Topics

Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

Gene
 

When you start to make a bookmark, if you tab once from the name field, you get to a field where you can specify the folder the bookmark will be saved in.  I don't remember if it is identified as a combo box, but that is how it functions. 
Up and down arrow through the choices.  If you want to add the book mark to the Internet Explorer folder, stop on that folder.  Don't press enter because I'm not sure what that would do.  You can experiment and see if you wish.
If you shift tab back to the name field and press enter, the book mark will be saved in the specified folder. 
 
You may change the name of the bookmark whenever you want, before or after you specify the folder.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2019 1:29 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

At 03:37 PM 2/11/2019, Gene wrote:
 >Are you assuming you can't change the name because Chrome says
 >bookmark added before you edit anything?

That's exactly what I unfortunately assumed.

 >I seldom add new bookmarks
 >in Chrome but I experimented.  If I use control d to add one, Chrome
 >says bookmark added but I am still on the edit field where I can
 >change the name.  It wasn't announced as an edit field for some reason
 >with NVDA.  I don't know what other screen-readers would do.

JAWS doesn't let me know I'm in an edit field either.

 >I tried  typing and I was able to change the name as in any
standard edit field.
 >That's an example of looking around an not assuming what your
 >screen-reader says is always relevant.  Somewhere, Chrome says
 >bookmark added but that is misleading and it hasn't been actually
 >saved yet.  If something seems wrong, look around.

I tend to do that, but that one passed me by.

As far as finding a book mark after you save it even if you don't know
 >the name, if you know what folder it is saved in, it is the first
 >bookmark at the end of the list.  If you are in the list and up arrow,
 >it will be the first one.  I don't work enough with book marks in
 >Chrome to discuss specifying a folder much but I can tell you a little
 >if you want to know.

Can you specify a folder for a bookmark? I of course wouldn't want my
IE bookmarks separated from the ones I make in Chrome, since their
directory structures would be intentionally identical.

 >I can't answer the other questions about how to move all bookmarks to
 >one folder, etc.  But creating bookmarks in Chrome is similar to doing
 >so in other browsers.

That's very good to know.


Orlando Enrique Fiol



Ejaz Shah
 

I use Livemarks extension for Firefox. It restores the RSS live bookmark support to Firefox.

On 12/02/2019 5:25 am, J.G wrote:
Hello,

When we talk about IE and FF/Chrome, we should not forget IE's management of RSS feeds. as I know this is the best implementation of this feature so far. Chrome has never had this feature implemented, FF has removed it "live bookmarks" since version 63 and I still haven't found an addon, which could worked well as I expected.
Any advice or should I use IE for reading RSS feeds?

thanks.

kind regards, Jožef

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

At 07:28 PM 2/10/2019, Brian Vogel wrote:
Oh, puhleeeze. There isn't a browser in existence that doesn't allow
you to set, and later edit your bookmark names. This is just common sense.
CTRL+SHIFT+O brings up the Chrome Bookmarks Manager and you can easily
change the current names assigned. Bringing up the context menu in
Bookmarks Manager when you're sitting on a bookmark gives Edit as the
first choice. You can set the name to anything you wish at creation
time right in the edit box presented and it's the first thing you land on.

That's all very good. But I want to edit the bookmark name before I save it, not afterward, since I won't be able to find my bookmark if I don't know what Chrome automatically named it.
Also, I'd like to move all my Internet Explorer favorites in Chrome from the Imported from IE directory to the root of wherever Chrome stores favorites. AI want all my favorites sorted into the directories I assigned them, not grouped by the browser from which they were imported.
Thanks,
Orlando

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

At 03:37 PM 2/11/2019, Gene wrote:
Are you assuming you can't change the name because Chrome says
bookmark added before you edit anything?
That's exactly what I unfortunately assumed.

I seldom add new bookmarks
in Chrome but I experimented. If I use control d to add one, Chrome
says bookmark added but I am still on the edit field where I can
change the name. It wasn't announced as an edit field for some reason
with NVDA. I don't know what other screen-readers would do.
JAWS doesn't let me know I'm in an edit field either.

I tried typing and I was able to change the name as in any
standard edit field.
That's an example of looking around an not assuming what your
screen-reader says is always relevant. Somewhere, Chrome says
bookmark added but that is misleading and it hasn't been actually
saved yet. If something seems wrong, look around.
I tend to do that, but that one passed me by.

As far as finding a book mark after you save it even if you don't know
the name, if you know what folder it is saved in, it is the first
bookmark at the end of the list. If you are in the list and up arrow,
it will be the first one. I don't work enough with book marks in
Chrome to discuss specifying a folder much but I can tell you a little
if you want to know.
Can you specify a folder for a bookmark? I of course wouldn't want my IE bookmarks separated from the ones I make in Chrome, since their directory structures would be intentionally identical.

I can't answer the other questions about how to move all bookmarks to
one folder, etc. But creating bookmarks in Chrome is similar to doing
so in other browsers.
That's very good to know.


Orlando Enrique Fiol

Cristóbal
 

I always recommend The Old Reader for RSS. It’s web based and fully accessible.

There are free as well as paid options. I choose to pay for the extra services as well as to support them. I’m grandfathered in at a $2.00 a month price for up to 500 feeds, but I think it may now be $2.50 or maybe $3.00 a month. I’m not sure.

The Old Reader can also sync with various mobile apps if you’ve got an Android or iOS device.

 

 

Cristóbal

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2019 5:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

 

Em 11/02/2019 22:25, J.G escreveu:

Any advice or should I use IE for reading RSS feeds?


Have you ever tried using Thunderbird? That's what I use and it's quite good for me. Maybe you should give it a try as well.

Cheers,

 

Em 11/02/2019 22:25, J.G escreveu:
Any advice or should I use IE for reading RSS feeds?

Have you ever tried using Thunderbird? That's what I use and it's quite good for me. Maybe you should give it a try as well.

Cheers,

 

well waterfox still can handle that.



On 12/02/2019 1:25 PM, J.G wrote:
Hello,

When we talk about IE and FF/Chrome, we should not forget IE's management of RSS feeds. as I know this is the best implementation of this feature so far. Chrome has never had this feature implemented, FF has removed it "live bookmarks" since version 63 and I still haven't found an addon, which could worked well as I expected.
Any advice or should I use IE for reading RSS feeds?

thanks.

kind regards, Jožef

J.G
 

Hello,

When we talk about IE and FF/Chrome, we should not forget IE's management of RSS feeds. as I know this is the best implementation of this feature so far. Chrome has never had this feature implemented, FF has removed it "live bookmarks" since version 63 and I still haven't found an addon, which could worked well as I expected.
Any advice or should I use IE for reading RSS feeds?

thanks.

kind regards, Jožef

Gene
 

Are you assuming you can't change the name because Chrome says bookmark added before you edit anything?  I seldom add new bookmarks in Chrome but I experimented.  If I use control d to add one, Chrome says bookmark added but I am still on the edit field where I can change the name.  It wasn't announced as an edit field for some reason with NVDA.  I don't know what other screen-readers would do.  I tried typing and I was able to change the name as in any standard edit field. 
 
That's an example of looking around an not assuming what your screen-reader says is always relevant.  Somewhere, Chrome says bookmark added but that is misleading and it hasn't been actually saved yet.  If something seems wrong, look around.
 
As far as finding a book mark after you save it even if you don't know the name, if you know what folder it is saved in, it is the first bookmark at the end of the list.  If you are in the list and up arrow, it will be the first one.  I don't work enough with book marks in Chrome to discuss specifying a folder much but I can tell you a little if you want to know.
 
I can't answer the other questions about how to move all bookmarks to one folder, etc.  But creating bookmarks in Chrome is similar to doing so in other browsers.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:34 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

At 07:28 PM 2/10/2019, Brian Vogel wrote:
 >Oh, puhleeeze.  There isn't a browser in existence that doesn't allow
 >you to set, and later edit your bookmark names.  This is just common sense.
 >CTRL+SHIFT+O brings up the Chrome Bookmarks Manager and you can easily
 >change the current names assigned.  Bringing up the context menu in
 >Bookmarks Manager when you're sitting on a bookmark gives Edit as the
 >first choice.  You can set the name to anything you wish at creation
 >time right in the edit box presented and it's the first thing you land on.


That's all very good. But I want to edit the
bookmark name before I save it, not afterward,
since I won't be able to find my bookmark if I
don't know what Chrome automatically named it.
Also, I'd like to move all my Internet Explorer
favorites in Chrome from the Imported from IE
directory to the root of wherever Chrome stores
favorites. AI want all my favorites sorted into
the directories I assigned them, not grouped by
the browser from which they were imported.
Thanks,
Orlando



 

On Mon, Feb 11, 2019 at 02:47 PM, Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
But I want to edit the bookmark name before I save it, not afterward, since I won't be able to find my bookmark if I don't know what Chrome automatically named it.
Which I already told you can be done, and is he first thing you land in as far as an edit box goes, when creating a bookmark.  Every browser acts this way, picking a default name based on the URL or webpage title, but allowing you to change it.

You can also rearrange your hierarchy at will, though that does require some use of keyboard commands for drag and drop if you intend to move large batches, such as those imported from another browser at install time, at once.

If you need to know how to do something please ask, and it's almost certain that someone here can and will tell you.

What irritated me is making assertions about Chrome, or any web browser, that anyone who's used web browsers for years knows is simply not so.

Chrome and Firefox both are highly accessible, as are most of the derivatives created by the code bases used for each of those.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

At 07:28 PM 2/10/2019, Brian Vogel wrote:
Oh, puhleeeze. There isn't a browser in existence that doesn't allow
you to set, and later edit your bookmark names. This is just common sense.
CTRL+SHIFT+O brings up the Chrome Bookmarks Manager and you can easily
change the current names assigned. Bringing up the context menu in
Bookmarks Manager when you're sitting on a bookmark gives Edit as the
first choice. You can set the name to anything you wish at creation
time right in the edit box presented and it's the first thing you land on.

That's all very good. But I want to edit the bookmark name before I save it, not afterward, since I won't be able to find my bookmark if I don't know what Chrome automatically named it.
Also, I'd like to move all my Internet Explorer favorites in Chrome from the Imported from IE directory to the root of wherever Chrome stores favorites. AI want all my favorites sorted into the directories I assigned them, not grouped by the browser from which they were imported.
Thanks,
Orlando

 

With regard to Chrome notifications, that's been discussed on this very group and the information is available in the archives.  To wit:


On 5/14/2018 5:21 PM, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

Alt+Shift+A should get you into what Chrome calls Actions, which are the notifications.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 06:26 PM, Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
Chrome doesn't even allow you to edit the bookmark name,
Oh, puhleeeze.  There isn't a browser in existence that doesn't allow you to set, and later edit your bookmark names.  This is just common sense.

CTRL+SHIFT+O brings up the Chrome Bookmarks Manager and you can easily change the current names assigned.  Bringing up the context menu in Bookmarks Manager when you're sitting on a bookmark gives Edit as the first choice.  You can set the name to anything you wish at creation time right in the edit box presented and it's the first thing you land on.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 

Em 10/02/2019 21:26, Orlando Enrique Fiol escreveu:
IE is they only browser  I've found where I can assign sounds to all sorts of navigation functions, most importantly, link activation, page loads and f previous/next page movement..
You should try a Firefox add-on called Navigational Sounds, or something like that. Actually, there's certainly more than just 1 add-on to do it to you.
Also you would be amazed how an only add-on allows us customizing things the way we like them.

Cheers,

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

At 05:56 AM 2/9/2019, Clare Page wrote:
Hi!
Firefox certainly works well with NVDA, I've used it 99.9% of the time
for several years now: I switched to it when I had a faulty version of
Internet Explorer, and haven't looked back. I haven't even opened IE
for years: I have Google Chrome as a backup web browser, although I
don't use it very much, but it's worked well with NVDA on the rare
occasions I've used it. Good to still have a choice, even on Windows 7
which I still have, now that IE is dying!
Havingg tried out Firefox,, Chrome, Edge and even Opera, I find myself returning to good old IE because off two important factors for me: favorites organization and system sounds. IE is they only browser I've found where I can assign sounds to all sorts of navigation functions, most importantly, link activation, page loads and f previous/next page movement.. In terms of favorites, Chrome doesn't even allow you to edit the bookmark name, let alone store it in a directory, although it does maintain Internet Explorer directory structures during importation.
FFor the life of me, I can't figure out how to access Chromes notification; I've tried alt+shift+A and alt+A, but neither actually speak the notification area to activate it. Chrome doesn't have as many settings as Internet Explorerr, such as when history is cleared,, and whether SSL is used.
Moreover, I say all this with the caveat that I am far from perfect and may not have discovered features in Chrome or Firefox that I could use effectively. If anyone knows how to edit favorite names, store them in directories and assign system sounds to browser navigations in Chrome, Firefox or Edge, please do enlighten me.
ManBut till then, although I'll always experiment with other browsers, Internet Explorer remains my reliable default.


Orlando Enrique Fiol
Ph.D. in Music Theory
University of Pennsylvania
Professional Pianist/Keyboardist, Percussionist, Arranger, Performer and Pedagogue

 

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 08:17 AM, Gene wrote:
You can make searching very complicated but it is usually unnecessary.
Yep.  And, like a great many things in life, the best way to learn is by doing.  You eventually perfect a method of generating your search terms that works for you.  Eventually trial and error transitions to "my method."

It's also a zero risk proposition (or very very low) if you're not trying to dig into the dark recesses of the internet.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

Gene
 

You can make searching very complicated but it is usually unnecessary.  Its good to know about quotes and using plus or minus if you want to limit a search at times but for most searches, this is unnecessary. 
 
Search engines are consumer products.  They want to make searches effective for those who know nothing about searching using such variables.  If I want to search for something, I usually get good results just by searching for what I want to find, no alterations, no signs added.  For example, if I want to search for information about the book Oliver Twist, if I simply type Oliver twist and if I want to find articles dealing with literary critism, I may type critique or criticism or critic, I'd have to experiment because (I haven't searched for that description so often that I'm sure what might get the best results, I can find all sorts of information.  If I want more general information, I might type Oliver Twist Wikipedia.  Or Oliver Twist Britanica.  Or even just Oliver Twist and nothing else would probably provide a variety of results.
 
If I want to find a song on Youtube, I just type the name of the song followed by Youtube.  I seldom have to do anything else. 
 
Many people are needlessly intimidated by searching.  Keep in mind that we are in a completely different era than in the early days of the Internet.  We are dealing with a consumer product and that as such, it is designed to guess about what people are searching for who know nothing about anything except the most elementary way to search.  That's how consumer products are.  If they can be simplified over time, they will be. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:44 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

Well there are books in searching, but you can control your search engine.

putting quotes round the items to search will search spacifically for that item online and nothing else.

You can add plus or minus simbles to search for extra items or not search for items.

Wildcards like * can be used, now there are various books on the net search thing, I forget where they can be gotten.

Your local blind organisation may have courses to teach people how to use computers that are blind.

And sone of those could deal with the net, and searching.

Some universities and other places may have them to and these can be usually free or low cost so I would recomend doing one of those if you want that is.

Search engines can be and have been quite smart for an age now, but they can get something wrong from time to time.

There have been a few massive foulups by google and others.



On 10/02/2019 2:02 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sat, Feb 9, 2019 at 06:46 PM, MAX wrote:
I’m not used to using web wide search engines to find information about a specific program.  Apparently it works better than searching within the program’s own help system. 
Some of my dearest friends are over 70 and 80, so the age thing carries no weight with me.

You have, however, hit upon a really valuable piece of information, that deserves reinforcement:  It most often works better to do a web search, using either reasonable keywords or an actual natural question, to get information on specific programs and features.  There are tons of people who've "been where you are now" no matter the you or the where, and a great many have generated tutorials or just descriptions of what they did that will generally be far more helpful than quite a few formal help systems are.

Not that one shouldn't avail oneself of a given program's help, too, but I generally go there second because finding things can be challenging - often times unnecessarily so.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 

Well there are books in searching, but you can control your search engine.

putting quotes round the items to search will search spacifically for that item online and nothing else.

You can add plus or minus simbles to search for extra items or not search for items.

Wildcards like * can be used, now there are various books on the net search thing, I forget where they can be gotten.

Your local blind organisation may have courses to teach people how to use computers that are blind.

And sone of those could deal with the net, and searching.

Some universities and other places may have them to and these can be usually free or low cost so I would recomend doing one of those if you want that is.

Search engines can be and have been quite smart for an age now, but they can get something wrong from time to time.

There have been a few massive foulups by google and others.



On 10/02/2019 2:02 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sat, Feb 9, 2019 at 06:46 PM, MAX wrote:
I’m not used to using web wide search engines to find information about a specific program.  Apparently it works better than searching within the program’s own help system. 
Some of my dearest friends are over 70 and 80, so the age thing carries no weight with me.

You have, however, hit upon a really valuable piece of information, that deserves reinforcement:  It most often works better to do a web search, using either reasonable keywords or an actual natural question, to get information on specific programs and features.  There are tons of people who've "been where you are now" no matter the you or the where, and a great many have generated tutorials or just descriptions of what they did that will generally be far more helpful than quite a few formal help systems are.

Not that one shouldn't avail oneself of a given program's help, too, but I generally go there second because finding things can be challenging - often times unnecessarily so.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

JM Casey
 

I was wondering that too, because the menu's name is "bookmarks" -- as in it should actually say that -- it's not a symbol or series of symbols, just a word.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io
Sent: February 9, 2019 5:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

When you use the alt key are you getting the menus?
Have you tried toggling the F11 key?
-LM
--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 2/9/19, MAX <max@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Saturday, February 9, 2019, 1:58 PM

#yiv3394914628
#yiv3394914628 --

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#yiv3394914628 OK. Here is a list of everything I see in the fire fox open menu. Sine into synk. Content blocking standard. New window. New private window. Restore previous session. Zoom 100% Edit. Library Add-ons. Options. Customize. Open file. Save page as. Print. Find in this page. More. Web developer. Help. Exit exit fire fox. I see nothing there that seems related to bookmarks. Find in this page seems to be on the right track for searching bookmarks but it searches the current page as you might expect. 73 (Regards). Max K 4 O D S. I've Never Lost the Wonder. Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/ From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of JM Casey
Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2019 12:55 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
Not only is it not an “easter
egg”, but it’s one of the choices right there in the menu bar that’s at the top of the screen in every version of the programme.
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
<nvda@nvda.groups.io>
On Behalf Of Gene
Sent:
February 9, 2019 1:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
I'm sorry you misinterpreted
my comment. I'm saying that you assumed you couldn't manage book marks. Instead of assuming, if you ask here or use some sort of documentation or instructional material, you will save yourself time and trouble, perhaps a lot. I'm speaking in general, concerning programs and Windows. It isn't an easter egg. There is nothing hidden about this. It is common to have context menus in various structures of a program. I don't know how sighted people learn this. I learned it because, whenever I want to see how to do something more easily or where there appears to be no way, if I am in a list or a menu, I look through the context menu.
Gene----- Original Message
-----From: MAX
Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2019 11:46
AMTo: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
Hi
Gene.
You have been mostly helpful to me
in the past so I’ll be civil to you. If you understand how I work with a computer and screen reader maybe you’ll be a little more understanding.
I
have some vision and a magnifying glass mounted in glasses frames so I can use it hands free. It helped me get through the university of Florida E E program, 35 years of employment, and it still serves me in retirement. Using this magnifier I can see the contents of a circle about ½ inch in diameter. I can see icons and the contents of menus. If I have more than 3 or 4 words to read I turn the job over to a screen reader. Most makers of screen readers assume that people are totally sighted or totally blind with nobody between. I think the statistics of blind and visually impaired say just the opposite. I am aware that nvda developers have acknowledged this through the mouse tracking feature. I have it turned on and use it all the time. The play audio coordinates when mouse moves would be useful to me if the tones were not so loud. I couldn’t find a volume control that would effect only the tones. Sorry for the digression.
Now to the current problem. I
have spent a lot of time visually looking through the menu in fire fox and have never seen the one that is invoked by alt B. How do the fully sighted know about this Easter egg? Now that I know this secret I will use it regularly to manage my bookmarks. Furthermore When I have the bookmarks open nvda reads each line of the menu but makes no distinction between direct links and folders. A fully sighted person can see the menus that pop up on the right side of the list of bookmarks but nvda makes no announcement of folder.
You wrote of a search bookmarks
feature. I haven’t visually seen that one in the menu either. How does it work?

73
(Regards).
Max K 4 O D S.
I've Never Lost the
Wonder.
Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Gene
Sent:
Friday, February 08, 2019 11:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
What do you mean by the management
is almost nonexistent? You can move bookmarks around in Firefox. I assume you can in Chrome as well. Instead of assuming something isn't available or doesn't exist, ask here or get some sort of documentation or tutorial. You'll save yourself a lot of trouble. Open the bookmarks menu with alt b.Move to a bookmark in Firefox. Open the context menu. Down arrow to cut. Press enter.Then move to where you want the bookmark to be. Open the context menu and find paste. Press enter.The bookmark has been moved.However, I almost never move or organize bookmarks in Firefox because of the very good search for bookmarks feature. If you are interested, I'll describe it. Gene----- Original Message
-----From: MAX
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 10:01
PMTo: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
The management of favorites in
chrome and Firefox is almost nonexistent. I use explorer to update and manage my favorites file. Why can’t programmers leave things alone. Especially things that work.

73 (Regards).
Max K 4 O D S.
I've Never Lost the
Wonder.
Antique Electronics Site: http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io
[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Gene
Sent:
Friday, February 08, 2019 8:39 PM
To:
nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer
You may not find ways that work as
well to use those sites. You may continue using Internet Explorer with them. It’s the browser you use as the main browser that is the issue, not the browser you use for occasional accessibility purposes with this or that site.
Gene----- Original Message
-----From: Rosemarie ChavarrFrom:
nvda@nvda.groups.io
[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io]
On Behalf Of Clarissa Mitchell
Sent: Friday,
February 8, 2019 5:10 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Microsoft's Own
Security Chief Says: STOP using Internet Explorer

I hardly use IE anymore at
all. For me, it's either Chrome or Firefox.
There were one or two site-specific functions I still had to use IE for because of one thing or another, but I'm going to find a way to access those sites with Chrome, which is my main browser. I'm still working on that. I haven't used IE as my main browser in ages. I don't understand why people are even still using that browser; it's outdated and, at least on my more recent computers, slow as a snail! To me, there's really not that much difference in using one of the other browsers, from a screen reader standpoint anyway. You can still use a lot of the same navigation commands. I don't know about Edge; I haven't used it much, but as far as I can tell, Chrome and Firefox work great with NVDA.

On 2/8/19, Brian Vogel <@britechguy>
wrote:
> Article that came out today in
The Telegraph newspaper in the UK:
>
> Stop using Internet
Explorer, warns Microsoft's own security > chief ( > https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2019/02/08/stop-using-internet-
>
explorer-warns-microsofts-security-chief/
> )
>
> If that doesn't convince people that
the shelf life of IE is now
> expired,
nothing will.
> --
>
> Brian *-* Windows 10
Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 > > *A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the > need for illusion is deep.* > > ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back > > > >

 

On Sat, Feb 9, 2019 at 06:46 PM, MAX wrote:
I’m not used to using web wide search engines to find information about a specific program.  Apparently it works better than searching within the program’s own help system. 
Some of my dearest friends are over 70 and 80, so the age thing carries no weight with me.

You have, however, hit upon a really valuable piece of information, that deserves reinforcement:  It most often works better to do a web search, using either reasonable keywords or an actual natural question, to get information on specific programs and features.  There are tons of people who've "been where you are now" no matter the you or the where, and a great many have generated tutorials or just descriptions of what they did that will generally be far more helpful than quite a few formal help systems are.

Not that one shouldn't avail oneself of a given program's help, too, but I generally go there second because finding things can be challenging - often times unnecessarily so.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back