how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Kevin <kleeva5@...>
 

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Gene
 

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


David Goldfield
 

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Gene
 

In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists.  In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work.  At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in. 
 
I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program.  Anyone is free to disagree with me.  but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them.  Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated. 
 
You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples.  That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that. 
 
I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models.  They have none too good a track record and they are trendy.  Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop?  What's happening now?  A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children. 
 
I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Gene
 

And what if someone just wants to record and isn't particularly interested in all sorts of inns and outs?  You obviously had such an interest in developing a lot of knowledge and skill when you started.  A lot of people start off simply and then move on if they are interested.  Context should be attended to when recommending something. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Gene
 

Also, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is because so many people recommend Gold Wave.  Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave.  If I didn't strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three recommended Gold Wave.  I guess Gold Wave is a better program.  So the entire context must be considered. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists.  In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work.  At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in. 
 
I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program.  Anyone is free to disagree with me.  but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them.  Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated. 
 
You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples.  That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that. 
 
I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models.  They have none too good a track record and they are trendy.  Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop?  What's happening now?  A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children. 
 
I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


David Goldfield
 

Gene,

Why do you have to express your opinion strongly to ensure that your point has been properly made? Don't get me wrong: I have strong opinions about lots of things from software to politics to morality. If someone asks for a recommendation and if I think that I have something to contribute to the discussion then I put my recommendation out on the table. This is what I like, this is why I like it, here's where you can acquire it and that's all that I need to say about it. I don't feel the need to compete with other recommendations to ensure that my particular one is somehow considered above the others or so that my recommendation somehow stands out enough to shift someone's opinion. That would actually make my recommendations and responses even more biased and I wouldn't fully trust someone who did that. I want to be regarded as a trustworthy resource and not as someone who tries to shift someone's opinion from others which have been expressed. What I care about is giving people options. I actually don't care if an option other than the one that I present is the one that someone might consider. I just don't care. If I know of several options I put them out there and state the pros and cons of each. It doesn't matter to me whether a reader chooses it or rejects it. Lists such as this one are forums where we can share what we know to empower others. I'm not interested in making dogmatic statements where I tell someone why they shouldn't use a particular piece of software. I want to know what you know. I'm not interested in knowing why you feel that I shouldn't be using a piece of software because it offers more features than what I'm using. At one point one of my relatives was using Excel for everything. Not only would she use it for its primary purpose for creating and editing spreadsheets but she would use it to compose documents. She would enlarge one cell and write documents within that cell. Honestly, my wife and I did think it was a bit crazy and I admit I used to snicker and wonder why she insisted on doing it. Admittedly, when I used to do assistive technology training I would have never trained any of my students to do serious word processing in Excel. That's what Microsoft Word was for. But this relative was set in her ways and somehow got used to using Excel for word processing even though I'm 99 percent sure that Word was installed on that computer. Hey, it was crazy and not something I'd ever encourage for serious writing. But for her it worked and she was just writing simple documents at home. If I told her that she should use Word she likely would not have listened. It was what she knew and that was how she intended to write her documents. You wouldn't catch me writing documents in Excel but my point is that somehow she got used to it and, for her, it worked. She was happy and worked very efficiently doing it this way. She also wasn't my student and so I had to accept it. I honestly wish you weren't so strong with your opinions. Just share what you know with no other agenda than to empower people to make their own choices, rather than trying to convince them to make the choice that you feel is best for them.  .

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/5/2019 1:13 AM, Gene wrote:
Also, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is because so many people recommend Gold Wave.  Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave.  If I didn't strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three recommended Gold Wave.  I guess Gold Wave is a better program.  So the entire context must be considered. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists.  In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work.  At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in. 
 
I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program.  Anyone is free to disagree with me.  but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them.  Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated. 
 
You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples.  That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that. 
 
I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models.  They have none too good a track record and they are trendy.  Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop?  What's happening now?  A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children. 
 
I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


David Goldfield
 

If someone just wants to record and is not interested in the ins and outs, as you say, it's certainly appropriate to say, "well, if that's all you want to do then you can start out with such and such which is free and just gives you the basic functionality you're asking for. There's nothing wrong with that. However, I might then talk about other packages which will offer those same basic features but which might offer some other cool features they hadn't thought of, such as multitrack recording or other effects. The person might say, "no, no, I don't want any of that, I just want to record my voice and save them as simple sound files." However, someone might say, "Really? That might be something I might want to explore later on." They might want something with extra features for future exploration but only if it's free or only if it costs no more than such and such. They might resist anything beyond basic recording. However, a consumer might say, "I want to do basic recording for now but what options are available at a reasonable price if I want to go beyond that?" As you say, context must be attended to. I look at all of those responses the consumer is giving me and, based on all of them, I discuss the most appropriate choices with them. I might recommend options but, ultimately, I'd like the consumer to make that final choice based not only on their current needs but on their potential needs for future work.

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/5/2019 12:51 AM, Gene wrote:
And what if someone just wants to record and isn't particularly interested in all sorts of inns and outs?  You obviously had such an interest in developing a lot of knowledge and skill when you started.  A lot of people start off simply and then move on if they are interested.  Context should be attended to when recommending something. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Brian's Mail list account
 

Well we could recommend Reaper, but if like me you have simple needs and do not need to understand a whole new set of terms and ways of working its not worth buying it.
On the other hand I have had consistent results with Goldwave and have paid for it, and I'm happy. Audacity, being a bit more complex to use can do good work, but I like the configurable nature of the effects on Goldwave.

Its really up to anyone who wants to edit and record to try them all and see what floats their boat. Certainly Goldwave can be run in demo mode.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 6:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Also, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is because so many people recommend Gold Wave. Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave. If I didn't strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three recommended Gold Wave. I guess Gold Wave is a better program. So the entire context must be considered.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists. In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work. At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in.

I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program. Anyone is free to disagree with me. but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them. Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated.

You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples. That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that.

I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models. They have none too good a track record and they are trendy. Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop? What's happening now? A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children.

I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: David Goldfield
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.





David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case. For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice. But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording. There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files. It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality. There is no one best recording program. It depends what you are going to use it for.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features. The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!



E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee



From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.



Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing. I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are. The options may be all you need. Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input. But just what do you want to record? Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online? What sorts of other things do you want to record?



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.



What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc


Gene
 

I don't overemphasize or alter facts.  But if three people recommend Goldwave, I may say something like, Goldwave isn't a good or isn't the best program for what you want to do in response to two or three recommendations of Goldwave.  Intended or not, I think that if three people recommend one program and one person recommends another, many people may decide to try the program that gets three recommendations.  So without changing facts I may make a statement like to do what you want to do, Goldwave isn't the best choice, or To do what you want to do, I strongly believe Goldwave isn't the best choice and explain why. 
 
You talk about dogmatic statements.  I didn't just make a statement you characterize as dogmatic.  I gave very specific reasons to support my statement.  Others are free to disagree. 
 
In the case of the woman who used Excel, that's an entirely different matter.  She does what she wants and she has been doing it a long time.  I don't go around telling people what I recommend if I haven't been asked.  But this is different.  Someone said, I want a program that does exactly this and that.  I tried another program and I couldn't get it to do it.  Three people recommended a complex program you pay for.  I recommended the program I think is best for the specified purpose. 
 
I could have given considerable information discussing other programs and why I think virtual Recorder is the best choice.  I indicated, without going into a lot of detail, why I think virtual Recorder is the best choice for the needs stated.  If you go into too much detail, it may be counterproductive.  the amount may differ depending on how much the person knows and how the program is intended to be used.
 
also, instructors make choices all the time.  When someone is learning how to use a computer and doesn't know various programs, as an instructor, the instructor doesn't explain why to use or not to use three word processors and ask the student to choose which to learn.  The instructor doesn't ask the person to decide between Windows 8 and Windows 10.  If the instructor knows the person wants to use Word, then, of course, the instructor should teach Word, but not necessarily as the first program.  It might make more sense to start with Wordpad.  I would think, and I don't know this because I haven't used Word in recent versions, but I would think that when teaching ribbons, it is much better to start in Wordpad, where the ribbons are simple than to start in a complex program like Word where the ribbons are very large and complex.  It’s the concept, not the complexity at first. 
 
You say you wish I weren't so strong in my opinions.  I don't know what other instances you have in mind.  I don't just state opinions, I give reasons for them.  I don't just say something like this isn't the best program for someone who is just learning. and not elaborate.  So my dogmatic statements, which I don't think usually are, are supported with reasons and others are free to counter them.  And consider that other things can have the effect of a dogmatic statement as well.  If three people recommend Goldwave, that can have the effect of a dogmatic statement.  Three people recommended this program.  I guess I'll try it because its probably good.  I'm not saying Goldwave isn't a good program. but three recommendations for one program and one for another may create a form of majority rules bias when someone is making up their mind. 
 
If you or others want to point out instances where you think I should state things differently, that's fine.  I don't mind discussing such things.  I'm not saying I'll agree but I'm willing to discuss them. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: David Goldfield
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 12:39 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Gene,

Why do you have to express your opinion strongly to ensure that your point has been properly made? Don't get me wrong: I have strong opinions about lots of things from software to politics to morality. If someone asks for a recommendation and if I think that I have something to contribute to the discussion then I put my recommendation out on the table. This is what I like, this is why I like it, here's where you can acquire it and that's all that I need to say about it. I don't feel the need to compete with other recommendations to ensure that my particular one is somehow considered above the others or so that my recommendation somehow stands out enough to shift someone's opinion. That would actually make my recommendations and responses even more biased and I wouldn't fully trust someone who did that. I want to be regarded as a trustworthy resource and not as someone who tries to shift someone's opinion from others which have been expressed. What I care about is giving people options. I actually don't care if an option other than the one that I present is the one that someone might consider. I just don't care. If I know of several options I put them out there and state the pros and cons of each. It doesn't matter to me whether a reader chooses it or rejects it. Lists such as this one are forums where we can share what we know to empower others. I'm not interested in making dogmatic statements where I tell someone why they shouldn't use a particular piece of software. I want to know what you know. I'm not interested in knowing why you feel that I shouldn't be using a piece of software because it offers more features than what I'm using. At one point one of my relatives was using Excel for everything. Not only would she use it for its primary purpose for creating and editing spreadsheets but she would use it to compose documents. She would enlarge one cell and write documents within that cell. Honestly, my wife and I did think it was a bit crazy and I admit I used to snicker and wonder why she insisted on doing it. Admittedly, when I used to do assistive technology training I would have never trained any of my students to do serious word processing in Excel. That's what Microsoft Word was for. But this relative was set in her ways and somehow got used to using Excel for word processing even though I'm 99 percent sure that Word was installed on that computer. Hey, it was crazy and not something I'd ever encourage for serious writing. But for her it worked and she was just writing simple documents at home. If I told her that she should use Word she likely would not have listened. It was what she knew and that was how she intended to write her documents. You wouldn't catch me writing documents in Excel but my point is that somehow she got used to it and, for her, it worked. She was happy and worked very efficiently doing it this way. She also wasn't my student and so I had to accept it. I honestly wish you weren't so strong with your opinions. Just share what you know with no other agenda than to empower people to make their own choices, rather than trying to convince them to make the choice that you feel is best for them.  .

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/5/2019 1:13 AM, Gene wrote:
Also, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is because so many people recommend Gold Wave.  Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave.  If I didn't strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three recommended Gold Wave.  I guess Gold Wave is a better program.  So the entire context must be considered. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists.  In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work.  At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in. 
 
I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program.  Anyone is free to disagree with me.  but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them.  Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated. 
 
You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples.  That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that. 
 
I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models.  They have none too good a track record and they are trendy.  Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop?  What's happening now?  A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children. 
 
I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


Gene
 

I don't believe in giving people all sorts of information just in case.  If a person asks for a specific program for a specific purpose and the person appears to know what she wants, I answer the question as asked.  there are times when a person appears to be asking a question but doesn't know enough about the subject to ask it properly.  In that case, I give more information if that seems to be what the person wants or would benefit from knowing.  Or I may try to find out what information would be useful by asking the person questions about what they want to do.  But this question was very specific and indicates to me the person knows what she wants.
 
There is an enormous amount of information or options you could discuss, just in case.  Special effects, file cconversion, a feature called punch in, which is useful if someone is going to dictate or correct spoken errors on the fly. 
 
I don't think a wide ranging discussion is what is desired in this case judging by what was asked and how. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 1:06 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

If someone just wants to record and is not interested in the ins and outs, as you say, it's certainly appropriate to say, "well, if that's all you want to do then you can start out with such and such which is free and just gives you the basic functionality you're asking for. There's nothing wrong with that. However, I might then talk about other packages which will offer those same basic features but which might offer some other cool features they hadn't thought of, such as multitrack recording or other effects. The person might say, "no, no, I don't want any of that, I just want to record my voice and save them as simple sound files." However, someone might say, "Really? That might be something I might want to explore later on." They might want something with extra features for future exploration but only if it's free or only if it costs no more than such and such. They might resist anything beyond basic recording. However, a consumer might say, "I want to do basic recording for now but what options are available at a reasonable price if I want to go beyond that?" As you say, context must be attended to. I look at all of those responses the consumer is giving me and, based on all of them, I discuss the most appropriate choices with them. I might recommend options but, ultimately, I'd like the consumer to make that final choice based not only on their current needs but on their potential needs for future work.

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/5/2019 12:51 AM, Gene wrote:
And what if someone just wants to record and isn't particularly interested in all sorts of inns and outs?  You obviously had such an interest in developing a lot of knowledge and skill when you started.  A lot of people start off simply and then move on if they are interested.  Context should be attended to when recommending something. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc




 


MAX <max@...>
 

Someone once told me that the best word processor is the one that you know how to use.  I am sure that can apply to any kind of software.

 

 

73 (Regards).

 

Max K 4 O D S.

 

I've Never Lost the Wonder.

 

Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:13 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.

 

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com

On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case.  For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice.  But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording.  There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files.  It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality.  There is no one best recording program.  It depends what you are going to use it for. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin

Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features.  The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

 

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing.  I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are.  The options may be all you need.  Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input.  But just what do you want to record?  Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online?  What sorts of other things do you want to record?

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

 

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam
 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

  Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc



 


 

To be honest, if all you want to do is record and don't care about or need to care about a fully good quality experience, it may be easier to spend the cash on a field recorder.

I have a soni px330 its buttons are accessible a few things are not accessible but it records in mp3 and is fine for field recording though you need to reformat the unit each time to clear it once done.

It can accept sd cards up to 32gb and in fact I have put a 4gb micro sd from my old dead nokia phone and its fine.

On 1/5/2019 6:51 PM, Gene wrote:
And what if someone just wants to record and isn't particularly interested in all sorts of inns and outs? You obviously had such an interest in developing a lot of knowledge and skill when you started. A lot of people start off simply and then move on if they are interested. Context should be attended to when recommending something.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.





David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case. For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice. But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording. There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files. It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality. There is no one best recording program. It depends what you are going to use it for.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features. The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!



E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee



From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.



Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing. I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are. The options may be all you need. Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input. But just what do you want to record? Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online? What sorts of other things do you want to record?



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.



What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc











 

To be honest a field recorder with accessible buttons while a bit clunky and crappy sounding will work fine.

You also don't need to bother with quality, put it by a speaker on your computer and generally do things.

Its fine for some podcasts but not otherwise.

Another thing you can do if you want to be geto is get something with win7 or even xp and just do whatever.

An interesting note is that after the 4th generation intel cpus you started getting a few more restrictions.

My new laptop I will get today for example has microphone and headphone managed via 1 jack which I hate but oh well.

There are still boxes out there 6th and 7th gen units and lower but be aware when getting any new laptop especially that a lot of the medium to high specked units are going usb c in a big way.

On 1/5/2019 8:06 PM, David Goldfield wrote:
If someone just wants to record and is not interested in the ins and outs, as you say, it's certainly appropriate to say, "well, if that's all you want to do then you can start out with such and such which is free and just gives you the basic functionality you're asking for. There's nothing wrong with that. However, I might then talk about other packages which will offer those same basic features but which might offer some other cool features they hadn't thought of, such as multitrack recording or other effects. The person might say, "no, no, I don't want any of that, I just want to record my voice and save them as simple sound files." However, someone might say, "Really? That might be something I might want to explore later on." They might want something with extra features for future exploration but only if it's free or only if it costs no more than such and such. They might resist anything beyond basic recording. However, a consumer might say, "I want to do basic recording for now but what options are available at a reasonable price if I want to go beyond that?" As you say, context must be attended to. I look at all of those responses the consumer is giving me and, based on all of them, I discuss the most appropriate choices with them. I might recommend options but, ultimately, I'd like the consumer to make that final choice based not only on their current needs but on their potential needs for future work.

David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com<http://WWW.David-Goldfield.Com>
On 1/5/2019 12:51 AM, Gene wrote:
And what if someone just wants to record and isn't particularly interested in all sorts of inns and outs? You obviously had such an interest in developing a lot of knowledge and skill when you started. A lot of people start off simply and then move on if they are interested. Context should be attended to when recommending something.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Sarah k Alawami<mailto:marrie12@...>
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Agreed. I started with gold wave for my sound engineering career, then went to audacity, then sonar,, , then garage band, and now reaper. So I do agree with david 100 percent. Start with a big program such as gw then work your way up to what ever.

On 4 Jan 2019, at 20:12, David Goldfield wrote:

Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.


David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2FWWW.David-Goldfield.Com&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cba4fbdb86b4045bbb41108d672d1d409%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636822642857269908&sdata=Hj11ayQSF8Ii9VXTwcfE7TRB0tmjUUAOhzwNS62oUa0%3D&reserved=0>
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:
If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case. For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice. But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording. There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files. It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality. There is no one best recording program. It depends what you are going to use it for.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin<mailto:kleeva5@...>
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features. The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

From: Gene<mailto:gsasner@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.

Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing. I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are. The options may be all you need. Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input. But just what do you want to record? Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online? What sorts of other things do you want to record?

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: Sam Bushman<mailto:libertyroundtable@...>
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io> <nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io<mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthirdpartyoffers.juno.com%2FTGL3131%2F5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cba4fbdb86b4045bbb41108d672d1d409%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636822642857269908&sdata=p%2FkQzyL6QWz%2BqV1qpMYuC1iPj8BX4UOvltD55XdL8W0%3D&reserved=0>








Sarah k Alawami
 

I was going to recommend reaper as well. It is, at least on mac, a bit harder to use but usable. In fact I replaced my work flow in the studio with reaper and it is really good, especially for editing video.

Take care

On 5 Jan 2019, at 0:34, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:

Well we could recommend Reaper, but if like me you have simple needs and do not need to understand a whole new set of terms and ways of working its not worth buying it.
On the other hand I have had consistent results with Goldwave and have paid for it, and I'm happy. Audacity, being a bit more complex to use can do good work, but I like the configurable nature of the effects on Goldwave.

Its really up to anyone who wants to edit and record to try them all and see what floats their boat. Certainly Goldwave can be run in demo mode.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2019 6:13 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Also, another reason I express my opinion strongly when a question like this comes up is because so many people recommend Gold Wave. Audacity is a good program, Mp3 Direct Cut is a good program, Virtual Recorder is a good program but almost all the recommendations are for Gold Wave. If I didn't strongly recommend something, it might be easier for someone to think, well, one person recommended Virtual Recorder and three recommended Gold Wave. I guess Gold Wave is a better program. So the entire context must be considered.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 11:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


In your example, you are saying the person is already using Word for shopping lists. In this case, someone is asking for a program and they are saying that they followed the recommended settings and they didn't work. At this point, all we know is that the person wants to record what they hear and maybe they want to use line-in.

I'm not helping anyone if I hedge my answer and don't make what I consider is the best recommendation for what the person says they want to do and if they already aren't familiar with a more sophisticated program. Anyone is free to disagree with me. but if someone wants to use a more complex program later, learning this very simple program won't dissuade them. Indeed, as they get to see how convenient computer recording is, they may be more motivated.

You can posit all sorts of what if or maybe examples. That gets in the way of evaluating what someone knows, what they want to do now, and making a recommendation based on that.

I don't put any confidence in what the public schools are doing as models. They have none too good a track record and they are trendy. Wasn't it almost only yesterday that every child had to have his or her own laptop? What's happening now? A revolt of the silicon Vally elite, many of whom have gone to the opposite extreme and won't let their children use computers or devices at all until they are much older than young children.

I invite anyone to disagree and recommend what they want but I also will express my opinion clearly if I have one because I strongly believe I'm not helping people properly if I don't.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: David Goldfield
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 10:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


Gene,

I think that it's important to respect a person's choice of software for what works well for them even if it's not a choice we would make for ourselves. In this case, Goldwave may well be the preferred piece of software for simple recording for some users. It might not necessarily be the first choice for that task we might think of recommending to someone but people use what works for them and we need to respect that. Someone might choose to use Microsoft Word to jot down and print their shopping list. We might feel that there are better options for that task. We might be tempted to recommend Jarte or even Notepad for what to us might seem like a simple task. However, if a user wants to use Word for that task then they have every right to do so and it's not for us to decide whether using Word for that purpose is the most appropriate choice for that user. Indeed, I could argue for that user by saying that the additional features of Word will always be available if or when they decide to branch out into more complex writing tasks. When that time comes they will already have learned the basics of Word and can therefore advance by learning how to use additional features in a program they already know on a basic level. If I choose to use Goldwave to read text into a microphone then that choice may work best for me. Perhaps I may discover other features contained within the program that I wasn't initially planning to use but which may cause me to be curious enough to experiment. I would personally prefer to learn about sound editing from one program rather than starting out with simple tasks on a more basic program and then learning a whole new piece of software when I want to try my hand with more advanced tasks. That approach may work well for many people and I think it's important to consider that. I've heard that in mainstream public schools they're teaching Powerpoint to fourth graders. They don't necessarily start out with a special program knowing that some kids might only use it for basic tasks. Kids are learning Office at a young age, starting out with basic tasks but working their way up to intermediate and advanced features. It's much more practical to learn all of these tasks on one program rather than forcing them to change over to another program later on. This is why many blind children start out with JAWS as their screen reader, rather than being taught NVDA and Narrator. You might start out by using JAWS to perform basic screen reading tasks. However, if a student finds that he needs more than the basics he can stay with the same screen reader and learn more as he needs to or wishes to.





David Goldfield, Assistive Technology Specialist WWW.David-Goldfield.Com
On 1/4/2019 11:31 AM, Gene wrote:

If you are saying that Gold Wave is the program of choice for simple recording and editing and that's all it will be used for, that isn't the case. For people with more complex needs, Gold Wave may be a good choice. But not for someone who just says, I want to do some recording. There are much more simple programs and in addition, regarding editing, Goldwave is definitely not the program to use to edit existing MP3 files. It reencodes the files and causes a loss of quality. There is no one best recording program. It depends what you are going to use it for.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin
Sent: Friday, January 04, 2019 6:43 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.


GoldWave is a fully functional demo allowing you to use all features. The only draw back if you don’t register it is that every time you enter it you get the GoldWave introduction, no big deal!



E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee



From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:47 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic pluggedin sure could use some help.



Goldwave isn't free and there is no reason to use it for simple recording and editing. I'll look at the program I'm going to send tomorrow and make sure what the options are. The options may be all you need. Or, you may need to learn to change sound card settings to record using a line-in input. But just what do you want to record? Do you want to record from a physical radio or record a radio stream that is streaming online? What sorts of other things do you want to record?



Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Sam Bushman

Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2019 10:16 PM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.



What options do you have in goldwave under the options, control properties, device tab?
Thanks,
Sam


-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sue J. Ward
Sent: Thursday, January 3, 2019 9:12 PM
To: nvda groups <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] how to record audio from the computer with no mic plugged in sure could use some help.

Hello. Does anyone know of any audio recording software that works with NVDA with no mic attached to the computer? I want to record a lot of internal stuff from my computer with no mic attached. I have tried audacity with everything they suggested when reading the user guide to make it work no such luck since am using windows 10. Lets just say if I want to record a radio station or anything from my computer what type of program could I use with NVDA? I have heard of total recorder and gold wave would those programs work since I do have everything up to date and I did check in the recording section and I have no stereo mics on my sound card. Have any of you used sound tap or any apps with in the app store to get anything to work with NVDA? I have tried everything with the line in jack nothing. Or maybe I am not setting it up right. Any suggestions would be excellent. Thank you.
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor Warns: "Throw Out This Vegetable Immediately"
unhealthpublications.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/5c2edd115b38d5d104ca5st01duc