Topics

Need help learning Braille


Akshaya Choudhary
 

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards


Jackie
 

sociohack, learning Braille is extremely helpful for what you want.
You may not get good enough to read books, but that isn't what you
want anyway. You just want to get good enough to read notes, etc, &
that is very very doable, even when you're older--& believe me, 22
just is not that old. I can assure you I use it for just that purpose,
as well as to sing in choir when I did that. I've seen people who were
older & even older diabetics learn it enough for those kinds of uses.
Learn it. Start now. You'll be ecstatic you did. Don't let the
naysayers have their day.

On 2/5/19, Sociohack AC <acsociopath@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille.
I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my
class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's
a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille
could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need
frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How
long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum
that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start
leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards



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Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Yes, learning Braille is definitely an asset for a blind person and even for those who still have some vision. Listening to information is fine, however, there are times when you need to have your fingers on the info for spelling and for close analysis of what you are reading. You are still young and, with practice, you can become a proficient reader. I read books in Braille and I can read with both hands about 350 words per minute. I started learning Braille as a teen in France.
Best of luck. Any question, please do not hesitate to contact me.
Blessings
Pascal

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jackie
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 10:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

sociohack, learning Braille is extremely helpful for what you want.
You may not get good enough to read books, but that isn't what you want anyway. You just want to get good enough to read notes, etc, & that is very very doable, even when you're older--& believe me, 22 just is not that old. I can assure you I use it for just that purpose, as well as to sing in choir when I did that. I've seen people who were older & even older diabetics learn it enough for those kinds of uses.
Learn it. Start now. You'll be ecstatic you did. Don't let the naysayers have their day.

On 2/5/19, Sociohack AC <acsociopath@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille.
I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations
in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to
present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe
learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in
professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this
point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read
on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at
it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards




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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs
& check out my sites at www.brighter-vision.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Brice Mijares
 

Hadley SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND WOULD BE A GOOD PLACE TO START.

On 2/5/2019 6:59 AM, Sociohack AC wrote:
Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.
What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.
All feedback is welcome.
Regards


Ervin, Glenn
 

Hi,

It is never too late.

Your state agency should teach you, but if not, Hadley School has a Braille curriculum for folks who are Blind.

I have taught it to people in their 90s, and I had one lady in her 90s who learned the entire alphabet in two weeks.

I know of diabetics with neuropathy who could read it faster than me, and I learned it at age 21, and although I’m not real fast, it meets my needs, but you can get much faster than I if you are motivated to learn it.

If I could not listen to audio feedback, I would be a lot faster, just from using it every day.

 

Glenn

 

 

Glenn Ervin  Orientation Counselor II

Norfolk Nebraska

402 370 3436

Cell: 402 992 0325

Welcome | NCBVI

 


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Well I learned it at age 50 plus. I am not a brilliant reader but I do have a label machine and can read most things given time. Notes are OK. I suggest fingerprint if you want a DIY course but obviously its better if you can find a tutor as the texts to read on in many of the courses are about as thrilling as watching paint dry.
Probably not a subject for here though. However with the cheaper displays coming on the market with much harder to push down pins then if you are a scrubber or hard presser you can even learn on a computer.
One caveat is that if you have any nerve issues in the fingers you are going to struggle. I'd also say that do not expect that always your dominant hand or expected finger will be the best one to use, oh and if you find you have to read those horrid plastic thermally made texts, use a bite talk on your finger to stop it sticking if you sweat.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sociohack AC" <acsociopath@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 2:59 PM
Subject: [nvda] Need help learning Braille


Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards


Gene
 

In the meantime, there are other ways you can give presentations without having to memorize.  I don't know what equipment you have, but you can use an earphone, over one ear, to play notes to yourself using something a laptop, a phone, a tablet, whatever is convenient.  If you were in a professional setting, such methods might be a detraction as opposed to Braille.  But in the classroom and as a temporary measure, I don't think they would matter.  I think that Braille, when used in such settings, makes you look more professional or equivalent to sighted people using printed notes.  But if you learn Braille, you can use this as a temporary measure. 
 
Also, you can learn as much Braille as you want.  Really strong Braille advocates may overemphasize what you will be able to do efficiently.  Many people who don't learn Braille as children don't develop the kind of speed to allow them to use Braille for reading books, for example.  They can do it, but their speed is too slow to be pleasant or practical.  And it isn't for lack of practice in many cases.  I know someone who learned Braille as a teenager and who is in the slow reader category. 
 
I should add that there may be ways of teaching and learning Braille that reduce or eliminate the problem, but that is what I gather is often the case with later Braille learners.  Others on the list may have comments that provide more information.  
 
And for your classroom settings, your use of computer equipment may be much shorter than you might expect.  You can learn contracted Braille but as you are starting, once you know the Braille alphabet and practice reading uncontracted Braille enough to be comfortable, if slow, you may find you can use your own Braille notes for presentations.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Jackie
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2019 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

sociohack, learning Braille is extremely helpful for what you want.
You may not get good enough to read books, but that isn't what you
want anyway. You just want to get good enough to read notes, etc, &
that is very very doable, even when you're older--& believe me, 22
just is not that old. I can assure you I use it for just that purpose,
as well as to sing in choir when I did that. I've seen people who were
older & even older diabetics learn it enough for those kinds of uses.
Learn it. Start now. You'll be ecstatic you did. Don't let the
naysayers have their day.

On 2/5/19, Sociohack AC <acsociopath@...> wrote:
> Hi guys!
> I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille.
> I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my
> class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's
> a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille
> could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need
> frequent public speaking.
>
> What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How
> long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum
> that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start
> leaning it at an advanced age.
>
> All feedback is welcome.
>
> Regards
>
>
>
>


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Sarah k Alawami
 

If you start now you can get to atbest 80 words per minute which is slow but doable. I would talk to yoru voc rehab for classes.

Good luck.

On 5 Feb 2019, at 6:59, Sociohack AC wrote:

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards


Jackie
 

Or you can check out Hadley School for the blind at:
www.hadley.edu .

On 2/5/19, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@gmail.com> wrote:
If you start now you can get to atbest 80 words per minute which is
slow but doable. I would talk to yoru voc rehab for classes.

Good luck.

On 5 Feb 2019, at 6:59, Sociohack AC wrote:

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning
Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent
presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the
stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm
thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see
myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this
point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read
on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at
it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards





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Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
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& check out my sites at www.brighter-vision.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Pascal,

I started learning braille when I was 5 years old. Yes, listening to information is fine but I find that I can retain things better if I actually read in braille. For instance, if I see a new word that I'm not familiar with, I can read the letters and remember how to spell the word.

Rosemarie

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pascal Lambert
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 7:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

Yes, learning Braille is definitely an asset for a blind person and even for those who still have some vision. Listening to information is fine, however, there are times when you need to have your fingers on the info for spelling and for close analysis of what you are reading. You are still young and, with practice, you can become a proficient reader. I read books in Braille and I can read with both hands about 350 words per minute. I started learning Braille as a teen in France.
Best of luck. Any question, please do not hesitate to contact me.
Blessings
Pascal

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jackie
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 10:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

sociohack, learning Braille is extremely helpful for what you want.
You may not get good enough to read books, but that isn't what you want anyway. You just want to get good enough to read notes, etc, & that is very very doable, even when you're older--& believe me, 22 just is not that old. I can assure you I use it for just that purpose, as well as to sing in choir when I did that. I've seen people who were older & even older diabetics learn it enough for those kinds of uses.
Learn it. Start now. You'll be ecstatic you did. Don't let the naysayers have their day.

On 2/5/19, Sociohack AC <acsociopath@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille.
I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations
in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to
present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe
learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in
professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this
point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read
on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at
it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards




--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs
& check out my sites at www.brighter-vision.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi,

 

It's never too late to learn braille. When I was a medical transcriber years ago, I had a medical dictionary in braille. That way when I came across unfamiliar words, I could look them up before typing out reports. Hadley School for the Blind does have some very good courses that will help you learn braille.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sociohack AC
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 7:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards


Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Hi,

If you have a rehab center for newly blind adults near you, that is the best place to learn Braille as you will have direct instruction with someone who will show you the scanning techniques and ways to develop the ability to read with both hands.  Otherwise, the Hadley school is the next choice.  Learning the basics is very simple and takes no time.  It is the practice reading that is the most important.  You start with single letters, then single words, then short sentences.   Avoid the tendency to rub the dots to identify them.  It is better to rock the finger’s tips over the dots.  Sometimes using thermoform (plastic paper) on which the Braille lessons are produced on, makes the identification at first easier.  I used it to teach blind persons with diabetes with great success.

Best of luck.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 2:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Hi,

 

It's never too late to learn braille. When I was a medical transcriber years ago, I had a medical dictionary in braille. That way when I came across unfamiliar words, I could look them up before typing out reports. Hadley School for the Blind does have some very good courses that will help you learn braille.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sociohack AC
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 7:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards


chris miles
 

On 05/02/2019 14:59, Sociohack AC wrote:

Hi guys!
I always had enough vision that I never felt the need of learning Braille. I'm 22 and wish to learn it now. I need to make frequent presentations in my class, and for now, I try and memorize all the stuff I need to present. It's a difficult and time consuming task, I'm thinking maybe learning Braille could help me in this regard. I see myself in professions which might need frequent public speaking.

What do you guys suggest? Is learning Braille a good idea at this point? How long will it take and how efficient can I get? I have read on this forum that it is very difficult and you can't get very good at it, if you start leaning it at an advanced age.

All feedback is welcome.

Regards

Hi,


Braille is made up of 6 cells; 3 on one side of the 6 dots and 3 on the other side of the 6 dots.


So you have:-


.1    .4

.2    .5

.3    .6


All you need to do to learn the first 10 letters of the alphabet and then add .3 for the next 10 letters and .6 for the last 6 letters (W comes at the end)


Dot 1 is A

Dots 1 and 2 is B

Dots 1 and 4 is C

Dots 1, 3 & 4 is D

Dots 1 & 5 is E

Dots 1, 2 & 3 is F

Dots 1, 2, 4 & 5 is G

Dots 1, 2 & 5 is H

Dots 2 & 4 is I

Dots 2, 4 & 5 is J



N.B: If you put a number sign in front of the first 10 letters - a BLE sign - Dots 3, 4, 5 & 6 - A (Dot 1) becomes number 1. So B becomes 2, and J is zero..


If you add a Dot 3 to Dot 1 it becomes K (originally A)

Therefore Dots 1 & 2 (B) and add Dot 3 - becomes L

So you do this until you get to J and add Dot 3 - becomes T


To get the next 6 letters all you need to do is add a Dot 6.


So Dot 1 (A)

Add Dot 3 - becomes K

Add Dot 6 - becomes U


So B - becomes V and so on.


So when you get to J:

Add Dot 3 - becomes T

Add Dot 6 to Dots 2, 4 and 5 - becomes W.


If you press dots 1, 2, 3, 4 & 6 together - AND sign

If you press all 6 dots together - FOR sign

If you press dots 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6 together - YOU sign

If you press dots 1, 2, 3, 5 & 6 - Of sign

If you press dots 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 together - WITH sign.


Once you have learned the alphabet, there are combinations of dots which are contractions; i.e. dot 6 with N - Nation....


I learned to type and read to grade 2 in about 6 months, generally about 3 days a week. I had a set of tapes whereby I had to type a number of words on a single line which included a certain contraction such as dis, etc. I used a Perkins to type on braille paper. A friend checked my work once a week and I learned a new contraction for the following week.


I hope this helps you.


I believe you can purchase braille learning materials from the RNIB; 03031239999


Michael Munn
 

I have been reading braille for 10 years now. Braille for me is what print is for sighted. I urge you to sign up with Hadley Institute ASAP and begin reading Braille.
Thanks 
Best Regards 
Michael Munn 


Akshaya Choudhary
 

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Gene
 

Paper Braille takes a lot of room so for that reason and also, I suspect, to speed up reading, there are lots of contractions for words and letters.  There is a sign for the word "the," a sign for the word "and," the contraction for the word but is the letter b, as examples.  There is an e r sign an a r sign, and an I n g sign, for examples of contractions of letter combinations.
 
Once you learn the alphabet, you can write all words in Braille just as you can write all words in print. I am discussing English that doesn't have accented letters.  But depending on how you want to use Braille, you may well want to learn the contractions.
 
Gene 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 7:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Hi,

Learning contractions is a must as it speeds up reading and writing.

Blessings

Pascal 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Paper Braille takes a lot of room so for that reason and also, I suspect, to speed up reading, there are lots of contractions for words and letters.  There is a sign for the word "the," a sign for the word "and," the contraction for the word but is the letter b, as examples.  There is an e r sign an a r sign, and an I n g sign, for examples of contractions of letter combinations.

 

Once you learn the alphabet, you can write all words in Braille just as you can write all words in print. I am discussing English that doesn't have accented letters.  But depending on how you want to use Braille, you may well want to learn the contractions.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Gene
 

It depends on how someone is going to use Braille. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 10:10 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

Hi,

Learning contractions is a must as it speeds up reading and writing.

Blessings

Pascal 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Paper Braille takes a lot of room so for that reason and also, I suspect, to speed up reading, there are lots of contractions for words and letters.  There is a sign for the word "the," a sign for the word "and," the contraction for the word but is the letter b, as examples.  There is an e r sign an a r sign, and an I n g sign, for examples of contractions of letter combinations.

 

Once you learn the alphabet, you can write all words in Braille just as you can write all words in print. I am discussing English that doesn't have accented letters.  But depending on how you want to use Braille, you may well want to learn the contractions.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

From: Sociohack AC

Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Pascal Lambert <coccinelle86@...>
 

Hi,

Yes, no need if you are going to use Braille for labelling and keeping addresses and phone numbers.  Any thing else, even writing/reading  more  than one page, you better off learning some contractions.

Blessings

Pascal

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 11:34 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

It depends on how someone is going to use Braille. 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 10:10 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Hi,

Learning contractions is a must as it speeds up reading and writing.

Blessings

Pascal 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Paper Braille takes a lot of room so for that reason and also, I suspect, to speed up reading, there are lots of contractions for words and letters.  There is a sign for the word "the," a sign for the word "and," the contraction for the word but is the letter b, as examples.  There is an e r sign an a r sign, and an I n g sign, for examples of contractions of letter combinations.

 

Once you learn the alphabet, you can write all words in Braille just as you can write all words in print. I am discussing English that doesn't have accented letters.  But depending on how you want to use Braille, you may well want to learn the contractions.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards,
Sociohack


Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Gene, Sociohack & List:

Contracted Braille is what most books & magazines are published in. Has about 150 short form words, two—cell signs and single-cell signs.

For example in grade II the word braille is written as brl; knowledge is “k, the quote mark representing a dot-5 followed by the letter K. Just is the letter j by itself.

Braille Shorthand used by Stenographers IS WRITTEN on paper tape, one inch wide with the model J shorthand machine made by RNIB of England. It is rated at 140 words per minute. A friend has one who is a Chartered Shorthand Reporter. She tried to use her machine at 200 WPM, the speed at which a judge delivers a Jury Charge the court reporter must transcribe. Her poor machine rapidly had cogs and springs start flying from it as it was not built to handle this speed.

 

There is also Grade III Braille, with around 500 signs, , including short form words, two-cell signs and signs the writer can create on the fly to represent words they need to note with no existing sign.

 

It was originally used by University students to keep up with professors writing on blackboards, now is a curiosity. Some people learn it, love it, use it extensively amongst their blind friends who also know it.

 

Sort of like the Esperanto Language in this respect. Once you learn grade III, you appreciate how it packs your page full of text, with no composition signs such as capitals, italic indicators, just the number sign preceding a number.

 

It even contracts numbers! Very versatile code.

Alas, I know of no books or magazines published in this code.

 

There are contracted Braille codes for other languages, French & German are two.

Some languages have no contracted Braille, such as Traditional Chinese & Japanese.

I trust this explains what contracted Braille is.

Brian K. Lingard VE3YI, Ab2JI, B. A., C. T. M.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: February 8, 2019 10:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Paper Braille takes a lot of room so for that reason and also, I suspect, to speed up reading, there are lots of contractions for words and letters.  There is a sign for the word "the," a sign for the word "and," the contraction for the word but is the letter b, as examples.  There is an e r sign an a r sign, and an I n g sign, for examples of contractions of letter combinations.

 

Once you learn the alphabet, you can write all words in Braille just as you can write all words in print. I am discussing English that doesn't have accented letters.  But depending on how you want to use Braille, you may well want to learn the contractions.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 7:44 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Need help learning Braille

 

Thank you guys for your encouragement! I would definitely initiate learning Braille as soon as possible. As many of you have suggested, even if I don't become proficient enough to read books, I would definitely be able to read notes and make presentations more efficiently. Also, I would like to clarify, many of you talked about contracted Braille. Is that similar to learning short hand for the sighted people?

Once again, thank you all for your feedback and support.
--
Regards
,
Sociohack