state and all user states are written out to disk and reloaded when the system is powered up again.  Fast Startup causes only the operating system state to be written out to disk in a special hibernation file and that is reloaded when the system is powered up again.  As this state gets written out, over, and over and over again over a span of days, weeks, and months there will be corruptions that occur in the hibernation file.  Almost invariably, at some point, a collection of little corruptions form a confluence where the entire system becomes unstable when it is restarted.  I have witnessed this on two occasions myself, and the behaviors displayed were so bizarre that I simply could not figure out what the cause was, initially.  Eventually, after a forced Restart rather that Shutdown/Power Up cycle, everything went back to normal.

I just cannot see how a few seconds to a minute or two of time saved at system start time is worth having to deal with the probability of this sort of problem.  All the more so if a system has an SSD as the OS drive rather than an HDD.  I would far rather have a complete, fresh, start where Windows 10 is loaded again from disk as it is when Restart is used than to have it come back from hibernation again and again.  This is all the more so since I do not power down my system frequently, preferring to allow Windows 10 to have the "inactive hours" to do the updates I delay it from doing if they get configured during active hours and require a system restart.

When I shut down a system I intend, and absolutely want, it to shut down.  I do not want it to hibernate the OS state.  If I want hibernation I will intentionally choose it, and I want the user state(s) to be saved, too.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Kwork
 

Thank you. Since I am not a bear, I never hibernated on older systems. Now that I know that's what fast start basically is, I made sure it was turned off.

Travis

On 12/31/2018 7:58 AM, Richard Wells wrote:

Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down. When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to shut down.

On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:

Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, Choose what the power button does link, activating the Change settings that are currently unavailable link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the Turn on Fast Startup (recommended) checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


brian <sackriderbrian45@...>
 

    annoother reason to have fast start up unchecked is to have windows music whenyou turn on your computer.  This was posted on the windows 10 list quite some time ago.  If fast start up is cheched you won't get any windows music when you turn on your computer only on restart.

Brian Sackrider

On 1/1/2019 10:35 PM, Kwork wrote:

Thank you. Since I am not a bear, I never hibernated on older systems. Now that I know that's what fast start basically is, I made sure it was turned off.

Travis

On 12/31/2018 7:58 AM, Richard Wells wrote:

Fast startup should not be checked, because each time you shut down your computer, it will only hibernate rather than really shut down. When you boot your computer again, it will bring back the last state instead of doing a fresh start. This doesn't apply to restart, only to shut down.

On 12/30/2018 9:03 PM, Kwork wrote:

Brian, out of curiosity, why do you not recommend fast startup to be checked?

Travis

On 12/30/2018 5:46 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
One can also enable/disable Hibernate under Power Options, Choose what the power button does link, activating the Change settings that are currently unavailable link, then checking/unchecking the Hibernate checkbox.

While you're in there uncheck the Turn on Fast Startup (recommended) checkbox.

I turned the presentation of Hibernate in the Power menu back on at the same time that I turned Fast Startup off.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back