Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?


Laurie Mehta
 

Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM

This strikes me as something that
can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
by the screen reader.

Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
Read Aloud add-on/extension.  I have used the latter
extensively with several of my clients since it distills
webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
links, etc.  It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
page without losing your mind, for instance.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home,
64-Bit, Version 1809,
Build 17763  
A great deal of
intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
illusion is deep.
          ~ Saul
Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Mary Otten
 

I have exactly the same question. I recall some time back installing an add-on, or at least thinking I had it installed, that was suppose to read like Safari does with its reader mode or FireFox with its. That never worked, and it is the chief reason why, following a couple of attempts at different times, I just kicked chrome to the curb. The f9 in FF is so convenient, but it would be good to have more than one alternative, especially since MS has said it is moving to use Chromium for its Edge browser.


Mary

On 2/17/2019 4:06 PM, Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM
This strikes me as something that
can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
by the screen reader.
Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
Read Aloud add-on/extension.  I have used the latter
extensively with several of my clients since it distills
webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
links, etc.  It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
page without losing your mind, for instance.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home,
64-Bit, Version 1809,
Build 17763
A great deal of
intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
illusion is deep.
          ~ Saul
Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


 

https://www.techwareguide.com/turn-on-secret-reading-mode-in-chrome-pc/

And I just confirmed it works, provided you have completely closed Chrome.  If you have not turned off the setting that allows Chrome to run in the background even when the browser is not visible to you, the user, you will need to restart your system before firing up the tweaked desktop shortcut.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

There is also a Read Mode extension, which works slightly differently than the native page distiller in Chrome.  The button it places on the Chrome Toolbar that you right arrow to get to after hitting ALT to throw focus to the Chrome Menu button serves as a toggle, turning that read mode on or off, depending on the current state of the page.

Chrome Reader Extension Install Page

I don't know if the results from one or the other may "play better" with a screen reader or not.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Laurie Mehta
 

Thanks..
--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 4:52 PM

There is also a Read Mode
extension, which works slightly differently than the native
page distiller in Chrome.  The button it places on the
Chrome Toolbar that you right arrow to get to after hitting
ALT to throw focus to the Chrome Menu button serves as a
toggle, turning that read mode on or off, depending on the
current state of the page.

Chrome
Reader Extension Install Page

I don't know if the results from one or the
other may "play better" with a screen reader or
not.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build
17763  
A great deal of intelligence can be
invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is
deep.
          ~ Saul
Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Gene
 

But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when reading.  Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related content links are missed.  Perhaps for other reasons I haven't thought of.  Just as the screen-reader has lots of settings for announcing or not announcing information such as headings and links, it is consistent with that design philosophy to also cause graphics to be announced or not.  The screen-reader shouldn't, by omission, steer the user toward using a specific reading mode.
 
I haven't used recent versions of NVDA so I don't know if an announce graphics has been added in document presentation settings But it should be.
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 6:06 PM
Subject: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?

Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
 To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
 Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM
 
 This strikes me as something that
 can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
 by the screen reader.
 
 Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
 Read Aloud add-on/extension.  I have used the latter
 extensively with several of my clients since it distills
 webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
 links, etc.  It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
 page without losing your mind, for instance.
 --
 
 Brian - Windows 10 Home,
 64-Bit, Version 1809,
 Build 17763  
 A great deal of
 intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
 illusion is deep.
           ~ Saul
 Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back
  
  
 
 
 



Mary Otten
 

I'm not sure what you were getting at here, Gene. If you want to hear all the stuff on the page, the screen reader will do what you want. But for most of us who want to read an article, we don't want to hear all that junk. So reader mode is a great thing, and it can be invoked or not, as it is part of the browser. So again, I am not sure what you are referring to here.


Mary

On 2/17/2019 7:28 PM, Gene wrote:
But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when reading.  Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related content links are missed.  Perhaps for other reasons I haven't thought of.  Just as the screen-reader has lots of settings for announcing or not announcing information such as headings and links, it is consistent with that design philosophy to also cause graphics to be announced or not.  The screen-reader shouldn't, by omission, steer the user toward using a specific reading mode.
 
I haven't used recent versions of NVDA so I don't know if an announce graphics has been added in document presentation settings But it should be.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 6:06 PM
Subject: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?

Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
 To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
 Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM
 
 This strikes me as something that
 can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
 by the screen reader.
 
 Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
 Read Aloud add-on/extension.  I have used the latter
 extensively with several of my clients since it distills
 webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
 links, etc.  It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
 page without losing your mind, for instance.
 --
 
 Brian - Windows 10 Home,
 64-Bit, Version 1809,
 Build 17763  
 A great deal of
 intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
 illusion is deep.
           ~ Saul
 Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back
  
  
 
 
 



Gene
 

The discussion started out about how to make NVDA not announce the word "graphic."  I was saying that this should be a user definable option, just as having announce a lot of other format information while reading is.  You can stop it announcing bloc quotes, headings, even links.  It still reads the text, but it doesn't announce the attribute.
 
The message I responded to said that using read mode, or whatever the exact name is, will solve this problem.  It will, but not if you don't want to use it for some reason and not on pages where it isn't available.
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Mary Otten
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 9:41 PM
Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?

I'm not sure what you were getting at here, Gene. If you want to hear all the stuff on the page, the screen reader will do what you want. But for most of us who want to read an article, we don't want to hear all that junk. So reader mode is a great thing, and it can be invoked or not, as it is part of the browser. So again, I am not sure what you are referring to here.


Mary

On 2/17/2019 7:28 PM, Gene wrote:
But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when reading.  Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related content links are missed.  Perhaps for other reasons I haven't thought of.  Just as the screen-reader has lots of settings for announcing or not announcing information such as headings and links, it is consistent with that design philosophy to also cause graphics to be announced or not.  The screen-reader shouldn't, by omission, steer the user toward using a specific reading mode.
 
I haven't used recent versions of NVDA so I don't know if an announce graphics has been added in document presentation settings But it should be.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 6:06 PM
Subject: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?

Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

 Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?
 To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
 Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM
 
 This strikes me as something that
 can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
 by the screen reader.
 
 Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
 Read Aloud add-on/extension.  I have used the latter
 extensively with several of my clients since it distills
 webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
 links, etc.  It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
 page without losing your mind, for instance.
 --
 
 Brian - Windows 10 Home,
 64-Bit, Version 1809,
 Build 17763  
 A great deal of
 intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
 illusion is deep.
           ~ Saul
 Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back
  
  
 
 
 



 

On Sun, Feb 17, 2019 at 10:28 PM, Gene wrote:
But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when reading.  Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related content links are missed
Which has next to nothing in regard to answering the question asked at the outset of this topic.

I presume that it was a spin-off of the other one, so I am more than willing to limit my response to the scope set by the original request here.

Not only that, but in the case of what I offered, "You have been warned," definitely applies.  If that's not what's wanted, then don't go that route.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


 

Em 18/02/2019 00:28, Gene escreveu:
I haven't used recent versions of NVDA so I don't know if an announce graphics has been added in document presentation settings But it should be.
No, there isn't such option yet. However, I agree, it should be.

Cheers,


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

What would be nice is to be able to cut and paste the uncluttered text so one can keep it in a normal text file format without having to edit out all the like this, picture stuff and the like afterwards.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mary Otten" <maryotten@comcast.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2019 3:41 AM
Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?


I'm not sure what you were getting at here, Gene. If you want to hear
all the stuff on the page, the screen reader will do what you want. But
for most of us who want to read an article, we don't want to hear all
that junk. So reader mode is a great thing, and it can be invoked or
not, as it is part of the browser. So again, I am not sure what you are
referring to here.


Mary

On 2/17/2019 7:28 PM, Gene wrote:
But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when
reading. Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related
content links are missed. Perhaps for other reasons I haven't thought
of. Just as the screen-reader has lots of settings for announcing or
not announcing information such as headings and links, it is
consistent with that design philosophy to also cause graphics to be
announced or not. The screen-reader shouldn't, by omission, steer the
user toward using a specific reading mode.
I haven't used recent versions of NVDA so I don't know if an announce
graphics has been added in document presentation settings But it
should be.
Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Laurie Mehta via Groups.Io
<mailto:lauriemehta=yahoo.com@groups.io>
*Sent:* Sunday, February 17, 2019 6:06 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while
navigating web pages using NVDA?

Hi,
I use reader view in Firefox but did not know that chrome has a reader
view mode. I do not want to use chrome's read aloud feature, but could
you tell me how to use reader view in chrome?
Thanks!
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/17/19, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com
<mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>> wrote:

Subject: Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages
using NVDA?
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, February 17, 2019, 3:53 PM

This strikes me as something that
can be taken care of outside the screen reader, rather than
by the screen reader.

Firefox and Chrome both have reader modes and support the
Read Aloud add-on/extension. I have used the latter
extensively with several of my clients since it distills
webpages to their narrative text, getting rid of embedded
links, etc. It makes it possible to go through a Wikipedia
page without losing your mind, for instance.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home,
64-Bit, Version 1809,
Build 17763
A great deal of
intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for
illusion is deep.
~ Saul
Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back









Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

After reading the query though, it was obvious to me that it was asking about getting rid of clutter, some of which was graphical, but much was just clusters of links, maybe commercials or other sundry bits of content the page designer is anxious to show the user!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2019 4:14 AM
Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?


On Sun, Feb 17, 2019 at 10:28 PM, Gene wrote:


But there may be times when people want to hear the page as it is when
reading. Perhaps the person wants to make sure that no related content
links are missed
Which has next to nothing in regard to answering the question asked at the outset of this topic.

I presume that it was a spin-off of the other one, so I am more than willing to limit my response to the scope set by the original request here.

Not only that, but in the case of what I offered, "You have been warned," definitely applies. If that's not what's wanted, then don't go that route.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


 

On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 03:15 AM, Brian's Mail list account wrote:
What would be nice is to be able to cut and paste the uncluttered text so one can keep it in a normal text file
You can certainly do this with the page that results from using the Chrome Reader mode.  After looking at the result of Chrome's native reader mode and the Reader add-on I far prefer the result from the former to the latter, particularly if cut and paste is desired.  The Reader add-on retains far more links along with other web objects like edit boxes, etc., that make no sense to me to have kept in the first place.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes of course page designers could help a lot by not hiding links under the text of pages that when read by us do not seem to be links unless we look at them, and you cannot get to the link address if you wanted, as I often do, to put the link in a text script for humans to read for an audio publication!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2019 1:46 PM
Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?


On Mon, Feb 18, 2019 at 03:15 AM, Brian's Mail list account wrote:


What would be nice is to be able to cut and paste the uncluttered text so
one can keep it in a normal text file
You can certainly do this with the page that results from using the Chrome Reader mode. After looking at the result of Chrome's native reader mode and the Reader add-on I far prefer the result from the former to the latter, particularly if cut and paste is desired. The Reader add-on retains far more links along with other web objects like edit boxes, etc., that make no sense to me to have kept in the first place.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Curtis Delzer
 

how did you follow the steps after you've changed the shortcut, that bit
about clicking on the upper left side? etc.
thanks I think it is step 5? :)
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA


 

The "three dots" menu is the Chrome Menu button, hit ALT and you have focus on it.  Hit either Enter or Down Arrow and it opens.

If you ever hear the description of either the "three dots" or "hamburger stack" menu or menu key, you can be virtually certain it's the browser's main menu key and that ALT will throw focus to it.  In the case of Firefox, though, ALT still brings up the old menu structure, which gives you access via a different route to all of the things that the Firefox main menu key (hamburger stack type, in this case) does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 


Gene
 

Or you can open the Chrome menu with one command, alt f.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 1:10 PM
Subject: Re: Question on Chrome, Re: [nvda] Can we pass graphics while navigating web pages using NVDA?

The "three dots" menu is the Chrome Menu button, hit ALT and you have focus on it.  Hit either Enter or Down Arrow and it opens.

If you ever hear the description of either the "three dots" or "hamburger stack" menu or menu key, you can be virtually certain it's the browser's main menu key and that ALT will throw focus to it.  In the case of Firefox, though, ALT still brings up the old menu structure, which gives you access via a different route to all of the things that the Firefox main menu key (hamburger stack type, in this case) does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back