accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"


Brian's Mail list account
 

Its the expect every user to be stupid or clueless thing again. and although I would agree with you for myself. I know at least two 'users' not blind ones whose ability to cock up anything is legendary, almost by just standing near the computer!
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:09 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"


On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:34 PM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra wrote:


Be careful before suspending protected view.
I have no argument with the advice you've given, as everyone has their own tolerance for risk.

I will note, however, that what you propose doing would unleash exactly the same macros as my method does once the file is open. That's why I don't find Protected View useful for myself. I have never opened anything I have no intention of interacting with, and the moment you unprotect a given file it's unprotected. For myself, I just see no advantage in doing this on a case by case basis since I'm strict about what I'll open.

If one has to deal with a lot of Office file throughput, though, and you don't have the need to interact with many of them, Protected View can come in handy.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Brian's Mail list account
 

That means then that there is obviously a way to turn it off. Is this a simple key like f2 to edit in Access for example?
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:33 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"


Mary,

Have a read through:

* Adjusting Protected View Settings in MS-Office Programs ( https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=0B98uELZbPFnOSHIyWXUzRnFkdmc )

I have hated Protected View as default since its introduction. I never open an MS-Office document from any source that I don't trust, so it's just a PITA for me. The sighted folks can see what's there, so they don't need to have something read it, and it's visible when Protected View is on. If they want to manipulate it in any way, though, they've got to turn it off, too, either for that document alone or as noted above.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Maria Reyes <blindteky@...>
 

Also you can press alt f then hit i e for enable editing. At least that's what I do and I save it then it won't be in protected view anymore.




On Jan 23, 2019, at 7:09 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:34 PM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra wrote:
Be careful before suspending protected view.
I have no argument with the advice you've given, as everyone has their own tolerance for risk.

I will note, however, that what you propose doing would unleash exactly the same macros as my method does once the file is open.  That's why I don't find Protected View useful for myself.   I have never opened anything I have no intention of interacting with, and the moment you unprotect a given file it's unprotected.  For myself, I just see no advantage in doing this on a case by case basis since I'm strict about what I'll open.

If one has to deal with a lot of Office file throughput, though, and you don't have the need to interact with many of them, Protected View can come in handy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 06:34 PM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra wrote:
Be careful before suspending protected view.
I have no argument with the advice you've given, as everyone has their own tolerance for risk.

I will note, however, that what you propose doing would unleash exactly the same macros as my method does once the file is open.  That's why I don't find Protected View useful for myself.   I have never opened anything I have no intention of interacting with, and the moment you unprotect a given file it's unprotected.  For myself, I just see no advantage in doing this on a case by case basis since I'm strict about what I'll open.

If one has to deal with a lot of Office file throughput, though, and you don't have the need to interact with many of them, Protected View can come in handy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Mary,

Brian gave you some very useful information on managing protected view. I must say that I like the protection it gives me. I prefer to be covered when a dynamic program like an excel workbook is sent from any source, even a trusted one! Excel is designed to carry macros and other devices that could be a threat from the wrong source or from a damaged source with no harm intended.

As soon as you open the workbook, just press f2 and tab once to "OK" and the full workbook is open and available to navigate as normal.

Similarly, in a Word file attachment it will normally come in protected view and, again, just press alt to open the ribbon bar, left arrow to "file", down-arrow into the ribbon options and tab twice to remove protected view.

Be careful before suspending protected view.

All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mary Otten
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:27 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] accessing a spreadsheet in "protected view"

Hi all,


I admit that I am really not very knowledgeable when it comes to working with spreadsheets. So maybe this is just an elementary question.


I got a spreadsheet from the farmer who does my local CSA. It contains
products, prices per specified unit of product and the 12 months of the
year, including showing, with an X in the boxes for months when said
products are not going to be available. And then there is a place to
fill in the amounts you want for each month and each product, and it
calculates your total for the year.


But when I open this in Excel from Office 2016, it says it is in
protected view, and when I arrow around, all I get are numbers for the
given cell I'm on, plus the word unlock. And I'm not seeing any actual
data from the sender of the sheet, i.e. no names of items, months etc.
So I haven't a clue how this thing is actually laid out. This protected
view is the way she sends this out, and apparently, it works okay for
the sighted folks. So, any advice on how I can do some magic on this
would really be appreciated.


Mary


Mary Otten
 

Thank you, Brian. You are a genius!


Mary

On 1/23/2019 11:33 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Mary,

  Have a read through:    I have hated Protected View as default since its introduction.   I never open an MS-Office document from any source that I don't trust, so it's just a PITA for me.  The sighted folks can see what's there, so they don't need to have something read it, and it's visible when Protected View is on.  If they want to manipulate it in any way, though, they've got to turn it off, too, either for that document alone or as noted above.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

Mary,

  Have a read through:    I have hated Protected View as default since its introduction.   I never open an MS-Office document from any source that I don't trust, so it's just a PITA for me.  The sighted folks can see what's there, so they don't need to have something read it, and it's visible when Protected View is on.  If they want to manipulate it in any way, though, they've got to turn it off, too, either for that document alone or as noted above.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Mary Otten
 

Hi all,


I admit that I am really not very knowledgeable when it comes to working with spreadsheets. So maybe this is just an elementary question.


I got a spreadsheet from the farmer who does my local CSA. It contains products, prices per specified unit of product and the 12 months of the year, including showing, with an X in the boxes for months when said products are not going to be available. And then there is a place to fill in the amounts you want for each month and each product, and it calculates your total for the year.


But when I open this in Excel from Office 2016, it says it is in protected view, and when I arrow around, all I get are numbers for the given cell I'm on, plus the word unlock. And I'm not seeing any actual data from the sender of the sheet, i.e. no names of items, months etc. So I haven't a clue how this thing is actually laid out. This protected view is the way she sends this out, and apparently, it works okay for the sighted folks. So, any advice on how I can do some magic on this would really be appreciated.


Mary