Want to upgrade computer


farhan israk
 

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for normal windows 10 user?


Antony Stone
 

1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?
--
This sentence contains exacly three erors.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit machine? 
 
Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.  Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things as they are. 
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

> I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
> normal windows 10 user?

--
This sentence contains exacly three erors.

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Antony Stone
 

If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


 

hi.
i read somewhere that windows 7 and layter windows 32 bit versions,
support 4 gb of ram and my windows xp, only supports 3.25 gb of ram.

On 1/14/19, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a
32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you
want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't* CC
me.



--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Gene
 

I doubt what you are saying is correct.  Its true that 32bit Windows is limited in memory access, as you say.  But at the same time, 32 bit versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or Windows 8.  Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for 64bit.  I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.  But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.
 
All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be upgraded to may well be 64bit.  But for anyone who has a 32bit computer who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

> Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit
> machine?
>
> Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have
> minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
> Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
> some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
> imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want
> to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
> as they are.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> 1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".
>
> 2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
> 64- bit Windows.
>
> 3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
> for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".
>
> Regards,
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
> > I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
> > for normal windows 10 user?

--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Gene
 

This page supports my view.
the first two answers on the page are written by people using 32bit Windows 10.  The second two answers are not clear responses and we don't know what bit version of Windows 10 they are addressing at which times or if they are making a proper and clear distinction in their answers.  But those who answered the question properly support my view.
 
Gene
----- Orignal Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

I doubt what you are saying is correct.  Its true that 32bit Windows is limited in memory access, as you say.  But at the same time, 32 bit versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or Windows 8.  Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for 64bit.  I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.  But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.
 
All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be upgraded to may well be 64bit.  But for anyone who has a 32bit computer who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

> Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit
> machine?
>
> Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have
> minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
> Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
> some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
> imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want
> to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
> as they are.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> 1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".
>
> 2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
> 64- bit Windows.
>
> 3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
> for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".
>
> Regards,
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
> > I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
> > for normal windows 10 user?

--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Antony Stone
 

However see https://www.quora.com/Why-does-Windows-only-show-about-3-5-GB-of-
my-4-GB-of-RAM (linked in the list at the bottom of your article) to confirm my
opinion that a 32-bit version of Windows will only use 3Gbytes (or 3.2Gbytes,
as stated in the article).

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:03:19, Gene wrote:

This page supports my view.
https://www.quora.com/Is-Windows-10-advisable-with-4-GB-of-RAM
the first two answers on the page are written by people using 32bit Windows
10. The second two answers are not clear responses and we don't know what
bit version of Windows 10 they are addressing at which times or if they
are making a proper and clear distinction in their answers. But those who
answered the question properly support my view.

Gene
----- Orignal Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:51 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I doubt what you are saying is correct. Its true that 32bit Windows is
limited in memory access, as you say. But at the same time, 32 bit
versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that
Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or
Windows 8. Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for
64bit. I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows
10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.
But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.

All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the
computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be
upgraded to may well be 64bit. But for anyone who has a 32bit computer
who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:
Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a
32bit machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you
want to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave
things as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
<flopsie> yes, but this is #lbw, we don't do normal

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

I wasn't disputing that.  I had the impression that Windows 10 doesn't use all 4GB, but a little less.  I don't think this is because of Windows 10 per se.  I think it has to do with how much memory 32gb Windows machines can address.  Regardless, the article I sent supports my position.
 
Also, though companies do stupid things at times, it would be illogical and damaging for Microsoft to release a 32 bit version of Windows 10 that runs poorly on 32bit Windows machines.  It would erode the confidence of those who upgraded and reduce goodwill toward the company. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:29 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

However see https://www.quora.com/Why-does-Windows-only-show-about-3-5-GB-of-
my-4-GB-of-RAM (linked in the list at the bottom of your article) to confirm my
opinion that a 32-bit version of Windows will only use 3Gbytes (or 3.2Gbytes,
as stated in the article).

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:03:19, Gene wrote:

> This page supports my view.
> https://www.quora.com/Is-Windows-10-advisable-with-4-GB-of-RAM
> the first two answers on the page are written by people using 32bit Windows
> 10.  The second two answers are not clear responses and we don't know what
> bit version of Windows 10 they are addressing at which times or if they
> are making a proper and clear distinction in their answers.  But those who
> answered the question properly support my view.
>
> Gene
> ----- Orignal Message -----
>
> From: Gene
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:51 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> I doubt what you are saying is correct.  Its true that 32bit Windows is
> limited in memory access, as you say.  But at the same time, 32 bit
> versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that
> Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or
> Windows 8.  Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for
> 64bit.  I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows
> 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.
> But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.
>
> All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the
> computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be
> upgraded to may well be 64bit.  But for anyone who has a 32bit computer
> who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
> hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.
>
> This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
> alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
> unusable RAM.
>
> Antony.
>
> On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:
> > Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a
> > 32bit machine?
> >
> > Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have
> > minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
> > Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
> > some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
> > imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you
> > want to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave
> > things as they are.
> >
> > Gene
> > ----- Original message -----
> >
> > From: Antony Stone
> > Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
> > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> > Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
> >
> >
> > 1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".
> >
> > 2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
> > 64- bit Windows.
> >
> > 3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
> > Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> >
> > Antony.
> >
> > On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
> > > I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
> > > for normal windows 10 user?

--
<flopsie> yes, but this is #lbw, we don't do normal

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Antony Stone
 

Oh, I do not dispute that 32-bit Windows runs much better in limited memory
than 64-bit Windows does.

Given a 64-bit machine with 2 Gbytes of RAM, running a 32-bit edition of
Windows on it will perform better than running a 64-bit edition of the same
version of Windows.

However, I also believe that running a 64-bit edition of Windows on a machine
with 8 Gbytes of RAM will perform better than a 32-bit edition running in 3
Gbytes (even if the machine itself contains 8 Gbytes).

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:39:48, Gene wrote:

I wasn't disputing that. I had the impression that Windows 10 doesn't use
all 4GB, but a little less. I don't think this is because of Windows 10
per se. I think it has to do with how much memory 32gb Windows machines
can address. Regardless, the article I sent supports my position.

Also, though companies do stupid things at times, it would be illogical and
damaging for Microsoft to release a 32 bit version of Windows 10 that runs
poorly on 32bit Windows machines. It would erode the confidence of those
who upgraded and reduce goodwill toward the company.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


However see
https://www.quora.com/Why-does-Windows-only-show-about-3-5-GB-of-
my-4-GB-of-RAM (linked in the list at the bottom of your article) to
confirm my opinion that a 32-bit version of Windows will only use 3Gbytes
(or 3.2Gbytes, as stated in the article).

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:03:19, Gene wrote:
This page supports my view.
https://www.quora.com/Is-Windows-10-advisable-with-4-GB-of-RAM
the first two answers on the page are written by people using 32bit
Windows 10. The second two answers are not clear responses and we don't
know what bit version of Windows 10 they are addressing at which times
or if they are making a proper and clear distinction in their answers.
But those who answered the question properly support my view.

Gene
----- Orignal Message -----

From: Gene
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:51 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I doubt what you are saying is correct. Its true that 32bit Windows is
limited in memory access, as you say. But at the same time, 32 bit
versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that
Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or
Windows 8. Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for
64bit. I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows
10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.
But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.

All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the
computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be
upgraded to may well be 64bit. But for anyone who has a 32bit computer
who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:
Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a
32bit machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just
have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you
a year. Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it
will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones
after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is,
why do you want to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might
want to leave things as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you
have 64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram
enough for normal windows 10 user?
--
I thought of going into banking, until I lost interest.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

But as one of the answers said on the page I linked to, for more memory intensive activities, it may not run very well, but for typical activities, it does.  I'm paraphrasing but that's the sense of it.  My disagreement is that you said to be sure its 64 bit Windows and I'm saying that, while that makes sense for 64bit machines with reasonable memory, those with 32bit machines don't have to give up their machines and they can run 32bit Windows 10 unless they use memory intensive programs that a lot of people don't use.  They should have 4gb of RAM.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

Oh, I do not dispute that 32-bit Windows runs much better in limited memory
than 64-bit Windows does.

Given a 64-bit machine with 2 Gbytes of RAM, running a 32-bit edition of
Windows on it will perform better than running a 64-bit edition of the same
version of Windows.

However, I also believe that running a 64-bit edition of Windows on a machine
with 8 Gbytes of RAM will perform better than a 32-bit edition running in 3
Gbytes (even if the machine itself contains 8 Gbytes).

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:39:48, Gene wrote:

> I wasn't disputing that.  I had the impression that Windows 10 doesn't use
> all 4GB, but a little less.  I don't think this is because of Windows 10
> per se.  I think it has to do with how much memory 32gb Windows machines
> can address.  Regardless, the article I sent supports my position.
>
> Also, though companies do stupid things at times, it would be illogical and
> damaging for Microsoft to release a 32 bit version of Windows 10 that runs
> poorly on 32bit Windows machines.  It would erode the confidence of those
> who upgraded and reduce goodwill toward the company.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Antony Stone
> Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 6:29 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
>
>
> However see
> https://www.quora.com/Why-does-Windows-only-show-about-3-5-GB-of-
> my-4-GB-of-RAM (linked in the list at the bottom of your article) to
> confirm my opinion that a 32-bit version of Windows will only use 3Gbytes
> (or 3.2Gbytes, as stated in the article).
>
> Antony.
>
> On Monday 14 January 2019 at 13:03:19, Gene wrote:
> > This page supports my view.
> > https://www.quora.com/Is-Windows-10-advisable-with-4-GB-of-RAM
> > the first two answers on the page are written by people using 32bit
> > Windows 10.  The second two answers are not clear responses and we don't
> > know what bit version of Windows 10 they are addressing at which times
> > or if they are making a proper and clear distinction in their answers.
> > But those who answered the question properly support my view.
> >
> > Gene
> > ----- Orignal Message -----
> >
> > From: Gene
> > Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:51 AM
> > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> > Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
> >
> >
> > I doubt what you are saying is correct.  Its true that 32bit Windows is
> > limited in memory access, as you say.  But at the same time, 32 bit
> > versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that
> > Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or
> > Windows 8.  Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for
> > 64bit.  I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows
> > 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used.
> > But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.
> >
> > All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the
> > computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be
> > upgraded to may well be 64bit.  But for anyone who has a 32bit computer
> > who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.
> >
> > Gene
> > ----- Original Message -----
> >
> > From: Antony Stone
> > Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
> > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> > Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
> >
> >
> > If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
> > hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.
> >
> > This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
> > alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
> > unusable RAM.
> >
> > Antony.
> >
> > On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:
> > > Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a
> > > 32bit machine?
> > >
> > > Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just
> > > have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you
> > > a year. Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it
> > > will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones
> > > after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is,
> > > why do you want to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might
> > > want to leave things as they are.
> > >
> > > Gene
> > > ----- Original message -----
> > >
> > > From: Antony Stone
> > > Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
> > > To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> > > Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer
> > >
> > >
> > > 1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".
> > >
> > > 2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you
> > > have 64- bit Windows.
> > >
> > > 3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
> > > Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > >
> > > Antony.
> > >
> > > On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
> > > > I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram
> > > > enough for normal windows 10 user?

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Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Personally and I'm sure there will be as many answers as there are people, I'd go for 8 meg of Ram, I have a machine with 4meg at our studio and it has the tendency to hiccup when writing audio files.
Of course you need to start with what it is you want to do. If its browse a few web sites, email and listen to the odd audio stream or file you can get away with very underpowered gear. Sadly the way software is being built now seems to suggest that its using more resources than it needs to, but then, we cannot influence that.

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "farhan israk" <fahim.net.2014@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:16 AM
Subject: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?



Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I have just been sniffing around the Microsoft pages and it seems windows 7 will be no longer supported mid 2020, however just like XP that does not mean it will stop working. I was also dismayed to learn that many builds of Windows 10 are not being supported
Even Office 2010 is going.
I tend to feel with Windows 10 they need to find a better model to follow. It breaks so many things that I moved back out of ten.

If they will not support older 10 series builds with security updates after just about a year or so, it seems a crazy situation to have for the home user to me.
Brian.

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:35 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year. Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?
--
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Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Well, it can use the extra, but its paged rather like we used to have in the old 8 bit days when if you recall they would only address 64k of ram, but huge amounts of ram started to appear. I had a half Gig machine based around a z80b, and it used paged ram, which in effect is yet another chip in the mix to do the housekeeping of swapping pages.



Anyway, back on topic. The crux is what the envisaged use is.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Antony Stone" <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Antony Stone
 

I thought one of the main concepts behind Windows 10 is that, unlike previous
versions of Windows, it isn't something that you just install on your computer
and leave it like that (maybe applying Service Packs when they get released),
but instead has an inherent "rolling upgrade" so that users are expected to
keep their machines updated and not be using older build versions.

Antony

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 15:30:39, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
wrote:

I have just been sniffing around the Microsoft pages and it seems windows 7
will be no longer supported mid 2020, however just like XP that does not
mean it will stop working. I was also dismayed to learn that many builds of
Windows 10 are not being supported
Even Office 2010 is going.
I tend to feel with Windows 10 they need to find a better model to
follow. It breaks so many things that I moved back out of ten.

If they will not support older 10 series builds with security updates after
just about a year or so, it seems a crazy situation to have for the home
user to me.
Brian.
--
I thought I had type A blood, but it turned out to be a typo.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

OK, then, I have a core Duo laptop still running xp with 2 gigs of memory. It can run say firefox 52 fast.
However a Pentium 4 single core with a similar speed of bus and clock is like a slog loading up Firefox 52, as its been optimised for multi processors.


I seem to recall that 32 bit machines can use 4gigs with advantages, but any more and the use is pointless.
Another thing to watch for on cheap machines is the actual disc size. I've seen tiny, by today's standards, discs in laptops, as small as 120 gigs, and by the time you have all the software and data on them there is hardly any space for doing anything.


My current machine bought at the end of 2015 is a quad core, non multithreaded, unfortunately, with 8 gigs of memory a 256 gig ssd and a 1 terabyte second drive. My mode of operation is to periodically shove less used data onto the hard drive, including all music etc, leaving a healthy amount of ssd for everyday use.

Now nvda is a 32 bit program, and hence has some problems with multitasking I think, which is probably why you do get a core max out at times, since only one thread is running in each core at any given instant in time.
I'm hoping to carry on with this hardware for another couple of years, though whether I can avoid having to use 10 is still in the breeze.
If I cannot I'm in need of a nice easy to use multi account with identities and newsgroups, program.


Does anyone know if OE classic has fixed its access yet?
Brian
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:51 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


I doubt what you are saying is correct. Its true that 32bit Windows is limited in memory access, as you say. But at the same time, 32 bit versions of Windows require far less memory and I very much doubt that Windows 10 is much more, if at all memory intensive than Windows 7 or Windows 8. Memory needs for 32bit Windows are dramatically less than for 64bit. I don't know if this is true, but the limitation may make Windows 10 run less efficiently if a very memory intensive program is being used. But for typical uses, I doubt there is a problem.

All of which may have no bearing on the current situation because the computer may be a 64 bit computer and the version of Windows that may be upgraded to may well be 64bit. But for anyone who has a 32bit computer who is following the thread, I think this point needs further discussion.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:37 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a 32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I think more or less correct, though I have to say adding an extra gig to xp after 2 seemed to make no difference whatsoever!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
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Please address personal E-mail to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: "zahra" <nasrinkhaksar3@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


hi.
i read somewhere that windows 7 and layter windows 32 bit versions,
support 4 gb of ram and my windows xp, only supports 3.25 gb of ram.

On 1/14/19, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
If you have a 32-bit version of Windows (no matter whether the machine's
hardware is 32- or 64-bit) then it will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM.

This tends to give disappointing performance when running a screenreader
alongside other applications, as well as being a waste of money for the
unusable RAM.

Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:35:38, Gene wrote:

Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10? What if the machine is a
32bit
machine?

Also, what version of Windows is currently being run? You may just have
minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.
Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but
some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an
imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion. So my question is, why do you
want
to upgrade? If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things
as they are.

Gene
----- Original message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have
64- bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum
Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:
I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough
for normal windows 10 user?
--
Normal people think "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Engineers think "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet".

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't* CC
me.




--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Gene
 

What do you mean by when writing audio files?  And what are you describing as hiccups?  I have a computer where programs run automatically off and on because the Task Scheduler starts them.  This sometimes boggs down the processor and recording programs may mis information when recording.  But that has nothing to do with insufficient RAM. 
 
Recording an audio file isn't memory intensive. 
 
Memory gets blamed for all sorts of things and many of those things aren't the fault of memory.  But for some reason, there is a mistique about memory.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 8:23 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

Personally and I'm sure there will be as many answers as there are people,
I'd go for 8 meg of Ram, I have a machine  with 4meg at our studio and it
has the  tendency to hiccup when writing audio files.
 Of course you need to start with what it is you want to do. If its browse a
few web sites, email and listen to the odd audio stream or file you can get
away with very underpowered gear. Sadly the way software is being built now
seems to suggest that its using more resources than it needs to, but then,
we cannot influence that.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "farhan israk" <fahim.net.2014@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 11:16 AM
Subject: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer


>I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
> normal windows 10 user?
>
>
>
>




 

Well I wouldn't recomend it but I have had the misfortune to have had to do that to a core2 duo 64 bit system and a core2 duo laptop.

Both with 2gb ram.

Can it be done, yes.

Is it a dream to use, no.

10 minute startups await you, slow performance, and then 2 years later your drive or board will explode and burn and you will lose everything but it can be done.

An i3, well its a bit of a joke just like all the other low powered units but it can be done as long as you don't overload the system with to many tasks, 1-2 windows at most and little in background running then you can do that to.

An i5 is what I'd go for, and if you use amd, I'd go for an a10 or anything with quad core.

Yes I know stuff runs on lower specked systems but once you take nvda as an actual program, and a program on to p of that you actually have 2 windows open at once, add all your cloud apps, etc then well.

I have had older systems which are crap with nvda running but probably fine when not probably because people that use them only use 1 window.

On 15/01/2019 12:22 AM, Antony Stone wrote:
1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
normal windows 10 user?


 

I agree.

I have been thinking of switching to the business branch.

Its the only reason I would spend the 200 bucks nz on the pro update I have more control of my system.



On 15/01/2019 12:35 AM, Gene wrote:
Isn't there a 32 bit version of Windows 10?  What if the machine is a 32bit machine? 
 
Also, what version of Windows is currently being run?  You may just have minor annoyances when Microsoft imposes two full upgrades on you a year.  Microsoft may slow the schedule down but we don't know if it will, but some people have more annoying problems or even serious ones after an imposed Microsoft upgrade on occasion.  So my question is, why do you want to upgrade?  If the reason isn't pressing, you might want to leave things as they are. 
 
Gene
----- Original message -----
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2019 5:22 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Want to upgrade computer

1. We don't know what you regard as a "normal Windows 10 user".

2. I would recommend more than 4Gbytes of RAM, and make certain you have 64-
bit Windows.

3. See the thread on this list starting Friday 11th entitled "Minimum Specs
for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications".

Regards,


Antony.

On Monday 14 January 2019 at 12:16:38, farhan israk wrote:

> I want to upgrade my computer. Is core i3 processor and 4gb ram enough for
> normal windows 10 user?

--
This sentence contains exacly three erors.

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.